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Learning Outcomes Assessment Project


Content
Outcomes
Knowledge of story elements such as character, setting, problem, solution, moral, and
plot is foundational within the realm of literature, and during my mini-unit on A Bad Case of
Stripes, my main goal was that the students solidify their understanding of these story elements
and apply that understanding to the story. One third grade Common Core State Standard really
covered the aspect of story elements and also brought in the added element of comparing and
contrasting story elements between two different stories. Because this standard matched with my
learning objectives for the mini-unit, I chose the state standard RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the
themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar
characters (e.g. in books from a series). One lesson in my mini-unit specifically focused on
comparing and contrasting the two books, A Bad Case of Stripes and Freckleface Strawberry.
Although these two books were not written by the same author, the characters, settings, plots,
and themes were very similar, which allowed for plentiful similarities and differences to discuss
while comparing and contrasting. This allowed for a successful introduction to the concept of
comparing and contrasting for the students which can be used in future units to compare and
contrast stories written by the same author.
Once I chose the state standard that closest fit my goals for the mini-unit, I created the
following learning outcomes for my mini-unit:

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1. The students will be able to explain the problem and solution of A Bad Case of
Stripes.
2. The students will be able to name characters and understand key characters roles in
A Bad Case of Stripes.
3. The students will be able to describe the setting and moral of A Bad Case of Stripes.
4. The students will be able to identify events that occur at the beginning, middle, and
end of A Bad Case of Stripes.
5. The students will be able to compare and contrast the stories A Bad Case of Stripes
and Freckleface Strawberry using a Venn diagram.
Creating these learning outcomes gave me a guideline for how to create both my lesson plans
and my pretest and posttest because by developing these learning outcomes, I was able to
formulate a clear idea of what I hoped the students would achieve and understand by the end of
the mini-unit.
I wanted my students to have a solid foundation of the story elements, but I also wanted
to strengthen their higher order thinking skills throughout this mini-unit. After selecting a
standard and writing the learning outcomes, I ensured that the journey to meeting these learning
outcomes would allow for learning experiences involving higher order thinking. While writing
my lesson plans and developing various learning experiences for students within the unit, I
strove to have students work within the higher levels of Blooms taxonomy, especially by
creating and analyzing. Instead of solely asking students to simply recall information that is
written out clearly in the text, A Bad Case of Stripes, I asked the students to dig deeper, to
analyze the text, and to use clues within the text to infer the true problem and solution that
Camilla, the main character, has in the story. Students also practiced their skills in analysis by

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comparing and contrasting two stories and their story elements. Comparing and contrasting A
Bad Case of Stripes and Freckleface Strawberry required these third grade students to utilize
their higher order thinking skills. In addition, I had students create within the mini-unit in several
ways, such as by having students write and record their own news reports based off of the events
and story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes. Throughout the mini-unit, I used my questioning to
encourage students to think in a deeper, more critical way about the text and the story elements.
By doing so, students continued building and improving their higher order thinking skills.

Assessment
Pretest & Posttest
I selected my pretest and posttest based on my learning outcomes and overall goals for
the mini-unit. Keeping in mind the grade level and the experiences they have had in other
assessments to date, I created a fifteen point assessment to be used as both a pretest and posttest.
This assessment included both multiple choice questions and short answer questions. In addition,
a Venn diagram for comparing and contrasting Freckleface Strawberry and A Bad Case of
Stripes was used as part of this assessment. These different elements of the assessment provided
students with several opportunities to express their understanding of the material learned during
the mini-unit. I included short answer questions and the Venn diagram to allow students the
opportunity to express their understanding of the story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes and
Freckleface Strawberry in their own words.

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I wrote this assessment carefully to reflect the students knowledge of the learning
outcomes of the mini-unit. Students answers to questions on the assessment show their
understanding of the story elements as well as their overall understanding of the story, A Bad
Case of Stripes. In addition, the use of a Venn diagram provides students with the opportunity to
display their knowledge of comparing and contrasting two stories. While I wrote the assessment
for this mini-unit, I specifically made sure that three questions on the assessment matched to
each learning outcome. This better ensured that the assessment instrument measured
understanding of the learning outcomes accurately. While writing the assessment, I carefully
attempted to avoid any form of bias, and I thought about how to best make my assessment both
valid and reliable. The following table clearly shows that the assessment instrument used for the
pretest and the posttest adequately measures each of my learning outcomes (see Table 1).
Table 1
Pairings of Data Items with Respect to Learning Outcomes
Learning Outcome

Data Item

1: The students will be able to explain the


problem and solution of A Bad Case of
Stripes.

Assessment Question #4:


What is the problem in A Bad Case of Stripes?
Assessment Question #5:
What is the solution in A Bad Case of Stripes?
Assessment Question #9:
What is one way the Cream family tried to solve
Camillas problem?
A)
B)
C)
D)

They made her chicken noodle soup.


They drove her to the hospital.
Camilla tried to wash her stripes off.
They asked Dr. Bumble to come help

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her.
2: The students will be able to name
characters and understand key characters
roles in A Bad Case of Stripes.

Assessment Question #1:


Who is the main character in A Bad Case of
Stripes?
Assessment Question #3:
Name at least two characters from A Bad Case
of Stripes.
1) ______________________________
2) ______________________________

Assessment Question #6:


Which character played the most important role
in solving Camillas problem?
A)
B)
C)
D)
3: The students will be able to describe the
setting and moral of A Bad Case of Stripes.

