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Katie Chock

Math Concept: Fractions


Grade 5
CCSS.Math.Content. 4.NF.3 Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b.
Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the
same whole. Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more
than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation. Justify decompositions, e.g., by
using a visual fraction model. Examples: 3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8; 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8; 2 1/8 = 1 + 1 +
1/8 = 8/8 + 8/8 + 1/8.

Big Idea: When equivalent, fractions represent the same amount of area of a rectangle and the
same point on the number line. These equivalencies can also be represented symbolically.
Furthermore, equivalence is evidenced when adding fractions with the same denominator. The
sum may be decomposed into parts (or recomposed into an equal sum).

Lesson Goal #1: Identify equal pieces of a unit.


Open Question: How can we cut this snickers bar into equal pieces?
Expected student responses
- Halves
- Fourths
- Eighths
Management
- Students will be given 5 minutes to cut their snickers bar into equal pieces.
- Teacher Questions to probe thinking: How would I know the pieces are equal?
How many different ways can I make equal parts? How many cuts did you
make, and how does the number of cuts you make compare to the number of
pieces?
Academic Language Check: Guide students in changing their informal language into academic
language or academic vocabulary. Discussion as a whole class, then groups highlight words and
phrases they used and write the replacement words next to their original ones. Chart the words
on a word wall as shown below.
- the same = equivalent
- part of a whole = fraction
- top number = numerator
- bottom number = denominator
Activity: Have students illustrate fractions that are equal to one half.
Model for the students the next activity. Have students sketch an area model, square that is
approximately 2 inches 2 inches. This is representing the same 1 unit. Ask students to define
half. (two equal parts) Show halves, by vertically dividing the square. Shade 1 half on the left.
Have students identify the two parts, and the 1 whole. Use one color highlighter to highlight the
two parts, and have another color that identifies the 1 whole unit.

Debrief: Provide students with a series of questions. Have students share their ideas with their
tablemates (small group). Write down all answers/ideas. Have students from each group share an
idea with the rest of the class. Record answers on a chart. Ask students to think about:
What was one of the units we used today? What did you do to your unit? How many
pieces did you get?
Summarize what we have learned: Complete paragraph frame and read to a partner. A
__________ is one of something, or one group of something. Today, we learned that if I split a
unit in ______________, I now have _______________ equal pieces. Have students glue this
paragraph frame in their math journal.
Formative Assessment: Exit Ticket.
Use the words unit, halves and equal pieces in a sentence.

Lesson Goal #2: Equal pieces can be represented in different ways.


Parallel Task: Students choose which group they prefer.
Group 1: Have students sketch an area model, representing a one unit square that is
approximately 2 inches 2 inches. Illustrate half of a unit. Write a one-sentence
explanation of why their picture demonstrates half.
Group 2: Have students sketch an area model, representing a one unit square that is
approximately 2 inches 2 inches. Illustrate half of a unit and write a paragraph
explaining their drawing. Be sure to include at least 3 academic vocabulary words.
Academic Language Check: Review word wall and chart from the previous day. Have students
restate lesson goals and the purpose of the lesson goal in their own words while using academic
language.
Debrief: Display students work from group 1 and group 2 on the ELMO. Ask the students to
explain their drawing and words and their thought process.
Open Question: How can we represent the same sized fraction in a different way, and how do
we know we are correct?
Expected student responses
- We are using different parts and different units.
- The units are being partitioned into smaller equal units.
- The value of the fraction is exactly the same
Management
- Students talk in teams and then share whole class. Teacher charts ideas.
- Teacher Questions to probe thinking: How can you cut something into more
pieces but still have the same size?

Summarize what we have learned: Complete paragraph frame and read to a partner. Equal
pieces can be represented multiple ways. An example of this is

Have students glue this paragraph frame in their math journal.


Formative Assessment: How can I double check that two fractions are equivalent?