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MAT 743/Teasley

Fall 2014

MAT Evidence 3: Unit Plan Cover Sheet


Intern: Conally Owen

Title of Unit: Literature in the Middle Ages

Course/Level: English IV- Standard

Date Submitted: December 1st, 2014

In this unit, students will explore literature in the Middle Ages. Students will primarily be working with a
text called Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Students will first explore the concept of a code of values.
Then, they will study the historical context of the Medieval times and note a major code of values within
this time periodchivalry. They will use this code of values to drive their analysis of the primary text.
Students will hear Sir Gawain and the Green Knight read aloud in class. During the reading, they will
actively participate by answering questions through cold-call and hand-raising. At the conclusion of the
text, they will prove their answer for the question of whether or not Sir Gawain is a chivalrous knight,
based on the code of values provided and specific evidence from the text. They will learn the form of the
ballad and annotate a particular one from the Middle Ages. Major assessment strategies will include a unit
quiz and test.

Performance
Indicator
Literacy Instruction

Interconnectedness of
Content Areas/Disciplines
Note links within or across
grades and subjects

Global Awareness

Where/How Addressed in the Unit


(ex: UbD chart, DLP#, title of activity or product)

Students will be constantly working towards understanding and


analyzing a text (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight) throughout
the entire unit. Students will work through difficult texts such
as this one by way of class discussion, reflection and
exploration, and study guide questions (see attachment 10.)
They will be given opportunities to advance their set of
analyzing tools, such as in Daily Lesson Plan 15, in which
students get a chance to independently annotate a poem (with
initial guided instruction and modeling.) This will give them a
tool set that they can apply to analyzing other complex
documents in the future.
There is a breadth of interconnectedness between history and
English within this unit. One expected understanding for the
students will be for them to see how societal values are
important to understanding the historical context of a piece of
literature (from Literature in the Middle Ages Unit Plan.)
Thus, it becomes necessary to examine the history of the
Middle Ages (as is done in Daily Lesson Plans 4 and 5attachments 6 and 7.) Students can then begin to make the
connections between what a society believes and the lasting,
famous works that are inherent with those beliefs.
The focus of this course is on literature from the area that
served as the roots of Britain. Student will get a sense of British
history in this unit by learning about the Middle Ages (Daily
Lesson Plans 4 and 5- attachments 6 and 7.) For instance, as
shown in attachment 7, students will see an image of a castle
during the history notes, which will help them to visualize and
discuss the rich, decorated history of Europe.
1

MAT 743/Teasley
Fall 2014

Integration with 21st


Century Skills and Content

Critical Thinking and


Problem-Solving

Learning and Innovation Skills: Students will use creativity and


innovation throughout many of the unit lesson plans. In Daily
Lesson Plan 1, students will be able to apply a set of
values/rules to a modern day film. In Daily Lesson Plan 2,
students will be able to create their own code of valuesone
that they choose to live by. This will require them to be original
and to apply this skill set to their own lives.
Information, Media, and Technology Skills: Students will have
to analyze media messages in Daily Lesson Plan 1. Here, they
will see that individuals interpret messages differently, based on
the fact that their groups may have different opinions than them
concerning the analysis of the film clips.
Life and Career Skills: Students will have opportunities to work
independently, such as in some cases of their work with the
study guide (attachment 10) and with their individual writing
activity (Daily Lesson Plan 2.) They will have to manage their
time with the Literature in the Middle Ages quiz of Daily
Lesson Plan 12.
Social and Cross-Cultural Skills: Students will have to work
effectively in diverse groups during collaborative group time.
These groups will be either assigned by the teacher or chosen
by the students themselves. For instance, in Daily Lesson Plan
11, the teacher will create expert groups. Students will have to
work with these groups to become experts on the questions
they are assigned. This will give them an opportunity to learn
how to be open-minded to others in their class.
Students will consistently be cold-called and questioned
regarding outcomes in the unit. During every lesson, students
will have an opportunity to think beyondthat is, they will
be able to work to make judgments and decisions by evaluating
a textSir Gawain and the Green Knight. For example, they
will be required to determine whether or not Sir Gawain is a
chivalrous knight, based on the Medieval code of chivalry (this
activity will take place during Daily Lesson Plan 13.)

MAT 743: Fall Unit Plan Conally Owen Middle Ages

Conally Owen: Literature in the Middle Ages (Standard English IV)


Stage 1Desired Results
Established Goals (From Common Core State Standards):

1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact

Understandings:
Students will understand that . . .

Essential Questions:

A set of guiding rules/principles can be


used to analyze and determine whether
such rules/principles apply in a text
Societal values are important to
understanding the historical context of a
piece of literature
Patterns can be recognized and noted in
different forms of texts in order for readers
to make inferences about common values
of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and
analyzed in texts
Subsequent cultures can be linked by
noting similarities and differences between
them
Genres of literature can be recognized
based on form and substance

Students will know . . .

Do characters/authors adhere to
rules/principles of a specific time period?
Or do they stray away from them?
What differentiates genres of literature?
How can we tell what a culture was like
through literature?
Do principles of chivalry still exist today?
If so, in what form?
How can we compare two different
cultures?
Does history continue to play a large role
in shaping literature?
How do literary devices add meaning to a
text?

Students will be able to . . .

The values/rules of chivalry, divided into


five broad categories (honor, self control,
courtly love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval

Analyze historical definitions of chivalry


Examine a variety of texts to see how
principles of chivalry apply in different
texts

MAT 743: Fall Unit Plan Conally Owen Middle Ages

romance
The structure of a ballad
The definition of literary terms, such as
paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism,
imagery, etc.
The basic history of the Middle Ages
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green
Knight

Infer common values of the Middle Ages


Highlight literary devices such as
alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism,
paradox, and irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Link two subsequent, different cultures by
noting similarities and differences between
them
Recognize particular types of literature
based of form and substance

Stage 2Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks:

Other Evidence:

Unit test: students will have a unit test


consisting of fill in the blank, multiple
choice, and short answer in order to
determine their knowledge and
understanding of the unit outcomes
Unit quiz: Students will have a quiz during
the middle of the unit in order to determine
their knowledge and understanding of the
unit outcomes. The quiz will consist of fill
in the blank and short answer questions.

Daily teacher observation and data


collection: teacher will get constant
feedback from students to determine their
understanding of the material. This will be
done mostly through cold call review
Study guide: There will be an
accompanying study guide for students to
use as we go through the text. This will
consist of straightforward plot questions,
interpretative questions concerning literary
devices, and further application questions.
Other activities: students will have other
activities to guide them through the history
of the Middle Ages. There will be
thoughtful reading guides, such as prereading questions for Sir Gawain and the
Green Knight and an application writing
activity.

Stage 3Learning Plan


Learning Activities:
Day 1: Introduce and have students analyze a modern code as it applies to a modern film
Day 2: Fill in the blank notes with values/rules of Medieval chivalry; give writing prompt
about a personal code
Day 3: Writing activity feedback; history notes
Day 4: History notes continued
Day 5: Have students complete Venn diagram activity, comparing the Middle Ages to the
Anglo-Saxon time period
Day 6: Introduce the Medieval Romance genre; pre-reading question activity; begin reading
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Day 7: Review; further reading; study guide for Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Day 8: Continue reading Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; study guide

MAT 743: Fall Unit Plan Conally Owen Middle Ages

Day 9: Go over answers to study guide; introduce literary terms; continue reading Sir
Gawain and the Green Knight
Day 10: Review; continue reading Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; study guide
Day 11: Study guide; continue reading Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Day 12: Middle Ages quiz; finish reading Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; finish study
guide
Day 13: Activity: is Sir Gawain a chivalrous knight?
Day 14: Review the quiz
Day 15: Ballad definition; The Three Ravens ballad activity
Day 16: Middle Ages test review
Day 17: Middle Ages Unit Test

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 1 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Societal values are important to understanding the historical context of a piece of literature
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Key Vocabulary for this Lesson

Values
Principles
Code
Chivalry

Worksheets
Transparency

Computer
Smart board
Youtube

Materials
Technology Needs

LESSON ACTIVITIES

Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)


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Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Describe objective:
Students will learn how to apply a code of specific values to a story.
Provide a simplified code worksheet of the Navy Code Values Charter (see attachment 1.) Go
over U.S. Navy values on the smart board. Have students provide input into the discussion,
explaining and comparing their own definitions of the values with the way the Navy explains
them. Explain that this is a modern day code that students are going to apply to a film today.
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the
Students will
do:
Input
5
Introduce The Guardian. Provide a brief synopsis.
Students will
mins. Briefly show characters (Ashton Kutcher, Kevin
listen.
Costner) and explain who they are/what their role is
in the film. If students cant remember names of
characters, have them refer to them as younger
guy/older guy.
Modeling &
Check for
Understanding

10
mins.

Explain the activity in detail. Hand out worksheet


(see attachment 2) and provide instructions (verbally
and on the board) for how to fill it out during the
clipslooking specifically at the values of honor,
courage, and commitment.

Students will pay


attention and
receive
worksheet. They
will ask
questions, if
Students will look primarily at these questions: In the necessary.
clips, do the characters uphold the values written in
the Navy code? Or do they fail to uphold the values?
Emphasize that students will need to take notes on
the clips in order to participate in the activity.
Emphasize that they will need to pay attention so that
they can use parts of the scenes/characters actions as
PROOF for whether or not they uphold the Navy
values as described on the handout.

Input

Input

10
mins.

10
mins.

Students watch clips:


Students will
1:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BjF9Wy_Qxc watch clips.
(stop at 1:30)
Students will
take notes.
and 2:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddvmEo60gf4
(first 3 minutes.)
These clips are two different scenes from the modern
day film The Guardian. Students will have to analyze
the clips to
see whether
Students
watch
clips: or not the characters
Students will
(described earlier in the lesson) uphold the values of
1:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BjF9Wy_Qxc
watch clips.
the U.S.
Navy Code. 7
(stop
at 1:30)
Students will
take notes.
and 2:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddvmEo60gf4

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Guided Pratice

10
mins.

Students will briefly get in groups to discuss


answers/findings.
Address the following questions:
Was there anything that their group members saw
that they missed? Are there any disagreements?

Students will
collaborate in
groups and
discuss; students
will check their
answers.

