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Starting Out, Word 2007

Objectives

 Launch Word
 Close Word
 Interact with Word
 Create a new document
 Type, delete, and select text
 Navigate through your document using the mouse, keyboard, and scroll bars
 Use the Go To dialog
 Use basic and advanced formatting
 Remove formatting
 Use undo and redo
 Save and open files
 Use the Recent Documents list
 Switch between open files
 Close documents
 Open Help
 Use the Help screen, including the search tool and the table of contents
 Get help in a dialog box

Meeting Microsoft Office Word 2007

What is Microsoft Office Word 2007?

Microsoft Office Word 2007 is the twelfth version of Microsoft’s powerful word processing program.
With it, you can create professional looking documents of nearly any type. You can also add tables,
charts, art, shapes, photos, and much more. Best of all, Word 2007’s interface is simple and intuitive, so
creating great documents is easy!

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Launching Word

To open Microsoft Office Word 2007, click the Start menu and place your mouse over All Programs. You
should see a Microsoft Office folder inside the Start menu. Hover over it with your mouse and then click
Microsoft Office Word 2007:

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Interface Overview

Now that we’ve opened Word, let’s take a look at what’s on our screen.

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1 Office Menu: When you click the Office logo, you will see a range of commands relating to your
document. It’s a lot like the File menu in older versions of Word.

2 Quick Access Toolbar: Although toolbars have mostly been removed from Microsoft Office Word
2007, you can add frequently used commands to the Quick Access toolbar.

3 Title Bar: This bar displays the name of the current document you’re working on and the program
you’re working in.

4 Window Controls: To the far left of the title bar, you have buttons to minimize, maximize, or close the
window.

5 Tabs: These tabs each contain a different set of options. So, if you want to change your page’s layout,
just click the Page Layout tab to see those commands:

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6 Help Icon: Click the question mark to see the help screen.

7 Groups: Each tab is divided into various parts called groups. For example, the Page Setup group on the
Page Layout tab contains all the commands you will need to configure your page.

8 Rulers: To help you line up text and objects, Microsoft Office Word has a vertical and a horizontal
ruler. (If you can’t see the rulers, use the View tab to enable them.)

9 Editing Window: This is where you will create your document.

10 Scroll Bar: Use this bar to scroll up and down in your document.

11 Status Bar: This bar at the bottom of your screen has commands for word count, spell check, and
view controls.

Interacting with Word

We talked a little bit about the different ways to use the different parts of the interface above. Now,
let’s break down different types of action items and see how we can interact with Word. As examples,
we are going to refer to some concepts we haven’t covered yet, so try to focus on the action item rather
than its possible applications.

Icons

Just like icons on your desktop, Word icons are small buttons with pictures that represent actions.
When you click the button, that action will happen. For example, you could click the Date and Time
button on the Insert tab and a dialog would open allowing you to choose a date and time format to
insert.

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One great thing about icons is ScreenTips. If you put your mouse over an icon, a small box will pop up
telling you what it does, like this:

This can be really useful if looking at an icon doesn’t tell you what it does.

Drop-down menus:

You can use these menus to pick from a number of choices. With some menus, you can type in your
choice. A good example is the Font menu on the Home tab. You can click where it says Calibri and type
in a font name, or you can click the drop-down arrow and then click on an item from a list of values.

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Expanding menu items:

Some menu items have a right-facing arrow beside them. This means that once you click on (or put your
mouse over) that item, an additional menu will show up (expand).

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Checked items:

Some items on the tab may have a check next to them. This means that the item is turned on or
enabled. If it has a check, normally you can turn the command off by clicking it, which will uncheck it. (In
the sample above, we could disable rulers by clicking it.) Other items can’t be unchecked; you must pick
another item to switch it.

Once you have Word open, there are a few ways to close it. The first is using the X in the top right hand
corner.

You can also click the Office logo in the top left hand corner and then click the Exit Word command.
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Note: If you try to close Word and you haven’t saved the document that you have been working on,
you will be prompted to do so.

Creating a Document

Now that we know a little bit about using Microsoft Office Word 2007, we’re going to start creating a
document. When you open Word, it creates a new document and names it Document 1 (visible on the
title bar).

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If you want to create another new document, click the Office menu and click New.

There are many options in the New Document window; for now, choose Blank Document and click
Create.

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You will then see a new document, named Document 2.

Typing Text

Once you’ve got a blank document, what do you do with it? You type in it! When you type on the
keyboard, you will see the letters appear at the position of the flashing cursor. You can click within text
you already typed to add, change, or delete words.

Just remember that that’s all there is to entering text in a document: click and type!

Deleting Text: There are several ways that you can delete text. The most common way is to use the
backspace key to remove items to the left of your cursor, or use the Delete key to remove items to the
right of your cursor. You can also use the cut and select tools to remove text, which we’ll discuss later.

The Basics of Selecting Text

Selecting text simply means to highlight or identify text. Using your mouse is the most common way of
selecting. First, place your mouse to one end of the part of text you want to select. Then, hold down
your left mouse button and drag your mouse over the text you want to select. Once you’ve completed
these steps, the text will appear highlighted (usually with blue).

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You can see how the cursor changes to an I-Beam to let us know that we can select. Once text has been
selected, any changes you make will be applied to the entire selected portion. For example, if you press
the Delete key, the selected portion will be removed.

You can select a whole word, a phrase, a paragraph, a page, or even a whole document. You can also
select any part of these levels (for example, the first two lines of a paragraph).

Navigating in Your Document

Now that we know how to create a document, we’re going to learn how to navigate through it using the
mouse, keyboard, scroll bars, and the Go To dialog.

Navigating Using the Mouse

To navigate using your mouse, simply click where you want to place your focus.

This usually only works if text is already in the location that you’re clicking, although there are some
special places that you can click, like the exact middle of a blank page.

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Navigating Using the Scroll Bars

Navigating using the mouse is fine if all your text is on one screen, but the document in the sample
above has many pages. Luckily, you can also navigate using the scroll bar on the right hand side of the
screen. Simply place your mouse over the small rectangle in the scroll bar; this indicates your current
position in the document. Then, click it and drag it up or down to where you want to go.

You can also click the up and down arrows at the top and bottom of the scroll bar to move one line at a
time.

Navigating Using the Keyboard

You can also use keyboard shortcuts to navigate. Between the part of the keyboard which contains all
the letters and the number pad, you should see a module with Insert, Home, Page Up, Delete, End, and
Page Down keys.

Four of these keys have special functions:

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All of these movements depend on where your cursor is when you press the button. You can also use
the Ctrl key with the Page Up or Page Down keys to go to the very beginning or the very end of the
document, respectively.

Using the Go To Dialog

A more precise way of navigating is using the Go To dialog. There are three ways to open this dialog. The
first is by clicking the arrow next to the Find button on the Home tab and clicking Go To:

The other way is by clicking the page count in the status bar (at the bottom of the Word screen).

You can also use the Ctrl + G shortcut.

Any of these actions will open the Go To dialog box. By default, Page is selected from the list on the left.
All you have to do is type the page number in the text box and click Go To.

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Doing More with Your Document

Now that we’ve got the basics of creating documents down, we’re going to learn some advanced tricks,
including applying formatting, removing formatting, and using Undo and Redo.

Using Basic Formatting

Here’s how you can apply each of these formats. First, select your text.

Then, follow the steps for the type of formatting you want to apply:

− Bold: Click the bold button ( ) on the Home tab or press Ctrl + B.
− Italics: Click the italics button ( ) on the Home tab or press Ctrl + I.
− Underline: Click the underline button ( ) on the Home tab or press Ctrl + U.

