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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Curriculum Project
By

Carly Sokol, Anna Hutcherson, and


Taylor Fletcher

Table of Contents

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Cover Page

Community Context..

3-4

Program Description.

5-9

Program Philosophy..

10-11

Curriculum

12-53

Beginning/Intermediate Orchestra....

13-28

Beginning Guitar/Ukulele....

29-31

Beginning/Intermediate Band...

32-42

High School Guitar...

43-45

High School Orchestra.

47-53

Community Context

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

1. Chesterfield County Schools are located in Chesterfield County, south west of Richmond
City. Midlothian Middle School and Midlothian High School are located in the town of
Midlothian and are both a part of Chesterfield County Schools.
2. General Demographics:
(lcps.org/cms/lib4/VA01000195/Centricity/Domain/2608/Guitar%20Curriculum
%202012-13.pdf)
a. Population (2014) 332,499
b. White alone, percent, 2013 69.9%
c. Black or African American alone, percent, 2013 23.2%
d. American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, 2013 0.6%
e. Asian alone, percent, 2013 3.6%
f. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, 2013 0.1%
g. Two or More Races, percent, 2013 2.5%
h. Hispanic or Latino, percent, 2013 7.7%
i. White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, 2013 63.8%
j. Land area in square miles, 2010 423.3039
k. Persons per square mile, 2010 747.1
3.

The primary stakeholders in the county and in the school are business owners and parents

(sometimes they are interchangeable). There are many small businesses in the suburban area of
Midlothian and parents are actively involved in their childrens lives. That means that support
for the program can come from both parents and the community. The teacher, in this situation,
should focus primarily on those groups for fundraising options.

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

4.

The Midlothian area is primarily a suburban area. It is not rural and does not sustain on

farming, rather the economy is focused on small businesses. Since it is close to Richmond City,
many people commute to work for large businesses.
5.

There are not very many cultural opportunities in Midlothian, however there are many

cultural opportunities in Richmond City, which are only a few miles away. The Richmond Folk
festival is one of many festivals that brings musicians from around the world of different musical
ethnicities together to perform at an exciting venue. Other resources to cultural opportunities can
be found at http://www.visitrichmondva.com/about-richmond-region/diversity/cultural-festivalssampler/.
6.

Musical opportunities are of a wide variety around Midlothian. As mentioned before, the

Richmond Folk Festival is a great place to experience music from other cultures. The Richmond
Symphony is close by with many professional musicians that offer private lessons. They also
sponsor the Richmond Youth Symphony Orchestra, which is a prestigious orchestra made up of
the best musicians in the area. There are many different orchestras that are a part of the
Richmond Youth Symphony Orchestra, so students of all levels can be involved.
7.

The context of the area affects the form of the curriculum by the social status of the

people of Midlothian. Since it is a wealthy area, and based on the demographics of the area,
many students will be able to afford their own instruments. They will also be able to rent
instruments from local shops (there are many good local shops that rent instruments out to
students). This means that students should be able to have access to every instrument (the school
can provide basses and some cellos for class). Also, it might impact playing if most students are
able to afford private lessons. It would drastically change the curriculum.

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Program Description

1. There are two schools involved in the program that is presented in the Curriculum
Project. The two schools are Midlothian High School and Midlothian Middle School. To
cover the 3 schools there would be a minimum of 3 teachers and a maximum of 6 for
their instrumental programs. The three needed teachers would be for Band, Orchestra,
and Guitar and they would switch between schools.
2. Ensembles
a. Beginning Guitar/Ukulele (MS)
This class is for all students, but will focus on students who are just
beginning in music. It will start in the 7th grade and have one coherent
class. Both guitar and Ukulele will be taught and students will be given
the option to learn either one, or both.
b. Beginning Band (MS)
Beginning band starts in the 6th grade. This is for students who are in their
first year of band. Students who decide to start band in the 7th or 8th grade
are welcome to join the program, they just must join this class. Beginning
band covers many musical fundamentals and also assigns students to a
specific instrument that they begin to learn the basics to.
c. Intermediate Band (MS)

Intermediate band is for students that have taken beginning band and wish
to continue their pursuit in music. Intermediate band will cover more
advanced band repertoire and more difficult strategies on every instrument
(including, but not limited to scales, arpeggios, small ensemble playing,
etc.)
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d. Beginning Orchestra (MS)

Beginning Orchestra starts in the 6th grade. Violin, viola, double-bass, and
cello are assigned to different students. The fundamentals of instruments
and basic notation will be learned. Students entering this class are not
expected to have a musical background. This class is open to beginning
students of all ages at the middle school level.

e. Intermediate Orchestra (MS)

Intermediate Orchestra is a step-up from beginning orchestra. It is for


students who wish to continue to pursue string-music and challenge
themselves further through more advanced literature and technique on
their instrument.

f. Beginning Guitar/Ukulele (HS)