Finally, we will look at a projected image of the


worksheet and discuss answers as a class. I will need
to explain why having this skill (interpreting whether
characters/events adhere to principles) is important in
the modern world. Its important when thinking
documents like the Constitution, school
codes/policies, sports teams, etc. and whether or not
people live by those guidelines/rules/principles.
Closing/
Summary

5
mins.

Students will be introduced to another set of guiding


principles (focusing on five main facets... loyalty,
honor, self-control, law/order, and courtly love)
chivalry. Introduce these elements by writing them
on the board.

Students will
listen and
participate in the
discussion.

Review objectives and preview tomorrows lesson.


Assessment of Student Learning
I will know students have learned this material when we go over their answers as a class.

Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English
Language
Learners:
Students will have time to Because the activity is catered toward student
Students will
work in groups so that, if
discovery, students will have a chance to go
have time to
confused or lost, they can beyond in analysis if they choose. I will be
work in groups
have a chance for peers or receptive to working with student answers that
so that, if
myself to catch them up.
may be beyond what is typically seen in this
confused or lost,
level.
they can have a
chance for peers
or myself to
catch them up.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
I will have visuals and handouts for each student. I will put information in many different places
and will repeat myself for auditory learners. Students will have many visuals to go by, between
8

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

I will have visuals and handouts for each student. I will put information in many different places
and will repeat myself for auditory learners. Students will have many visuals to go by, between
the clips and the accompanying guided worksheets.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
This lesson will bring a modern perspective to a Middle Age code. Students who are interested in
technology and film today can relate to the film I will show clips from. Students who are
interested in military virtues will find interest in the film as well.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 2 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Knights
Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Code
Values/principles/rules
Materials
Transparency
Worksheets
Paper
Technology Needs
Smart Board
10

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Explain how, just like the U.S Navy has a code, the knights of the Middle Ages also had a
codecalled chivalry (3 mins.)
Ask students about whether or not they have heard of the idea of chivalry.
Interest questions to consider:
What do we hear in the present day about chivalry?
Is there still a code of chivalry?
If so, who must abide by it?
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Guided
20
Hand out chivalry fill-in-the-blank
Students will follow along and
Practice
mins. activity (see attachment 5.) Explain
fill in the blanks as I go through
how, just like the U.S Navy has a
the notes.
code, the knights of the Middle Ages
also had a codecalled chivalry.
Input,
Modeling, &
Check for
Understanding

10
mins.

Writing activityDisplay the


following prompt on the board (see
attachment 3):
Chivalry was a code that knights
lived by during the Middle Ages.
What is a code that you try to live by
today? Provide examples and
descriptions of the values/rules that
you follow in this code. If you cant
think of any specific code that you
follow, start by writing down and
describing values/rules that you live
by. Then write about whether you see
patterns in your principles.
I will read and explain the prompt
after it is written on the board. I will
talk about how their code might be a
sports code, religious code, family
code, or moral code. I will provide a
few examples, such as how I have a
runners code:
*EX: Training: whenever I sign up
for a race, I plot out a calendar
schedule for training. I do this so I

11

Students will listen and interact.


Students will respond to coldcall and volunteer questions.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

can build up the endurance that I need


to run the race. So, if Im signed up
for a half marathon, I would work my
way up with mileage. Id probably
start at 3 or 4 miles, then work my
way up to about 10 or 11. I rarely go
the full mileage of race day when I
train so that I dont injure myself.
Physical health: diet and sleep are
essential to running. If Im not getting
proper nutrition, my body wont last
during a long run. For instance, I was
once training for a 31 miler. I was
constantly losing weight. My wife
was worried about me. Shes really
interested in health and nutrition. We
talked and she helped me to work out
a diet that I could follow, based on
what days I was running.
Motivation: I have to keep myself
motivated. To do this, I set small
goals for myself. During a run, I say
things to myself like... if I can get to
[a location I am familiar with], I will
give myself a sip of water or a
nutrition bar. Oftentimes the races
themselves serve as a motivation for
me. I enjoy the energy of the crowds,
the music, etc. I use them as
motivation during my training.
Without motivation, I would not have
the will to run.
Companionship: I like to run with
people. I started running with my dad
many years ago. He was the one who
got me interested in running in the
first place. Its still something we do
whenever we are together. It creates a
bond between us. Some of my fondest
memories are running with my dad. I
will also sometimes run with my
wife. When running, making friends
can often get you through a race (I
will discuss my experience in the
Shamrock half marathon.)

12

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Guided
Practice

25
mins.

Students will get started on the


writing activity. The rest of class
period will be used for this activity. I
will collect these at the end of class
and give feedback within the week.

Students will write.

Assessment of Student Learning


I will know students have learned this material when I ask about the principles/values of chivalry
next class. I will also know how they understood the objective when reading through their
personal codes.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
While giving notes, I will
Because the activity is catered
While giving notes, I will break
break down the concepts
toward student discovery
down concepts thoroughly so
thoroughly so that students (especially in the writing
that students can understand
can understand what is
activity), students will have a
what is going on. I will also
going on. I will also model chance to go beyond in analysis model my writing so that
my writing so that students if they choose. I will be
students can have an idea of
can see what they are
receptive to working with
what they are supposed to be
supposed to be doing in the student answers that may be
doing in the assignment.
assignment.
beyond what is typically seen in
this level.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
I will have visuals and handouts for each student. I will put information in many different places
and will repeat myself for auditory learners. Students will have many visuals to go by, between
the models and the accompanying guided worksheets.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will be animate and make the principles of chivalry relevant to high school aged students. I will
do this by finding ways to relate it to their lives, their interests, and also the material that they
have already learned in the class. In terms of the writing activities, students will be writing about
something personal to them. This should allow for a variety of samples, with students feeling
comfortable to write about what they are interested in.

13

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 3 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Subsequent cultures can be linked by noting similarities and differences between them
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The basic history of the Middle Ages
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Link two subsequent, different cultures by noting similarities and differences between them

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Code
Values/principles/rules
Middle Ages
Feudalism
Caste system
Materials
14

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Code writings
Paper
Transparency

Smart Board
Overhead

Technology Needs

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Tell students that I read their writings the previous night and that they will get a chance to see
what kinds of personal codes all classes came up with today (3 mins.)
Connect to objective: Explain that this will help students to receive a better understanding of
how a code of values is still applicable today and how these codes can help us to determine what
a society is like.
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Input,
15
Writing activity feedback:
Students will listen and look for
Modeling, &
mins. Acknowledge that I read the students their codes. They will also
Check for
writings.
respond to questions.
Understanding
Direct the activity back to the
outcome by saying: I found that
there are indeed a lot of codes that we
live by today. We constantly try to
apply the values/rules of these codes
to our lives. I have to ask you a
question, though. Are we always
successful in applying these codes to
our lives? Do we always meet the
standards of a code we try to follow?
These questions are important to
preview our upcoming story, Sir
Gawain and the Green Knight, in
which students will determine
whether or not Sir Gawain is a
chivalrous knight (according to the
Middle Ages code of chivalry.)
Input,
Modeling, &
Check for
Understanding

15
mins.

Read examples of codes that students


wrote aloud (see attachment 4.)
Acknowledge that a lot of students
had overlap, such as character codes,
better me codes, sports codes, etc.
15

Students will listen and respond


to questions.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

and that I grouped those all into one


categorypersonal codes. Pick a few
examples to read.
Finally, reiterate the objective about
the application of a code to students
lives.
Note taking: students will take notes
Students will take notes in their
on the history of the Middle Ages
notebook. They will participate
(see attachment 6.) Provide detailed
actively by answering questions
information as we go along. Show
about what they know and what
pictures during the notes in order to
they are interested in knowing
give visual representations (see
regarding the historical setting
attachment 7.) This will be labeled in of the upcoming story.
their notebook. Star a few concepts
that are really important from these
notes (the major religion, the section
on Feudalism, chivalry connections),
in order for students to see what is
most important objective-wise.
Closing/
5
Review: Tell students that we will
Students will listen and ask
Summary
mins. finish up these notes tomorrow and
questions, if necessary.
discuss how the way that people lived
in the Middle Ages differed from the
way that people lived in the Anglo
Saxon time period (a literature period
we studied right before this unit.)
Assessment of Student Learning
Ill know students have learned this material when I ask about history in future classes/quizzes.
Guided
Practice

15
mins.

Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
While giving notes, I will
I will be receptive to working
While giving notes, I will break
break down concepts
with student questions that may down concepts thoroughly so
thoroughly so that students be beyond what is typically seen that students can understand
can understand what is
in this level. I will go over the
what is going on. Students will
going on. Students will also history in depth at some points
also have a chance to see how
have a chance to see how
for those who are interested.
other students wrote their
other students wrote their
personal codes.
personal codes.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?

16

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

I will put the writing samples on the smart board for visual learners. I will also talk about what
kinds of things were positive in terms of what people wrote. For notes, students will see them
written on the overhead and will also hear me talking about them in detail.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
While giving writing feedback, I will make sure students see their own writing idea on the board.
This will gather their interest because they will feel successful and proud of what they wrote. I
will be animate and make the history relevant to high school aged students. I will do this by
finding ways to relate it to their lives, their interests, and the material that they have already
learned in the class.

17

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 4 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Subsequent cultures can be linked by noting similarities and differences between them
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The basic history of the Middle Ages
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Link two subsequent, different cultures by noting similarities and differences between them
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Middle Ages
Anglo Saxons
Venn Diagram
Feudalism
Caste System
Values
Materials
18

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Worksheets
Paper
Technology Needs

Smart Board
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Briefly review history notes. Up to this point, the students have learned about how the AngloSaxon culture was replaced by the Anglo-Norman or Middle Ages culture. With this new culture,
different things became embracedideas such as the arts took off and were booming. Thus, we
saw a surge in stories, such as the one we will soon read.
Explain the format for the day. Students will finish off their notes from yesterday and will use
the notes (as well as a set of previous notes) to compare and contrast two different historical time
periods.
(5 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Guided
25
Finish history notes (see attachment
Students will write down notes
Practice
mins. 6.) This portion of the class will
and actively participate in
mainly be focused on ideas of
discussion.
Feudalism and chivalry. Show images
of these history concepts on the smart
board to help student visualization
(see attachment 7.) Star a few
important concepts in order for
students to know what they should
focus on.
Input,
Modeling, &
Check for
Understanding

15
mins.