You can also click the format command to turn it on before you type text.

Then, type your text. In the following image, note how the underline button is orange, indicating it is
active.

Now, click the format command again to turn it off.

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You can also combine effects by turning multiple effects on:

There are a lot more effects you can use, but we’ll save those for another lesson. Bold, italics, and
underline are the three you will use the most often.

Using Advanced Formatting

You will find three other effects on the Font module of the Home tab. From left to right, they are
strikethrough, subscript, and superscript.

Here is what they look like.

Strikethrough

Subscript

Super
script

Their application is the same as the basic effects: select text and choose your formatting, or turn the
command on, type text, and turn the command off.

Using Undo and Redo

You will find the Undo and Redo commands on the Quick Access toolbar.

These commands let you undo or redo your previous actions. Take a look at this text, which we just
typed.

If we click the Undo button, the text will be removed.

If we click the Redo button (which in this case is a Repeat arrow: ) the text will be repeated:

You can also click the down arrow beside the Undo button to undo several actions. Take a look at this
text.

I am learning how to use Undo and Redo

Now, let’s click the drop-down arrow by the Undo button.

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Here, we can see a list of our recent actions, from most recent to oldest. We can now select the actions
that we want to undo.

In this example, we’re going to undo all the formatting that we performed on the text. Once we click the
last action we want to undo, we’ll see the results. Note that the Undo and Redo commands aren’t
always available. For example, you can’t undo saving a file. You also can’t redo some actions, such as
deleting text.

Removing Formatting

We just used Undo to clear all the formatting from our text. However, you can only redo sequential
actions. This means that if we had typed text or performed some other action after formatting the text
that action would also have to be undone to remove the formatting. Luckily, there is an easier way to
remove formatting. One way is to select the formatted text and click the formatting command on the
Home tab to remove it.

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The other way is to select text and click the Clear Formatting button in the Font module of the Home
tab.

Working with Your Document

So far, we have learned how to create documents, but we have been creating documents from scratch.
That’s really not practical! Let’s take a look at how to open, save, close, and work with Word documents.

Saving Files

To save a file for the first time, you can click the Save icon on the Quick Access toolbar, press the Ctrl
and S keys, or click the Office menu and click Save. Any of these options will open the Save As dialog:

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At the top of the window, you can choose a location to save your file. (You can also use the shortcuts on
the left hand side of the window.) At the bottom, enter a file name. (You can also choose a file type; for
now, we will stick with the default Word document type.) Once you’re ready, click Save. Once you have
saved a file in this way, you can use the commands mentioned above (Save icon on the Quick Access
toolbar, Ctrl and S keys, or Office menu and Save) to update the saved file. (You won’t need to enter the
file name, location, or type again. If you want to save the file with a different location, name, or type,
press the F3 key or use the Office menu – Save As command. This will re-open the Save As dialog.)

Opening Files

There are a few ways to open Word documents. The first is to find the file and double-click it.

From within Word, you can click the Office menu and click Open or use the Ctrl + O shortcut. This will
launch the Open dialog.

This dialog works much the same as the Save As dialog. Select a location from the top or the pane on the
left, click a document to select it, and then click Open. You will then see the file open in Word.

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After you have opened a file and edited it, you can use any of the basic save commands discussed in the
last lesson to update the original file.

Using the Recent Documents List

Another way that you can open files is via the Recent Documents list. If you click the Office menu, you
will see a list of recently opened documents on the right hand side.

You can click any of these documents to open them. You can also click the pin icon to keep the
document in the list. This is useful if you often use a particular document and want to make sure it’s
always accessible.

To unpin the document, simply click the pin again.

Switching Between Open Files

If you have several Word documents open at once, there are a few ways to switch between them. From
within Word, you can click the View tab and click the Switch Windows command. Then, click the file that
you want to work with. (The checked file is the one currently active.)

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You can also click the icons on the Windows taskbar to switch between files. (The icon that is a darker
color is the currently active file.)

Closing Files

To close a document without closing Word, click the Office menu and click Close.

Or, you can right-click on the taskbar icon and click Close. You can also use the Alt + F4 shortcut.

Note

Remember that if you close a document without saving it, you will be prompted to do so.

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WORD 2007 Interface

Objectives

 Use the Office menu

 Use the Status Bar

 Use the Mini Toolbar

 Use dialog boxes

 Use right-click menus

 Use keyboard shortcuts

 Use the Quick Access toolbar

 Add buttons to and remove buttons from the toolbar

 Move the Quick Access toolbar

 Use the Options dialog to customize the toolbar

 Use tabs, groups, and option buttons

 Minimize the tab

 Use the Home tab

 Use the Insert tab

 Use the View tab

Getting Acquainted

As we learned in the last module, one of the biggest changes in Microsoft Office Word 2007 is the
interface. In the last module, we got some experience with the interface as we learned how to use
Word. In this module, we’ll focus entirely on the new interface. We’ll start with learning how to use
some components of the Word screen.

Using the Office Menu

In the last module, we used the Office menu to open, close, and save files. Using the Office menu is
easy: click the Office logo, point to the command that you want, and click it. For example, if you wanted
to close Word, you would click the Exit Word option.
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The menus that have a right-facing arrow will offer you more choices in the pane on the right when you
hover over them. For example, if we hover our mouse over Save As, we will get a menu of options:

We can click Save As to open the Save As dialog, or we can choose one of the other options.

Here’s a quick overview of all the choices in the Office menu.

New: Click this option to see the New Document screen, where you can create a blank document or
work from a template.

Open: Open a Word document.

Save: Save the current file.

Save As: Click the Save As option to open the Save As dialog, or choose a specific format from the list on
the right.

Print: Click the Print option to open the Print dialog, or choose another option from the menu on your
right.

Prepare: Hover over the Prepare option to see a menu of tools to polish your document, including the
Document Inspector, Compatibility Checker, and Document Properties.

Send: Send your document via e-mail or fax.

Publish: Publish your document to a blog, document management server, or SharePoint workspace.

Close: Close the current document.

Word Options: Opens the Options dialog, where you can configure how Word works.

Exit Word: Close Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Using the Status Bar:

The status bar is the information bar at the bottom of the screen. Let’s take a closer look at it.
Remember, this is just an overview, so don’t worry if you’re not familiar with these tools yet.

Page Count: Shows you what page of the document you are in. Click this area to open the Go To dialog.

Word Count: Shows you how many words the current document has in it. Click this area to open the
Word Count dialog, a detailed count of items in your document.

Proofing Tools: This book icon indicates whether or not there are spelling errors in your document. Click
the icon to do a spell check.

View Controls: Use these buttons to change views. (We will discuss views at the end of this manual.)

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Zoom Slider: Use this slider to zoom in or out of your document. (We will discuss how to use the slider
at the end of this manual.)

Using the Mini Toolbar: In our last module, we learned how to type and select text. You may have
noticed the mini toolbar pop up as you were doing so:

This toolbar contains the most popular formatting commands, some of which we’ve already discussed.
Let’s take a look at each command.

Applying formatting from the mini toolbar is the same as applying it from the Home tab: click to turn the
formatting on, type text, and turn the formatting off; or select text and apply formatting.

Using Dialog Boxes

Some of Microsoft Office Word 2007’s features are accessed through dialog boxes. (We will look at how
to open dialog boxes in the next lesson.)

Let’s take a look at a common dialog box: Fonts.

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Let’s look at the different elements in a dialog box.

Tabs: Dialog boxes can contain options for different items. Click the tabs (usually at the top of the
screen) to change the options that you see.

Dropdown menus

Just like tab drop-down menus, you can type in the box or click the down arrow to choose from a list of
values.