This class is similar to the beginning guitar/ukulele class at the middle


school. It is for students with little to no musical background who wish to
begin playing an instrument (guitar or ukulele). Students of all levels in
the high school may join this group.

g. Advanced Guitar/Ukulele and Songwriting (HS)

Audition required. In order to join this class students must take and pass
an audition, held by the teacher, to ensure they are experienced enough to
join this class. In this advanced class students will use theory, singing, and
playing to write music and learn more advanced repertoire on their
instrument.

h. Concert Band (HS)

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Concert band is the entry-level band at Midlothian High School. All


students who have previously played in middle school band are welcomed
to join. Marching band is a requirement in the fall semester to those who
are able to join.

i. Symphonic Band (HS)

Audition required. Symphonic band is the premier band at Midlothian


High School. Students must pass an audition, held by the teacher, prior to
the year they wish to join. In symphonic band students cover a wide
variety of band literature and are expected to have decent mastery over
their instrument.

j. Jazz Band (HS)

Jazz band is an after-school group that is led by the teacher. In jazz band
students will learn about jazz and how to play different jazz charts. They
will also improvise and learn to play in different jazz styles.

k. String Ensemble (HS)

String ensemble is the entry-level orchestra at Midlothian High School.


All students who have taken orchestra in middle school are welcome to
join.

l. Philharmonic Orchestra

Audition required. The Midlothian High School Philharmonic Orchestra


is the premier string group at Midlothian High School. Student in the
Philharmonic are expected to have decent mastery over their instrument

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

and pass an audition with the teacher. In this class students will be
exposed to many major string orchestra pieces.
3. Elective Courses
a. Music Exploration (MS)

Music exploration is and eye-opening class for 6th grade students who are
not sure what they want to do, or not sure if music is for them. In this
class students will learn about music in different cultures and the basics of
many different instruments from many different instrument groups.

b. Music Theory/History Level 1 (HS)


This course is an entry-level course to music theory and music history.
Students will learn how to sight-sing and analyze basic chord patterns.
They will also cover a small range of music history.
c. Music Theory/History Level 2 (HS)
Examination Required. An exam must be taken and passed before
entering this class. This class covers advanced music theory and a broad
range of music history.
1

4. Scheduling

High School

Schedule 6 blocks with Optional 7th period

The optional 7th period is available so students have access to a study


hall period. At this time students can also come to a music classroom and
receive private instruction and tutoring.

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

OP7a

OP7b

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

7.30- 8:40

8:50- 10:00

10:10-

10:30-

12:40-

2:00

3:20-

4:00-

10:20

11:40

1:50

-3:10

3:50

4:30

Middle School
This schedule does not have the optional 7th period, so the only time
students may be playing their instruments is in class.

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

7:10- 8:20

8:30-9:40

9:50-10:00

10:10-11:20

12:20-1:30

1:40-2:50

Program Philosophy

1.

As a department, we would like to see every student graduate our program with the skills

to continue musical activities in their adult lives. Every student, regardless of ability, will have
the opportunity to join our classrooms, be challenged and succeed.
2.

Some of the things we considered when putting together our curriculum include the

National Standards, the Virginia SOLs and spiral learning. Primary objectives that spread
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throughout all grade levels include multicultural repertoire mixed with western classical,
adaptations for students with special needs, opportunities in and outside of large ensemble, basic
music theory, students active in their own learning, relating music to other subjects, composition,
improvisation, performance, analysis and modern music culture.
3.

Students will be exposed to music of other cultures and learn to be accepting of other

cultures not only in music, but also in life. These skills will encourage students to continue being
open minded about cultures different from their own, and break down discrimination barriers.
Students will also learn about the musical masters of the past and genres of western classical
music, and understand their influence throughout music history.
As we push towards total inclusion, the music classroom is often the first to
accommodate students with special needs. It is a privilege and honor to develop musical skills
with all students regardless of their ability or needs. This is also a great opportunity for typical
students as they will learn to accept all peers.
Students will have the opportunity to participate in activities outside the large ensemble,
such as self-reflection, solo repertoire, chamber and other various side projects. This will engage
students who are interested in musical activities other than large ensemble or those who wish to
challenge themselves further.
Music theory is something that will be embedded into the curriculum and applied to the
repertoire. It will start at a basic level and progress naturally depending on the subject being
studied.
To ensure that students are active in their own learning, supplements such as practice logs
and self-reflection are part of the curriculum. It is important that students have reasons within

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

themselves to be motivated to keep improving. Doing so for the good of the ensemble is not
enough and that alone is not indicative to lifelong learning.
Music encompasses many aspects of life and school. It is important to connect music to
other areas of academia such as math and literature. Even students who may not pursue music as
a career, many students will connect to academic pursuits more through a love and appreciation
of music.
Activities such as improvisation and composition are crucial to assess student
understanding of music. Being able to create music illustrates the highest musical understanding.
Also, this is an outlet for students who are extremely creative and it shows students another
possible role music can play in their lives.
Students will have performance opportunities as a way to keep students moving towards
a goal. Performing builds confidence, and also serves as a learning experience to figure out when
can be improved for next time.
Students will be exposed to modern music culture, such as todays popular music or
contemporary music. Music is in the present, not just in the past. Also, incorporating the latest
musical trends will cater to the interest of a wide variety of students, and add variety to the
classroom.