Using history (attachment 6) and


chivalry notes (attachment 5),
students will compare and contrast
the culture of the Anglo-Saxons with
the culture of the Middle Ages.
Explain what a Venn diagram is:
when youre told to compare and
contrast, it means to record
similarities and differences.
Similarities go in the middle (where
they overlap) and differences go on
the outside. Provide suggestions for
areas to think about comparing, such
19

Students will listen; students


will work in collaborative
groups (or alone if they choose)
to complete the Venn Diagram
activity.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

as religion, values, living


arrangements, what people were
judged by (what was the most
important thing for people to do?),
and what served as the center of life.
Have students create their own Venn
Diagram in their notebooks (this wil
serve as a rough draft.) Students can
work as a group if they choose to.
The task is to compare and contrast
the Anglo-Saxon time period with the
Middle Ages, specifically in terms of
what is described above.
Wrap up: Explain that, tomorrow,
Students will listen and ask
students will work more on the Venn questions, if needed.
Diagrams. Let them know that,
afterwards, we will go over them as a
class.
Assessment of Student Learning
I will know students have learned the material when I walk around during group/independent
work on the Venn Diagram activity. I will ask students questions during this time. I will also
know about their knowledge and understanding when I quiz them later on history and integrate it
into the story.
Closing/
Summary

5
mins.

Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
While giving notes, I will
I will be receptive to working
While giving notes, I will break
break down the concepts
with student questions that may down the concepts thoroughly
thoroughly so that students be beyond what is typically seen so that students can understand.
can understand. I will teach in this level. I will go over the
I will teach students about what
students about what a Venn history in depth at some points
a Venn Diagram is, which will
Diagram is, which will help for those who are interested.
help those who have always
those who have always
When I walk around, if students heard them term but have never
heard them term but have
seem bored with Venn Diagram, been able to fully understand
never been able to fully
I will ask them some deeper
how to use it.
understand how to use it.
questions about the relationship
between the time periods.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
For notes, students will see them written on the overhead and will also hear me talking about
them in detail. Students will have a choice to either work in a group or independently, which will
allow them to have some autonomy in their classroom choices.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?

20

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

I will be animated and make the history relevant to high school aged students. I will do this by
finding ways to relate it to their lives, their interests, and the material that they have already
learned in the class. I will give a Venn Diagram example of something funny, like comparing the
clothes of my mentor teacher and I. This will hopefully rope students in to learning about Venn
Diagrams.

21

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 5 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Subsequent cultures can be linked by noting similarities and differences between them
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The basic history of the Middle Ages
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Link two subsequent, different cultures by noting similarities and differences between them

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Middle Ages
Anglo Saxons
Venn Diagram
Feudalism
Caste System
Values
Materials
22

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Worksheets
Technology Needs

Smart board
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Explain format of the day: students will continue to work on the Venn Diagram activity and we
will go over the answers at the end of the period (5 mins.)
Encourage students by noting the progress of yesterdays work in groups. Remind students of the
different aspects of life they can be looking at particularly in this activity. Remind them of the
objective: to note how historical context can shape a body of literature.
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Guided
25
Give students more time to work on
Students will work on Venn
Practice
mins. the Venn Diagram activity, either in
Diagram activity. If they
groups or by themselves. They should worked in groups yesterday,
be getting their final ideas down.
they can continue this
collaboration today.
Modeling &
15
Hand out a hole punched copy of a
Students will share answers and
Check for
mins. Venn Diagram, telling students to
write down correct answers on
Understanding
label it and place it in their notebook
clean Venn Diagram sheet.
(see attachment 8.) State that they can Students will participate
use their first Venn Diagrams as
through cold-call and by
rough drafts and that the clean one
volunteering to answer
will go in their notebooks.
questions.
Go over the answers, reviewing
Feudalism and Chivalry. Engage
students by asking questions from the
Venn Diagram, leading them to
answers.
Provide a mnemonic device to help
the students more easily learn the five
values of Medieval Chivalry:
High Schoolers Can Love Learning.
This mnemonic device will be used
throughout the rest of the unit as a
tool for student success.
Closing/
Summary

3
mins.

Preview: Explain that we will be


starting a text from the Midieval era,
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,
tomorrow.
23

Students will listen.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Preview: Explain that we will be


Students will listen.
starting a text from the Midieval era,
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,
tomorrow.
Assessment of Student Learning
Again: I will know students have learned the material when I walk around during
group/independent work on the Venn Diagram activity. I will ask students questions during this
time. I will also know about their knowledge and understanding when I quiz them later on
history and integrate it into the story
Closing/
Summary

3
mins.

Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
While giving answers to
I will be receptive to working
While giving answers to the
the activity, I will break
with student questions that may activity, I will break concepts
concepts down thoroughly be beyond what is typically seen down thoroughly so that
so that students can
in this level. When I walk
students can understand what is
understand what is going
around, if students seem bored
going on. Students will also
on. Students will also have with the Venn Diagram, I will
have the opportunity to work in
the opportunity to work in
ask them some deeper questions groups, if they choose.
groups, if they choose. A
about the relationship between
mnemonic device will be
the time periods. When we go
provided, which should
over the answers together, I will
help students to grasp the
ask for deeper insight from
concept of chivalry.
students who seem particularly
interested in the subject.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will have had an opportunity to hear the information, see the information, and work
with it themselves before we go over it. Thus, it will be a nice opportunity to lead students to
success, primarily by cold-call. Students will have had multiple ways to see and process the
information.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will be animated and make the comparison of the two historical contexts relevant to high school
aged students. I will do this by finding ways to relate it to their lives, their interests, and the
material that they have already learned in the class (and others.)

24

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 6 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Medieval Romance (genre)
25

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Chivalry
Simile
Imagery
Alliteration
Symbolism

Materials
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide

Overhead
Smart board

Technology Needs

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Hook: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight- pre-questions: Try to gauge student interest in the
upcoming text by asking five yes or no questions at the beginning of class. Students will
receive this as a handout (see attachment 9.) Tell them that I am interested to see their answers
and that the activity will get us started thinking about some of the things we might see in the text.
I will collect their answers and tell them that I am going to look at them over the weekend (5
mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Statement of
2
Remind the students that we are
Students will listen and respond
Objective &
mins. going to look at a Medieval Romance to posed questions.
Purpose
todayexperiencing the form of it,
looking for literary devices,
discovering the plot, and applying
principles of chivalry within the text.
Input,
Modeling, &
Check for
Understanding

40
mins.

Begin reading Sir Gawain and the


Green Knight aloud to the class. As
we go along, we will stop frequently,
as I explain things and engage the
class, allowing them to reason
through what is happening in the text.

Students will listen and actively


participate in discussion
(through cold-call and by
volunteering to answer
questions) as we make our way
through the text.

I will write character names on the


board as they come up so that
students can get an understanding of
whos who in the story. The goal
will be for us to get through pages
136-139 of the text.

Students will respond to


questions regarding plot,
principles of chivalry, and
literary devices.

26

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Closing/
Summary

3
mins.

Review: Ask students a few questions


from the story, such as:
Who came to town?
What is the main literary device we
saw at the beginning of the text?
Can someone give me an example of
alliteration?
What is imagery? Where did we see
imagery in the first part of the text?

Students will listen and


participate actively,
volunteering answers to
questions and also answering
through cold-call.
Students will make predictions
regarding what they will happen
next in the text.

Preview: have students make


predictions about what is to come
next in the story.
Go over the mnemonic device as a
tool to remember the aspects of
chivalry:
High Schoolers Can Love Learning
(Honor, Self Control, Courtly Love,
Loyalty, Law and Order.)
Assessment of Student Learning
I will know that students have learned the material when I ask questions during the reading of
the text. I will also be able to gauge what they are taking away when we get to the study guide
questions.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will slow down the
I will pull more out of them by
I will slow down the reading
reading and define words
asking complex questions
and define words that are
that are confusing. I will try (particularly, I think that the
confusing. I will try to be
to be animated and use
paradox as a literary term would animate and use hand motions
hand motions so that
be a good starting point for an
so that students have a sense of
students have a sense of
advanced discussion.)
what the mood and expression
what the mood and
of a scene is.
expression of a scene is.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
At the beginning of the period, students will have a hands-on worksheet where they can
independently read creative questions and answer them to their liking. This will give those who
really like creative thinking and reading a good way to get involved with the text. Students will
both have a copy of the text (for visual learners) and will hear the text read aloud (for auditory
learners.) As we go through the text, students will have different ways to get involved either by
cold call, raising hands, or shout outs.

27

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand. Also, the
pre-questions serve to light a spark of interest in what the students will soon read after.

28

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 7 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Alliteration
29

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Rhyme
Imagery
Symbolism
Paradox
Materials
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide
Technology Needs
Smart board
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Review:
Discuss the last reading of Sir Gawain (we read pages 136-139.) Hand out the text (5 mins.)
Hook: Ask students to make an oath that they will hand back their texts to me after we finish
with it each day.
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Guided
35
Collaborative work: Expert groups:
Students will work in
practice
mins. Divide students into 7 different
collaborative expert groups to
groups (should be about 3 students in complete study guide questions.
each.) Give each group 2 questions
from the study guide (see attachment They will then volunteer their
10.) Explain that I want each group to answers, based on what group
become an expert on their questions.
they are in, when we go over
Tell students that I will be calling on
the study guide as a class.
groups to provide answers when we
go over them as a class.
Walk around and monitor as students
work. If they are not working,
encourage them to get them done by
driving the expert factor. After
students are done, go over answers on
the overhead. Use this as a review,
especially for those students who
were out during the first reading of
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Move quickly through these so that
we can get to more of the story.

30

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Input,
Modeling, &
Check for
Understanding

5
mins.

Start reading Sir Gawain and the


Green Knight on page 140.
Hook students into the story by
saying that there is going to be a
fight. Talk about an example of
loyalty and frame this example in
terms of a coach or some other leader:
ex.: If your coach or leader was in
trouble, would you step up to protect
him/her?

Students will read along and


participate in discussion of text,
answering cold-call questions
and volunteering answers.
Questions for the students will
be framed in terms of plot,
literary devices, and applying
the values of the code of
chivalry to the text.

Try and get to the part where the


Green Knights head is cut off, so that
students will ultimately be hooked by
the end of the day.
Closing/
Summary

3
mins.

Provide a brief review and summary


of the text, based on where we got in
todays class.

Students will listen and input


their knowledge into the review
of the text.