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Check boxes

If an item is checked, it means it’s enabled. If the item is unchecked, it’s disabled. Click the checkbox to
change this status.

Radio buttons

Use these buttons to choose from a list. Like check boxes, click to change the item that is in use.
Normally, only one item from the list can be selected.

Text boxes

These boxes must be filled out by typing in them.

Buttons

Some buttons open more dialog boxes and allow you to specify advanced settings.

OK and Cancel Buttons

In any dialog box, you can click OK to save your changes. You can also click Cancel to discard your
changes. Some dialog boxes also have an Apply button so you can apply your changes before making
more changes or without having to close the window.

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Using Right- Click Menus

As you become more and more familiar with Word, you’ll discover that there are many ways to do
things. We’ve already learned that we can apply formatting from the Home tab or from the mini toolbar.
Another way to perform actions is by right-clicking. When you right-click, menus are contextual, which
means they change depending on what you’ve right-clicked on. Using a right-click menu is as easy as
clicking on the command you want!

Let’s take a look at an example. Here, we’re right-clicking on regular text:

We have lots of commands for text, including changing the font, paragraph, style, and more. If we select
a table and right-click on it, however, we get a very different set of options.

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As you can see, some of the basic options (like cut, copy, and paste) are still the same, but we have
additional formatting options (such as Merge Cells) that wouldn’t apply to regular text.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Another way to implement commands in Word is by using shortcut keys.

Shortcut keys are when you press a key (or sometimes a combination of two or even three keys at once)
to perform an action instead of clicking on the icon or finding its toolbar command. Sometimes you can
see this shortcut in the icon’s ScreenTip.

There are hundreds of shortcuts in Word, but here’s a list of the most common ones:

Open a new document Ctrl + N

Save a file Ctrl + S

Open a file Ctrl + O

Print a document Ctrl + P

Close Word Alt + F4


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Select All Ctrl + A

Copy text Ctrl + C

Cut text Ctrl + X

Paste text Ctrl + V

Find text Ctrl + F

Align text to centre Ctrl + E

Align text to left Ctrl + L

Align text to right Ctrl + R

Justify text Ctrl + J

Increase font size Ctrl + Shift +.

Undo last action Ctrl + Z

Redo last action Ctrl + Y

Check spelling or grammar F7

Get Help F1

The Quick Access Toolbar

Although toolbars have mostly been done away with in Microsoft Office Word 2007, we do have the
Quick Access toolbar. This toolbar is right next to the Office menu. It’s a place to store your most
frequently used commands, to save you from hunting around in the tabs. In this lesson, we’re going to
learn all about the toolbar.

Using the Toolbar

By default, there are three icons on the toolbar.

From left to right, they are Save, Undo, and Redo/Repeat. Using the toolbar is as easy as clicking the
icon!

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Adding and Removing Buttons

The point of the Quick Access toolbar is to provide quick access to the commands you use most, so it
makes sense that you can customize it. To add buttons to the Quick Access toolbar, click the drop-down
arrow next to it.

Then, click any commands you want to add to the toolbar. If a command has a check by it, it means it’s
active and on the toolbar. To remove a command, simply click it to remove the check.

You can also right-click almost any command and click Add to Quick Access Toolbar.

Moving the Quick Access Toolbar

If you like, you can use the drop-down menu to move the Quick Access toolbar below the tab:

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Here’s what it will look like after you move it:

To move the tab back to its original place, click the drop-down arrow and click Show Above the Ribbon.

Using the Options Dialog to Customize the Toolbar

You may have noticed that the list of options in the Quick Access toolbar’s drop down menu was pretty
limited. For advanced customization options, click the More Commands item.

This will open the Customize tab of the Options dialog.

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There are several things you can do with this dialog. You can easily add buttons by selecting a category
from the list at the top, choosing a command, and clicking Add.

Or, you can remove buttons by selecting them from the list on the right and clicking Remove. You can
also use the arrows to change the button’s position in the list. You will also find commands to show the
toolbar below the ribbon and to reset the toolbar to its default state.

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Tabs and Groups

Now that we know how to use some of the elements of the Word screen, it’s time for the big stuff: tabs
and groups. Tabs and groups form the core of the new Office interface, so it’s important that we really
understand how they work before we look at the individual tabs and commands.

About Tabs

By default, Microsoft Office Word 2007 has seven tabs:

As you know, each tab has its own set of commands. So, if you wanted to change your view, you would
click the View tab to see those commands.

As well, you will see special tabs appear when you create certain objects, such as drawings or tables.

We will discuss these tabs in general in the next module and in depth as we encounter them.

About Groups

Each tab is composed of groups of commands. For example, the Home tab has Clipboard, Font,
Paragraph, Styles, and Editing commands.

These separations are useful as it helps you quickly and easily find commands.

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About Option Buttons

Some groups will have a small button in their bottom right hand corner.

Clicking this button will open a dialog box with more features related to the group. In the example
above, clicking the small arrow would open the Font dialog.

Minimizing the Tab

If you would like, you can hide the commands and just leave the tabs.

This way, you can click on the tab to display commands, but once you click the title bar or the editing
window, the tab goes back to minimized.

To minimize the tab, simply click the drop-down arrow next to the Quick Access toolbar and click
Minimize the Ribbon.

To restore the tab, click the Quick Access toolbar menu again and click Minimize the Ribbon again.

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The Home Tab

Now that we know how to use the different parts of the Word interface, we’re going to learn about the
Home tab. This is probably the tab you will use the most often. Remember that we’re not expecting you
to understand all of these commands. This is just so that you know where to find commands when you
go to use them.

Clipboard Commands

The first group of the Home tab is the Clipboard module.

This offers options to cut, copy, and paste text, and to use the format painter. It also features an option
button to open the Office clipboard. We will learn about all of these tools later on in this course.

Font Commands

The next group is one that we have already worked with: Font.

This group contains commands to change the appearance of your text. We have covered most of these
options already; we will cover the rest of the options later on in this manual. You can also click the
option button to open the Font dialog, which is a one-stop shop for most font settings.

Paragraph Commands

Our third group contains paragraph tools.

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With this group you can indent, align, and justify paragraphs; create bulleted and numbered lists;
change spacing; add borders and shading; sort text; and view special characters. (We will talk about
some of these tools later on.) You can also click the option button to open the Paragraph dialog.

Styles Commands

Our fourth group is devoted to the styles available in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Styles are preset formatting that help you keep your document consistent. Instead of having to
remember what formatting you used for titles, you can simply use the pre-built styles. Later on in this
manual, we will talk about how to apply these styles. (We will save our in-depth discussion for the
Advanced manual.)

Editing Commands

Our last group focuses on editing.

These options let you find and replace text, as well as select objects.

The Insert Tab

The next tab we are going to look at is the Insert tab. When you have mastered creating basic
documents, this tab will help you add other elements to your document, such as charts, pictures, cover
pages, headers, and footers. Don’t worry about the application of the commands right now. We will
practice some of the basics in the step-by-step exercise, but we will get in depth into each element later
on.

Pages Commands

Our first group is Pages.

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As you might expect, this group lets us add a cover page, a blank page, or a page break to our document.

Tables Commands

Our next group is Tables.

This command expands into a menu that lets you draw a table, insert an Excel spreadsheet, or add a
pre-defined table.

Illustration Commands

I think this next group is the most exciting. It lets us add illustrations to our document. Even better,
Word’s graphic features are vastly improved over older versions.

As you can see, you can add pictures, ClipArt (images included with Office), shapes, SmartArt (diagrams),
and charts to your document. We will experiment with some of these features in the Step by Step
exercise.