Curriculum Section

Curriculum GRADES 6-8 ORCHESTRA


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This middle school curriculum includes grades 6-8, and is divided into two orchestras: 6th
grade, or, beginning orchestra and 7/8 grade orchestra. In order to create my objectives, I am
referencing the VA standards, the National Standards and making some use of spiral learning.
Students will be introduced to the basics and continue to use them while building on those skills
and reaching more advanced levels, especially when going from beginning orchestra to 7/8
orchestra. My curriculum relies heavily on level-appropriateness. This is why a little bit of
everything is touched upon in 6th grade, and is gradually made more advanced.
Since 7th and 8th graders are in one orchestra, they will have a lot of the same objectives.
8th graders however, will have higher standards to reach for as far as behavior, assessment and
assignments in general.

Grade 6
Overall Objectives: Students will learn the fundamentals of string instruments and be able to play
a variety of styles and techniques with a solid tone, echo passages, describe music with music
terminology, read music, notate music, improvise, perform and compose.

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Yearly Objectives:

Assemble their instrument

Name the parts of the instrument

Take basic care of their instrument;

Hold their instrument correctly (this includes bow)

Make relatively clean sounds on instrument; using proper technique

Play 1-octave D and G major/minor scale and identify the appropriate accidentals/key
signatures

Play in tune

Sing select repertoire excerpts

Read and play whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, eighth notes, Sixteenth notes, dotted
notes and corresponding rests

Echo short phrases; a few pitches with simple rhythms

Recognize and respond to conducting in 4/4, 2/4 and 3/4

Play legato, staccato, tremolo, slurs and pizzicato

Play correct bow directions as marked/dictated by teacher

Improvise simple rhythms

Identify history/background/style of pieces referenced in class and composer information

Learn about cultures other than Euro-American (see examples of literature)

Play dynamics in exercises/repertoire, pp-ff

Identify moods in music and how music can evoke emotion

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Play using musical shaping or phrasing; rising and falling of passages

Compose and notate 4-measures using knowledge acquired in class

Demonstrate proper concert etiquette

Learn to tune (although they may not do it on their own right away)

Evaluate their own performances/reflect

Sight-read level-appropriate music

Perform at least once

Monthly Objectives: Students will


September:

Assemble their instruments

Learn about instrument care/take care of instruments

Names the parts of the instrument

Hold instruments correctly (this includes bow)

Make relatively clean sounds on instrument on open strings

Be able to names the strings of their instrument

Echo my playing- whole, half, quarter, eighth notes on open strings

Know corresponding rests

Learn string crossing; open strings

Play the notes in the D major scale 1 octave and identify accidentals

Read simple rhythms first without pitch, then some notes of the D major scale
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Know what key signature and time signature are, as well as lines and spaces

Respond to conducting in 4/4 and 3/4

Play using different dynamics

Read from Essential Elements method book 1

Read a repertoire piece in D major

Improvise rhythms on open strings

Learn and play a song by ear

Echo my playing using the notes of the D major scale

Read/work on first repertoire piece in D major

October:

Play the G major scale

Improvise using a few notes from the D major or G major scale

Read/work on a repertoire piece in G major and continue playing and improving


repertoire piece in D major

Demonstrate knowledge of repertoire such as historical background, composer, style,


mood changes (via class discussion, mini projects, the way they play the piece)

Compose and notate a 4-measure piece either in the key of D major or G major

November:

Play repertoire piece in D major and G major with attention to styles, bowings,
articulations, balance, dynamics
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Begin learning techniques involved with vibrato

Work on playing in tune via ear training; tuning thirds and fifths

Sight-read level-appropriate music; chorales, Essential Elements pieces

Play 2/4 meter

December:

Students will perfect repertoire

Perform; Nursing home performance, community performance, or winter concert through


the school

Demonstrate proper concert etiquette

Verbally reflect individual and ensemble performance in a written assignment

Sing d minor scale

Play d minor scale

Demonstrate knowledge of repertoire such as historical background, composer, style,


mood changes (via class discussion, mini projects, the way they play the piece)

January:

Play d minor repertoire

Tune in d minor; thirds and fifths

Play scales using bow techniques; tremolo, pizzicato, staccato

Play dotted rhythms on open strings

Play sixteenth notes


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February:

Play dotted rhythms in the context of scales

Sight-read more challenging music

Continue d minor activities

Listen and analyze music using music terminology

March:

Compose 4 and notate measures in d minor including new bow techniques and dotted
rhythms