Camillas teacher
The Environmental Therapist
Dr. Bumble
The old woman

Assessment Question #10:


Where does most of A Bad Case of Stripes take
place?
A) The school bus
B) Camillas house
C) The zoo
D) A shoe store
Assessment Question #11:
What is the moral or lesson of A Bad Case of
Stripes?
Assessment Question #12:
What can you learn from the story A Bad Case
of Stripes?
A) You shouldnt yell at others.
B) You should always be yourself.
C) You should paint stripes on yourself, so

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everyone likes you.
D) You should eat pizza if youre feeling
angry.
4: The students will be able to identify events
that occur at the beginning, middle, and end
of A Bad Case of Stripes.

Assessment Question #2:


Which event happens in the beginning of A Bad
Case of Stripes?
A) Camilla wakes up and eats cereal for
breakfast.
B) Camilla paints stripes on herself.
C) Camilla tries on outfits for the first day
of school.
D) The Experts come to Camillas house.
Assessment Question #7:
Which event happens in the middle of A Bad
Case of Stripes?
A) On the school bus, Jack made fun of
Camillas stripes.
B) Camilla turns into a giant pill.
C) Lucy wore a striped shirt to school, but
no one liked it.
D) The doctors solved Camillas problem.
Assessment Question #8:
Which event happens at the end of A Bad Case
of Stripes?
A) The Specialists come to her house and
fix her problem.
B) Camilla decides she likes her stripes.
C) The neighbors come over to play.
D) Camilla eats lima beans.

5: The students will be able to compare and


contrast the stories A Bad Case of Stripes and
Freckleface Strawberry using a Venn
diagram.

Assessment Question #13-15:


Use the Venn Diagram to compare and contrast
A Bad Case of Stripes and Freckleface
Strawberry.

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Instruction
Curriculum Alignment
Using backwards design, I very carefully selected instructional activities and created my
lesson plans with the learning outcomes of my mini-unit in mind. I knew while creating this
mini-unit that I wanted the students to really dig deep with the story elements in A Bad Case of
Stripes, and this kind of literary analysis took repetition by discussing story elements as a class,
writing about the story elements, playing the Story Pass It game that deals with the story
elements, drawing pictures of the problem and solution, and recording news reports containing
the story elements from A Bad Case of Stripes. This repetition of the story elements allowed
students to fully grasp certain ideas such as that the problem in A Bad Case of Stripes was not
simply that Camilla had stripes that she could not get off. The true problem, the reason why she
had a bad case of stripes, was because she worried about what other people thought about her
and was not staying true to herself. Even finding similarities and differences between A Bad
Case of Stripes and Freckleface Strawberry helped the students to deepen their understanding of
the story elements while comparing and contrasting using Venn diagrams. Each lesson plan in
this mini-unit had a distinct purpose, and each aspect of every lesson had a place in helping
students reach understanding of the learning outcomes.
In my first lesson, I introduced possible unfamiliar words through a PowerPoint and
activated students prior knowledge of those words through a group discussion. While reading A
Bad Case of Stripes for the first time as a class, I stopped frequently to ask questions about the
story elements. At the end of the story, I led a group discussion of elements such as characters,
problem, solution, and setting as a class (Learning Outcomes 1, 2, and 3). Following the class

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discussion, the students participated in a think-pair-share to answer the question, What is the
moral or lesson in A Bad Case of Stripes? Through this discussion, students thought and talked
about what they can learn or take away from this story and apply to their own lives (Learning
Outcome 3).
In the second lesson of the mini-unit, we started by watching the YouTube video and
listening to the song Elements of the Story to review what beginning, middle, end, setting, and
characters mean as story elements (Learning Outcomes 2, 3, and 4). Following the video, I
modeled for students how to use a Shape GO! Map to describe the beginning, middle, and end of
a story. We completed a Shape GO! Map as a class with the setting, characters, problem, middle,
solution, and moral for A Bad Case of Stripes. The next day, students completed their own Shape
GO! Maps individually using sticky notes for each of these six story elements in A Bad Case of
Stripes (Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and 4). As closure for the lesson, students were given the
opportunity to turn and talk to share a summary of A Bad Case of Stripes with their desk partner
(Learning Outcome 4).
Day three of the mini-unit began with the Story Pass It game where students worked
within their table groups to each brainstorm and write ideas about the setting, characters,
beginning, middle, and end of A Bad Case of Stripes (Learning Outcomes 2, 3, and 4). Using
what they wrote during the game, we worked as a class to talk about these five story elements
within the story. Included in this discussion was a review of problem and solution from what we
talked about previously in the mini-unit (Learning Outcome 1). Following the discussion,
students completed a story elements graphic organizer with the characters, setting, problem,
solution, beginning, middle, and end of A Bad Case of Stripes (Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and

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4). Lastly, students were asked to complete an exit slip with either something they were still
confused about or something they learned during the lesson.
On the final day of instruction for the mini-unit, students began by watching the
YouTube video Introduction to Reading Skills: Compare and Contrast. This video was used as
a way to introduce Venn diagrams, comparing, and contrasting to those students for whom this
was a new concept (Learning Outcome 5). I used the video as a way to launch a discussion about
what comparing and contrasting means, and before reading Freckleface Strawberry, I explained
to the students that they should stay on the lookout for similarities and differences with A Bad
Case of Stripes while I read the story. After I finished reading the book, I led a whole-class
discussion about the similarities and differences between Freckleface Strawberry and A Bad
Case of Stripes. As we discussed, I used the similarities and differences the students shared to
model using a Venn diagram and to complete a Venn diagram as a class (Learning Outcome 5). I
emphasized that comparing and contrasting the story elements between the two stories is an
excellent way to complete a Venn diagram, and then, the students had the opportunity to
complete their own Venn diagrams individually using similarities and differences between the
two stories (Learning Outcome 5). To wrap up the lesson, students were given the Draw itWrite it Problem Solution graphic organizer to complete for the problem and solution in either
Freckleface Strawberry or A Bad Case of Stripes (Learning Outcome 1).
In addition to our reading lessons, I also incorporated the story elements of A Bad Case
of Stripes into our writing lessons during the mini-unit as well. I started the project by first
playing the students my example video news report for one of their previous reading stories,
The Little Red Ant and the Great Big Crumb. I showed the students my written news report
script and explained to the students that they each get to be a Channel 206 news reporter and