Link Commands

The fourth group of the Insert tab lets you create links to Web sites (called hyperlinks) and other places
in your document (bookmarks and cross-references). We are going to save these features for the more
advanced phases of the course.

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Header and Footer Commands

Headers and footers are the text at the top or bottom of each page, respectively. This group lets you add
a header, a footer, or simple page numbers.

The great thing is, when you click one of these options, you have a menu of preset choices waiting for
you. That means you can add a header, footer, or page number with just two clicks!

Text Commands

Our next group contains a variety of items.

Let’s take a look at each item. Text Box Like headers and footers, you can click the Text Box command to
choose from a menu of stylish text boxes. (You can also draw a blank text box.)

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Symbols Commands

Our last module of the Insert tab lets us add symbols and equations to our document.

When clicked, each item will display a menu of choices.

You can see that inserting a complicated equation is as easy as two clicks!

The View Tab

The last tab we’re going to look at is the View tab. As you might imagine, this tab will allow us to view
our documents in different ways. Like the other tabs, right now we’re just going to give you an overview
of the commands. We’ll delve deeper into each command later on in the manual.

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Document Views Commands

This module of the tab gives you different ways to view your document.

All you have to do is click the view you want. Each view is pretty self explanatory; you can see your
document as it will appear on paper (Print Layout), Full Screen, as it will appear on the Web, in an
outline format, or in a draft format (which will show less features). We will look at each view more
closely later on in this manual.

Show/Hide Tools

This group lets you easily customize your Word screen.

If an item is checked, that means it’s visible on the screen. If it’s unchecked, it’s currently hidden. We’re
going to take a look at using each of these elements later on in this manual. For now, feel free to check
and uncheck these items and see what the effect is.

Zoom Tools

Our next group lets us zoom in and zoom out of the page.

The first button will open a Zoom dialog which will let you choose specific Zoom settings. (We will take a
look at this dialog later on.) The next button will automatically set your zoom level to 100%. The next
three buttons will zoom to show one page, two pages, or the page width. All you have to do is click to
zoom.
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Window Commands

This module of the View tab will let us control how our windows are arranged.

With the first column of commands, you can create a new window, arrange windows, or split the
current window. With the second column of commands, you can view documents side by side and
control how they appear. The last command is Switch Windows, which we already looked at; it lets you
switch between open documents.

Macro Commands

The last button on the View tab lets you open the Macros dialog box. If you click the drop-down arrow,
you will see a menu related to macros.

Macros let you record or code a series of commands so that you can perform a number of actions with
just a few clicks. We’re going to cover this topic in our Expert manual.

The Page Layout Tab

In our last module, we went over the basics of the new interface and discussed the three tabs that you
will probably use most often. In this module, we’re going to take a look at the other four tabs and see
what commands they offer. We’ll start out with the Page Layout tab.

Themes Commands

Themes are greatly improved in Microsoft Office Word 2007. This group of the Page Layout tab will let
you choose an overall theme for your document, or choose a color, font, and effects theme separately.

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We will experiment with themes in the practice exercise, but we won’t look at them in depth until the
Intermediate manual.

Page Setup Commands

This group will let you control every aspect of your page.

We’re going to look at it in depth at the end of this manual, but in summary, there are options for
margins, orientation, page size, page columns, page breaks, line numbers, and hyphenation.

Page Background Commands

As you might expect, this group controls what goes on your page, behind your text.

You can choose a watermark, a solid color, or a page border.

Paragraph Commands

This group is like the Paragraph group on the Home tab, except it has fewer options.

You can control paragraph indent or spacing. You can also open the Paragraph dialog using the option
button in the bottom right hand corner.

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Header and Footer Tools

You will also see special tabs open when you create a header or a footer (such as page numbers).

The Header and Footer Tools Design Tab lets you control the appearance, content, and alignment of the
text that appears on the top and/or bottom of every page.

Developer Tab

To show the Developer tab, click the Office menu and click Word Options.

Then, in the Popular module, click “Show Developer tab in the ribbon.” Click OK. You will now see the
word Developer in the tabs. Click it to see

Developer commands.

This tab contains advanced commands for coding languages (such as XML and Visual Basic), creating
macros, developing forms, and restricting document access. We will discuss all of these commands in
the Expert manual.

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Creating Documents

Objectives

 Create blank documents

 Create documents from templates and from existing documents

 Select text using the mouse, keyboard, and Home tab

 Cut, copy, and paste text

 Move text by dragging and dropping

 Use the Office clipboard

 Find and replace text

 Use the Format Painter

 Add drop caps to text

 Apply a Quick Style to text

 Align and justify text

Creating a New Document

In our last two modules, we focused on using the interface to do a variety of tasks. In this lesson, we’re
going to focus on the number of ways that you can create a new document.

Creating a Blank Document

We discussed creating a blank document in our very first module; let’s go over it once again. You already
know that when you open Word, it creates a new document and names it Document 1 (visible on the
title bar). If you want to create another new document, click the Office menu and click New. There are
many options in the New Document window; for now, choose Blank Document and click Create. You will
then see a new document, named Document 2.

Creating a Document from Local Templates

To create a document from a template, click the File menu and click New.

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In the New Document dialog, choose Installed Templates from the list on the left.

Then, from the pane in the middle, choose a template and click Create. The document will now be in
Word, ready for you to customize.

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Creating Documents from an Existing Document

To create a new document from an existing document, click the From Existing command in the pane on
the left of the New Document dialog. (Remember that you can open this dialog by clicking the File menu
and clicking New.)

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Then, browse to the document that you want to work off of.

The document will then appear in Word. As you can see below, the document itself has not been
opened; a new document has been created from it.

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You are now free to modify this file without affecting the original file.

Using the Recently Used Templates Area

Once you have downloaded or opened templates, you will see a Recently Used module in the New
Document window. Rather than hunting for the template all over again, you can simply click the
template from this list and click Download.

Selecting Text

At the very beginning of this manual, we learned how to select text with the mouse. Now that we’re
creating longer, more complicated documents, you’ll want some faster, easier ways to select. That’s that
we’re going to cover in this lesson.

Selecting Text with the Mouse

We already know that we can use the mouse to click and drag over text to select it. When text is
selected, the text will appear highlighted (usually with blue). Remember, once text has been selected,
any changes you make will be applied to the entire selected portion.

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Selecting Text with the Keyboard

Did you know that you can use the keyboard to select text too? This can be a much quicker way of
selecting items once you get used to Microsoft Word. For most of these methods, we’ll be using the
special keys in the middle of your keyboard (Home, End, and the Arrow keys).

Here’s a list of how to select different items:

Select a letter to the left of your cursor Shift + Left Arrow

Select the letter to the right of your cursor Shift + Right Arrow

Select text from your cursor to the beginning of a word Ctrl + Shift + Right

Arrow Select text from your cursor to the end of a word Ctrl + Shift + Left Arrow

Select from your cursor to one line above Shift + Up Arrow

Select text from the position of your cursor to one line below Shift + Down Arrow

Select text from your cursor to one page above Shift + Page Up

Select text from your cursor to one page below Shift + Page Down

Select text from your cursor to the beginning of the line Shift + Home

Select text from your cursor to the end of the line Shift + End

Select text from your cursor to the beginning of the paragraph Ctrl + Shift + Up Arrow

Select text from your cursor to the end of the paragraph Ctrl + Shift + Down Arrow

Select an entire document Ctrl + A

Selecting Text and Objects with the Home Tab

We can also use the Editing group on the Home tab to select text and objects. Simply click the Select
button and click what you want to select.