Play D and G major and minor scales as review

Hone technical aspects of repertoire

Listen and analyze music using music terminology

April:

Play the g minor scale

Sight-read

Prepare for end-of-the-year concert

May:

Perform in a concert

Demonstrate proper concert etiquette


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Reflect on individual and ensemble performance in a written assignment

June:

Sight-read music that will give students an idea of what to expect in 7/8 grade orchestra

Listen and analyze performances using music terminology

Review material from leading back to September

First 5 Weekly Objectives: Students will

Week 1:

Assemble their instruments

Tighten/loosen bow, shoulder rest, rock stop (cellos), stool (basses)

Learn about instrument care/take care of instruments

Cleaning cloth, rosin, loosening bow when finished playing, keeping instrument
in appropriate temperatures

Names the parts of the instrument/know their uses

Bow, frog, f holes, scroll, nut, fingerboard, bridge, fine tuners, pegs, peg box,
neck, chin rest, tailpiece, shoulder rest,

Hold instruments correctly (this includes bow)

Bow hold, wrist/arm movement (right hand), violin placement, straight wrist (left
hand), finger placement, sitting/standing up straight

Make relatively clean sounds on instrument on open strings


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Names the strings of their instrument

EADG, GDAE, CGDA

String cross on open strings

Week 2:

Echo my playing on open D, whole, half, quarter, eighth notes

Play do-sol of D major scale (continued work on string crossing)

Sing Mary Had a Little Lamb (or similar song)

Echoing: Play Mary Had a Little Lamb (or similar song) by ear, max. 5 notes

Read and play simple rhythms first without pitch, then some notes of the D major scale;
quarters, eighths

Clapping first

Know what key signature and time signature are, as well as lines and spaces

Respond to conducting in 4/4 and 3/4

Play dynamics/understand dynamic markings, up bow/down bow symbols

Read from Essential Elements book 1, do-sol of D major

Week 3:

Play the D major scale

Play the D major scale with different rhythms; whole, half, quarters, eighths

Clap new rhythms- whole and half note- first

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Echo my playing using do-sol of D major scale

Read from Essential Elements book 1, notes from D major scale

Read/work on a level-appropriate repertoire piece in D major

Play appropriate dynamics, time signature, key signature, bowings

Play techniques written into part, ex: pizz., tremolo, slurs etc.

Discuss history/composer/style etc. of piece

Week 4:

Play do-sol of G major scale

Read from Essential Elements book 1, do-sol G major scale

Play songs in a round

Know what key signature and time signature are, as well as lines and spaces

Respond to conducting in 4/4 and 3/4

Play dynamics/understand dynamic markings, up bow/down bow symbols

Play Mary Had a Little Lamb in G major

Improvise rhythms on open strings (or some notes if confident) to a looping backtrack

Week 5:

Play the G major scale

Focus on tone; long bows, full sound (detache)

Read from Essential Elements book 1, G major scale


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Know what key signature and time signature are, as well as lines and spaces

Respond to conducting in 4/4 and 3/4

Play dynamics/understand dynamic markings, up bow/down bow symbols

Improvise rhythms using 1-3 notes in D or G major

Call and Response with classmates; class copies 1 student

Examples of literature that support objectives:


Grade 1, At the Grasshopper Ball by Richard Meyer, D major
Grade 1, Dance in D by Richard A. Stephan, D major
Grade 1, Dorian Variations by Mark Williams, D Dorian
Grade 1.5, Fantasy on a Japanese Folk Song by Brian Balmages, D major
Grade 2, Dragon Dances by Soon Hee Newbold, G major
Grade 2, 1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky arr. Carrie Lane Gruselle, G major

Grade 7/8
Overall Objectives: Students will expand on their knowledge from 6th grade by playing more
challenging pieces that include a variety of styles, techniques and musical expression. Students
will echo passages, describe music with music terminology, read music, notate music, improvise,
perform and compose at a higher level and in general, learn material at a slightly faster pace.

Yearly Objectives:

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Take care of instrument; cleaning cloth, rosin, loosening bow when finished playing,
keeping instrument in appropriate temperatures, etc.

Hold their instrument correctly (higher standards for posture/bow hold)

Make clean sounds throughout the year in all repertoire/exercises/performances by using


proper technique

Play D and G major a minor scales and arpeggios, additionally, Bb, C and F major and
identify appropriate accidentals/key signatures

Play in tune; higher standards

Sing select repertoire excerpts and a major scale

Read and play whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, eighth notes, dotted half notes,
dotted quarter notes, dotted eighth notes, sixteenth notes, hooked bows and corresponding
rests

Read and play ties across bar lines; level-appropriate syncopations

Echo phrases including all above note values and pitches do-sol

Recognize and respond to conducting in 4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 3/2, 6/8

Play legato, slurs, pizzicato, tremolo, martele, staccato, accents

Play correct bow directions as marked/dictated by teacher

Improvise simple rhythms on several pitches

Identify history/background/style of pieces referenced in class and composer information.