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report on A Bad Case of Stripes. The students first each wrote their own news report by filling in
the script with the main characters name, the problem, the solution, the moral, the setting, and
two events from the middle of the story (Learning Outcome 1, 2, 3, and 4). Each student went
through the writing process with his or her news report, and then, when students reached the
publishing step, they worked with partners to record their news reports using iPads after
practicing their scripts for fluency. To complete the project, students shared their finished news
reports in small groups.
Each of these lessons differentiated instruction to meet the needs of both students who
understood the material and were in need of a challenge as well as students who struggled with
the material and needed additional support and individualized instruction. Throughout the miniunit, I was able to provide enrichment in each lesson for those who needed a challenge. This
enrichment allowed students who understood the material to be challenged to go one step further
or to dig a little deeper with the story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes. For example, while
completing the Shape GO! Map, these students named four specific events that happened in the
middle of the story instead of only writing one summarized sentence. Also, these students wrote
more than two items in each section of their Venn diagram and used their completed Shape GO!
Maps to create and write down a short summary of A Bad Case of Stripes. This enrichment kept
these students engaged in their learning and helped develop their critical thinking skills by
encouraging them to make connections between texts and to delve more deeply into the story
elements of A Bad Case of Stripes.
Differentiation of instruction also helped struggling students to find success during this
mini-unit. While asking questions during group discussions, I altered my levels of questioning to
match the students levels of understanding of the story elements and the specific story being

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used, A Bad Case of Stripes. In addition, during independent work, I helped these students who
were having trouble grasping an understanding of the material by giving them individualized
instruction through additional examples and modeling. Several students in the class had a hard
time digging deep to the true problem and solution in our story. For these students, I took the
time to work with them and to ask them questions to help lead them to make inferences about the
story elements in the text. While writing news reports, I was able to give students feedback based
on their specific individual needs. Every student has strengths and weaknesses in writing, and as
I conferenced with student writers, I was able to praise them for their particular writing strengths
and to provide instruction on how to improve certain aspects of their writing for their final news
report as well as in future writing assignments.
Pedagogy
While developing each of the lesson plans for this mini-unit, I carefully considered which
best practice strategies to employ in order to best facilitate student learning and accomplishment
of the learning outcomes while building students higher order thinking skills. Over the course of
the mini-unit, I attempted to incorporate as many of those best practice strategies as possible in
order to maximize student learning. The first best practice strategy I chose to utilize in my miniunit was allowing students to gain understanding of the material in a vast array of ways. I utilized
PowerPoint presentations, whole-class discussions, small-group work, graphic organizers, Venn
diagrams, and YouTube videos at different times throughout the mini-unit in order to help allow
students to grasp the material in the way in which they learn best. Because each student is a
unique learner, providing students with a wide variety of instructional activities is essential to
foster student growth and to facilitate student learning. I knew my students learn best in many
diverse ways, so I worked diligently to incorporate as many different ways of presenting new

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material and deepening understanding of that material as possible. Each lesson within the miniunit included an array of different learning opportunities, and also, in each lesson, at least one of
those instructional activities gave students the opportunity to strengthen their higher order
thinking skills while discovering more about the story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes.
In addition, as another best practice strategy, I also gave students the opportunity to
demonstrate their knowledge and comprehension of the material in an extensive range of ways.
Students were able to show their understanding in whole group discussions as well as in small
groups. Students also shared and expanded their knowledge through partner activities such as
think-pair-share and turn and talk. The completion of graphic organizers and a written news
report provided students with a way to demonstrate their understanding through writing. Through
the use of the Story Pass It game, students presented their comprehension of many of the story
elements in a more active way. By recording their news reports using the iPads, students
displayed their grasp of the story elements through oral presentation while also demonstrating
their fluency. Students were able to exhibit their knowledge of the story elements in A Bad Case
of Stripes in many various ways over the course of the mini-unit, and many of these
demonstrations of their understanding of the material required the use of their higher order
thinking skills. While showing what they knew about the story elements in these lessons,
students were unknowingly continuing to build upon their higher order thinking skills.
Utilization of reflection was another essential best practice strategy that I used during the
mini-unit. I provided students with the opportunity to reflect on their own learning, and I also
practiced self-reflection in order to improve my instruction. Students were given the chance to
reflect on their learning by identifying questions they may have, new pieces of information they
have learned, or concepts they have not yet grasped fully. One tool I used to help students in the

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area of reflection was exit slips. The students used exit slips to either ask a question they still had
or to share something new that they learned in that lesson. By completing these exit slips,
students had the chance to reflect on their learning and their remaining questions, and by reading
these exit slips, I was able to address misunderstandings in later lessons, to answer students
questions, and to talk to individual students to help solidify their understanding of the material.
Participating in this type of reflection requires students to really stop and think about what they
are learning and about what they still do not understand. This kind of metacognition involves
students in a special type of higher order thinking, thinking about their own learning and thought
processes.
Practicing self-reflection throughout the two weeks was also a necessity for the success
of the mini-unit and was another valuable best practice strategy included in the execution of my
mini-unit. Reflecting after each lesson helped me to analyze the ways in which I could improve,
to modify upcoming lessons as necessary, and to think about ways in which I could more
effectively meet the needs of each student as an individual learner. By reflecting on the strengths
and weaknesses of each lesson, I was able to take notes for ways I would change my plans for
the next time I teach this mini-unit. This reflection will help my teaching in future iterations of
this mini-unit, and it helped me to continue to improve in each lesson of the mini-unit by better
providing individualized feedback and meeting the needs of each student as a unique learner. By
participating in this type of self-reflection, I was developing my own higher order thinking skills
and thinking more deeply about how I could further assist students in building upon their own
higher order thinking skills in later lessons of the mini-unit.
Another important best practice strategy included that played an important role in the
success of my mini-unit was actively engaging students. Students who are not interested in a

