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SMART HOTEL MENU ORDERING SYSTEM

A PROJECT REPORT

Submitted by

PATEL DARSHAN (120773111013)

PRAJAPATI JAYESH (120773111002)

BAROT RAHUL (120773111012)

In fulfillment for the award of the degree

of

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING

in ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING in ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS SILVER OAK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, AHMEDABAD

SILVER OAK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, AHMEDABAD

Gujarat Technological University, Ahmedabad

NOVEMBER, 2014

SILVER OAK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICATION

2014

CERTIFICATE

Date:

This is to certify that the dissertation entitled “SMART HOTEL MENU ORDERING SYSTEM” has been carried out PATEL DARSHAN, PRAJAPATI JAYESH& BAROT RAHUL under my guidance in fulfillment of the degree of Bachelor of Engineering in (7th Semester/8th Semester) of Gujarat Technological University, Ahmedabad during the academic year

2014-15.

Guide:

MR.K.S.MODH (ASST.PROFESSOR)

Head of the Department

MR. AMIT AGRAWAL

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Every project big or small is successful largely due to the effort of a number of wonderful people who have always given their valuable advice or lent a helping hand. I sincerely appreciate the inspiration; support and guidance of all those people who have been instrumental in making this project a success.

We, Patel darshan, Prajapati jayesh and Barot Rahul the students of SILVER OAK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (EC), am extremely grateful to our guide Mr.M.S MODH Sir for the confidence bestowed in us and entrusting our project entitled “SMART HOTEL MANAGMENT”. He has been extremely helpful by giving his valuable guidance to us. I take this opportunity to thank our project coordinator Mr. Sugnesh Hirpara Sir for guiding us through right paths and enlighten our project’s vision so successfully.

At this juncture I feel deeply honored in expressing my sincere thanks to Mr. Amit Agrawal for making the resources available at right time and providing valuable insights leading to the successful completion of my project.

Last but not the least I place a deep sense of gratitude to my family members and my friends who have been constant source of inspiration during the preparation of this project work.

members and my friends who have been constant source of inspiration during the preparation of this
members and my friends who have been constant source of inspiration during the preparation of this

Page i

ABSTRACT

The project is Smart Hotel Management. In this project menu is going to be available at customer’s seating area. Menu will be available in display of the monitor. Customer does not have to wait for the waiter for order. It is very easy and handy method for customer. Placed order will be sent to the chef’s display using ZigBee. This integration solution can add or expand hotel software system in any size of hotel chains environment. This system increases quality and speed of service. This system also increases attraction of place for large range of customers. Implementing this system gives a cost efficient opportunity to give your customers a personalized service experience where they are in control choosing what they want, when they want it from dining to ordering to payment and feedback.

they are in control choosing what they want, when they want it from dining to ordering
they are in control choosing what they want, when they want it from dining to ordering

Page ii

LIST OF TABLES

Table No

Table Description

Page No

Table 2.1.2

PROJECTPLAN………………….5

Table 2.3

ESTIMATION…………………

7

No Table 2.1.2 PROJECTPLAN …………………. 5 Table 2.3 ESTIMATION………………… 7 Page iii
No Table 2.1.2 PROJECTPLAN …………………. 5 Table 2.3 ESTIMATION………………… 7 Page iii

Page iii

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure No

Figure Description

Page No.

1.

PIC16F877A……………………………….8

2.

ZigBee………………………………

10

3.

Touchpad………………………………

12

4.

LCD……………………………………….13

5.

Buzzer…………………………………….13

6.

Functional Behavioral and Modelling……15

7.

Modal……………………………………

16

8.

PIC16F877A…………………………

17

9.

ZigBee…………………………………….17

10.

Touchpad………………………………

18

11.

LCD……………………………………….18

12.

Buzzer…………………………………….19

13.

Screenshot………………………………

22

14.

Screenshot………………………………

22

15.

Screenshot………………………………

23

16.