Use this information in some way to affect playing

Learn about cultures other than Euro-American (see examples of literature)


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Play dynamics in repertoire, and playing appropriately for ensemble

Balance (melody v. accompaniment)

Identify moods in music and what specific aspects/techniques evoke emotion

Play using musical shaping and phrasing, articulations appropriate to the style of
repertoire

Play level-appropriate mixed meter

Compose 8 measures using knowledge acquired in class

Demonstrate proper concert etiquette

Tune themselves; higher standards for tuning procedures

Evaluate their own performance, the performance as an ensemble and professional


performances using music terminology

Perform at least twice

Perform at a festival/competition

Monthly Objectives: Students will

September:

Review material/skills from 6th grade; instrument care, scales, rhythms, meters,
techniques, sight-reading, singing etc.

Play 1-octave C major scale

Tune chords (tonic, third, fifths)

Sight-read new repertoire


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Echo passages

October:

Sing major scale

Play 1-octave F major scale

Tune chords (tonic, third, fifth)

Play a repertoire piece in F major

Identify history/background/style of piece and composer information. Use this


information in some way to affect playing

Compose and notate 8 measures in C or F major

Improvise using notes from C major. Improvise using notes from F major

November:

Play new bowing styles and techniques; martele, accents, hooked bows

Play repertoire pieces with attention to ensemble

Balance; bringing out the melody, lowering accompaniment

Phrasing; emphasis

Listen and analyze new techniques in examples of professional performance

Describe what these techniques do to evoke emotion, create a certain mood, etc.

Suggest ways to apply techniques to class repertoire

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

December:

Students will perfect repertoire

Perform; Nursing home performance, community performance, or winter concert through


the school

Complete verbal and written reflections of performance

January:

Play the Bb scale

Play ties and slurs across bar lines

Play syncopated rhythms

Play repertoire in Bb major

Play repertoire that includes the above new techniques

Identify history/background/style of pieces referenced in class and composer information.

Use this information in some way to affect playing

Listen and identify techniques in examples of professional performance

Identify emotive qualities in repertoire and/or listening examples

February:

Play and work on two new repertoire pieces

Identify history/background/style of pieces referenced in class and composer information.

Use this information in some way to affect playing

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Continually play techniques learned since September, particularly those that appear in
repertoire

March:

Compose and notate 8 measures in Bb major

Hone skills in repertoire pieces (should be 3 or 4 at this point)

Play C and F scales as review using different rhythms, styles, bowing techniques,
dynamics

April:

Perform at festival/competition

Verbal review of feedback from festival/competition

Play and improve repertoire according to feedback for end-of-the-year concert

May:

Perform in a concert

Demonstrate proper concert etiquette

Reflect on individual and ensemble performance in a written assignment

Sight-read

June:

Sight-read music that will give students an idea of what to expect in high school
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Listen and analyze performances using music terminology

Review material from leading back to September

First 5 Weekly Objectives: Students will

Week 1:

Review Material; review fundamentals

Week 2:

Play C major scale

Sight-read possible repertoire, chorales, Essential Elements book 2

Respond to conducting in 4/4, 3/4, 2/4

Play dynamics/understand dynamic markings, up bow/down bow symbols

Play Michael Allen Daily Warm-Ups. Apply to different keys

Week 3:

Hone C major scale; intonation

Work on a piece/exercise in C major

Echo passages with whole, half, quarter, eight and sixteenth notes

Play arpeggios in D major and G major

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Week 4:

Play 3/2 meter

Play 6/8 meter

Clap first

Clap first

Play a repertoire piece or exercises including mixed meter (4/4, 3/4, 2/4)

Week 5:

Play F major scale

Work on a piece in F major (could be same as week 4 repertoire piece)

Review C major

Play Michael Allen Daily Warm-Ups

Examples of grade 7/8 literature:


Grade 1, Fiddles On Fire by Mark Williams
Grade 2, Dance of the Samodivi by Soon Hee Newbold, a minor
Grade 2, Sleepers Wake by J.S. Bach, arr. Soon Hee Newbold, F major
Grade 2, Ave Verum Corpus by Mozart, arr. Elliot Del Borgo
Grade 3, Pirates of the Caribbean by Klaus Badelt, arr. Ted Ricketts

Materials:

Essential Elements method book

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Youtube (backtrack for improvisation and performance analysis)

Daily Warm-Ups, Michael Allen

Amplified metronome

Beginning Guitar/Ukulele Curriculum

This class is designed for beginning Guitar/Ukulele Students (students who have never played
one of these instruments before). Starting in 7th grade, the idea would be that this class would
prepare students for the advanced guitar/songwriting class in high school and later in middle

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

school. Throughout the course students will learn the basics of the instrument and how to play
individual notes. They will also learn how to build certain chords. At the end of the year
students will put on a concert in an ensemble performing music they have been working on all
semester.