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lesson will very likely not gain any long-term skills and knowledge or certainly will not develop
their higher order thinking skills. On the other hand, students who are actively engaged,
interested, and participating in the instructional activities are much more likely to grasp a solid
understanding of the material and to utilize and continue developing their higher order thinking
skills. I did my best to engage students by providing elements of student choice throughout the
mini-unit and choosing instructional elements, especially in the anticipatory set, that would
successfully grab and keep their attention and interest. For example, the use of YouTube videos,
my example news report, and the Story Pass It game made the students excited about what
we were learning and seized students attention and interest for the lesson to come. This student
engagement was an absolute necessity for student achievement of the learning outcomes and for
further progress in the students higher order thinking skills. Students are not likely to utilize
their higher order thinking skills effectively if they are not interested and engaged in the learning
activity they are participating in. Engaging students at the beginning of each lesson was a
necessity in order to interest students enough in order to use and improve their higher order
thinking skills.
Proper use of assessment was another best practice strategy I made use of throughout this
mini-unit. The use of formative assessments in multiple forms in each lesson of the mini-unit, in
addition to the summative assessment at the end of the mini-unit, gave me valuable information
regarding the students understanding of the story elements and their comprehension of the story,
A Bad Case of Stripes. Formative assessments alerted me of misunderstandings about the story
elements and highlighted areas that I needed to reinforce in later lessons with the students in
order to solidify their understanding of the material. With written formative assessments, such as
graphic organizers and their written news report scripts, I was able to put another best practice

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strategy in place by giving individualized praise and feedback. On these papers, I worked to give
specific individualized feedback to each student in writing. I praised each student for something
he or she did well on, provided explanation for how to improve, and clarified any
misunderstandings. For students who really struggled on any formative assessment, I followed
up in person and took the time to clear up any misunderstandings and to guide each student to a
better understanding of the correct idea through questioning and returning to the actual text of A
Bad Case of Stripes. During each lesson, I encouraged students who participated in the
discussions and praised students for their efforts. Also, I gave individualized instruction,
feedback, and encouragement while students worked on their independent practice. Through this
individualized feedback, I was able to more easily encourage each student at his or her level to
participate in higher order thinking and to further develop his or her critical thinking skills.
Another best practice strategy found within my mini-unit was integration of technology.
Integrating some form of technology into every lesson helped engage my students in learning
and assisted me in teaching some aspect of each lesson. Furthermore, students used technology
actively in order to show their comprehension of the mini-units content and created their own
recorded news reports based off of the story using iPads, a form of technology. These lessons
increased their experiences using technology in addition to showcasing and solidifying their
understanding of the story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes. Having the iPads and other
technology available allowed for the possibility of the news report project, a project that really
required students to use their higher order thinking skills in order to think deeply about the story
elements in A Bad Case of Stripes, to change their point of view to that of a news reporter
reporting on the events of the story, and to create their own news report based on the events of
the story.

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Reflection
Results
Once I saw the results of the posttest, it was very clear that the students had met the
desired learning outcomes for this mini-unit. The lowest grade out of the 25 students was an
87%, and the class average score for the posttest was a 98%. Throughout the mini-unit, I was
able to see student growth in the areas of the story elements, specifically within the story, A Bad
Case of Stripes. The posttest results confirmed that the planned lessons were successful in
helping students to meet the learning outcomes I planned for this mini-unit and to achieve a solid
understanding of the story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes. Table two and figure one found
below clearly depict students growth from pretest to posttest. Table two portrays the students
success in meeting the learning outcomes as a whole class while figure one displays students
improvement from pretest to posttest as individuals.
Table 2
Assessment Averages
Assessment
Pretest
Posttest
Note. N=25

%
46
98

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120%

100%

80%
Pretest

60%

Posttest
40%

20%

0%
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Figure 1. Assessment percentages by student.


Over the course of teaching this mini-unit, I was able to grasp an understanding of the
strengths and weaknesses of each lesson through reflection. Overall, I was very satisfied with the
learning experiences I planned, and I specifically thought the variety of those experiences
contributed to the mini-units success. I believe the gradual release of the lessons was beneficial
for the students, and that gradual release allowed the students to feel confident in each activity
while still utilizing their higher order thinking skills. By measuring student reactions and
participation through observation, I know that I engaged the students as a whole in the material
we were learning in each of the lessons during this mini-unit. That student engagement is
essential to their learning, and in order to meet the learning outcomes, their participation was
completely necessary for their understanding of the material. That engagement and participation
was a definite strength of the mini-unit. The integration of technology as well as the inclusion of
a writing experience during this mini-unit was also a strength. Students enjoyed writing their