Screenshot……………………………….23

……………………………… 23 16. Screenshot ……………………………… .23 Page iv
……………………………… 23 16. Screenshot ……………………………… .23 Page iv

Page iv

LIST OF SYMBOLS, ABBREVIATIONS AND NOMENCLATURE

Symbol Name

Abbreviations

PIC16F877A……………………………….Peripheral Interface Controller

LCD………………. ……………………

Liquid

Crystal Display

Interface Controller LCD ………………. …………………… Liquid Crystal Display Page v
Interface Controller LCD ………………. …………………… Liquid Crystal Display Page v

Page v

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgement………………………………………………………………

Abstract……………………………………………………………………………ii

i

List of Tables……………………………………………………………………

iii

List of Figure ……………………………………………………………………

iv

List of Abbreviations……………………………………………………………

v

Table of Contents………………………………………………………………

vi

Chapter: 1 INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………

1

1.1 PROJECT SUMMARY…………………………………………………………….2

1.2 PURPOSE…………………………………………………………………………

2

1.3 SCOPE ……………………………………………………………………………

3

Chapter: 2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT………………………………………

4

2.1

PROJECT PLANNING & SCHEDULING ……………………………………

4

2.1.1PROJECT PLANINNG & DEVELOPMENT……………………………………

4

2.1.2PROJECT PLAN………………………………………………………………

5

2.1.3MILESTONES…………………………………………………………………

6

2.1.4ROLES…………………………………………………………………………

6

2.1.5RESPONSIBILITIES……………………………………………………………

6

2.1.6DEPENDENCIES………………………………………………………………

6

2.2

RISK MANAGEMENT…………………………………………………………

7

2.2.1RISK IDENTIFICATION……………………………………………………

7

2.2.2RISK PLANNING……………………………………………………………

7

2.3

ESTIMATION…………………………………………………………………

7

Chapter: 3 SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

3.1

USER REQUIREMENTS………………………………………………

8

3.1.1PIC16F877A……………………………………………………………………

8

3.1.2ZIGBEE…………………………………………………………………………….9

3.1.3TOUCHPAD………………………………………………………………………11

3.1.4LCD……………………………………………………………………………

12

11 3.1.4LCD…………………………………………………………………………… 12 Page vi
11 3.1.4LCD…………………………………………………………………………… 12 Page vi

Page vi

3.1.5BUZZER…………………………………………………………………………

13

3.2

CONSTRAINTS…………………………………………………………………

14

3.2.1HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS…………………………

14

Chapter: 4 SYSTEM ANALYSIS…………………………………………

15

4.1 FUNCTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL MODELLING ………………………….15

4.2 MAIN MODULES OF SYSTEM………………………………………………

4.2.1PIC16F877A………………………………………………………………………17

17

4.2.2ZIGBEE…………………………………………………………………………

17

4.2.3LCD……………………………………………………………………………

18

4.2.4TOUCHPAD……………………………………………………………………

18

4.2.5BUZZER………………………………………………………………………

19

4.3SELECTION OF HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE JUSTIFICATIOMN……

19

Chapter: 5 IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING & DETAILS………………

5.1 SAMPLE CODING………………………………………………………………

20

20

Chapter: 6 SCREENSHOTS…………………………………………………

23

Chapter: 7 LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE ENHANCEMENT…………

25

Chapter: 8 CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSION…………………………

26

References………………………………………………………….27

Experiences………………………………………………………

28

.27 Experiences ……………………………………………………… 28 Page vii
.27 Experiences ……………………………………………………… 28 Page vii

Page vii

PROJECT ID:1045

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

Restaurants are one of the favorite premises. With no regard to the actual reasons for Visiting restaurants, customer will make orders and wait for the ordered meals. However, it is common if customers complain for not feeling satisfied about the services offered. There are many reasons leading to the feeling of dissatisfaction including being entertained late in terms of order taking by the waiter and meals serving. The issue of being late entertained could be solved with help of the Advancement in the technologies of communication. In accordance, this study Initiates an integrated and networked system, with the focus is on its ability to solve the above described limitations in order taking. This study names the system as Digital Ordering System for Restaurant Using ZIGBEE (DOSRUZ).In definition, DOSRUZ is an integrated system, developed to assist restaurant management groups by enabling customers to immediately make orders on their own selves. This will minimize the number of minutes to wait for the meal serving. This project deals with Digital ordering system for restaurant. This topic includes scope of the project, project characteristics, Operating environments, Assumption and dependencies, design and implementation constraints. Scope of the project includes features that can be implemented. Design part includes the method and way of designing theproduct. It also explains certain constraints on designing and implementation

also explains certain constraints on designing and implementation Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
also explains certain constraints on designing and implementation Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