Curriculum:

Guitar/Uke:
Level 1

Standards of
Learning

Technique

1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic guitar VSOL 1, 3, 7,


care and maintenance
16, 24, 25
2. Students will demonstrate the proper playing
position
3. Students will learn basic musical abilities such as
rhythm, note-reading, playing in an ensemble, and
improvising.
4. Students will write and complete assignments

Chords

1. Students will learn basic I-IV-V(V7) progressions in VSOL 14, 15


F, C, G, D, A, Am, Em
2. Students will learn moveable power chords
3. Students will learn and be able to recite chordal
charts

Scales

1. Students will play F, C, G, D, A, Major, one-octave


scales in first position
2. Students will Perform a one-octave chromatic scale
ascending and descending

VSOL 6, 8

Note-Reading

1. Students will read and perform whole, half, quarter,


and eighth notes
2. Students will read and perform dotted quarter and
dotted half notes
3. Students will read and perform music in simple,
duple, and triple meters
4. Students will read simple melodies at sight using
above notes and rhythms, in the keys mentioned in
the Scales section

VSOL 5, 11,
12, 15, 19

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

5. Students will read and perform ties


6. Students will perform written articulations and
dynamics
Repertoire

1. Students will perform unaccompanied guitar solos


and ensemble parts with technical accuracy, musical
phrasing, and dynamic contrast for musical
expression
2. Students will identify and analyze composers,
styles, and historical periods from materials being
studied

VSOL 9, 10,
11, 21

Repertoire list follows at the bottom


Improvisation

1. Students will improvise rhythms and


accompaniments
2. Students will improvise using the scales listed in
Scales Section

VSOL 5, 19

Listening

1. Students will analyze and discuss individual and


group performances
2. Students will discuss musical performances and its
value to community
3. Students will demonstrate concert etiquette as an
active listener

VSOL 22, 23,


24, 25

Repertoire Requirements:
GRADE 1 Position: 1st position; single line melody or alternating melody and bass. R.H.
Techniques: fingerstyle: rest stroke; i, m / free stroke i, m L. H. Techniques: limited use of
ascending and descending slurs; bends, glissandi Key Signature: Maximum of 2 #s Rhythm: tqth
h. w ed Ties Meter: Simple 4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 2/2 Tempo: e with q = 70 - 84 Texture: Homophonic
GRADE 2 Position: Up to 2nd position; single line melody or arpeggios R.H. Techniques:
fingerstyle: rest stroke; i, m ; free stroke:, simple arpeggio patterns L. H. Techniques: slur
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CURRICULUM PROJECT

combinations Key Signature: Maximum of 1 b or 3 #s Rhythm: Triplets, wo h. ht qt ed q. Meter:


Simple 4/4, 3/4, 2/4 Tempo: e with q = 88 - 120 Chords: 1st position F with partial bar Texture:
limited use of polyphony
Repertoire:

Beginning and Intermediate Band Curriculum

For the band curriculum I designed a template for my weekly lesson plans (it will follow
in the next few pages). Each weekly lesson plan will give me more flexibility from class-to-class
and also allow me to see the bigger picture. This does not mean that I will not have daily lesson
plans, I am just showing the weekly ones to help guide through a 6 week curriculum.
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CURRICULUM PROJECT

At the end of each week I want to have students fill out a form on google docs that will
help me understand where each student is at. The form (see below) will only be a completion
grade for students and the answers that they put will not reflect on their final grade.

Weekly Lesson Plan Template

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Week 1

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Week 2

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Week 3

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Week 4

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Week 5

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Week 6

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Ensemble Grading Rubric

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Large Ensemble Literature


Midnight Sky
Majestica
Midnight Mission

Balmages, Brian
Balmages, Brian
Balmages, Brian

1 FJH
1+ FJH
1 FJH
Southern

Yorkshire Ballad

Barnes, James

2+ Music
Company
Bent Space

Melodious Thunk

Biedenbender, David

Sailor's Odyssey, A

Bobrowitz, David

2+

Symphony No. 4

Boysen, Andrew

3 Music

Music
Grand Mesa
Music
Neil A. Kjos
Company
Neil A. Kjos

Tricycle

Boysen, Andrew

3 Music

Havener Fanfare

Boysen, Andrew

Company
3 Kjos
Neil A. Kjos

Unraveling

Boysen, Andrew

3 Music

Sinfonia XIX

Broege, Timothy

Company
Boosey and
Hawkes

Methods Books
Standards of Excellence

Midlothian High School


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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Midlothian High School Guitar

The high school level guitar class will be open to students who had guitar experience in
middle school or are new to the instrument. The class will contain varied ability levels and will
strive to help each individual improve as well as the whole group. Throughout the year students
will develop basic guitar skills such as holding the instrument, chord structures, and right hand
techniques. Students will develop skills to read in both standard and tablature notation and
understand all aspects of notated music. Students will develop aural skills, practice skills, and
music interpretive skills.

