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Common Core English/Language Arts


National Council for the
Standards
Social Studies
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.4
VI. Power, Authority, &
Determine
or clarify
the meaning
Unit Plan:
The Politics
of Hip-Hop
Cultureofand SpokenGovernance
Word
unknown
and
multiple-meaning
words
or
Social studies programs
Ben Hiromura
phrases based on grade 8 reading and
should include experiences
Scope and
Sequence
content, choosing flexibly from a range of
that provide for the study of
strategies.
how people
createinand
How does the poetic
form allow us to express our thoughts
and emotions
terms of our
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.4.A
change
structures
of power,
Use Science
context+(e.g.,
the
overall Arts
Grade Eight- Social
English
Language
authority, and governance, so
meaning of a sentence or
that the learner can:
paragraph; a word's position or
function in a sentence) as a clue to
the meaning of a word or phrase.
a. examine the rights and

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.10
Write routinely over extended time frames
(time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or
a day or two) for a range of disciplinespecific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.5
Demonstrate understanding of figurative
language, word relationships, and nuances
in word meanings.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.5.B
Use the relationship between
particular words to better
understand each of the words.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.10
Write routinely over extended time frames
(time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or
a day or two) for a range of disciplinespecific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.5
Demonstrate understanding of figurative
language, word relationships, and nuances
in word meanings.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.5.A
Interpret figures of speech (e.g.
verbal irony, puns) in context.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3
Write narratives to develop real or
imagined experiences or events using

responsibilities of the
individual in relation to his or
her social group, such as
family, peer groups, and
school class;
VI. Power, Authority, &
Governance
Social studies programs
should include experiences
that provide for the study of
how people create and
change structures of power,
authority, and governance, so
that the learner can:
h. recognize and give
examples of the tensions
between the wants and
needs of individuals and
groups, and concepts such
as fairness, equity, and
justice.
II. Time, Continuity, &
Change
Social studies programs
should include experiences
that provide for the study of
the ways human beings view
themselves in and over time,
so that the learner can:
c. compare and contrast

Lesson Foci
*Word Study
*Introduction to
Journaling

Assessme
nt
**Journal

*Basic Human Rights


*Politics- the study of
socio-political
position in the world?
power relationships
*Critical Theory- how we
analyze systematic
oppression
Essential Questions:
*What is political
science?
*What is critical theory?

*Idioms
*Word Association
*Journaling- physical
description (imagery),
emotive components,
concluding ideas

*Journal
Writing

*Systems of Oppressionfocus on Chicago


Essential Questions:
*What factors lead
citizens to become
down-and-out?
*What is segregation and
what does it mean to be
born on the other side
of the tracks?
*Figurative languagemetaphor, simile,
personification,
alliteration, and
symbolism
*Short Stories
*History of oppression
-Civil Rights
-Japanese Internment
-Womens Rights

*Short
Story #1

Works Cited
Resources Used
Fisher, M. T. (2007). Writing in rhythm: Spoken word poetry in urban classrooms. New York, N.Y: Teachers
College Press.
Low, B. E. (2011). Slam school: Learning through conflict in the hip-hop and spoken word classroom.
Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press.
Smith, M. K., & Eleveld, M. (2003). The spoken word revolution: Slam, hip-hop & the poetry of a new
generation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks MediaFusion.
Potential Resources
Anglesey, Z. (1999). Listen up!: Spoken word poetry. New York: One World.
Behn, R., & Twichell, C. (1992). The Practice of poetry: Writing exercises from poets who teach. New York,
NY: HarperPerennial.
Cisneros, S. (1991). The house on Mango Street. New York: Vintage Books.
Freedom Writers., & Gruwell, E. (1999). The Freedom Writers diary: How a teacher and 150 teens used
writing to change themselves and the world around them. New York: Doubleday.
Mali, T. (2012). What teachers make: In praise of the greatest job in the world. New York, N.Y: G.P. Putnam's
Sons.