INTRODUCTION

1.1 PROJECT SUMMARY

When the customer enters the restaurant, he would surf on the tablet to order his menu. He could also surf quickly if he has already decided upon what to order. He would click the item he wants to order and after he is sure he wants each item in the list, he would click confirm. The confirmed order would be displayed on the display screen in the kitchen. After the chef has completed preparing the item, it would be notified to the customer. After the customer has completed eating the Food, bill would be directly displayed on his tablet as well as managers system

1.2 PURPOSE

Our purpose to make this project is to make order easier less time taking. Human effort would be less. Customer can easily place his order just by touch. This becomes very easy and customer would be satisfied as he placing his order himself. No confusion would be there. Customer does have to wait for the waiter to come and take his order. As in paper menu we cannot cancel the order. In this we can easily cancel the order.

cannot cancel the order. In this we can easily cancel the order. Silver oak college of
cannot cancel the order. In this we can easily cancel the order. Silver oak college of

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

INTRODUCTION

1.3 SCOPE

In current formal dining environments, some form of physical static menu is utilized to convey the available food and beverage choices to customers. Said menus are generally paper based and hence impose restrictions on the textual real estate available and the ability a restaurateur has to update them. This document specifies the requirements for a restaurant paper menu and ordering replacement strategy to alleviate the problems associated with the current archaic method. Three related concepts are encompassed by the general scope of the Restaurant Menu and Ordering System. The first pertains to the replacement of paper based menus using an electronic format, the second relates to a complementary electronic strategy for the front of house handling of a customer’s order and the third surrounds the process of transferring said electronic orders to the kitchen for preparation. It should be noted that while the suggested strategy incorporates the use of various hardware components, the primary focus of the presented SRS relates to the constituent software elements. The following are the features which can be a part of the proposed system: Ordering, Waiting, Billing, Table Reservation, and Home Delivery.

Ordering, Waiting, Billing, Table Reservation, and Home Delivery. Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
Ordering, Waiting, Billing, Table Reservation, and Home Delivery. Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

CHAPTER 2: PROJECT MANAGEMENT

2.1 PROJECT PLANNING AND SCHEDULING

2.1.1 PROJECT PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Firstly we find this project interesting project. We decide to work out on it. We search thing for this project and learn components details and what can of controller we gone a use for this we decide to use PIC controller and ZIGBEE for this project. PIC is we easy and interesting language so start to learn this language. We learn and start working on the project. First we work on LCD programming. We work on it. Then we work on touchpad programming. Slowly we working on the every single this way complete the programming wok then we start work on hardware. We connect LCD and touchpad slowly all the components gone be complete our project work.

slowly all the components gone be complete our project work. Silver oak college of eng. &
slowly all the components gone be complete our project work. Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

2.1.2 PROJECT PLAN

Table 1: project plan

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

MONTH

PLANNING

AUGUST

STUDY THE VARIOUS PAPERS PRESENTED ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATION ON VARIOUS CONTROLLERS.

SEPTEMBER

COLLECTING ALL THE HARDWARES REQUIRED FOR THE EXECUTION OF THE PROJECT.

OCTOBER

ANALYSIS OF THE ARRANGEMNET OF THE HARDWARE ACCORDING TO THE SOFTWARE AND PROJECT REQUIRMNETS.

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

START STUDYING PIC LANGUAGE

JANUARY

COMPLETE HARDWARE IMPLEMENTATION BEFORE EXTERNAL VIVA AND COMPLETION OF THE RESEARCH REGARDING SOFTWARE SIDE.

FEBRUARY

START WORKING ON THE SOFTWARE SIDE OF THE PROJECT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SOFTWARE

MARCH

COMPLETE ERROR CHECKING OF THE DESIGNED PROJECT

MARCH COMPLETE ERROR CHECKING OF THE DESIGNED PROJECT Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
MARCH COMPLETE ERROR CHECKING OF THE DESIGNED PROJECT Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

2.1.3 MILESTONES

The major milestone in our project was learning and implementing the python microC of pic microcontroller. The work conducted through programming and running programs had been the major influence of the project. Learning such an interesting and influence language shed a huge amount of confidence in our project. Hence the programming language itself was the best part of the project which grabbed special attention and henceforth proved to be a major milestone in it.