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news reports and recording each other using the iPads immensely. This activity was a fantastic
assessment of their knowledge of the story elements in A Bad Case of Stripes, and it fully
captured their attention and interest while boosting their self-efficacy.
On the other hand, I realized through reflection that if I were to use this mini-unit in the
future, I would like to make the lessons even more effective by developing them even further.
Although I provided a range of learning opportunities to support the needs of all of my students
as individuals, I do wish I had been able to include more lesson aspects to aid kinesthetic
learners. If I were to teach this mini-unit again, that is an element I would certainly like to
improve. Also, an area I would like to integrate more fully into this mini-unit in the future is the
vocabulary from the story. Vocabulary really did not relate to my learning outcomes for this unit,
so I simply introduced a few words that may have been unfamiliar to students in the first lesson
prior to reading A Bad Case of Stripes for the first time. However, I believe that the word
choices in this story are great vocabulary words for the students to practice integrating into their
writing experiences. Next time I teach this mini-unit, I would enjoy providing students with the
opportunity to find a level of comfort using these new vocabulary words from the story both
orally and in their writing.
In future iterations of the mini-unit, my goal for myself would be to continue to engage
the students through the variety of instructional activities. I also would challenge myself to
integrate more aspects for kinesthetic learners and to provide opportunities for students to fully
grasp the meanings of the vocabulary words and to include those words in their speech and
writing. For my students, my goal would be that they try their absolute best, participate in each
learning activity to the best of their ability, and ultimately, improve their understanding of the
story elements through the story, A Bad Case of Stripes. I also would challenge students from the

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beginning of the mini-unit to not just be satisfied with the surface level answers to story elements
such as problem and solution but to instead really dig deep and to find the real emotional
issues within the characters through literary analysis.

Student Growth
Student Learning
All 25 of my students met the learning outcomes for this mini-unit in the posttest as
depicted in the table and figure below (see Table 3 and Figure 2). These results prove student
growth in understanding of the story elements, specifically in the story, A Bad Case of Stripes,
over the course of this mini-unit. Between the pretest and posttest for this mini-unit, students
gained a better comprehension of what each of the story elements means as well as how each
story element plays a part in A Bad Case of Stripes. In addition, students grew in understanding
of how to use a Venn diagram to compare two similar stories. Table three and figure two both
clearly show the students growth in meeting the learning outcomes from pretest to posttest.
Table 3
Students who Meet Learning Outcomes by Assessment
Assessment
Pretest
Meet
Do Not Meet
Posttest
Meet
Do Not Meet
Note. N=25

1
24

4
96

25
0

100
0

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120%
100%
80%

Posttest
Pretest

60%
40%
20%
0%
Meet

Did Not Meet

Figure 2. Percentages of students who meet learning outcomes by assessment.

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Appendix A
Pretest and Posttest Assessment

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Name:_______________________________________

1. Who is the main character in A Bad Case of Stripes?


_______________________________________

2. Which event happens in the beginning of A Bad Case of Stripes?


E)
F)
G)
H)

Camilla wakes up and eats cereal for breakfast.


Camilla paints stripes on herself.
Camilla tries on outfits for the first day of school.
The Experts come to Camillas house.

3. Name at least two characters from A Bad Case of Stripes.


3) ______________________________
4) ______________________________

4. What is the problem in A Bad Case of Stripes?


_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
5. What is the solution in A Bad Case of Stripes?
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
6. Which character played the most important role in solving Camillas problem?
E)
F)
G)
H)

Camillas teacher
The Environmental Therapist
Dr. Bumble
The old woman

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7. Which event happens in the middle of A Bad Case of Stripes?
E)
F)
G)
H)

On the school bus, Jack made fun of Camillas stripes.


Camilla turns into a giant pill.
Lucy wore a striped shirt to school, but no one liked it.
The doctors solved Camillas problem.

8. Which event happens at the end of A Bad Case of Stripes?


E)
F)
G)
H)

The Specialists come to her house and fix her problem.


Camilla decides she likes her stripes.
The neighbors come over to play.
Camilla eats lima beans.

9. What is one way the Cream family tried to solve Camillas problem?
E)
F)
G)
H)

They made her chicken noodle soup.


They drove her to the hospital.
Camilla tried to wash her stripes off.
They asked Dr. Bumble to come help her.

10. Where does most of A Bad Case of Stripes take place?


E)
F)
G)
H)

The school bus


Camillas house
The zoo
A shoe store

11. What is the moral or lesson of A Bad Case of Stripes?


______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________

12. What can you learn from the story A Bad Case of Stripes?
E)
F)
G)
H)

You shouldnt yell at others.


You should always be yourself.
You should paint stripes on yourself, so everyone likes you.
You should eat pizza if youre feeling angry.

Faber 24
13-15. Use the Venn Diagram to compare and contrast A Bad Case of Stripes and Freckleface
Strawberry.

Freckleface Strawberry

Both

A Bad Case of Stripes

Faber 25

Appendix B
Mini-Unit Lesson Plans

Faber 26

EELP Linear Chart- LOAP Unit- A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon
Reading week 5/6- Day 1
1.

Content:
A. Standards

B. Enduring Understandings &


Essential Questions

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the


themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same
author about the same or similar characters.
-Story elements of fictional texts include character,
setting, problem, solution, beginning, middle, and end.
How do I identify story elements in a text?
When you come across an unknown word while reading, a
good strategy is to figure out the words meaning from
context clues within the sentence.

C. Objectives: (SWBAT)

How do I use context clues to find the meaning of a word?


-Students will be able to think-pair-share about the
problem and solution in A Bad Case of Stripes.
-Students will be able to provide their understanding of
words and guess words meanings from context clues
during the vocabulary PowerPoint.

2.
Assessment:
A. Formative Assessment (Active
Strategies to Check for
Understanding, Guide Practice,
Exit Class, etc.)

B. Summative Assessment (when


appropriate quizzes, objective
tests, essays, projects, etc.)
3.
Instruction:
A. Anticipatory Set

B. Instructional Activities
(includes Introduction,
Presentation, Clues for

-Students responses during the vocabulary PowerPoint.