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You can choose to select all the text in the document, or to select text with similar formatting. (The
Select Objects command is for pictures and other graphics; we’ll discuss it in a later manual.)

Tips and Tricks

Once you get good at selecting text, you’ll find all kinds of ways to make selecting text easier. Here are a
few tips and tricks to get you started:

• If you have a block of text selected and you start typing, the selected text will be erased and
your new text will replace it.
• You can select a block of text and drag and drop it into anywhere in your document. (We’ll talk
about this more in a moment.)
• You can select any level of text (letter, word, phrase, paragraph, page, a document, or parts
thereof) and manipulate it. This means you can bold a single letter the same way you would an
entire document.
• You can double-click a word to select it. Triple-click to select the whole paragraph.
• If you want to delete a portion of text, you can select it and hit either the Backspace or Delete
keys on your keyboard rather than cutting it.
• You can cut or copy a portion of text and then paste it in a separate document or word
processing program (like Notepad or WordPad, which come with Windows).
• You can select different parts of text by selecting the first part, then holding the Ctrl key with
your mouse and selecting another part.
• You can select a large portion of text by selecting the first word, then holding the Shift key and
selecting the last word. (This sounds really abstract, but we’ll practice it in a moment.)
• To deselect text, just click anywhere in your document.

Moving Text

Now that we’ve got a good grasp on selecting text, we’re going to look at moving text around. In this
lesson, we’ll look at using cut, copy, and paste; drag and drop; and find and replace.

Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Text

Cut, copy, and paste are fundamental skills. You should cut text when you want to move it from one
location to another, or when you want to remove text that you may need later. To cut text, select the

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text first. Then, click the Cut button ( ) on the Home tab. (You can also right-click on the text and click
Cut or use the Ctrl + X shortcut.) Use the Copy command when you want to copy text from one location
to another. First, select the text you want to copy. Then, click the Copy button on the Home tab. (You
can also right-click on the text and click Copy or use the Ctrl + C shortcut.) It won’t look like anything has
happened, but your text has been copied to the clipboard. Once you’ve cut or copied your text, you can
paste it anywhere you want. Just click in the spot you want the text to appear, and click the Paste button
on the Home tab. (You can also right-click in the spot and click Paste or use the Ctrl + V shortcut.) Don’t
forget that paste will only insert the last item that was cut or copied.

Once you have pasted text, you will see the paste icon at the end of the text.

If you click on it, you will get some options:

Don’t forget that you can cut, copy, and paste between Word documents.

Keep Source Formatting: Keep the formatting from the original text.

Match Destination Formatting: Change the pasted text’s format to the format used in the document.

Keep Text Only: Changes the formatting of the pasted text back to the default font and size with no
formatting.

Set Default Paste: Opens the Options dialog so you can control how future paste operations work.

Just click the option you want for it to be applied!

Using the Office Clipboard

Earlier, we mentioned that the paste command will only insert the last item that was cut or copied. If
you want to cut and paste (or copy and paste) more than one item, you should use the Office clipboard
as it can contain up to 24 items. The first step is to show the clipboard. To do this, click the option
button in the lower right hand of the Clipboard group on the Home tab.

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You will then see the Clipboard pane appear to one side of your screen.

Now, if you cut or copy an item, it will automatically appear in the clipboard.

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You will also see a notification in the bottom right hand corner of your screen, confirming that the item
has been collected. To paste an item from the clipboard, click to place your cursor where you want the
item to go. Then, right-click the item and click Paste

Note that you can also delete the item from the clipboard using this menu. You can also use the Paste
All and Clear All buttons at the top of the clipboard to perform those actions. To close the clipboard,

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click the X in the task pane. You can also click the Options button at the bottom of the pane to control
how the clipboard operates.

Dragging and Dropping Text

You can also drag text around in your document. First, select the text. Then, hold your mouse button
down and drag the text down to where you want it. When you’re ready, release the cursor. The text will
look just like it’s been cut and pasted (you will even have paste options), but the operation was much
quicker.

Finding Text

If you have a long document, it can be useful to have a tool to search through it. Luckily, Word has just
the feature for you! To find text, click the Find button on the Home tab. (You can also use the Ctrl + F
shortcut.)

To find text in your document, just type the text you’re looking for in the Find What text box.

Once your text is entered, click the Find Next button. Word will select the first instance for you. You can
stop there and close out of the box by clicking Cancel. If it’s not what you’re looking for, click Find Next
again to find the next instance. You can also change what you have typed in the “Find What” box at any
time.

Replacing Text

The other option we’re going to talk about in the Find dialog box is the Replace tab. If you click the
replace button on the Home tab (or use the Ctrl + H shortcut).
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This window looks a lot like the Find dialog. In the main part of the screen, type what you’re looking for
and then type what you want to replace it with. Then, choose an option at the bottom.

Here’s what those buttons at the bottom do:

More: Opens advanced options, which we will cover later on.

Replace: Will find the next instance of the word or phrase. Then, you must click Replace again to confirm
each replacement.

Replace All: Will find the next instance of the word or phrase. Then, click Replace All to replace every
instance of this word.

Find Next: Finds the next instance of the word or phrase.

Cancel: Closes the dialog box without making any changes.

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Applying Advanced Text Effects

We’ve spent most of this lesson learning how to create a document, select text, and move text around.
Now it’s time to get into the fun stuff: applying effects to text. In this lesson, we’ll focus on some of the
common effects you will use: drop caps, alignment, justification, styles, and the Format Painter.

Using the Format Painter

Word has a neat trick that allows you to copy formats within or between documents. First, select the
text that has the formatting that you want.

Next, click the Format Painter icon on the Home tab, or use the Ctrl + Shift + C shortcut. Your cursor will
turn into a paintbrush.

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Then, select the text you want to format.

The new text will take the format of the old text.

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You can also double-click the Format Painter to apply the formatting to multiple items. When you are
done using it, simply click the icon again to turn it off. Remember that formats are not stored on the
clipboard, and you can only copy formatting for one set of text at a time. The format painter captures all
kinds of formats, including:

 Paragraph formatting (spacing, alignment, indents)


 Font formatting (effects, spacing, font type, size, color, animation, and highlighting)
 Borders, fills, shading, and patterns
 Bullets and numbering
 Columns

Adding Drop Caps

A drop cap is a capital letter at the beginning of a paragraph that is usually larger than other letters and
that is dropped down into the paragraph. Drop caps can be a good way to highlight portions of your
document, or just to make it more visually appealing. To apply a drop cap, first place your cursor
anywhere in the paragraph that you want the drop cap to appear. Then, click the Insert tab. Next, click
the Drop Cap button and choose Dropped (which places it in the paragraph) or Margin (which places it
beside the text).

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You can also choose Drop Cap Options to specify advanced settings.

To remove a drop cap, place your cursor in the paragraph, click the Insert tab, choose Drop Cap, and
click None.

Applying a Quick Style

So far, we have talked about many types of formatting. However, one of the great new features of
Microsoft Office Word 2007 is the styles built right in. A style can include fonts, formatting, colors, and
borders and shading. There are two parts to the styles in Word. The first part is the Quick Style Gallery,
which we have used already. This is composed of the styles that you can see on the Styles group of the
Home tab. Word places the most frequently used styles here for quick access.

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If you click the drop-down arrow in the right hand corner of the list, you $will see more styles.

To apply any of these styles, simply select the text that you want to format and click a style. There are
many more styles available than the ones you see here. To see additional options, click the Change
Styles button next to the Quick Style Gallery.