Preview the reading for tomorrow.


Assessment of Student Learning
I will know that students have learned the material when I ask questions during the reading of
the text. I will also be able to gauge what they are taking away as they complete the study guide.
When going over the study guide questions, I will be able to have some sufficient data to see how
students are following along with the outcomes.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will slow down the
I will pull more out of them by
I will slow down the reading
reading and define words
asking complex questions
and define words that are
that are confusing. I will try (specifically, regarding
confusing. I will try to be
to be animated and use
symbolism in the story.) I will
animated and use hand motions
hand motions so that
also be able to walk around
so that students have a sense of
students have a sense of
during group work and ask
what the mood and expression
what the mood and
more complex questions where of a scene is. Students will have
expression of a scene is.
necessary.
an opportunity to work in a
Students will have an
group, if they get lost.
opportunity to work in a
group, if they get lost.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will both have a copy of the text (for visual learners) and will hear the text read aloud

31

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

(for auditory learners.) As we go through the text, students will have different ways to get
involved either by cold call, raising hands, or shout outs. Students will work in a group as they
complete the study guide.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand. I will
channel in on the expert part of the activity and make it fun for the students to have a goal in
mind during their collaborative group work.

32

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 8 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Alliteration
33

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Rhyme
Imagery
Symbolism
Paradox

Materials
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide

Smart board
Overhead

Technology Needs

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Hand out Sir Gawain packets.
Review: Provide a quick review/refresher of Sir Gawain. Use cold call for this.
Hook: Ask a question about the fight scene:
What does the typical fight scene look like today?
How do you think this differs from what things looked like during Sir Gawains time?
What is the worst possible thing that could happen during a fight?
(5 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Statement of
30
Pick up on reading as soon as
Students will read along and
Input,
mins. possible. We stopped yesterday on
participate in discussion of text,
Modeling, &
page 140 (line 142 for period 1, line
both by cold-call and by
Check for
138
for
period
2,
bottom
of
page
139
volunteering to answer
Understanding
for period 3.)
questions.
Try to read fluidly, stopping when
appropriate, but not to the points
where it becomes choppy.
Goal: get to page 144.
Guided
Practice

10
mins.

Students will work, either


independently or in a group
(according to their choice) on
questions 14-25 (see attachment 10.)
I will walk around to help students
and assess understanding of the text
and unit outcomes.

34

Questions for the students will


be framed in terms of plot,
literary devices, and applying
the values of the code of
chivalry to the text.
Students will work in
collaborative groups or alone to
answer study guide questions.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Closing/
Summary

3
mins.

Review: Ask questions regarding


what students learned today.

Students will listen.

For example:
What were the main values of
chivalry that were seen in the text
today?
What is Sir Gawains oath? Do you
think that he is going to keep it?
Where does the Green Knight tell Sir
Gawain to find him?
Preview: Tell students that we will
continue to explore the text of Sir
Gawain and the Green Knight. Let
students know that there will be a
quiz on the literature unit coming up
soon.
Assessment of Student Learning
Again: I will know that students have learned the material when I ask questions during the
reading of the text. I will also be able to gauge what they are taking away as they complete the
study guide. When going over the study guide question, I will get some nice data collection as to
how students are following along with the outcomes.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will slow down the
I will pull more out of them by
I will slow down the reading
reading and define words
asking complex questions
and define words that are
that are confusing. I will try (specifically, regarding
confusing. I will try to be
to be animated and use
symbolism and foreshadowing
animated and use hand motions
hand motions so that
in the story.) I will also be able
so that students have a sense of
students have a sense of
to walk around during group
what the mood of a scene is.
what the mood of a scene
work and ask more complex
Students will have an
is. Students will have an
questions where necessary.
opportunity to work in a group
opportunity to work in a
during study guide work, if they
group during study guide
get lost.
work, if they get lost.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will both have a copy of the text (for visual learners) and will hear the text read aloud
(for auditory learners.) As we go through the text, students will have different ways to get
involved either by cold call, raising hands, or shout outs. Students will have the opportunity to
work in groups (if they choose to) as they complete the study guide.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?

35

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand. Relevance
will be key here.

36

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 9 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Alliteration
37

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Rhyme
Imagery
Symbolism
Paradox
Materials

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text


Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide
Technology Needs

Smart board
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Hand out Sir Gawain packets.
Provide a quick review of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Note key plot events. Highlight
points where we start to see Sir Gawain falter in terms of the code of chivalry. Ask students
about what they have learned from the text up to this point (5 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Statement of
25
Go over the answers to study guide
Students will answer questions
Objective &
mins. questions 14-25 (see attachment 10.)
aloud and write down answers
Purpose
Use cold-call for this.
on the study guide.

Input,
Modeling, &
Check for
Understanding

5
mins.

Guided
Practice

15-20
mins.

Emphasize objectives by highlighting


big ticket items such as literary
devices, application of chivalry code,
and major plot events.

Questions for the students will


be framed in terms of plot,
literary devices, and applying
the values of the code of
chivalry to the text.

Review literary terms:


imagery, paradox, simile

Students will write down these


terms in their notebook.

Definitions will be provided on the


smart board. Students will be given
literary terms to define in their
notebook (in a pre-determined spot.)

They will be asked questions as


we go along, by way of coldcall or through volunteering
answers.

Pick up on reading as soon as


possible.

Students will read along and


participate in the discussion of
the text.

38

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Start with a hook to get students


interested in the text. For example:
Students will be engaged in
Have you ever been on a quest? A
cold-call and by volunteering
quest is a long journey where there
answers to questions.
are often trying times for characters.
Characters in modern film often go
on quests. For instance, in Pirates of
the Caribbean, the main characters go
on a quest to seek treasures. Just like
this, Sir Gawain goes on a quest to
find the Green Knight and his
chapel.
Read text, starting at page 144, line
243. Make sure to explain the plot
info they mention in the italics. Try to
stop only at red marks. Goal: try to
get to end of page 147.
Closing/
3
Again, remind students that there will Students will listen.
Summary
mins. be a quiz in the near future. Note
where we are in the text and talk
briefly about how we will be going
forward in our unit.
Assessment of Student Learning
Again: I will know that students have learned the material when I ask questions during the
reading of the text. I will also be able to gauge what they are taking away as they complete the
study guide. When going over the study guide questions, I will be able to have helpful data
collection to see how students are coming along with the intended outcomes.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will slow down the
I will pull more out of them by
I will slow down the reading
reading and define words
asking complex questions
and define words that are
that are confusing. I will try (specifically, regarding
confusing. I will try to be
to be animated and use
symbolism in the story.)
animated and use hand motions
hand motions so that
so that students have a sense of
students have a sense of
what the mood and expression
what the mood and
of a scene is. I will make sure
expression of a scene is. I
they have had ample time to
will make sure they have
feel confident about their
had ample time to feel
answers before I call on them in
confident about their
study guide review.
answers before I call on
them in study guide review.

39

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will both have a copy of the text (for visual learners) and will hear the text read aloud
(for auditory learners.) As we go through the text, students will have different ways to get
involved either by cold-call, raising hands, or shout outs. Also, when we go over the study guide,
students will have had time to write down their answers or review them with a group so that they
can feel proud and confident in their answers.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand. Relevance
is key here.

40

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 10 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Alliteration
Rhyme
41

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Imagery
Symbolism
Paradox

Materials
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide

Smart board
Overhead

Technology Needs

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Hand out Sir Gawain packets.
Provide a quick review of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Note key plot events up to this
point. Preview key events coming up in the text. Explain confusing parts, such as the new game
that Sir Gawain is set to play with Lord Bercilak. Highlight the game idea as a way to get
students excited (5 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Input,
30
Pick up on reading as soon as
Students will follow along with
Modeling, &
mins. possible.
the text.
Check for
Understanding

Start with a hook to get students


interested in todays plot events.
For example:
Lady Bercilak is about to make a
move on Sir Gawain.
How do you think Sir Gawain in
going to react, according to what we
know about him so far?
What would be the chivalrous thing
to do, according to the code of
chivalry for Medieval knights?
Read the text aloud, starting at the
last few lines of page 144, line 255.
Have clearly defined stopping points,
so that reading does not become to
choppy for the students. The goal for
today is to try and get to the end of
page 147, at least.

42

They will be asked questions as


we go along, by way of coldcall or through volunteering
answers.
Questions for the students will
be framed in terms of plot,
literary devices, and applying
the values of the code of
chivalry to the text.

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Guided
Practice

Closing/
Summary

(N/A) If there is a large amount of time


remaining after getting to page 147,
provide a cold-call approach to get
the study guide questions 26-41
answered quickly (see attachment
10.) If there is not a large amount of
additional time at page 147, carry on
with the reading.

Students will participate in the


study guide activity. They will
be cold-called to answer
questions.

5
mins.

Students will listen and answer


review questions.

Again, remind students that there will


be a quiz in the near future.

They will then record the


answers to the study guide
questions in their notebooks.

Review where we are in the text and


talk briefly about how we will be
going forward in our unit.
Assessment of Student Learning
Again: I will know that students have learned the material when I ask questions during the
reading of the text. I will also be able to gauge what they are taking away as they complete the
study guide. If we are able to go over the study guide questions, I will receive some helpful
collection to see how students are coming along with the intended outcomes.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will slow down the
I will pull more out of them by
I will slow down the reading
reading and define words
asking complex questions
and define words that are
that are confusing. I will try (specifically, regarding
confusing. I will try to be
to be animated and use
symbolism and other devices in animated and use hand motions
hand motions so that
the story.)
so that students have a sense of
students have a sense of
what the mood of a scene is.
what the mood of a scene
is.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will both have a copy of the text (for visual learners) and will hear the text read aloud
(for auditory learners.) As we go through the text, students will have different ways to get
involved either by cold-call, raising hands, or shout outs.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand. Relevance
is key here.