2.1.4 ROLES

The roles played by each of us were done completely with immense sincerity and dedication.

Each part of the programming which includes software and the part of project that includes hardware was equally divided and distributed amongst us and henceforth, the was no burdening of tasks in any perspective of the project. So the project has smoothly handled without many troubles.

2.1.5 RESPONSIBILITIES

The responsibilities too were equally divided amongst us. During the last phase of project summarization it was very essentially to work together as a team and put in maximum effort. The responsibilities were equally divided and distributed too. The hardware and software was equally divided and rendered with immense care and responsibility in order to get optimum output.

2.1.6 DEPENDENCIES

While implementing the project there were a large number of people on whom we were dependent on. As the language was completely new to us it had become very difficult for us

to handle it alone. The faculties of our college were the first we were dependent on. The various search engines and links of the raspberry pi and python helped us to enhance the project completely.

pi and python helped us to enhance the project completely. Silver oak college of eng. &
pi and python helped us to enhance the project completely. Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

2.2 RISK MANAGEMENT

While executing any project it necessarily involves a lot of risks. These are of various kinds. It may be regarding the device, the controller, the software language used etc. in many cases one of the major problems would be shorting of the device.

2.2.1 RISK IDENTIFICATION

We found out that in our project when order is completed customer cannot get that is his/her

order is complete. Is it reached to the chef?

2.2.2 RISK PLANNING

To solve this problem we had used buzzer. So user can know that his order is complete and

reach to the chef.

2.3 ESTIMATION

Table 2: Estimation

Components

Price

PIC microcontroller

200

Touchpad

700

LCD

450

Total

1350

200 Touchpad 700 LCD 450 Total 1350 Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC] Page
200 Touchpad 700 LCD 450 Total 1350 Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC] Page

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

3.1 USER REQUIREMENTS

3.1.1 PIC16F877A

The original PIC was built to be used with General Instrument's new CP1600 16-bit CPU. While generally a good CPU, the CP1600 had poor I/O performance, and the 8-bit PIC was developed in 1975 to improve performance of the overall system by offloading I/O tasks from the CPU. The PIC used simple microcode stored in ROM to perform its tasks, and although the term was not used at the time, it shares some common features with RISC designs.

time, it shares some common features with RISC designs. FIGURE 1: PIC16FF877A In 1985, General Instrument

FIGURE 1: PIC16FF877A

In 1985, General Instrument spun off their microelectronics division and the new ownership The architectural decisions are directed at the maximization of speed-to-cost ratio. The PIC architecture was among the first scalar CPU designs and is still among the simplest and cheapest. The Harvard architecturein which instructions and data come from separate sourcessimplify timing and microcircuit design greatly, and this benefits clock speed, price, and power consumption.

The PIC instruction set is suited to implementation of fast lookup tables in the program space. Such lookups take one instruction and two instruction cycles. Many functions can be modeled in this way. Optimization is facilitated by the relatively large program space of the PIC (e.g.

facilitated by the relatively large program space of the PIC (e.g. Silver oak college of eng.
facilitated by the relatively large program space of the PIC (e.g. Silver oak college of eng.

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

4096 × 14-bit words on the 16F690) and by the design of the instruction set, which allows for embedded constants. For example, a branch instruction's target may be indexed by W, and execute a "RETLW" which does as it is named - return with literal in W.

Interrupt latency is constant at three instruction cycles. External interrupts have to be synchronized with the four clock instruction cycle; otherwise there can be a one instruction cycle jitter. Internal interrupts are already synchronized. The constant interrupt latency allows PICs to achieve interrupt driven low jitter timing sequences. An example of this is a video sync pulse generator. This is no longer true in the newest PIC models, because they have a synchronous interrupt latency of three or four cycles.

was upgraded with an internal EPROM to produce a programmable channel controller. Today a huge variety of PICs are available with various on-board peripherals (serial communication modules, UARTs, motor control kernels, etc.) and program memory from 256 words to 64k words and more (a "word" is one assembly language instruction, varying from 8, 12, 14 or 16 bits depending on the specific PIC micro family).

PIC and PIC micro are registered trademarks of Microchip Technology. It is generally thought that PIC stands for Peripheral Interface Controller, although General Instruments' original acronym for the initial PIC1640 and PIC1650 devices was "Programmable Interface Controller". The acronym was quickly replaced with "Programmable Intelligent Computer".

