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InterventionPBLOverview

Title:

Algebra

Est. Start Date:

Teacher:
Content
Focus:

Debbie Hernandez
Algebra Expressions and
Equations

Grade Level: Algebra


Other subject areas to be included:
Writing, Speaking, and Listening

Project
Idea:

Students will apply what they experience with balance logic


problems to solving a one variable equation. They will create a
presentation to teach others their method.

Essential
Question:

How do you solve a one


variable equation?

Summary of the
issue, challenge,
investigation,
scenario, or
problem

Driving
Questi
on

Duration: 4
weeks

How do you solve a balance


problem?

CCCSS
Content and
Skills
Standards to be
addressed:
(CCCSS, NGSS,
Calif.)

6.EE.2a Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters
standing for numbers.
6.EE.2c Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions
that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations,
including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when
there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations).
6.EE.6 Use variables to represent numbers and write expressions when solving a realworld or mathematical problem; understand that a variable can represent an unknown
number, or, depending on the purpose at hand, any number in a specified set.
W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence
SL.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions building
on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and
logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization,
development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose audience, and task.

st

21 Century
Skills and
MPS to be
explicitly taught
and assessed
(T+A) or that
will be
encouraged (E)
by Project work
but not taught or

Make sense of
problems and
persevere in solving
them.
Construct viable
arguments and critique
the reasoning of
others.
Model with
mathematics

T+
A
x

T+
A
Look for and make use of
structure

Communication

Creativity

E
x

assessed:

Attend to precision

Group:

Culminating
Products
and
Performanc
es

Individual:

Collaboration

Create a presentation teaching


other students how to solve a
one variable equation (poster,
rap, song, dance, skit, etc.).
Written test

Presentation Audience
Class
x
School
Community
Experts
Web
Other:

Project Overview
Pre-Assess: Explain how to solve an algebraic expression
Entry event
to launch
inquiry, engage
students:

Outline or
Conceptual
Flow
Include
assessment
points:

Using balance scales, give students an unknown weight for one


side and various other weight values for the other side. Students
experiment with the weights to make it balance. Do a number of
trials. Discuss strategies and how do they know if its balanced. (If
a teeter-totter is available, do outside and use people to balance
the two sides.)
SL.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions building
on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and
logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization,
development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose audience, and task.
Pre-Assess: Solve expressions using order of operations
6.EE.2c Evaluate expressions. Perform arithmetic operations, including those
involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when there are no
parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations).
Assessment: Solve one-variable algebraic equations.
6.EE.2a Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters
standing for numbers.
W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
6.EE.6 Use variables to represent numbers and write expressions when solving a realworld or mathematical problem; understand that a variable can represent an unknown
number, or, depending on the purpose at hand, any number in a specified set.
Assessment: Project

Assessment: Final test- Solving equations and writing original

stories/problems to accompany equations


Assessment
s

Formative
Assessments
(During Project)
Summative
Assessments
(End of Project)

Resources
Needed

On-site people,
facilities
Equipment
Materials

Reflection
Methods

(Individual, Group,
and/or Whole
Class)

Quizzes/Tests

x Jour Journal/learning log

Written Product(s), with


rubric

Self-Evaluation

Oral Presentation, with


rubric

Peer Evaluation

Short Answer Test

x
x

Classroom

Balance scales
Teeter-totter
Weights or objects to use as weights
Copies of Balance Logic Problems
Hangars
Art supplies for mobiles and presentation preparation
Found objects
Journal/Learning Log

Whole-class discussion

Project Teaching and Learning Guide


Knowledge and Skills Needed by Students
(to successfully complete culminating projects and to do well on summative assessments)
Student needs to be able to: understand that the two sides of an
equation are balanced

Student needs to be able to: understand what a variable is and


what it represents

Student needs to be able to: correctly apply order of operations

Student needs to be able to: translate words into mathematical


symbols and mathematical symbols into words

Student needs to be able to: effectively present ideas to others

Questions to be Provided by the Project Teacher


(to successfully complete culminating products and to do well on summative assessments)
Teacher asks questions to recall facts, make observations, or
demonstrate understanding:
How do you know the teeter-totter or scale is balanced?
What does it mean if you have two or three of the same shape?
What are all the possible solutions for that branch of the puzzle?
What is PEMDAS?
Where do you start?
Whats next?
Teacher asks questions to apply or relate:
What would happen if mathematicians didnt follow the order of
operations?
Why did the two of you get different answers to the same problem?
Whos right? How do you know?
How is solving a balance problem like solving this algebra equation?

Teacher asks questions to summarize, analyze, organize, or


evaluate:
What do the arms of the puzzles represent? What clues do they give
you?
Which configurations were the hardest to solve on the puzzles?
What strategies helped you when there was more than one possible
solution?
How did you keep track of the solutions you tried?
What made a problem solvable or unsolvable?
Teacher asks questions to predict, design, or create:
How can you make this side balance the other side of the mobile?
What do these problems have in common?
What elements would we have to include to write our own problems?
What suggestions can you make to help someone adjust the way a
problem is written so that it can be solved?

Teacher Reflection:
How did the unit flow? What worked well? What needs to be changed for next time? What did the students learn? What evidence do
you have to support students learning?