43

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 11 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): (From Common Core Standards)
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance
Key Vocabulary for this Lesson

Medieval Romance (genre)


Chivalry
Simile
Imagery
Alliteration
Symbolism
44

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Materials

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text


Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide
Technology Needs
Overhead
Smart board

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Review: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by cold call: call on students at random to review
what we have read so far. As there will have been a weekend+ break in between, there will need
to be extensive review in order to refresh students memories. Also, review to try and help catch
up students who have not been in class recently (5 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time
What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Statement of
2 mins. Remind the students that we are
Students will listen and be
Objective &
looking at a Medieval Romance
asked about the unit
Purpose
experiencing the form of it, looking
objectives.
for literary devices, discovering the
plot, and applying principles of
chivalry within the text.
Guided
30-35
Expert Groups: Students will
Students will work in
Practice
mins.
continue to work on their study
collaborative groups to
guides (see attachment 10.) Divide
become experts on certain
students into seven different groups
study guide questions.
(this may vary for 2nd period, as it is
a small class.)
Students will answer questions
using the text and by applying
Using the smart board, display group objectives that we have been
numbers to correlate with question
working on as a class..
numbers. Students will work to
complete character IDs: Sir Gawain,
Guinevere, Lady and Lord Bercilak,
Gringolet AND questions: 26-42.

Input,
Modeling, &
Check for

15
mins.

As they work, circulate around the


room to help answer questions and
to gather student knowledge and
understanding of the text. After 6-7
minutes, go over the answers on the
overhead by cold-calling expert
groups.
Try to finish the reading of Sir
Gawain and the Green Knight by
reading the story aloud to the class.
45

Students will listen and


actively participate in
discussion (through cold-call

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Stop frequently to explain and define


events/terms and engage the class
with questions, prompted from the
study guide and grounded in unit
objectives. This will allow students
to reason through what is happening
in the text. The goal will be for us to
get through pages 148-end.
However, this pace will be flexible
based upon time.

Understanding

Closing/
Summary

4 mins.

and by volunteering answers


to questions) as we finish up
the text.
Questions for the students will
be framed in terms of plot,
literary devices, and applying
the values of the code of
chivalry to the text.

Review: I will remind students of the Students will listen and


values/rules of chivalry. This will be practice the mnemonic device.
done by reviewing the mnemonic
device:
High Schoolers Can Love
Learning.
(Honor, self control, courtly love,
loyalty, and law and order.)

Preview: I will detail to students


where we will be going from here.
They should start thinking about the
question:
Is Sir Gawain a chivalrous knight,
according to the values/rules of
Medieval chivalry?
Assessment of Student Learning
During guided practice, I will be circulating the classroom and gauging what students got out of
the text. I will look at their answers and talk with them to assess how much they have learned
from our past readings. Going over the study guide by cold-calling will also give me a clearer
understanding of who is on board with meeting the objectives. I will use the responses of my
students as assessment data.
Differentiation Strategies
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
Students will have the
When walking around during
I will break down the
opportunity to work in
guided practice, I will pull
questions into simple terms
expert groups. This will
more out of them by asking
and define words that are
help them have a chance to
more complex, analytical
tricky. I will be animated and
become an
follow up questions about the
use hand motions while going
expert on certain
text.
over plot events.
questions/concepts and will
(hopefully) increase the
confidence in their answers

46

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

during cold-call. During the


reading, I will slow down and
define words and events that
are complex.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will have a chance to experience the text visually and to answer questions directly from
the text during expert groups. Although some of the questions are inference/application
questions, a lot of them are concrete plot questions. Thus, students will have some variety in
question level. Students will participate in group work, although they know (from a previous
time that they did expert groups) that they will eventually be called on individually. If they do
not get the question answered individually, they can refer to their groups. Thus, students will feel
responsible for the material collectively as well as individually. If there is time for reading,
students will be able to both see the text in front of them and hear the text read aloud by me.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand. Relevance
is key here.

47

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 12 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to determine whether such rules/principles
apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Subsequent cultures can be linked by noting similarities and differences between them
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The structure of a ballad
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The basic history of the Middle Ages
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Link two subsequent, different cultures by noting similarities and differences between them
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance
48

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Code
Values/principles/rules
Paradox
Metaphor
Foreshadowing
Materials
Middle Ages quiz
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide
Technology Needs
Smart board
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Remind students of the quiz. Allow a few minutes for questions (3 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Quiz
30
Literature in the Middle Ages quiz
Students will take the quiz. If
mins. (see attachment 13).
they have questions, they will
have the opportunity to raise
Explain the format of the quiz.
their hand and ask me as I
Distribute the quiz. Monitor and
circulate.
answer student questions as they take
the quiz.
Input,
15
Finish the reading of Sir Gawain and Students will read along and
Modeling, &
mins. the Green Knight. Pick up on reading participate in discussion of the
Check for
as soon as possible.
text, answering questions by
Understanding
volunteering and through coldStart with a hook to get students
call techniques.
interested in the ending of the text.
For example:
Questions for the students will
Think back to your codes. Some
be framed in terms of plot,
value codes are extremely important
literary devices, and applying
to certain people. For instance, if a
the values of the code of
person has an athletic code that they
chivalry to the text. The
live by, they may feel embarrassed or symbolism of the Green
shamed if they publically break it in
Knights swings will become
front of their teammates. Imagine that really important here.
this is how Sir Gawain feels here. He
is shamed and must be haunted by the
green girdle forever.
49

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Finish the text, starting at page 149,


line 450 (period 1) and line 463
(period 2.)
After the completion of the text, ask
students about their reactions to the
text as a whole (especially the
ending.)
Use questions such as:
How would you feel if you were Sir
Gawain?
Do you think Sir Gawain will want to
go back to the castle of Lord Bercilak
and celebrate with him?
What do you think about the
supernatural elements of the text?
What can we say about Lady Bercilak
now that we know about the tricks
played by Lord Bercilak?
Guided
Practice

Closing/
Summary

10
mins.

3
mins.

Have students finalize the study guide


answers by reviewing the remaining
questions (see attachment 10.)
Students will answer these questions
by way of cold-call.

Tell students that we will go over the


quiz before we have the unit test.

Students will participate in


cold-call and volunteer answers
for the study guide.
They will focus on the main
outcomes of the unit by way of
answering and reflecting on
these questions.
Students will listen.

Assessment of Student Learning


I will know that students have learned this material when I grade the quizzes.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will slow down the
I will pull more out of them by
I will slow down the reading
reading and define words
asking complex questions
and define words that are
that are confusing. I will try (specifically, regarding
confusing. I will try to be
to be animated and use
symbolism of the strikes and
animated and use hand motions
hand motions so that
further predictions about what
so that students have a sense of
students have a sense of
happens to Sir Gawain after the what the mood and expression
what the mood and
story ends.)
of a scene is. I will allow these
expression of a scene is.
students the option of using an
English-Spanish dictionary on
50

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

the quiz.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will have both a copy of the text (for visual learners) and will hear the text read aloud
(for auditory learners.) As we finish up the text, students will have different ways to get involved
either by cold-call, raising hands, or shout outs.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain and the Green Knight more applicable to teenage life by showing
excitement and by talking about the plot events in ways the students can understand and relate to.
Relevance is key here.

51

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 13 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Code
Values/principles/rules
Materials
Is Sir Gawain a Chivalrous Knight? worksheet
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight text
Technology Needs
52

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Overhead
Smart board

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Preview: tell students about the activity that we are going to work on today, in which they will
get a chance to prove their answer to the question we have been thinking about as a class.
Encourage them continue to think about the question, is Sir Gawain a chivalrous knight? (3
mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Input and
10
Explain Is Sir Gawain a Chivalrous Students will listen.
modeling
mins. Knight activity: Students will
receive a formal handout to answer
the following question: Using the
code of chivalry (see attachment 5)
and the text of Sir Gawain and the
Green Knight, is Sir Gawain
chivalrous?
Hand out a checklist (see attachment
12) that displays the five
values/rules of chivalry. Then, ask
students for proof (specific examples
from the text) as to whether or not
Sir Gawain meets each of those
values.
Guided Practice

20
mins.

Put students into assigned


collaborative groups to work on the
handout (see attachment 12.)
The ultimate goal is for students to
have an answer for whether they
believe Sir Gawain is a chivalrous
knight (based on the chivalry values
they have learned about and events
in the text itself.) They will
eventually rank Sir Gawain on a
chivalry scale.

Guided Practice

15-20
mins.

We will go over the worksheet


together as a class. Students will
write down the answers that will
53

Students will work together in


collaborative groups to
complete the worksheet. They
will prove whether or not they
believe Sir Gawain to be a
chivalrous knight, based on
proof from the text and their
knowledge of the values/rules
of chivalry.

Students will check their


answers with the document on
the overhead (see attachment

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

We will go over the worksheet


Students will check their
together as a class. Students will
answers with the document on
write down the answers that will
the overhead (see attachment
help to lead the to the outcomes for
11.)
this unit. Finally, they will rate Sir
Gawain on a chivalry scale of 110.
Closing/Summary 5
Preview: Inform students that they
Students will listen.
mins. will see a question much like this
one on their test.
Assessment of Student Learning
I will know that students have learned this material by walking around and collecting student
feedback during group work, by hearing student responses when we go over answers, and by
eventually having students answer this particular question on the unit test.
Guided Practice

15-20
mins.

Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
Students will have the
When walking around during
Students will have the
opportunity to work in
guided practice (and while
opportunity to work in groups.
groups. This will allow them going over the worksheet, for
This will allow them to think
to think through their
that matter), I will pull more
through their answers and ask
answers and ask questions
out of them by asking more
questions before they are
before they are asked to
complex, analytical follow-up
asked to recall answers in front
recall answers in front of the questions about their answers.
of the class. Also, the
class. Also, the worksheet is
worksheet is set up in a simple
set up in a simple format for
format for easy following.
easy following.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will be able to both hear and see the instructions of the assignment. The worksheet itself
will serve as a clear visual representation of what I am looking for. Students will be able to work
in groups to talk about ideas before they write them down. We will eventually go over them
together so students can have an official copy of what I am looking for in an answer.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will try to make Sir Gawain more applicable to teenage life by showing excitement and by
talking about his chivalry in ways the students can understand. Relevance is key here.

54

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 14 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Subsequent cultures can be linked by noting similarities and differences between them
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The basic history of the Middle Ages
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Link two subsequent, different cultures by noting similarities and differences between them
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

55

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Code
Values/principles/rules
Paradox
Simile
Symbolism
Alliteration
Caste system
Feudalism
Materials
Graded quizzes
Transparency with quiz on it
Technology Needs
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Hand back quizzes. Tell students that we are going to over the quiz that they took a couple of
days ago. Talk about the average of the quiz and how students did overall. Explain how we can
use this quiz as a tool to study for the upcoming test (5 mins.) Students will be able to keep a
copy of the quiz. As always, if they have any questions about their grades, they may come and
talk to me.
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Guided
35
Review the quiz: Go over the unit
Students will listen and follow
Practice
mins. quiz on the overhead projector. Have along, participating in
students follow along as I write down answering quiz questions by
answers.
cold-call and volunteering.
Cold-call questions along the way so
that students are required to think
about what answers they put and how
they should adjust them for the test.
Closing/
Summary

5
mins.