The first option, Style Set, lets you choose another group of styles. The second option lets you choose
another color scheme. The third option lets you choose another font scheme. (Note that fonts and
colors will not work with all style sets.) So, let’s say you pick the Modern style set but you don’t really

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like its colors. You can choose a different color scheme from the Colors list to easily customize the style.
We’ll take a closer look at customizing styles in the practice exercise.

Aligning and Justifying Text

The last text effect we’re going to look at is alignment and justification. You will find these buttons on
the Paragraph group of the Home tab.

Each type of alignment indicates which margin the text lines up with. From left to right, you can apply
left alignment, center alignment, right alignment, or justification (where the text is spread out to take up
the whole line.) Simply select the text that you want to apply the alignment to, and then click the
appropriate button. Note that one type of alignment must be selected at all times.

Note how the justified paragraph looks very similar to the left aligned paragraph. Look closer, however,
at the second line. The word “brown” stretches all the way to the right margin in the justified example,
giving a cleaner look.

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Doing More with Text

Objectives

 Change the font type, size, color, and case


 Apply highlighting and special underlines to text
 Open and use the Font dialog
 Set your default font
 Embed fonts into your document
 Use, set, move, and remove tabs
 Indent text using the ruler and the Home tab
 Change paragraph spacing
 Add borders and shading to text

Fonts on the Home Tab

We have looked at many different kinds of formatting. Now it’s time to look at one of the most versatile
formatting options: fonts. A font is a complete set of characters (with typeface and style) that you use to
type. Some fonts are all capitals. Other fonts are all symbols. Fonts are really customizable: you can
change their size, type, colour, spacing, and effects. The fonts that you have available in Word depend
on what other applications you have installed and if you have installed any extra font packages. The
most commonly used fonts are Calibri, Times New Roman, Tahoma, Arial, and Courier New. Remember
that font settings (types, sizes, effects, spacing, etc.) are like other formatting: you can either turn it on
to have the next text you type use that font type and size, or you can select text you’ve typed already
and apply that formatting to it. In this lesson, we’ll learn how to change font type, size, color, and case.
We’ll also learn how to apply highlighting and advanced underlining to text.

Choosing a Font Type

To choose a font type, first select the text that you want to apply the font to. Then, click the Font drop-
down menu and select the font that you want to apply. As you scroll over the font, you will see a
preview being applied to your text.

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Note that at the top of the font list, your theme fonts are listed. Choosing these fonts will help keep your
document consistent. Word also stores your recently used fonts near the top of the list. If you know
what font you want, you can type it into the drop-down list. Word will automatically complete the font
name for you; press Enter to accept its selection.

The font face commands are also available on the mini toolbar.

Changing the Font Size

You can change your font size the same way: select a size from the menu or type a size in the box. If you
choose to use the menu, you will see a preview as you scroll through the sizes.

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You can also use the up and down arrows to nudge the font size up or down.

The font size commands are also available on the mini toolbar.

Applying Font Color

To change your font color, select the text that you want to change. Then, pick a color from the list. Once
again, you will see a preview of the color applied to your text. Once you see a color you like, click it to
apply it.

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Note that the theme colors take up the major portion of the color picker. This can help you keep your
document looking consistent and professional. You can also choose a standard color or click More Colors
to pick a custom color. As you might expect, the Font Color command is also available on the mini
toolbar.

Applying Highlighting

In addition to the main font color, you can also apply highlighting to text. Simply select the text you want
to highlight and click a color from the Font group of the Home tab.

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(You can later remove highlighting by selecting the text and clicking No Color on the highlight menu.)
The Highlight Text command can also be found next to the color menu on the mini toolbar.

Applying Advanced Underlining

In the first module, we learned how to apply basic underlining. If you click the drop-down arrow next to
the underline command, you will see a menu of underline styles:

You can click any of these styles to apply it. You can also click More Underlines to open the Font dialog,
or choose a color for the underlining with the Underline Color menu.

Changing Case

Have you ever typed a long title just to realize it should be all in caps? Or typed a paragraph just to
realize that your caps lock was on, SO YOUR WHOLE PARAGRAPH LOOKS LIKE THIS. (Oops!) Luckily,
there’s a quick, easy way to change your font case. First, select the text that you want to change. Then,
click the Font Case button on the Home tab and choose the case that you want.

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You can also use the shift + f3 shortcut to cycle through the various cases.

The Font Dialog

In our last lesson, we learned about using the Home tab and the mini toolbar to apply font type, size,
color, and underlining. In this lesson, we’re going to learn how to use the Font dialog to perform all of
this formatting in one shot.

Opening the Font Dialog

To open the Font dialog, click the option button in the bottom right corner of the Font group in the
Home tab.

You can also use the following shortcuts:

Open the main Font dialog Ctrl + D

Open the Font dialog to the font face list Ctrl + Shift + F

Open the Font dialog to the font size list Ctrl + Shift + P

Using the Font Tab

When you initially open the Font dialog, it will be open at the Font tab.

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Here, you can use the various menus to set font face, style, size, color, and effects. You can also choose
an underline style and color. At the bottom, you will see a preview of your effects applied to sample
text.

Using the Character Spacing Tab

The other tab in the Font dialog is the Character Spacing tab.

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The first option in this window is Scale. You can use a regular size font, but select a percentage so the
font is scaled down. The next option is Spacing. You can set spacing to Normal, Condensed, or Expanded,
and then choose a point (the same as font point sizes). You can also modify position options to normal,
raised, or lowered, and specify a point size for this position.

The last check box enables Kerning, which adjusts the spacing between letters so that it looks consistent.
If you enable kerning, you can also specify what sizes you want Word to kern (from a certain point on).
Any options you set will be reflected in the preview pane.

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Setting your Default Font

If you find yourself always adjusting the font to a particular type, style, size,and/or, color, you can
choose to make your settings the default by clicking the Default command in the bottom left hand
corner of the Font dialog. This way, whenever you open Word, this font will be used automatically. Once
you click the Default command, you will be warned of the change that you are about to make.

To proceed, click Yes. To cancel, click No. To return to the Font dialog, click Cancel.

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Embedding Fonts

Microsoft Office Word 2007 contains some new fonts, most notably Calibri. If you are sending
documents to people using older versions of Word, you should make sure the fonts are saved with the
document. This is called embedding fonts. To embed fonts into your document, first click the Office
menu and then click Word Options.

Then, click the Save category on the left hand side. You will see the Embed option at the bottom of the
dialog:

Once you have checked the option to embed the font, click the OK button.

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Using Tabs

Earlier on in this module, we talked about using alignment to position text on the page. In this module,
we will talk about positioning text more precisely using tabs.

Types of Tabs

Tabs are pre-defined places within your document. They can help you place text quickly and
consistently. There are five types of tabs.

Left Tabs: If you use this type of tab, your text will start at this point and flow to the right.

Right Tabs: Text will start at this point and flow to the left when you use this type of tab.

Center Tabs: If you use this type of tab, your text is centered on this point.

Decimal Tabs: Use this tab to align numbers around a decimal point.

Bar Tabs: These tabs are the only type that doesn’t affect text. It just places a vertical bar at the point of
the tab.

Using Tabs:

To use tabs, simply press the Tab key on your keyboard. Your cursor will jump to the next tab marker.

By default, Word sets default tabs at every half inch. Every time you press Tab, your cursor will move
another half inch.

Setting Tabs:

To set tabs, first make sure you can see the rulers. If not, click the View tab and make sure Rulers is
checked.

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Once we’re in the right view, click the tab marker next to the ruler to select what type of tab you want.

Clicking this button will cycle through the different tab types:

Once you’ve selected your tab type, click the horizontal ruler to place it:

It can now be used in the same way as a regular tab: press the Tab key to advance to it. You can see the
icon for each type of tab on the ruler. Take a look at the sample below.