-Students responses during think-pair-share.
-The teachers observations during the lesson including
answers to questions while reading the story.
-Reading test

The teacher will use the vocabulary PowerPoint to


activate students prior knowledge of possible unfamiliar
vocabulary words from the story.
The teacher will call students to the carpet. The teacher
will read A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon. The
teacher will ask questions to check for understanding

Faber 27
Discovery, Modeling, and
engagement in gradual release,
as planned)
With special attention to:

C. Gradual Release Techniques


(See Formative Assessment
Checking for Understanding,
Guided Practice, Independent
Practice, Class Exit)

D. Closure
4.
Reflection:
A. How can I and they do better?

throughout the story. These questions will have an


emphasis on story elements such as characters, setting,
problem, solution, and beginning, middle, end.
1)

Differentiation

The teacher will vary her levels


of questioning to provide an
appropriate challenge for each
student at his or her reading
comprehension level.
-Microphone
The teacher will ask students to
2)
Higher Order
analyze a sentence for context
Thinking
clues to guess a words meaning.
The teacher will use a
3)
Technology
PowerPoint to introduce
possibly unfamiliar vocabulary
words and their meanings.
I- The teacher will read the story aloud to the students.
We- The class will discuss story elements within the story
such as problem and solution. As a class, we will go
through the vocabulary PowerPoint.
You- The students will think-pair-share about the problem
and solution of the story.
The teacher will instruct students to think-pair-share to
identify the moral or lesson of A Bad Case of Stripes.
I think next time I teach this mini-unit I would find a way
to integrate the vocabulary words from the PowerPoint
further into the unit by continuing to work with these
words and use them in our writing.
A few students could have done a better job carefully
listening while I read the story. It would have been nice if
we had a class set with a copy of the book for each of the
students.

B. What are they and what am I


ready to do next?

We are ready to delve deeper into the story elements of A


Bad Case of Stripes in day 2 of our mini-unit.

Faber 28
EELP Linear Chart- LOAP Unit- A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon
Reading week 5/6- Day 2
1.

Content:
A. Standards

B. Enduring Understandings &


Essential Questions

C. Objectives: (SWBAT)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the


themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same
author about the same or similar characters.
-Story elements of fictional texts include character,
setting, problem, solution, beginning, middle, and end.
How do I identify story elements in a text?
-Students will be able to complete their own Shape GO!
Map with the setting, characters, problem, middle events,
solution, and moral of A Bad Case of Stripes.
-Students will be able to turn and talk to give their desk
partner a summary of A Bad Case of Stripes.

2.
Assessment:
A. Formative Assessment (Active
Strategies to Check for
Understanding, Guide Practice,
Exit Class, etc.)

B. Summative Assessment (when


appropriate quizzes, objective
tests, essays, projects, etc.)
3.
Instruction:
A. Anticipatory Set

B. Instructional Activities
(includes Introduction,
Presentation, Clues for
Discovery, Modeling, and
engagement in gradual release,
as planned)

-Students completed Shape GO! Maps.


-Students summaries during the turn and talk.
-The teachers observations during the lesson including
answers to questions.
-Reading test

The teacher will play the YouTube video Elements of the


Story to help review for students what setting, characters,
beginning, middle, and end mean as story elements.
The teacher will review with the students how the Shape
GO! Maps work. Each student will be given a Shape GO!
Map and 6 sticky notes (setting, characters, problem,
summary of middle events, solution, and moral). We will
talk about each element of A Bad Case of Stripes as a
class using the text. Then, the students will individually
complete their own Shape GO! Map for the story using
the 6 sticky notes. When finished, the students will place
their sticky notes on the correct part of the map and turn it
in.

Faber 29
With special attention to:

C. Gradual Release Techniques


(See Formative Assessment
Checking for Understanding,
Guided Practice, Independent
Practice, Class Exit)

D. Closure

4.
Reflection:
A. How can I and they do better?

B. What are they and what am I


ready to do next?

1)

Differentiation

-Students in need of a challenge


will be given four sticky notes
for the middle of the story to
write down four specific events
that happened in the middle of
the story.
-Students who need additional
support will work in a small
group with the teacher to
complete their Shape GO! Maps.
-Microphone
Students will create their own
2)
Higher Order
Shape GO! Maps with the story
Thinking
elements of A Bad Case of
Stripes.
-YouTube video- Elements of a
3)
Technology
Story (by CI350 Class)
-Document Camera
I- The teacher will model how to use the sticky notes and
Shape GO! Map.
We- The class will watch the YouTube video about story
elements, and we will talk about the setting, problem,
solution, characters, and middle events of A Bad Case of
Stripes.
You- The students will turn and talk to share a summary
of A Bad Case of Stripes.
The teacher will ask students to turn and talk to give a
summary of the story, A Bad Case of Stripes, with their
desk partner.
I ended up having to tape down their sticky notes because
I thought they might fall off, so next time I might create a
document similar to the Shape GO! Map that just has
more space for the students to write and use that instead of
the sticky notes. If they could just write on the paper it
would probably be a more effective use of class time.
Next, we are ready to learn more about the story elements
in day 3 of this mini-unit.

Faber 30
EELP Linear Chart- LOAP Unit- A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon
Reading week 5/6- Day 3
1.

Content:
A. Standards

B. Enduring Understandings &


Essential Questions

C. Objectives: (SWBAT)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the


themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same
author about the same or similar characters.
-Story elements of fictional texts include character,
setting, problem, solution, beginning, middle, and end.
How do I identify story elements in a text?
Students will be able to write their ideas of the characters,
setting, beginning, middle, and end of the story during the
Story Pass It game.
Students will be able to complete their story elements
sheet correctly for the story A Bad Case of Stripes.

2.
Assessment:
A. Formative Assessment (Active
Strategies to Check for
Understanding, Guide Practice,
Exit Class, etc.)

-Students completed story elements sheet.


-The teachers observations during the lesson, including
answers to questions.
-Students sheets from the Story Pass It game.

