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Perspectives on Japanese-American Internment During WWII

Lesson Topic: WWII internment of Japanese-American citizens


Time Frame: 1 class period (60 minutes)
Course: Social Studies (WWII unit 2nd quarter)
Grade Level: 8

TERMINAL BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVE


SWBAT make an argument for or against the U.S. governments implementation of internment camps during
World War II, using a minimum of 4 points of supporting evidence.

CURRICULUM/STANDARDS
S1C1PO6
S1C8PO2
S1C8PO4a,e
S1C8PO5e

(AZDE 8th Grade Social Studies Standards)

HOMEWORK
No homework assigned for this lesson.

RESOURCES/MATERIALS

Promethean board
Video: Youre a Sap, Mr. Jap - 1942 (YouTube)
Video: Japanese Americans Interned (PBsLearningMedia.org)
Video: Reality of Manzanar (PBSLearningMedia.org)
Primary source letters from Japanese-American citizens detained in internment camps w/ accompanying
guide questions
PowerPoint Presentation on Executive Order 9066 and Japanese internment camps
WWII war correspondent journals (constructed by students, earlier in the semester)
Lined paper and pencils

Task Analysis
Terminal Objective: SWBAT make an argument for or against the U.S. governments implementation of
internment camps during World War II, using a minimum of 4 points of supporting evidence.
TIM
E

SUB-OBJECTIVE
(include Blooms level)

TEACHING STRATEGY

CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING/


ACTIVE STUDENT PARTICIPATION

5
min

SWBAT summarize, in their


own words, the key events of
the Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor (Dec. 7, 1941)

Bellwork: In a short paragraph


(3-4 sentences), summarize
the events of December 7,
1941, identifying all of the
5Ws.

Intermittent Closure: In a class


discussion, students will be
called upon to share their
summaries with the class. Nonvolunteers will be called to
share.

SWBAT identify, and explain,


examples of Anti-Japanese
racism, stereotypes, and
propaganda, during World
War II.

Video: Youre a Sap, Mr. Jap


Popeye cartoon
Video: Japanese Americans
Interned
+
Reality of Manzanar

Blooms Level:
Comprehension/Understandin
g

Lecture: Anti-Japanese
sentiments and propaganda,
following Pearl Harbor.

Note-taker: In their WWII unit


journals, students will write
responses to pre-determined
questions regarding the videos,
while watching, and after. The
questions will be posted &
recorded prior to the video.
Intermittent Closure: Students
will share their observations
and question responses.

SWBAT explain, in their own


words, the essential
elements of the Executive
Order 9066.

Lecture: President Roosevelts


issue of Executive Order 9066,
and relocation of JapaneseAmerican citizens.

Blooms Level:
Knowledge/Remembering

20
min

5
min

Class Discussion: What were the


specific points of EO 9066, who
was targeted by it, and why?

Blooms Level:
Comprehension/Understandin
g
TIM
E

SUB-OBJECTIVE
(include Blooms level)

TEACHING STRATEGY

20
min

SWBAT compare and contrast


experiences and attitudes of
Japanese American citizens
held in internment camps

Paired readings: Students will


individually read letters from
Japanese internment camps,
then share their information
with their partners, discussing
details and attitudes
expressed in their letters.
Partners will have different
letters, with differing details
and commentary.

Class Discussion: Groups will


share their comparative
analyses with the rest of the
class, in a reflective class
forum.

Independent Practice:
Students individually write an
argument for/against the U.S.
governments usage of
internment camps, based on
the prior information covered
during class. This argument
must be a minimum of 1
paragraph (4-5 sentences)

Independent Practice: Students


individually write an argument
for/against the U.S.
governments usage of
internment camps, based on
the prior information covered
during class.

Blooms Level:
Analysis

10
min

SWBAT make an argument for


or against the U.S.
governments
implementation of
internment camps during
World War II, using a
minimum of 4 points of
supporting evidence.

Blooms Level:
Evaluation

CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING/


ACTIVE STUDENT
PARTICIPATION

Final Closure: Students will be


called upon to share a summary
of their argument in a class
discussion. Non-volunteers will
be called upon.