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Teacher Candidate: Chandler Hepler

Grade Level: 4th Grade

Description of Lesson: Students will demonstrate the distance between the eight different
planets and the sun, using their bodys to represent the planets with 100% accuracy.
Essential Question: Is the solar system spread out or crowded?
Curriculum Standards Addressed:

SC Curriculum Standard(s): 4-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the


properties, movements, and locations of objects in the solar system.
SC Academic Indicator(s): 4-3.1: Recall that Earth is one of many planets in the solar system that
orbit the sun.

Lesson Objective(s):
Students will
demonstrate the
distance between the
eight different
planets and the sun,
using their bodys to
represent the planets
with 100% accuracy.

Assessment(s) of the Objectives:


Before: Students will create a KWL chart to discuss what they already know
about the solar system. They will only fill out the know and want to know
columns.
During: Students will work together to form the solar system using their
bodys. Each student will represent one planet, and they will measure how far
away their planet is from the sun. 1 Astronomical Unit (92,955,887.6 miles)
will equal 1 foot.
After: Students will fill in their learned portion of their KWL chart, and they
will draw a picture of the solar system where 1 Astronomical Unit
(92,955,887.6 miles) will equal 1 inch.

Materials/Resources:
Smart Board
Science Notebook
Writing Utensil
Measuring Sticks
Signs (9: Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune)

Prerequisites (Prior Knowledge):


1. Students know how to create a KWL chart.
2. Students know that there are eight planets, and that each planet orbits around the Sun.

Procedures

Engagement:
Students will create a KWL chart for the solar system. They will only be able to fill in the know
and want to know columns of their charts at this time. Then the students will share what they
have written on their KWL chart.
Exploration:
1. Divide the students into 3 groups; each group will contain 8 students.
2. Allow the students to select a planet that they want to represent, and give each group a
measuring stick.
3. Take students outside to begin their experiment.

4. Students will measure the distance provided for each planet to see how far away each
planet is from the sun.
Mercurybetween 0-1 feet
Venusbetween 0-1 feet
Earth1 foot
Mars1 foot, 6 inches
Jupiter5 feet, 3 inches
Saturn9 feet 8 inches
Uranus19 feet
Neptune30 feet
*If asked if Pluto were a planet it would be about 40 feet away from the sun
5. Tell students that they need to remember where each planet is located so when they go
back to the classroom they can draw their model in their science notebook.
Explanation:
The students will fill in the learned section of their KWL chart. The students will also take this
time to draw a model of the solar system in their science journals. 1 AU will equal 1 inch. The
students will discuss their findings about the solar system.
Elaboration:
Students will be able to look at a model of the solar system that I have found online. The
students will be able to discuss how the online model is different from their model. I will probe
them with questions like; what are the real planets doing in space that they are not doing in our
model? What shape was our model? Do planets really line up like that in space? What shape are
the planets orbits? (Circular, oval, elliptical) Students will addition things they learned during
the elaboration phase to their learned column on their KWL chart.
Evaluation (Assessment):

Students will discuss what they have learned during this activity, and some students will
have the opportunity to share their models of the solar system.
Differentiation/Accommodations/Modifications/Increases in Rigor
I divide the groups up so there was at least one GATAS student is each group. I did this so the students
that needed an extra push in the right direction would have it. The students that needed extra help I will
aid them by probing them with questions that will help lead them in the right direction. For the students
that this is too easy for, they will discuss which planets have rings, what colors are the different planets,
which planets have water, etc. I might allow these students to do some research on the computer in the
back of the classroom.

References:
www.s2temsc.org/k-8-science-lessons.htm