B. Summative Assessment (when


appropriate quizzes, objective
tests, essays, projects, etc.)
3.
Instruction:
A. Anticipatory Set

B. Instructional Activities
(includes Introduction,
Presentation, Clues for
Discovery, Modeling, and

-Reading test

The students will play the story pass it game. The


teacher will pass out a setting, characters,
beginning, middle, and end for each table. Each
student will start with one of the sheets. Once the teacher
says go the students will brainstorm about what they
know about that story element for A Bad Case of Stripes.
When the teacher says pass it, they stop where they are at
and pass it to their right. The teacher keeps saying pass
it until the paper reaches its original owner.
The teacher will ask students to share out what they wrote
in the pass it game. We will compile as a class the setting,
characters, beginning, middle, and end of the story. Then,
the teacher will ask students to recall what they identified

Faber 31
engagement in gradual release,
as planned)

With special attention to:

as the problem and solution of the story on Monday. The


teacher will introduce the story elements sheet, and the
teacher will instruct students to work on it independently.
Those who struggle with the concepts will work as a small
group with the teacher.
1)
Differentiation Students in need of a challenge
will be encouraged to use their
finished story elements graphic
organizer to write a short
summary of A Bad Case of
Stripes.
Students who struggle with the
concept of the story elements or
have low reading
comprehension will work in a
small group with the teacher for
the story elements sheet.

C. Gradual Release Techniques


(See Formative Assessment
Checking for Understanding,
Guided Practice, Independent
Practice, Class Exit)

2)

Higher Order
Thinking

3)

Technology

Microphone
Students will apply their
knowledge of the story elements
to identify the characters,
beginning, middle, end,
problem, and solution from A
Bad Case of Stripes.
-The teacher can use Padlet
online to compile the class
ideas for character, setting,
beginning, middle, and end.

-Document Camera
I-The teacher will model how to play the Story Pass It
game and will take student responses to compile the class
ideas of story elements.
We- As a class, we compile our ideas of characters,
setting, beginning, middle, end, problem, and solution for
A Bad Case of Stripes.
You- Independently, the students will write their ideas of

Faber 32

D. Closure
4.
Reflection:
A. How can I and they do better?

story elements during the Story Pass It game. Also,


students will complete the story elements graphic
organizer on their own.
Students will complete an exit slip with something new
they learned or something they are still confused about.
Next time I teach this mini-unit, I would give students
more time during the Story Pass It game to brainstorm
because I saw several unfinished sentences on the sheets
from each table.
Some students did not follow the directions for the exit
slip correctly. They need to listen to directions more
carefully, but next time I think I would write the
directions for this exit slip on the board under must do.

B. What are they and what am I


ready to do next?

We are ready to learn about comparing and contrasting


using Venn diagrams in day 4 of this mini unit.

Faber 33
EELP Linear Chart- LOAP Unit- A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon
Reading week 5/6- Day 4
1.

Content:
A. Standards

B. Enduring Understandings &


Essential Questions

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the


themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same
author about the same or similar characters.
-Story elements of fictional texts include character,
setting, problem, solution, beginning, middle, and end.
How do I identify story elements in a text?
-When you compare and contrast two stories, you look for
similarities and differences such as in the story elements.
You ask questions such as how are the main characters
similar? or how are the settings different?

C. Objectives: (SWBAT)

-How do you compare and contrast the story elements of


two different books?
-Students will be able to contribute to a class discussion
about the similarities and differences between Freckleface
Strawberry and A Bad Case of Stripes.
-Individually, students will be able to complete their own
Venn Diagram by comparing and contrasting Freckleface
Strawberry and A Bad Case of Stripes with at least two
items in each section.

2.
Assessment:
A. Formative Assessment (Active
Strategies to Check for
Understanding, Guide Practice,
Exit Class, etc.)

-Students completed Venn Diagrams


-Students responses in the group discussion about
similarities and differences of the two stories.
-The teachers observations during the lesson including
answers to questions.

B. Summative Assessment (when


appropriate quizzes, objective
tests, essays, projects, etc.)
3.
Instruction:
A. Anticipatory Set

-Reading test

The teacher will play the YouTube video Introduction to


Reading Skills: Compare and Contrast by McGraw Hill

Faber 34

B. Instructional Activities
(includes Introduction,
Presentation, Clues for
Discovery, Modeling, and
engagement in gradual release,
as planned)

Education as an introduction to what it means to compare


and contrast.
The teacher will through questioning lead students to the
conclusion that comparing means finding similarities and
contrasting means finding differences. The teacher will
read the book Freckleface Strawberry. Prior to reading,
the teacher will inform students that we will be comparing
and contrasting today, so they should be on the lookout
for similarities and differences to A Bad Case of Stripes.
Following the reading, the teacher will ask students for a
few examples of similarities and differences that they
noticed. The teacher will use these examples to fill in a
Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting the two stories.
The teacher will emphasize that in order to fill the
diagram students should think about each story element
and decide if that is a similarity or a difference between
the two books.

With special attention to:

Then, the teacher will pass out individual Venn Diagrams


and ask students to complete the Venn Diagram with at
least two items in each section.
4)
Differentiation Students in need of a challenge
will be encouraged to draw a
picture for both stories in the
Draw it- Write it Problem
Solution graphic organizer and
to in the write it section write
what the two problems had in
common and what the two
solutions had in common. These
students also will be challenged
to write more than two items in
each section of their Venn
Diagram.
Students who struggle with the
concept of the story elements or
have low reading
comprehension will work in a
small group with the teacher for

Faber 35
the Venn Diagram.

C. Gradual Release Techniques


(See Formative Assessment
Checking for Understanding,
Guided Practice, Independent
Practice, Class Exit)

D. Closure

4.
Reflection:
C. How can I and they do better?

D. What are they and what am I


ready to do next?