Remember that tabs are set per document, so you can set as many tabs as you want for each document.
This can come in handy if you create lots of different kinds of documents that each needs specific
alignment. Note that if you create a tab in a line that already has text, the tab will only be available for
that paragraph.

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Moving or Removing Tabs

You can move a tab just by dragging it to a different location, like this:

The dotted line will appear when you move a tab; it can help you place it in the proper spot. To delete a
tab, just drag it off the ruler.

Paragraph Options

Now that we know how to use tabs, we’re going to look at another type of alignment: indents. (An
indent is how far each line of the paragraph is set in from the margin.) We’ll also look at changing
paragraph spacing and adding borders and shading.

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Indenting Using the Ruler

You may have noticed two odd icons when we were clicking through the tab types on the ruler.

First Line: A first line indent only indents the first line of the paragraph rather than the whole thing.

Hanging: A hanging indent does the opposite: it doesn’t indent the first line of the paragraph, but does
indent the rest of the lines. To add an indent, click through the tab buttons to choose the type of indent
that you want. Then, click the place on the ruler where you want the indent to appear. Like tabs, if you
create an indent in a line that already has text, the indent will only be available for that paragraph. And,
indents can be moved just like tabs, by dragging them around the ruler.

Indenting Using the Home Tab

If you want to indent the entire paragraph, use the indent buttons on the Paragraph group of the Home
tab.

Use the right-facing button to increase the indent. Use the left-facing button to decrease the current
indent.

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Changing Paragraph Spacing

To change paragraph spacing, first place your cursor in the paragraph that you want to change. Then,
click the Spacing command on the Home tab and choose your spacing.

You can also choose to add or remove spaces before paragraphs. If you click Line Spacing Options, the
Paragraph dialog will open. (We’ll cover this dialog in the Intermediate manual.)

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Adding Borders or Shading Using the Home Tab

You can also make your paragraphs more colorful by adding borders and/or shading. First, select the
paragraphs that you want to apply the formatting to. (If you’re just formatting one paragraph, you can
simply place your cursor in it.) To apply borders, click the Border button on the Home tab and choose
what kind of border you want to apply.

To apply shading, select the paragraph that you want to format. Then, click the small paint bucket icon
to apply the default shading, or click the drop-down arrow to choose other colors .

Note that you can see a preview of each color as you scroll over it.

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Using the Borders and Shading Dialog

Although the Borders and Shading commands on the Home tab are great for quick formatting, their
options are a bit limited. To view more options, click the Borders and Shading command in the Borders
menu.

Then, you will see this dialog.

You can choose a basic setting from the list on the left. Or, use the menus in the middle to choose a
style, color, and width for your border. You will be able to see a preview of your choices on the right.
You can also use the buttons here to toggle parts of your border on or off. (For example, to remove the

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bottom line, you would click the button.) Note that there is also a Shading tab in this dialog. You can use
this tab to choose a main color, style color, and fill style.

Once you have made your choices, click OK to apply them. You can go back into the Borders and
Shading dialog at any time to adjust your settings

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Printing and Viewing Your Document

Objectives

 Use print layout, full screen reading view, Web layout, outline view, and draft view
 Use minimize, maximize, and restore
 Use zoom on the View tab
 Use the view controls on the Status bar
 Use thumbnails
 Use the document browser
 Use the document map
 Use the show/hide tools
 Show and hide special characters
 Use Print Preview and the Print Preview tab
 Use the Page Setup group and dialog
 Use print commands
 Use basic and advanced print options
 Modify printer properties

Using Layouts and Views

So far, we have stuck with Word’s default view: print view. This view gives you a pretty good idea of how
your document will look on paper. But what if you’re creating a Web page? Or what if you’re more
interested in reading the document? Luckily, Word has views for many different purposes, and that’s
what we’re going to learn about in this lesson.

Using Print Layout

Print Layout is the default view, and it’s the one that we have been working with all along. To get back
to this view, you can click the Print Layout button on the View tab or on the right hand side of the status
bar.

This view should be very familiar to you by now:

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Note how the current view is highlighted both on the status bar and in the View tab.

Using Full Screen Reading

As you might imagine, full screen reading layout is best used when you want to read a document. Like
other views, you can switch to it using the status bar or the View tab.

This view removes many of the toolbars to devote as much space to text as possible.

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At the top left, you have a basic toolbar allowing you to save or print the document, add highlighting, or
add a comment. You also have a Tools button that offers a menu of editing commands. In the middle,
you can see which screen you are on and navigate through the screens. Then, on the right, you have a
menu of view options and a Close command. (If you close this view, you will return to Print Layout.)

Using Web Layout

This command shows you what your document will look like if it was published as a Web page. This is
very convenient if you’re creating a document to be published to the Internet.

The main change you will see in this view is that margins and white space are removed.

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Using Outline View

You can switch to Outline View the same way we have switched to other views: using the View tab or
the status bar.

However, this view is a little different from the other views we have looked at.

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Outline view focuses on the text and the headings that have been applied. (You can see that our text
box has been removed, for example.) You can also see that we have a new Outlining tab. We will take a
closer look at all of these tools in the Expert manual.

Using Draft View

Our last view is Draft view.

This is a good view to use if you’re looking at a draft of your document, and you’re not worried about
images or formatting.

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Images are removed, white space is reduced, and page breaks are indicated as a dotted line.

Using Zoom on the View Tab

Another handy tool is Zoom. This tool lets zoom in or out of your document to see it close up or far
away. First, we will look at the Zoom commands on the View tab. To use any of these commands, simply
click the icon.

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Using View Controls on the Status Bar

You can also use the controls on the status bar to change your view.

In the last lesson, we learned that the first five buttons change the type of view you are in. You can also
use the slider to zoom in or out of the document. Or, click the plus or minus buttons to zoom in or out
(respectively) by ten per cent increments.

Using the Zoom Dialog

If you want to set advanced zoom options, click the Zoom button on the View tab, or click the
percentage in the status bar.

Either of these actions will open the Zoom dialog.

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Using this dialog is easy. You can choose a percentage, page width, or number of pages from the top of
the dialog. Or, you can type a percentage in the text box. No matter what your choice, you will see a
preview at the bottom of the dialog.

Once your options are set, click OK to apply them.

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Advanced View Tools

Now that we’ve got the basics about views down, we’re going to look at some advanced tools, including
the document browser, thumbnails, the document map, and showing and hiding elements of the Word
screen.

Using the Document Browser

Typically, the small arrows at the bottom of the vertical scroll bar let you browse from page to page.

But what if you’re more interested in looking at the various tables in your document? Or navigating
through comments? To change what the browse arrows look through, click the small dot between them.

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Then, choose what object you want to browse by.

Let’s look at each of the choices. Most of them refer to elements we haven’t covered yet, but it’s useful
to know how to browse by these elements for when we do learn about them.

Using the Show/Hide Tools

There is a special module of the View tab that lets you customize what elements appear on your screen.

We have already worked with the ruler when adding tabs and indents. If you don’t need the ruler, you
can uncheck it to remove it from your screen. You can also add gridlines to the screen; this can help
when arranging objects. The next item is the message bar. This is a new security feature that we haven’t
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yet seen. If it doesn’t apply to your document, it won’t be available; that’s why it’s grayed out in the
image above. The next two items in the Show/Hide module are Document Map and Thumbnails. We’ll
take a close look at these items in the next few concepts.

Using the Document Map

If you check Document Map in the Show/Hide module of the View tab, you will see a pane appear on
the left hand side of your screen.