Yearly Objectives

Music literacy in both standard notation and tablature

Identify, read, and perform in simple and compound meter

Play Major, Harmonic Minor, and chromatic scales in several keys appropriate to class
repertoire

Learn Major, Minor, and 7th chords in multiple keys appropriate to class repertoire

Understand chord structure, both triads and seventh chords, and how this relates to chord
notation.

Standard chord progressions: I-IV-V7-I

Improvisation and composition of simple melodies over standard chord progression.

i-iv-V7-I

I-vi-IV-V7-I etc

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Use of music technology for practice, composition, and recording.

Instrument parts, care, position, posture, and tuning.

Varied right hand technique including finger, pick, and notation of these in music.

Ensemble skills including intonation, blend, balance, and part significance.

Demonstrate musicianship and personal engagement

Explore a variety of musical styles.

Understand music in historical and cultural context.

Analyze, evaluate, and critique music based on research and personal response.

Monthly Objectives: 4-week blocks


Block 1:

Part of the instrument

Proper posture and hand placement

Music notation pair teaching for any new students

Major scale fingering pattern

Chords: CM, GM, DM, and AM

Block 2

Begin music for first concert

Compare and contrast Standard notation and Tablature notation

Musical focus: Intonation, tempo, and rhythm

Block 3

Musical Focus: Dynamics, blend, balance, and phrasing


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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Block 4

First Concert

Written concert reflection.

Begin Introducing improvisation

Block 5

Improvisation/ composition project (adapted to each student level)

Solo music study

Block 6

Music Portfolio Project: Choose 5 pieces form contrasting cultures, genera, and areas.
Research and write about the background of each piece as well as the personal opinions
and response to the music. Presentations at end of block.

Block 7

Begin music for second concert

Musical focus: Intonation, tempo, and rhythm

Block 8

Musical Focus: Dynamics, blend, balance, and phrasing

Block 9

Second Concert

Resume project: Students will create a personal music resume. This may build on same
project from the pervious years as well as involvement in music outside of class. Students
will write music they worked on during the year and any skills they learned in music
technology or industry.
Page | 44

CURRICULUM PROJECT

First 5 Weekly Objectives: Students will

2
3

4
5

Week 1
Parts of the instrument
Written Quiz will be given to label parts of the guitar and accessories
Week 2
Students will begin to play the a major scale pattern, experienced students will be
paired with new students as needed.
Week 3
Continue learning scales in other keys. More experienced students will play
chords as drones as other play scales.
Week 4
Chords CM, GM, DM, and AM
Week 5
Students will play chord progressions using the chords learned in week 4.

Repertoire and Materials:

Graduated Repertoire for the Classical Guitarist

Everybodys Classical Guitar book 1 by John Sutherland, B.J. Sutherland, David Hoge,
Philip Groeber, and Antigoni Goni

FJH Guitar Skill Sheets No1-5

Midlothian High School Orchestra


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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Yearly Objectives:

Play VBODA grade 3-4 music.

Read and notate in standard music notation

Identify, read, compare, and perform in different meters

Identify and notate scales based on key signatures of repertoire

Two octave scales C, F, B-flat, E-flat, G, D, A, major; G and A Harmonic and melodic
minor.

Identify forms and melody to harmony relations in music being played.

Compose and improvise simple melodies

Knowledge of musical terms in repertoire being studied

Tuning and posture appropriate for being ready to play in an ensemble setting.

Intonation and adjusting pitch.

Proper bow placement, weight, angle, speed for different articulations

Ensemble skills including intonation, blend, balance, and part significance.

Musical expression such as articulation, dynamics, and phrasing

Sight-reading as an ensemble and individual.

Exploration of multicultural music styles of outside of the western classical tradition.

Analyze and evaluate music based on composer, time period, and culture.

Analyze and evaluate music based on personal response.

Use of music technology for practice, composition, and recording.

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Monthly Objectives: 4-week blocks


Block 1:

Begin Music for first concert

Musical Focus: Intonation, tempo, and rhythm

Block 2

Musical Focus: Dynamics, blend, balance, and phrasing

Block 3

First Concert

Block 4

Begin festival music

Musical Focus: Intonation, tempo, and rhythm

Block 5

Assign optional recital pieces

Continue preparation for Festival

Block 6

Musical Focus: Dynamics, blend, balance, and phrasing

Block 7

Pre-festival concert

Festival

Post Festival reflection and written review.

Block 8
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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Resume project: Students will create a personal music resume. This may build on the
same project from the pervious years as well as involvement in music outside of class.
Students will write about music they worked on during the year and any skills they
learned in music technology or industry.

Block 9

Music Portfolio Project: Choose 5 pieces form contrasting cultures, genera, and areas.
Research and write about the background of each piece as well as the personal opinions
and response to the music. Presentations at end of block.