The Microchip 16C84 (PIC16x84), introduced in 1993, was the first Microchip CPU with on-

chip EEPROM memory. This electrically erasable memory made it cost less than CPUs that

required quartz "erase window" for erasing EPROM.

3.1.2 ZigBee

ZigBee is a specification for a suite of high-level communication protocols used to create personal area networks built from small, low-power digital radios. ZigBee is based on an IEEE 802.15 standard. Though its low power consumption limits transmission distances to 10100 meters line-of-sight, depending on power output and environmental characteristics, [1] ZigBee devices can transmit data over long distances by passing data through a mesh network

data over long distances by passing data through a mesh network Silver oak college of eng.
data over long distances by passing data through a mesh network Silver oak college of eng.

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

of intermediate devices to reach more distant ones. ZigBee is typically used in low data rate applications that require long battery life and secure networking (ZigBee networks are secured by 128 bit symmetric encryption keys.) ZigBee has a defined rate of 250 Kbit/s, best suited for intermittent data transmissions from a sensor or input device. Applications include wireless light switches, electrical meters with in-home-displays, traffic management systems, and other consumer and industrial equipment that requires short-range low-rate wireless data transfer. The technology defined by the ZigBee specification is intended to be simpler and less expensive than other wireless personal area networks (WPANs), such as Bluetooth or Wi- Fi.

area networks (WPANs), such as Bluetooth or Wi- Fi. FIGURE 2: ZigBee ZigBee is a low-cost,

FIGURE 2: ZigBee

ZigBee is a low-cost, low-power; wireless mesh network standard targeted at wide development of long battery life devices in wireless control and monitoring applications. ZigBee devices have low latency, which further reduces average current. ZigBee chips are typically integrated with radios and with microcontrollers that have between 60-256 KB flash memory. ZigBee operates in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) radio bands: 2.4 GHz in most jurisdictions worldwide; 784 MHz in China, 868 MHz in Europe and 915 MHz in the USA and Australia. Data rates vary from 20 Kbit/s (868 MHz band) to 250 Kbit/s (2.4 GHz band).

The ZigBee network layer natively supports both star and tree networks, and generic Mesh networking. Every network must have one coordinator device, tasked with its creation, the

must have one coordinator device, tasked with its creation, the Silver oak college of eng. &
must have one coordinator device, tasked with its creation, the Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

control of its parameters and basic maintenance. Within star networks, the coordinator must be the central node. Both

ZigBee builds on the physical layer and media access control defined in IEEE standard 802.15.4 for low-rate WPANs. The specification includes four additional key components:

network layer, application layer, ZigBee device objects (ZDOs) and manufacturer-defined application objects which allow for customization and favor total integration. ZDOs are responsible for a number of tasks, including keeping track of device roles, managing requests to join a network, as well as device discovery and security.

3.1.3 Touchpad

Touchpads operate in one of several ways, including capacitive sensing and conductance sensing. The most common technology used as of 2010 entails sensing the capacitive virtual ground effect of a finger, or the capacitance between sensors. Capacitance-based touchpads will not sense the tip of a pencil or other similar implement. Gloved fingers may also be problematic.

While touchpads, like touchscreens, are able to sense absolute position, resolution is limited by their size. For common use as a pointer device, the dragging motion of a finger is translated into a finer, relative motion of the cursor on the output to the display on the operating system, analogous to the handling of a mouse that is lifted and put back on a surface. Hardware buttons equivalent to a standard mouse's left and right buttons are positioned below, above, or beside the touchpad.

Some touchpads and associated device driver software may interpret tapping the pad as a click, and a tap followed by a continuous pointing motion (a "click-and-a-half") can indicate dragging. [1] Tactile touchpads allow for clicking and dragging by incorporating button functionality into the surface of the touchpad itself, To select, one presses down on the touchpad instead of a physical button. To drag, instead performing the "click-and-a-half" technique, one presses down while on the object, drags without releasing pressure and lets go when done. Touchpad drivers can also allow the use of multiple fingers to facilitate the other mouse buttons (commonly two-finger tapping for the center button).

buttons (commonly two-finger tapping for the center button). Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
buttons (commonly two-finger tapping for the center button). Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