Preview: Explain that students will


see some of these questions again on
the test. Also let students know that
they have an opportunity to bring up
their grade by half if they do better on
the upcoming unit test.

Students will listen and ask


questions about the quiz or test,
if necessary.

Assessment of Student Learning


I will know that students have learned this material from the quiz grades that I just graded. I will
56

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

also gather more data during the cold call review of the quiz. I will eventually have further
assessment from the test.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I will call on a struggling
I will try and push these
I may call on a struggling
student to answer a
students further by asking more student to answer a question
question that I know they
advanced verbal questions
that I know they got correct on
got correct on the quiz
regarding a quiz question.
the quiz (based on my
(based on my assessment
assessment data.) This will help
data.) This will help them
them to feel confident in
to feel confident in
answering.
answering.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
Students will have a visual (the overhead) to follow along with as we go over the quizzes. I will
write along with them. They will also be able to see their quizzes (with my written feedback) as
they go along. If they have questions, I will be very receptive to answering anything regarding
course material.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I will, as per usual, try and make explanations and questions relevant to students lives.

57

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Standard Honors AP
Unit Title:
Day: 15 of 17
Literature in the Middle Ages
Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The structure of a ballad
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson


Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Deer symbol (fallow doe)
Ballad
Annotate
58

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Repetition
Materials
The Three Ravens poem handout and transparency
Technology Needs
Smart board
Overhead

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Hook: Show a picture of a raven. Tell students that we are going to work with a poem about a
raven today. Ask if anyone knows what is unique about ravens as birds. In this way, we can set
up context for the poem (5 mins.)
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students
will do:
Input,
10
Introduce the ballad, using the definition that they Students will write
Modeling, &
mins. will write in their notebooks.
down ballad as a
Check for
definition in the
Understanding
literary terms
section of their
notebooks.
Guided
30
Introduce the poem, The Three Ravens. Show a Students will use
Practice
mins. picture of a raven. Together as a group, students
the ballad
will use the ballad definition to annotate the poem defintition, along
(Explain annotating as adding notes to a text to
with the skills I
explain or comment) and apply the values/rules of show to them for
chivalry.
annotation, to
actively annotate
Talk about how when I am reading something, I
the poem.
will often write what Im thinking/my reactions to
a text. It helps to keep me engaged, especially on a
test.
In the poem, students will note:

Simple language/structure

Repetition

Popular subject matter of the Middle Ages:


o Chivalry
o Supernatural

59

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

o Religion
Closing
activity

5
mins.

Play the audio recording of The Three Ravens-- Students will listen.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uT7tEayUwk Afterwards,
students will reflect
The purpose of this recording is to show students
on what they heard
that these poems are rhythmicthat they can
and will answer
make more sense when they are put to music. This questions about the
can be tied to the historical note about the arts
modern ballad.
rising during the Middle Ages. This will also
provide a segue into discussing the evolution of
the modern day ballad.
After this is played, ask students questions about
the ballad. Have them reflect on what they heard.
Suggest questions such as:
Are there still ballads in todays world?
What kind of ballads do you listen to today?
How does music bring the poem to life?
What kind of rhythm does this particular ballad
have?

Assessment of Student Learning


I will know that students have learned this material when I see their annotations and when I
review with them for the unit test.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language
Learners:
I will slow down the poem When walking around during guided
I will slow down
reading and define words
practice, I will pull more out of them by
the poem reading
that are confusing. I will
asking more complex, analytical follow up
and define words
try to be animated and use questions about the text.
that are confusing. I
hand motions so that
will try to be
students have a good sense
animated and use
of what is going on in the
hand motions so
poem.
that students have a
good sense of what
is going on in the
poem.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
This will be a great activity for students who like to practically organize their thoughts, as
students will have in-depth practice in annotating a poem. I feel that I have organized the activity
so that students can follow along clearly. They will also be able to practice autonomy in marking
60

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

up what they would like to mark up in the poem.


How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
I am hoping to be able to use the music and the picture of the ravens as a way to draw student
interest. I believe that students will be interested in how the ballad has evolved today in modern
times. I will draw upon modern ballads to show why these Medieval poems are so important to
our society.

61

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Daily Lesson Plan


Course Name: English IV
Unit Title:
Literature in the Middle Ages

Standard Honors AP
Day: 16 of 17
*(DAY 17 IS TEST DAY
See attachment 16 for test)

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):


1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text
leaves matters uncertain.
3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements
of a story or drama
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, or beautiful
5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact
Specific Lesson Objectives
Students will understand:
A set of guiding rules/principles can be used to analyze and determine whether such
rules/principles apply in a text
Patterns can be recognized and noted in different forms of texts in order for readers to make
inferences about common values of a society
Literary devices can be recognized and analyzed in texts
Subsequent cultures can be linked by noting similarities and differences between them
Genres of literature can be recognized based on form and substance
Students will know:
The values/rules of chivalry, divided into five broad categories (honor, self control, courtly
love, loyalty, law and order)
The three main elements of a medieval romance
The structure of a ballad
The definition of literary terms, such as paradox, foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, etc.
The basic history of the Middle Ages
The plot line of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Students will be able to:
Analyze historical definitions of chivalry
Examine a variety of texts to see how principles of chivalry apply in different texts
Infer common values of the Middle Ages
Highlight literary devices such as alliteration, rhyme, imagery, symbolism, paradox, and
irony in a text
Recall plot events and outcomes of a story
Link two subsequent, different cultures by noting similarities and differences between them
62

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

Recognize particular types of literature based of form and substance


Key Vocabulary for this Lesson
Chivalry: honor, loyalty, self control, courtly love, law and order
Code
Values/principles/rules
Paradox
Simile
Symbolism
Alliteration
Caste system
Feudalism
Materials
Hat
Small sheets of papers with all students names on them
Technology Needs
Smart board

LESSON ACTIVITIES
Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.)
Explain that, today, there will be a test review for the Literature in the Middle Ages test
tomorrow. Explain the basic format and set up of the test (4 mins.) There will be fill-in-theblank, multiple choice, and short answer. There will be about twenty-one questions of varying
length and point value.
Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary.
Section
Time What the Teacher will do:
What the Students will do:
Guided
45
TEST REVIEW:
Students will answer the review
Practice
mins. On the smart board, twelve questions questions on the smart board
will be listed (see attachment 15.)
without the help from notes.
Students will have 10 minutes to
write down their answers to these
Students must be prepared to be
questions, with no help from notes.
called on at random.
Students will then be called on at
random (based on who I draw out of
the magic hat) to answer any
question.
There will be two class lifelines. If
students are not sure about an answer,
they will be able to either phone a
classmate or ask the text. These
lifelines can only be used once a
piece, creating a pressure for students
63

Owen, English IV, Literature in the Middle Ages

to save them.
It is necessary to hit all objectives
along the way in order to increase
student understanding. Focus on
improving what students know about
the unit by drawing from the
outcomes listed above.
Closing/
5
Review: Take time to ask students if
Students will ask questions, if
Summary
mins. they have any additional questions
necessary.
regarding the unit material or the test.
Assessment of Student Learning
I will know that they have learned the material by hearing their answers to the review questions.
I will also be able to gather data in their unit test answers.
Differentiation Strategies*
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS?
Struggling Students:
Gifted/Advanced Students:
English Language Learners:
I may call on a struggling
I may try and push these
I may call on a struggling
student to answer a
students further by asking more student to answer a question
question that I know they
advanced questions regarding a that I know they got correct
got correct from my
review question.
from my circulation of the
circulation of the room.
room.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students LEARNING PROFILES?
During the review, students will have time to write down their answers and reflect. They know
that they will be called on, so they will hopefully work hard to get an answer. However, they do
have lifelines available, in which they can either phone a classmate or ask the text. Thus,
there will be pressurebut hopefully not too much pressure.
How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students INTERESTS?
It is a game, so students should be motivated to get all the answers. If they do, they will earn the
success of having had all the review questions answered before the test. They will hopefully get
motivated by the magic hat, which I will sometimes ask my mentor teacher and other students
to pull from. I will have high energy during the game to keep students engaged and to make it a
fun learning experience.

64

Attachment 1

Department of the Navy Core Values

1. Honor: bear true faith and allegiance

Maintain integrity:
-Keep your word
-Be honest and truthful
Take full responsibility for your professional and personal actions
Act appropriately with those who are ranked higher, lower, and equal with you
Be in good legal standing

2. Courage: support and defend

Have the guts to meet all challenges


Act in the best interest of the United States and its military, despite what it might
mean for your personal life
Dont let your emotions take control of you during hard times
Be loyal to your nation

3. Commitment: obey the orders

Care for the personal and spiritual well-being of people


Show respect toward all people without regard to race, religion, or gender
Strive for positive change and personal improvement
Maintain high moral character and professional excellence in all that you do

65

Analyzing Core Values Activity taking sheet


note

66

Attachment 2


Attachment 3

Writing Activity

Chivalry was a code that knights lived by during the Middle Ages. What is a code that you try to
live by today? Provide examples and descriptions of the values/rules that you follow in this code.

If you cant think of any specific code that you follow, start by writing down and describing
values/rules that you try to live by. Then write about whether you see any patterns in these
values/rules.

67


Attachment 3

Example:
I try to follow a runners code. My runners code consists of four main values and rules.
1) Companionship: I like to run with people. I started running with my dad many years ago. He
was the one who got me interested in running in the first place. Its still something we do
whenever we are together. Some of the best memories I have involve running with my dad. Now
that I am married, I will sometimes run with my wife. When running long distances, making
friends on the course can often get me through a race. Running companions challenge me, cheer
me on, and keep me going.
2) Motivation: I have to keep myself motivated while running. To do this, I set small goals for
myself. I say things to myself like... if I can get to a certain location, I will give myself a sip of
water or a nutrition bar. Oftentimes the races themselves serve as a motivation for me. I enjoy
the energy of the crowds and the music. Without motivation, I would not have the will to run.
3) Follow Through with Training: Whenever I sign up for a race, I plot out a calendar schedule
for training. I do this so I can build up the endurance that I need to run the race. So, if Im signed
up for a half marathon, I would work my way up with mileage. Id probably start at 3 or 4 miles,
then work my way up to about 10 or 11. I rarely go the full mileage of race day when I train, so
that I dont injure myself.
4) Take Time for Physical Health: Diet and sleep are essential to running. If Im not getting
proper nutrition, my body wont last during a long run. For instance, I was once training for a 31
miler. I was constantly losing weight. My wife was worried about me. Shes really interested in
health and nutrition. We talked and she helped me to work out a diet that I could follow, based
on what days I was running.