5)

Higher Order
Thinking

6)

Technology

Students will create their own


Venn Diagram based on the two
books Freckleface Strawberry
and A Bad Case of Stripes.
-YouTube video

-Document Camera
I-The teacher will play the YouTube video, read
Freckleface Strawberry, and lead a discussion about
comparing and contrasting the two stories.
We- As a class, we will complete a class Venn Diagram
comparing and contrasting Freckleface Strawberry and A
Bad Case of Stripes.
You- Independently, the students will complete their own
Venn Diagram by comparing and contrasting the two
stories with at least two items written in each section.
Students will complete the Draw it-Write it Problem
Solution graphic organizer. Students can choose whether
they would like to complete it for A Bad Case of Stripes
or Freckleface Strawberry.
I can do a better job next time by going through each of
the story elements one by one and using those elements to
complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting
Freckleface Strawberry and A Bad Case of Stripes. I think
this would help students realize how the story elements
really can guide us while comparing and contrasting.
A few students could do better by paying attention and not
goofing off during instruction. I should pay closer
attention to the seats students choose and emphasize to
them that they should make good choices for who they sit
next to during instruction.
We are ready to record our news reports on A Bad Case of
Stripes using the iPads.

Faber 36
EELP Linear Chart- LOAP Unit- A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon
Reading/Writing/Technology/Speech Lesson- News Report
Writing weeks 6 and 7- Reading week 5
5.

Content:
D. Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the


themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same
author about the same or similar characters.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.5 With guidance and support
from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, and editing.

E. Enduring Understandings &


Essential Questions

CCSS.ELA- Literacy.W.3.6 With guidance and support


from adults, use technology to produce and publish
writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact
and collaborate with others.
-Story elements of fictional texts include character,
setting, problem, solution, beginning, middle, and end.
-How do I identify story elements in a text?
-The five step writing process allows writers to create
more effective works of writing that will persuade, inform,
or entertain readers.
-How do I use the five step writing process for more
effective pieces of writing?

F. Objectives: (SWBAT)

-An effective news report requires the reporter to speak


clearly and at a good pace.
-How do I give an accurate news report?
Using the five step writing process, students will be able
to complete their news report by filling in the problem,
solution, main character, moral, setting and major events
from the story, A Bad Case of Stripes.
Students will be able to navigate and use the iPads to
record their news reports.
Students will be able to practice their news reports and to
read their news report during the recording fluently,
accurately, and with good pacing.

6.

Assessment:

Faber 37
C. Formative Assessment (Active
Strategies to Check for
Understanding, Guide Practice,
Exit Class, etc.)

-The teachers observations during the lesson, including


answers to questions.

D. Summative Assessment (when


appropriate quizzes, objective
tests, essays, projects, etc.)

-Reading test

-Students news reports at each of the five steps of writing


process (their prewriting, rough draft, revised draft, edited
draft, and final copy).

-Students finished videos of their A Bad Case of Stripes


News Reports

7.
Instruction:
E. Anticipatory Set

The teacher will share her Channel 206 News report for
the reading story The Little Red Ant and the Great Big
Crumb with the class. The teacher will let the students
know that they will all be reporters and will create their
own news reports for the story, A Bad Case of Stripes.
F. Instructional Activities (includes The teacher will explain the overall process we will
complete for this project and give the overall
Introduction, Presentation,
expectations. The teacher will pass out the news report
Clues for Discovery, Modeling,
script to be filled out along with the example of the
and engagement in gradual
teachers script from the finished news report video she
release, as planned)
shared.
Students will then begin the five step writing process by
brainstorming (prewriting). Once this step is completed,
the student will check in with a teacher for feedback.
Following the mini-conference, students will begin
drafting. After drafting is completed, the student will sit
down with a teacher for a combined revising/editing
conference. The student, now knowing strengths of his or
her writing as well as areas to improve, will revise and
edit his or her script. Once revising and editing are
complete, the student will check in with a teacher for final
approval to start practicing his or her script for publishing.
Students will practice their scripts during time allotted at
school as well as at home. Then, it will be time to record
their news reports using the iPads. The teacher will model
how to record using the iPads and will make it clear to
students how to use the iPads correctly. Students will

Faber 38

With special attention to:

G. Gradual Release Techniques


(See Formative Assessment
Checking for Understanding,
Guided Practice, Independent
Practice, Class Exit)

H. Closure
8.

Reflection:

work with a partner under teacher supervision to record


their news reports.
4)
Differentiation While in writing conferences
with individual students, the
teacher will give individualized
feedback and instruction based
on the students strengths,
weaknesses, and overall writing
skills.

5)

Higher Order
Thinking

6)

Technology

Microphone
Students will create their own
video news reports based on
their understanding of the story
elements in A Bad Case of
Stripes.
The teacher will share her
finished News Report video
with the class as an example.

The students will create their


own videos using iPads.
I-The teacher will show her example news report. The
teacher will provide explanation and modeling for how to
use the iPads to record.
We- As a class, we will analyze the example video to
determine how we should speak and what nonverbal
communication we should use during our reports.
Students will work in pairs to record their reports, and
students will share their finished reports in small groups.
You- Independently, the students will work through the
five step writing process in order to write an effective
news report. The students also will practice their final
news report in order to establish fluency, accuracy, and a
good pace during the recording.
Students will share their finished news reports in small
groups.

Faber 39
C. How can I and they do better?

Next time I would do a better job planning out exactly


where students could record (a place that they feel
comfortable enough to speak loudly without noisy
background noises). It would have been more effective
time-wise if I had several pre-planned recording places
where pairs of students could go record.
Some of the students should have spoken more loudly for
the recording. Next time I would really emphasize to
students that they need to project and speak loudly enough
while recording their news reports using the iPads.

D. What are they and what am I


ready to do next?

We are ready for the conclusion of this mini-unit, the


posttest. I am ready to use their scores from the posttest to
measure the student growth from the pretest to now.