Some touchpads have "hotspots", locations on the touchpad used for functionality beyond a mouse. For example, on certain touchpads, moving the finger along an edge of the touch pad will act as a scroll wheel, controlling the scrollbar and scrolling the window that has the focus vertically or horizontally. Many touchpads use two-finger dragging for scrolling. Also, some touchpad drivers support tap zones, regions where a tap will execute a function, for example, pausing a media player or launching an application. All of these functions are implemented in the touchpad device driver software, and can be disabled.

the touchpad device driver software, and can be disabled. 3.1.4 LCD FIGURE 3: Touchpad A liquid-crystal

3.1.4 LCD

FIGURE 3: Touchpad

A liquid-crystal display (LCD) is a flat panel display, electronic visual display, or video display that uses the light modulating properties of liquid crystals. Liquid crystals do not emit light directly.

LCDs are available to display arbitrary images (as in a general-purpose computer display) or fixed images which can be displayed or hidden, such as preset words, digits, and 7-segment displays as in a digital clock. They use the same basic technology, except that arbitrary images are made up of a large number of small pixels, while other displays have larger elements.

of small pixels, while other displays have larger elements. Silver oak college of eng. & technology
of small pixels, while other displays have larger elements. Silver oak college of eng. & technology

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

PROJECT ID:1045 SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY FIGURE 4: LCD LCDs are used in a wide range of

FIGURE 4: LCD

LCDs are used in a wide range of applications including computer monitors, televisions, instrument panels, aircraft cockpit displays, and signage. They are common in consumer devices such as DVD players, gaming devices, clocks, watches, calculators, and telephones, and have replaced cathode ray tube (CRT) displays in most applications. They are available in a wider range of screen sizes than CRT and plasma displays, and since they do not use phosphors, they do not suffer image burn-in. LCDs are, however, susceptible to image persistence. [1]

3.1.5 Buzzer A buzzer or beeper is an audio signaling device, which may be mechanical, electromechanical, or piezoelectric. Typical uses of buzzers and beepers include alarm devices, timers and confirmation of user input such as a mouse click or keystroke

of user input such as a mouse click or keystroke FIGURE 5: Buzzer Silver oak college

FIGURE 5: Buzzer

of user input such as a mouse click or keystroke FIGURE 5: Buzzer Silver oak college
of user input such as a mouse click or keystroke FIGURE 5: Buzzer Silver oak college

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM REQUIREMENT STUDY

Early devices were based on an electromechanical system identical to an electric bell without the metal gong. Similarly, a relay may be connected to interrupt its own actuating current, causing the contacts to buzz. Often these units were anchored to a wall or ceiling to use it as a sounding board. The word "buzzer" comes from the rasping noise that electromechanical buzzers made.

3.2 CONSTRAINTS

3.2.1 HARDWARE LIMITATION

As we using graphical LCD it is capable to operate in PIC microcontroller. If we want to use touch screen it require ARM controller cause of this cost increases and complexity circuit too. In spite of controller we also can use android which is easier than controller.

we also can use android which is easier than controller. Silver oak college of eng. &
we also can use android which is easier than controller. Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SYSTEM ANALYSIS

CHAPTER 4: SYSTEM ANALYSIS

4.1 FUNCTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL MODELLING

POWER
POWER
SUPPLY ZIGBEE MICRO Controller TOUCH LCD KEYPAD BUZZER
SUPPLY
ZIGBEE
MICRO
Controller
TOUCH
LCD
KEYPAD
BUZZER

FIGURE 6: Block Diagram

Controller TOUCH LCD KEYPAD BUZZER FIGURE 6: Block Diagram Silver oak college of eng. & technology
Controller TOUCH LCD KEYPAD BUZZER FIGURE 6: Block Diagram Silver oak college of eng. & technology

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

Project View:

SYSTEM ANALYSIS

PROJECT ID:1045 Project View : SYSTEM ANALYSIS FIGURE 7: Model Silver oak college of eng. &

FIGURE 7: Model

PROJECT ID:1045 Project View : SYSTEM ANALYSIS FIGURE 7: Model Silver oak college of eng. &
PROJECT ID:1045 Project View : SYSTEM ANALYSIS FIGURE 7: Model Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

4.2MAIN MODULES OF SYSTEM

4.2.1. PIC16F877A

SYSTEM ANALYSIS

4.2MAIN MODULES OF SYSTEM 4.2.1. PIC16F877A SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4.2.2 ZigBee FIGURE 8: PIC16F877A FIGURE 9:XBee Silver