68

Attachment 4

Our Codes
Personal code #1
Honesty: Stay true to yourself; never tell a lie
Work hard: apply yourself; put forth all your effort; never
give up
Respect: respect yourself; respect those around you; respect
property
Personal code #2

Tell the truth: do not tell lies


Keep your word: if you agree to commit, dont go against it
Confidence: be confident in everything you do
Trust: if you can trust someone, they can trust you

Soccer code

Work together: play with the team


Warm-up: be ready when the team is about to start
Train: run daily; play or practice every day
Never give up: if the team is losing, resist getting mad

Football code
Keep up with training: make sure to go every day and give
100%
Show leadership on and off the field: show confidence; set
an example always
Follow pregame for good luck: do the same thing every
Friday before a game; never break a step

69

Attachment 4

Basketball (Michael Jordan) code:


Never quit: always try again
Train to be the best: work even on the days off
Never feel good with a loss: never think of yourself as a
loser
Strive for a championship: become a legend
ROTC code
Do not lie: always be honest
Do not cheat: cheating on any form of work is not
responsible and not tolerated
Do not steal: theft will be punished, no matter what the
circumstance is
Shopping code
Do not spend more than 2 hours in a store: if you cant find
anything in that time, there is nothing in there
Budget before you go: set aside money for expenses
Dont convince yourself to buy something you dont really
like: if you wont wear it, its a waste of money
Buy what you need first: buy things you need before
buying pointless accessories
Work code
Be loyal: go to work when you are on the schedule; be
loyal to customers and managers

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Attachment 4

Self control: when customers have attitudes, dont give an


attitude back
Honor: tell the customers the truth, no matter what
Education code
Commitment: stay committed to do working and what you
need to do
Efficiency: turn in work efficiently and on time
Effort: try to do the work, even if you dont finish. Always
give 100%
School code

Do your best: work hard to do well


Do your homework: homework helps to get good grades
Meet attendance: only miss if its an emergency
Pay attention: dont sleep or zone out

Trail-riding code:
Loyalty: represent your saddle club by wearing your club
shirt
Respect: respect yourself and the older people
Always follow the trail boss: never try to go ahead of the
bunch
Make sure you have a ribbon on the horses tail if it kicks
Religious code
(from 10 commandments)
Dont steal

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Dont lie
Dont murder
etc.

Home code
Do chores everyday: take out the trash; vacuum the stairs
Be respectful to your family: say yes sir and yes
maam; dont cuss
Clean up your room and your side of the bathroom: keep
room neat; clean up trash

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Medieval Chivalry Core Values

Attachment 5

1. Loyalty

Take an _______________ of loyalty:


-Be loyal to your _______________ or overlord
-Be loyal to the _______________ (Christianity)
-Be _____________ to your country

2. Honor

Do not __________; remain faithful to your word

Demonstrate respect for others

Be ____________________ and charitable

3. Self ________________

Think before you act

Make decisions with ______________ in mind

Work ______________

4. Law and Order

Follow certain rules of ____________________ :


-Show bravery; never give up before an enemy
-Complete strict ___________________ procedures to become a ___________________
-Never attack an unarmed opponent
-Take risks to show your ____________________
-Fight against ___________________ and evil

Embrace the order of ________________________


-Respect the social hierarchy (______________ system)
-Acknowledge God as the supreme ruler
-Follow through with all _______________________ duties

5. Courtly Love

Enhance bravery by adoring a lady other than your wife:


-Honor and _________________ your lady in the highest regard (nonsexual)

-Wear colors of your lady in battle

-_____________________ your lady and allow her to inspire you

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Attachment 6




MIDDLE AGES PERIOD (1066-1485 A.D.)
AKA Medieval Period (think: root medi=middle)

I. End of the Anglo-Saxons


A. The final Anglo-Saxon King (Harold) was defeated by William The Conqueror
(of Normandy) in a day-long battle
B. William began what is known as the Norman Conquest, which largely
influenced modern English language and culture
C. Unlike the Romans, The Normans would never leave England
II. Life under William the Conqueror
A. He wanted to rule the Anglo-Saxons, not get rid of them
B. He recorded every piece of property in England in The Domesday Book
C. He set up a useful tax system
III. Middle Ages
A. Feudalism
1. Think: castles, moats, battles, and knights
2. The caste system was a hierarchy or ranking based on social power and
divine right (inherited by blood/family)
3. Basic social ranking: GodPopeKing/overlordsknightsserfs
4. Groups were known as vassals, bounded by oath and loyalty to a higher
power
5. Battles occurred when groups were weak or did not listen (fighting
occurred between knights)
B. Knighthood
1. Many boys were required to become warriors (knights)
2. Boys were trained at an early age in locations other than their houses
3. Training was strict and tough
4. Dubbing ceremonies occurred when boys finished their training (boys
were tapped on the shoulder with a sword and formally became sirs)
5. Loyalty was very important to knighthood
C. Chivalry (See L-____)
1. Chivalry was a code for knights to follow
2. The form and manners of chivalry (L-___) influenced the life, art, and
literature of the Middle Ages
D. Religion
1. Christianity continued to be the main religion of the land
2. Chivalry code included ideas of Christianity and loyalty to the Church

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Attachment 7


The Domesday Book

Welsh castle built around 1283-1289AD





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Attachment 7


Knight dubbing ceremony


Courtly love

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Attachment 8
Anglo Saxon Life

Middle Ages Life


A

Directions: Using L-2 and L-5/L-6, compare and contrast the


way that people lived during the Anglo Saxon (Beowulf) times
with the way people lived during
the Middle Ages.
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77
777

Attachment 9

Before we start Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, here are some questions
for you to think about (circle YES or NO):
1) If your leader (parent, teacher, coach, etc.) told you to do something that would risk your life,
would you do it? YES or NO
2) Have you ever seen a green person? YES or NO
3) If you lived in the Middle Ages, would you be able to go through the training and become a
knight? YES or NO
4) Would you ever go into a fight unarmed? YES or NO
5) Are there any rules that you go by (perhaps in your code that you wrote about) that you would be
willing to break in order to save your life? YES or NO

Before we start Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, here are some questions
for you to think about (circle YES or NO):
1) If your leader (parent, teacher, coach, etc.) told you to do something that would risk your life,
would you do it? YES or NO
2) Have you ever seen a green person? YES or NO
3) If you lived in the Middle Ages, would you be able to go through the training and become a
knight? YES or NO
4) Would you ever go into a fight unarmed? YES or NO
5) Are there any rules that you go by (perhaps in your code that you wrote about) that you would be
willing to break in order to save your life? YES or NO

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Attachment 10
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Study Guide

Character IDs:
The Green Knight

Sir Gawain

Arthur

Guinevere

Gringolet

Lord Bercilak

Lady Bercilak
______________________________________________________________________________
1) What stands out about the horse and the horseman?

2) In lines 15-20, provide an example of imagery. Who or what does it describe?

3) What does the Green Knight carry with him as he rides?

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Attachment 10
4) What is the line graven in green with graceful designs an example of? (Line 38)

5) In line 45, how does the Green Knight act when he reaches the hall? Who does he ask to speak
with?

6) Why does the Green Knight look for the most noble renowned in line 53? What part of chivalry
does this action and title refer to?

7) Why does everyone stare at the Green Knight in silence?

8) In line 75, what does Arthur refer to himself as?

9) What attracts the Green Knight to the hall of Arthur?

10) What does the Green Knight carry in one hand to give evidence that he comes in peace?

11) In addition to the answer in #10, what else does the Green Knight carry (look at study guide
question #3)? How is what he carries an example of a paradox?

12) What does the Green Knight want to do in the hall of Arthur?

13) What is the Christmas game? Why is it called by this name?

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Attachment 10
14) What kind of weapon does the Green Knight want to use in the game?

15) Who FIRST volunteers to swing at the Green Knight?

16) What literary device is used in lines 136-138? What does it say about the Green Knights
reaction to the stroke?

17) What value/rule of chivalry does Sir Gawain show when he stops King Arthur from striking the
Green Knight?

18) What value/rule of chivalry is shown in line 146? How so?

19) What does Sir Gawain say about himself in lines 154-155? What aspect of chivalry does this
show?

20) Who, then, ends up playing the Christmas game?

21) What oath does Sir Gawain take at line 179?

22) Where does Sir Gawain hit the Green Knight? What do the people standing around do to his head?

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Attachment 10
23) How does the Green Knight react after he is hit? What part of the Medieval romance definition
does this event show?

24) In lines 224-229, what does the Green Knight remind Sir Gawain of? Where does the Green
Knight tell Sir Gawain to find him?

25) In line 232, what does The Green Knight say Sir Gawain will be called if he does not stay true to
his word?

26) Does Sir Gawain attempt to stay true to his word? What value/rule of chivalry does this show?

27) When looking for the Green Chapel, where does Sir Gawain stop and stay?

28) Lord Bercilak asks Sir Gawain to play a game. How is this game played?

29) According to the italics on page 144, what does the lady of the Castle (Lady Bercilak) try to do to
Sir Gawain each day?

30) Does Sir Gawain initially give into her seduction? What value/rule of chivalry does he show by
not giving in?

31) Does Lord Bercilak get mad that Sir Gawain hangs out with his wife? Why would he not get mad,
according to the rules/values of chivalry?

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Attachment 10
32) In lines 243-251, what does Lady Bercilak try to offer him? Why does he refuse?

33) What does she offer him next?

34) What value/rule of chivalry does Sir Gawain speak of in line 271, I shall stay your devotee?

35) What is special about this girdle (belt), according to Lady Bercilak?

36) Does she persuade him to accept the girdle (belt)? Why do you think he accepts it?