This pane literally gives you a map of your document based on headings. In this sample, we can see that
we have Octopi, Habitat, Appearance, and Relatives as main topics in this document. To hide the
document map, uncheck it in the Show/Hide module or click the X in the top left hand corner of the
pane.

Using Thumbnails

There are two ways you can view thumbnails. If you have the document map open, you can choose
Thumbnails from the task pane menu.

You can also check the Thumbnails option from the Show/Hide module of the View tab.

Either action will show you a thumbnail of each page in your document in a pane on the left.

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You can click the thumbnail to go to that page, or you can use the scroll wheel on your mouse to zoom
in and out of the pane. If you have a lot of pages in your document, you can use the scroll bar to scroll
up and down in the list. To hide the thumbnails, uncheck it in the Show/Hide module or click the X in the
top left hand corner of the pane.

Showing Special Characters

When you type anything, even a space, a character appears on the screen. The symbols for certain
characters (such as spaces and paragraph marks) are usually hidden. If you want to show these
characters, click the paragraph symbol on the Paragraph group of the Home tab, or use the Ctrl + *
shortcut.

This will then make all the hidden characters in your document appear. To hide the characters, just click
the Show/Hide command again.

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Using Print Preview

Although creating documents in Word is great, there will be times when you want to print out a paper
copy. Before you print, however, you should make sure that everything looks OK. In this lesson, we’re
going to look at how to preview a document.

Opening Print Preview

To open Print Preview, click the Office menu, choose Print, and choose Print Preview.

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Then, your document will appear in the Print Preview screen.

Note that all default tabs have disappeared, but you still have the status bar and the scroll bar.

Using the Print Preview Tab

Let’s take a closer look at the tab that is available when we’re in print preview.
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These commands are very well-labeled, but let’s take a look at them.

Print Print Opens the Print dialog, which we


will look at shortly.

Options Opens the Display module of

the Word Options dialog.

Page Setup Margins Change the white spacearound


the edge of the page.

Orientation Change the direction that text

reads.

Size Change the size of the page

Option button Opens the Page Setup dialog

Zoom Zoom Opens the Zoom dialog

100% Return to default zoom level.

One Page View one page.

Two Pages View two pages.

Page Width View the page width

Preview Show Ruler Show the ruler.

Magnifier Turns your cursor into a

magnifying glass; click to

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zoom in and click again to

zoom out.

Shrink One Page Shrink One Page

Next Page Goes to the next page

Previous Page Goes to the previous page.

Close Print Preview Close the Print Preview

window.

Navigating Print Preview

To move through the pages in your document in print preview, you can use a few different tools. Like
the editing window, you can use the browse arrows, scroll bars, or the scroll wheel on your mouse to
move between pages.

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You can also use the Next Page and Previous Page buttons on the Preview group of the Print Preview tab
to navigate.

Closing Print Preview

To close Print Preview and return to editing view, press the Esc key on your keyboard, or click Close Print
Preview on the Preview group of the tab.

Print Preview versus Print Layout

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When should you use print preview, and when should you use print layout? Here’s a quick overview of
the pros and cons of each view

Using Page Setup

In the last lesson, we learned how to look at your document. But what if there are some changes you
need to make? In this lesson, we’ll learn how to set up your document so that it prints perfectly.

Using the Page Setup Group

On the Page Layout tab, you will find a group devoted to setting up your page.

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Let’s look at each command. We’re going to look at the more complicated commands one by one, so
don’t panic if you don’t understand how to use all of these options yet.

Margins: Click this button to see a menu of preset margins. You can also click Custom Margins to
open the Page Setup dialog.

Orientation: Choose portrait or landscape orientation.

Size: Click this button to see a menu of preset paper sizes. You can also click More Paper
Sizes to open the Page Setup dialog.

Columns: Format your text into columns.

Breaks: Insert line, page, or module breaks. (We will learn about these tools in the Intermediate
manual.)

Line Numbers: Add numbers to your lines.

Hyphenation: Control hyphenation options.

Options button: Opens the Page Setup dialog.

Setting Margins

Margins are the white space around the page’s edges. To change the margins, click the Margins button
on the Page Setup group and pick a preset size.

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Note that this change will affect your entire document. If you don’t like the options that you see, click
the Custom Margins button to open the Page Setup dialog. (We’ll take a look at this dialog shortly.)

Changing Page Orientation

Page orientation refers to how the text is laid out on the page.

As you can see, with portrait orientation the paper would be printed on with the long side vertically.
With landscape orientation, the paper would be printed on with the long side horizontally.

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To change your document’s orientation, click the Orientation button on the Page Setup group and
choose either portrait or landscape.

Setting Paper Size

Typically, you will be using Word’s default paper size: 8 ½ by 11 inches, called legal size. If you want to
change this, however, you can do so using the Size command. Simply click the Size button on the Page
Setup group and click the size that you want.

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If your paper size isn’t there, click More Paper Sizes to open the Page Setup dialog, which we’ll look at in
a moment.

Using the Page Setup Dialog

All along, we’ve been referring to the Page Setup dialog. As we saw, you can open it from the Size or
Margin menus. You can also open it by clicking the option button in the bottom right hand corner of the
group.

Here is what the Page Setup dialog looks like:

Let’s take a brief look at each tab.

Margins: Control margin size, page orientation, and the type of pages in the document.

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Paper: Set the paper size and source.

Layout: Set advanced options including module options, header and footer configuration, and page
alignment. This tab also contains commands for line numbers and page borders.

Each tab also has a preview area (where you can see the effects of your changes before you apply them)
and a Default button (so that you can make every new document have the current page settings).

Printing a Document

Now that we know how to preview and set up our document, it’s time to learn how to print it!

Print Commands

There are a few ways you can print your document. First, you can add a Quick Print or Print icon to the
Quick Access toolbar. The Quick Print icon will send the document directly to the printer, while the Print
icon will open the Print dialog. You can also use the Ctrl + P shortcut to open the Print dialog.

The more conventional method is to use the Print module of the Office menu. Clicking the Print
command in the main menu or the sub-menu will open the Print dialog. Clicking Quick Print will send the
document directly to the printer without specifying any options. Clicking Print Preview will open that
window, which we looked at in Lesson 6.4.

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Using Basic Print Options

Let’s take a look at the Print dialog.

Our first set of options is Printer. Here, you can choose your printer, choose to print to a file, or choose
manual duplex (print pages on both sides manually). The next set of options is Page Range. Here you can
choose to print all pages, the current page, or just a selection. You can also click the Pages command
and enter page numbers. There are a few ways to specify pages by typing them; here’s a list of the most
commonly used ways:

1,3,5 Prints pages one, three, and five.

1-5 Prints pages one through five.

-5 Prints from the beginning of the document to page five.

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5- Prints page five onward (until the end of the document).

3 Prints only page three.

S3 Prints only module three.

You can also combine these commands. For example, you could type 1,3,5,9-11,17- to print pages one,
three, five; pages nine to eleven; and page seventeen to the end of the document.

Our next module lets you choose the number of copies you want to print and if you want to collate
(keep each copy of the document together) them. Our last module lets you zoom into or scale pages.
Once you’ve configured your settings, click OK to print.

Using Advanced Print Options

You may have noticed an Options button at the bottom of the Print dialog. Clicking that button will open
the Word Options dialog:

As you can see, you can choose to print or hide particular elements of your document. These options are
particularly useful when printing drafts.

Setting Printer Properties

To set options specific to your printer, click the Properties command in the top right hand corner of the
Print dialog..

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The dialog that you will see will depend on your printer. Typically, you will have options for color
settings, page size, and paper type.

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