4.2.2 ZigBee

FIGURE 8: PIC16F877A

PIC16F877A SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4.2.2 ZigBee FIGURE 8: PIC16F877A FIGURE 9:XBee Silver oak college of eng. &

FIGURE 9:XBee

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

4.2.3 LCD

SYSTEM ANALYSIS

PROJECT ID:1045 ‘ 4.2.3 LCD SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4.2.4 Touchpad FIGURE 10: LCD FIGURE 11: Touchpad Silver

4.2.4 Touchpad

FIGURE 10: LCD

‘ 4.2.3 LCD SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4.2.4 Touchpad FIGURE 10: LCD FIGURE 11: Touchpad Silver oak college

FIGURE 11: Touchpad

SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4.2.4 Touchpad FIGURE 10: LCD FIGURE 11: Touchpad Silver oak college of eng. &
SYSTEM ANALYSIS 4.2.4 Touchpad FIGURE 10: LCD FIGURE 11: Touchpad Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

4.2.5 Buzzer

SYSTEM ANALYSIS

PROJECT ID:1045 4.2.5 Buzzer SYSTEM ANALYSIS FIGURE 12: Buzzer 4.3 JUSTIFICATION The hardware and software selected

FIGURE 12: Buzzer

4.3

JUSTIFICATION

The hardware and software selected in the project are of the latest technology. Both hardware and software are chosen in a way that maximum and optimum output can be obtained

AND

SELECTION

OF

HARDWARE

AND

SOFTWARE

output can be obtained AND SELECTION OF HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE Silver oak college of eng. &
output can be obtained AND SELECTION OF HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

IMPLEMENTATION PLANING AND DETAILS

CHAPTER 5: IMPLEMENTATION PLANING AND DETAILS

5.1 SAMPLE CODING

sbit LCD_RS at RB4_bit; sbit LCD_EN at RB5_bit; sbit LCD_D7 at RB3_bit; sbit LCD_D6 at RB2_bit; sbit LCD_D5 at RB1_bit; sbit LCD_D4 at RB0_bit;

sbit sw1 at RD0_bit; sbit sw2 at RD1_bit; sbit w3s at RD2_bit; sbit sw4 at RD3_bit;

sbit LCD_RS_Direction at TRISB4_bit; sbit LCD_EN_Direction at TRISB5_bit; sbit LCD_D7_Direction at TRISB3_bit; sbit LCD_D6_Direction at TRISB2_bit; sbit LCD_D5_Direction at TRISB1_bit; sbit LCD_D4_Direction at TRISB0_bit;

void main() { Lcd_Init();

TRISA=0xff;

while(1)

at TRISB0_bit; void main() { Lcd_Init(); TRISA=0xff; while(1) Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
at TRISB0_bit; void main() { Lcd_Init(); TRISA=0xff; while(1) Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

{

start:

lcd_Out(1,1,"Welcome Sir");

delay_ms(5000);

Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear);

IMPLEMENTATION PLANING AND DETAILS

lcd_out(1,1,"1 Chinese");

lcd_out(2,1,"2 Gujarati");

while(1)

{

if(sw1==1){ delay_ms(1000); Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); lcd_out(1,1,"1

Manchurian 80"); lcd_out(2,1,"2

if(sw1==1){ delay_ms(1000); Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); lcd_out(1,1,"Thank you"); delay_ms(2000); }

if(sw2==1){ delay_ms(1000); Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); lcd_out(1,1,"Thank you"); delay_ms(2000); }

Noodles 70"); delay_ms(1000);

}

if(sw2==1){ Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); delay_ms(1000); lcd_out(1,1,"1

Dhokla 30"); lcd_out(2,1,"2

if(sw1==1){ Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); delay_ms(1000); lcd_out(1,1,"Thank

you"); delay_ms(2000); } if(sw2==1){ Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); delay_ms(1000);lcd_out(1,1,"Thank you"); delay_ms(2000); }

Khaman 40");

}

you"); delay_ms(2000); } Khaman 40"); } Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC] Page 21
you"); delay_ms(2000); } Khaman 40"); } Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC] Page 21

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

IMPLEMENTATION PLANING AND DETAILS

if(sw3==1){ Lcd_cmd(_lcd_clear); delay_ms(1000); goto start; break; }

}

delay_ms(1000);

}

}

delay_ms(1000); goto start; break; } } delay_ms(1000); } } Silver oak college of eng. & technology
delay_ms(1000); goto start; break; } } delay_ms(1000); } } Silver oak college of eng. & technology

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

CHAPTER 6: SCREENSHOTS

SCREEN SHOTS

PROJECT ID:1045 CHAPTER 6: SCREENSHOTS SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 13: Screenshot FIGURE 14: Screenshot Silver oak college

FIGURE 13: Screenshot

CHAPTER 6: SCREENSHOTS SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 13: Screenshot FIGURE 14: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng.