37) What value/rule of chivalry does Sir Gawain break when he accepts the girdle (belt)?

38) What two literary techniques are used in line 303, The bristling barbs of rock seemed to brush the
sky.

39) What kind of place is the mound that Sir Gawain believes to be the Green Chapel? Give proof.

40) What is the sound that Sir Gawain hears?

41) Is the Green Knight happy to see Sir Gawain? Why? (Think about chivalry values/rules.)

42) What does Sir Gawain do when the Green Knight starts to hit him the first time?

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Attachment 10

43) What happens the second time the Green Knight starts to hit Sir Gawain?

44) In line 429, what literary device is used to describe the way that Gawain reacts to the hit? Explain.

45) On the third time the Green Knight starts to hit Sir Gawain, what happens?

46) What does Sir Gawain do in lines 451-460 after the Green Knight hits him? What value/rule of
chivalry does this show?

47) Does the Green Knight wish to fight? Why?

48) What do the three hits symbolize in lines 480-495?

49) Who, then, is the Green Knight?

50) What is the point of the games? Do you think Sir Gawain passed his test of chivalry?

51) In lines 515-524, how does Sir Gawain react when finds out about this trick?

52) What does the Green Knight/Lord Bercilak say about Sir Gawain at the end? What does the Green
Knight give to Sir Gawain to keep?

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Attachment 11

Is Sir Gawain a chivalrous knight?

Value/Rule

Does he
always
show it?

Proof

Honor

No

Sir Gawain does fulfill his promise to find the Green Knight.
However, he doesnt remain faithful to his word when he
fails to give his biggest winning (the belt) to Lord Bercilak.

Self control

No

Sir Gawain does refuse gifts and sex from Lady Bercilak.
However, he makes the decision to take the belt from her
without keeping his main goal (chivalry) in mind.

Courtly love

Yes

Sir Gawain honors Lady Bercilak and tells her that he is her
devotee. He also keeps their relationship nonsexual.

Loyalty

Yes

Sir Gawain is loyal to his King (Arthur) by taking his place in


the Christmas game.

Law and Order

Yes

Sir Gawain shows bravery by challenging the Green Knight


after the three strikes.

85

Is Sir Gawain a chivalrous knight?


Value/Rule

Does he always Proof


show it?

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Attachment 12

English IV
Mr. Owen

Attachment 13
Name _______________________________
Middle Ages Quiz

Fill in the blank: Using one or two words, put the correct answer in each blank (4 points each)
1. A knight had to take a(n) ______________ of loyalty to his King.

1. ______________________

2. Caste system: GodPope_____________KnightsSerfs/Peasants

2. ______________________

3. A code of values/rules that knights had to follow in the Middle Ages

3. ______________________

4. The two things that the Green Knight carries with him

4. __________________ & __________________

5. The part of chivalry that is defined by the words do not lie,


demonstrate respect, and be generous and charitable

5. ______________________

6. The literary device used in graven in green with graceful designs

6. ______________________

7. The winning that Sir Gawain offers Lord Bercilak each night

7._______________________

8. A Medieval Romance is a long poem about a knight who goes on


a _____________.

8. ______________________

9. A Medieval Romance often has _____________ elements.

9. ______________________

Short Answer: Answer the following questions (15 points each)


1. List three of the five values/rules of chivalry

2. Besides alliteration, what is one other literary device used in the following lines? Explain your answer using
the definition of the literary device.
That a horseman and his horse should have such a color
As to grow green as grass, and greener yet, it seemed,
More gaudily glowing than green enamel on gold

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Attachment 13

3. What value/rule of chivalry does Sir Gawain show in the following lines? Explain your answer.
She proffered him a rich ring wrought in red gold...
She offered it him urgently and he refused again,
Fast affirming his refusal on his faith as a knight

4. Based on the values/rules of chivalry, how can we explain the relationship between Sir Gawain and the lady
of the castle (Lady Bercilak?) Give proof for your answer.

88

The Three Ravens


Attachment 14

THERE were three rauens sat on


a tree,

His haukes they flie so eagerly,



Downe a downe, hay down, hay


downe

Theres no fowle dare him come


nie. 1
15

There were three rauens sat on a


tree,
With a downe

Downe there comes a fallow doe,



There were three rauens sat on a


tree, 5

As great with yong as she might


goe.

They were as blacke as they


might be.

With a downe derrie, derrie,


derrie, downe, downe.

She lift vp his bloudy hed,

And kist his wounds that were so


red.


The one of them said to his mate,


She got him vp vpon her backe,

20

Where shall we our breakefast


take?

And carried him to earthen lake.


2


Downe in yonder greene field,

10


She buried him before the prime,

There lies a knight slain vnder


his shield.

She was dead herselfe ere euen-


song time.


His hounds they lie downe at
his feete,


God send euery gentleman,

So well they can their master


keepe.

Such haukes, such hounds, and


such a leman. 3 25
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Attachment 15

Middle Ages Test Review


1. What is she runs like the wind an example of?
2. Which value/rule of chivalry allows for the relationship of Sir Gawain and
Lady Bercilak?
3. A ____________ is a long, narrative poem about a hero (knight) on a
quest. The knight is influenced by values/rules of chivalry. There are often
supernatural elements
4. The Green Knight carries both an axe and a holly cluster (which seemingly
contradict each other.) This is an example of what literary term?
5. How many times does the Green Knight strike (or fake strike) Sir Gawain?
6. What does each strike represent?
7. Just as Wiglaf shows ____________ to Beowulf in Beowulf, Sir Gawain
shows ____________ to King Arthur in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
8. What is the name of the place that Sir Gawain is out to find on his quest?
9. What is the name of the value/rule of chivalry that is defined by following
certain rules of warhood (bravery, strict training, fighting, strength) and
embracing the order of Feudalism (caste system and military duties)?
10. What is the literary term for descriptive language such as Jimmy made
loud, crunching noises while he ate his large, buttery bag of popcorn?
11. Name an example of Sir Gawain breaking a value/rule of chivalry in the
story. Then name an example of him successfully showing a value/rule of
chivalry.
12. Name the mnemonic device we used to remember the value/rules of
Medieval chivalry.

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Attachment 16
Name _______________________________
Middle Ages Test

Fill in the blank: Using one or two words, put the correct answer in each blank (2 points each)
1) The _________ system was a social ranking system based on divine right

1. ______________________

2) The modern slogan, StateFarm is there like a good neighbor, is an example


of what literary device?

2. ______________________

3) Just as Wiglaf shows this value/rule to his King in Beowulf, Sir Gawain
3. ______________________
shows _________ to his King when he takes Arthurs place in the Christmas game
4) When the Green Knight arrives at Arthurs castle, he carries an axe and
a holly branch. This serves as an example of a _________, in which two
things placed side by side seemingly contradict one another.

4. ______________________

5) Who FIRST volunteers to hit the Green Knight?

5. ______________________

6) Imagery is descriptive language that appeals to the __________.

6. ______________________

7) When Sir Gawain says to Lady Bercialk, And ever through hot and cold
I shall stay your devotee, what value/rule of chivalry does he show?

7. ______________________

8) The Green Knight picks up his head from the ground after Sir Gawain strikes
him. This shows that the Green Knight is a _________ character.

8. ______________________

9) The name of the place that Sir Gawain seeks on his quest

9. ______________________

10) Which of the following values/rules of Medieval chivalry best describes this
modern scenario: A high school student tells the truth about a fight in the
hallway, even though telling the truth could make her friends mad at her.

10. ______________________

11) The winning(s) that Sir Gawain gives to Lord Bercilak each night in
the castle

11. ______________________

Multiple choice: Circle the best answer for each question (2 points each)
12) During the Middle Ages, knights were judged mainly by the way that they followed ________.
a) the Bible
b) the Doomsday Book
c) the code of chivalry
d) Feudalism
e) Supernatural events

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Attachment 16

13) Who does the Green Knight turn out to be?


a) Gringolet

d) Guinevere

b) Lady Bercilak

e) King Arthur

c) Lord Bercilak
14) What does Lady Bercilak successfully give to Sir Gawain?
a) sex

d) belt

b) jewelry

e) whistle

c) hair band
15) What is the main literary device (besides alliteration) used in the lines, On the bank beyond the brook, a
barbarous noise. What! It clattered amid the cliffs fit to cleave them apart...?
a) irony
b) imagery
c) rhyme
d) paradox
e) theme
16) Who is described in the line, Such a horseman, in the whole wide world was never seen or
observed by those assembled before, not one...?
a) Sir Gawain
b) Guinevere
c) The Green Knight
d) Lady Bercilak
e) King Arthur
17) Alliteration is most clearly shown in which of the following lines?
a) For Arthur sensed an exploit before the high days...
b) I was craven about our encounter...
c) You honor the trysts you owe...
d) Down in yonder green field there lies a knight slain...
e) First, a green gossamer, a golden one next...

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Attachment 16

Short Answer: Answer the following questions


18) Based on the following passage, which value/rule of chivalry attracts the Green Knight to
King Arthurs castle? Explain your answer using the passage as well as the definition of the
value/rule you choose. (18 points)
But as your reputation, royal sir, is raised up so high,
And your castle and cavaliers (knights) are accounted the best,
The mightiest of mail-clad men in mounted fighting,
The most warlike, the worthiest the world has bred,
Most valiant to view with in virile contests
Value: _________________________
Proof:

19) After the Green Knight strikes Sir Gawain, he explains his actions as examples of symbolism.
In the following chart, explain the TYPE of strike that the Green Knight gives to Sir Gawain each time.
Then, name AND specifically explain (in detail) what each strike symbolizes or represents. (15 points)

Strike

Type of strike

What does it symbolize?

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Attachment 16

20) Complete the following steps. (18 points)


Step One: Name all five values/rules of chivalry.
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Step Two: On a scale of 1-10 (10 being MOST chivalrous), rate Sir Gawains chivalry level.

10

Step Three: Using at least three of the five values/rules of chivalry and examples from the text, defend your rating.
1)

2)

3)

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21)

Attachment 16

A Medieval Romance is a long, narrative poem. It often contains supernatural elements.


Identify the two parts missing from the Medieval Romance definition above. Then, use each missing part
and proof from the text to show that Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a Medieval Romance. (15 points)

1)

Missing Part:

How the text fits this part of the definition:

2)

Missing Part:

How the text fits this part of the definition:

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