Optional Recital

First 5 Weekly Objectives: Students will

2
3

4
5

Week 1
Rhythm and interval call and response activities to prepare for new pieces.
Sight reading exercises to prepare for new music
Week 2
Begin isolated sections of new pieces.
Week 3
Read new music
Begin addressing intonation and rhythm mistakes
Week 4
Focus on tuning chord of pieces and the vertical lines
Week 5
Begin work on balance and dynamics in new music

Repertoire:
Grade 3

Danse Infernale; by Elliot Del Borgo

Danse Macabre; by Camille Saint-Sans Arranged by Carrie Lane Gruselle

Lion City; by Soon Hee Newbold


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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Pavane; by Faure Arranged by John O'Neill

Rockin' Jammin' Swingin'; by Soon Hee Newbold

Sleeping Beauty Waltz; by Tchaikovsky Arranged by Chris Sharp

Grade 3.5

Bebop; by Bob Lipton

Themes from Symphony No. 3 "Eroica" by Beethoven Arranged by Robert D. McCashin

Symphony No. 8 "Unfinished"(First Movement) by Schubert Arranged by Robert D.


McCashin

Materials: Advance Techniques for Stings from the Essential elements line. Recording device.
Access to note flight at home or at school.

Advanced Orchestra (HS)

Yearly Objectives:

Play VBODA grade 4-5music.

Read and notate in standard music notation

Identify, read, compare, and perform in different meters

Identify and notate scales based on key signatures of repertoire

Two octave scales and arpeggios in C, F, B-flat, E-flat, G, D, A, major; G and A


Harmonic and melodic minor. One octave Scales and arpeggios in all other keys.

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Three octave scales for violin: G, A, Bflat, and E-flat

Three octave scales for Cello and Viola: C, D, E-flat, and F

Identify forms and melody to harmony relations in music being played.

Compose and improvise melodies and harmonies

Knowledge of musical terms in repertoire being studied

Etiquette, tuning. and posture appropriate for being ready to play in an ensemble setting.

Intonation and adjusting pitch.

Proper bow placement, weight, angle, speed for different articulations

Use shifting. Violin and viola up to 5th position. Cello and Bass to thumb position.

Use of vibrato

Ensemble skills including intonation, blend, balance, and part significance.

Musical expression such as articulation, dynamics, and phrasing

Sight-reading as an ensemble and individual.

Exploration of multicultural music styles of outside of the western classical tradition.

Analyze and evaluate music based on composer, time period, and culture.

Analyze and evaluate music based on personal response.

Students will evaluate and correct personal performance errors.

Use of music technology for practice, composition, and recording.

Monthly Objectives: 4-week blocks


Block 1:
Page | 50

CURRICULUM PROJECT

Begin Music for first concert

Musical Focus: Intonation, tempo, and rhythm

Block 2

Musical Focus: Dynamics, blend, balance, and phrasing

Block 3

First Concert

Block 4

Begin festival music

Musical Focus: Intonation, tempo, and rhythm

Block 5

Assign optional recital pieces

Continue preparation for Festival

Block 6

Musical Focus: Dynamics, blend, balance, and phrasing

Block 7

Pre-festival concert

Festival

Post Festival reflection and written review.

Block 8

Resume project: Students will create a personal music resume. This may build on the
same project from the pervious years as well as involvement in music outside of class.

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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Students will write about music they worked on during the year and any skills they
learned in music technology or industry.
Block 9

Music Portfolio Project: Choose 5 pieces form contrasting cultures, genera, and areas.
Research and write about the background of each piece as well as the personal opinions
and response to the music. Presentations at end of block.

Optional Recital

First 5 Weekly Objectives: Students will

2
3

4
5

Week 1
Rhythm and interval call and response activities to prepare for new pieces.
Sight reading exercises to prepare for new music
Week 2
Begin isolated sections of new pieces.
Week 3
Read new music
Begin addressing intonation and rhythm mistakes
Week 4
Focus on tuning chord of pieces and the vertical lines
Week 5
Begin work on balance and dynamics in new music

Repertoire:
Grade 4

Themes from Romeo and Juliet by Pyotr I. TchaikovskyArranged by Carrie Lane


Gruselle

Pictures at an Exhibition Arranged by Carrie Lane Gruselle

La Cinquantaine Arranged by Stan Applebaum

Grade 5
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CURRICULUM PROJECT

Lyric Metal by Brian Balmages

Capriol Suite by Peter Warlock

Academic Festival Overture Opus 80 Arranged by Robert D. McCashin

Egmont Overture by Ludwig van Beethoven Arranged by Robert D. McCashin

Overture to Ruslan and Lyudmila Arranged by Robert D. McCashin

Materials: Advance Techniques for Stings from the Essential elements line. Recording device.
Access to note flight at home or at school.

Page | 53