FIGURE 14: Screenshot

SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 13: Screenshot FIGURE 14: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 13: Screenshot FIGURE 14: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

SCREEN SHOTS

PROJECT ID:1045 SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 15 Screenshot FIGURE 16: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng. &

FIGURE 15 Screenshot

PROJECT ID:1045 SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 15 Screenshot FIGURE 16: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng. &

FIGURE 16: Screenshot

ID:1045 SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 15 Screenshot FIGURE 16: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng. & technology
ID:1045 SCREEN SHOTS FIGURE 15 Screenshot FIGURE 16: Screenshot Silver oak college of eng. & technology

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

LIMITATION AND FUTURE ENHANCEMENT

CHAPTER 7: LIMITATION AND FUTURE ENHANCEMENT

Wastage of paper is avoided as our implementation is working just on tablet and does not need any paperwork. e.g. For taking the order, we are not Using papers. Also, our menu card would be digitized.

A customer going into restaurant does not has to wait for the waiters to take the order. As soon as he occupies a seat, he would order whatever he needs.

As soon as the order is ready, it would be notified to the customer. So, there would not Be any issue of late delivery in spite of the food being ready

Customer feedback. Customer can enter the feedback about the service and the food served.

This helps the Restaurant owner to analysis the service and makes necessary changes if Needed.

This also helps the Customer’s to decide a particular Food item with a positive feedback. Searching Item.

Customer can search a particular food item according to name, price, category etc.

This saves a lot of time of customer to order an item. Offers for Customer:

The Restaurant owner can post various offers on tablet.

This will help the customer as well as the restaurant owners. Attractive Presentation.

The Menu is organized in an attractive way.

There are images of every food item which will make the view of customers more clear About how the food will look like after delivery.

Here is an attractive use of various themes and color schemes. Sorting an Item:

The food items will be sorted according to price, season and user ratings.

This helps the customer to find or select a food item which has a good rating and which is Liked by a many customers.

This also helps the Restaurant owner to make changes in a particular food item if it has low ratings which improves the quality of food. Time to Serve.

The menu includes the approximate time to be served of a particular food item.

This will help the customer to select the food item accordingly. Modifiable Menu:

The menu can be modified by the Kitchen manager.

LIMITATION

If we compare our system with traditional paper based system, more maintenance would be

needed. Some technical assistance would also be needed.

would be needed. Some technical assistance would also be needed. Silver oak college of eng. &
would be needed. Some technical assistance would also be needed. Silver oak college of eng. &

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION

CHAPTER 8: CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION

The proposed system would attract customers and also adds to the efficiency of maintaining the restaurant’s ordering and billing Sections.

of maintaining the restaurant’s ordering and billing Sections. Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
of maintaining the restaurant’s ordering and billing Sections. Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

REFERENCES

Terrell Croft and Wilford Summers (ed), American Electricans' Handbook, Eleventh Edition, McGraw Hill, New York (1987) ISBN 0-07-013932-6 page 7-124

McGraw Hill, New York (1987) ISBN 0-07-013932-6 page 7-124 Silver oak college of eng. & technology
McGraw Hill, New York (1987) ISBN 0-07-013932-6 page 7-124 Silver oak college of eng. & technology

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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PROJECT ID:1045

EXPERIENCES

1. Learning and exploring python language.

2. Learning about various interfacing with raspberry pi.

3. Exploring more about monitoring devices.

4. A sneak peek over the various functionalities and necessity of designing.

5. Learning about the field of robotics as much we could.

6. Discussing about various industrial application were monitoring is required

about various industrial application were monitoring is required Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]
about various industrial application were monitoring is required Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

Silver oak college of eng. & technology [EC]

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