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Running head: BRAIN COMPATIBLE

Brain Compatible Lesson Plans


Crystal Jones
EDU 417 Cognitive Studies Capstone
Instructor Joanna Savarese- Levine
June 1, 2015

BRAIN COMPATIBLE

Apples, Apples, Apples Lesson Plan


http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plan/apples-apples-apples-lesson-plan
Grade: PreK- K, 1-2
Objective
Children will develop science and math skills as they learn about different types of apples,
identify characteristics of apples, and engage in cooking and graphing activities.
Suggested Time: 45 minutes adjust time for students with diverse learning needs

Resources

Apples, Apples, Apples

by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Before Reading
On a sheet of chart paper, write the following question: What can you do with an apple? Show
the children the book Apples, Apples, Apples. For those students who have special needs in many
areas show an educational video about apples. Ask them to look at the cover and describe what
the bunny is doing. Review the question that is written on the sheet of chart paper. Discuss the

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video and explain any portion that needs to be broken down for their understanding. Ask the
children to think of different things that can be done with an apple after it has been picked from
the tree. Allow students to draw, paint or tell about what they know about apples and what can be
done with them. Record their responses.
Materials

Chart paper

Markers

Several color varieties of apples (red delicious, golden delicious, granny smith)

Soil

Plastic cups

Masking tape

Construction paper: white, brown, red, yellow, green

Glue sticks

For planting: soil, apple seeds, plastic cups or pint-size milk cartons

IPad, videos about apples

Scissors

Paints of various colors

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Set Up and Prepare


Read the book Apples, Apples, Apples with the class. Plan a class trip to an orchard, farmer's
market, or local store to purchase different varieties of apples. Explain to the children that they
will engage in a variety of activities using apples, including the activities that are presented in the
book. Bring in different flavors of applesauce from the store to have the students try.
Activities
1. Observing Apples. Show the graph of the different varieties of apples depicted in the
book.Have the students create their own graphs of the different varieties of apples. Have
the with special needs glue precut apples to create their graph or they may draw them if
able. Review the information with the class. Explain that they will learn about different
types of apples. Place the apples in the middle of the meeting area or on a table. Invite the
class to look at and compare the shapes of the apples. Give each student an apple to hold
and study.Ask them to describe the differences and similarities. Invite the children to feel
the different apples. Prepare a sheet of chart paper to record their observations. Allow
those who can to chart their finding and others to orally or choose from descriptive words
on cards.

2. Smelling Apples. Place one of each type of apple in a small basket or container. Tell
the class that they will each have a turn to smell the different types of apples. Ask them to
compare the different apple smells. Do the different-color apples all smell similar? It is
important to encourage hands-on sensory exploration of the apples. Record their

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responses on chart paper.

3. Comparing Apple Seeds. Show students the page in the book where Mr. Miller cuts
an apple in half to reveal a star and the seeds. Ask them to recall how many seeds an
apple can have. Have an adult cut each apple in half. Invite the children to predict how
many seeds they will find in each apple. Do they think that different types of apples will
have more or less seeds? Will the seeds all be the same shape or color? Cut all of the
apples in half and show the section with the seeds. Record their observations on a sheet
of chart paper listing the type of apple, number of seeds, and any other information that
the children would like to include. After studying the apple halves have the students use
the apple halves to make a picture using the apple as a stamp. Put out different color
paints that represent the apples presented in the classroom and to make a design on the
chart paper.

4. Apple-Seed Study. Save the seeds from each apple for a planting activity. Place each
type of apple seed in a separate labeled plastic cup or bag and set aside. Ask the children
if they think they can grow an apple tree from the seeds. Divide the students into small
group placing students with special needs also within the groups. Provide them with
plastic cups or pint-size milk cartons for planting, seeds, and potting soil. Label each
planting container with the type of apple seed it contains. Assist students as they fill the
containers with the soil and seeds. Add water to moisten the soil. Encourage the children
to find an area inside the classroom to place the containers. Plan to observe the apple
seeds over a two- to three-week periodHave students discuss and predict what they think

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may happen over the next couple of weeks within their small groups. Prepare a weekly
observation chart to record information about the growth of the plantsRecord which
groups comes close to the right predictions about the seeds growth.

5. Tasting Apples and Graphing Our Favorites. Make a graph on a large sheet of chart
paper to record the children's favorite apples. In addition to the graph have students bring
in their favorite apple or apple recipe to share with the class.Write the following question
on the top of the graph: What is your favorite kind of apple?Then have the classmates ask
question about their presentation. Divide the paper into vertical columns for each type of
apple that the children will taste. Label each column with the name of each type of apple.
Use colored construction paper to make apple cutout shapes to depict the different types
of apples the children will taste. Cut the apples in advance, giving a slice of each type to
the children. Invite the children to taste each type of apple. Engage the children in a
discussion about the different tastes and textures. Is the apple sweet or tart, crisp or soft?
Show the children the graph and review the question with them. Invite them to glue a
cutout paper apple in the column that represents their favorite apple. Encourage the class
to observe the information on the graph as it is being completed. Invite the children to
read the completed graph and develop a summary sheet.Have the students discuss as a
whole class which apples won as the class favorite? What was the most popular apple?
What was the least popular? What was the taste and texture of the most popular apple?

6. Apple Parts Collage. Show the children the page in the book that illustrates an apple
cut in half and the parts of the apple.Create a game called parts of an apple. Assign

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small groups to create their own games. Explain to the children that they will use
construction paper to make a similar apple collage. Provide the children with pre-cut
construction paper representing the stem, skin, core, flesh, seeds, and leaf of the apple,
and a sheet of blue paper and glue sticks. Invite a small group of children to the art area
to assemble their apple collage. Offer assistance if needed.Have students assist the
students with special needs in this project. Encourage the children to label the parts of the
apple. Children can also label the leaf and seeds of the apple. Who remembers the other
name for an apple seed?

7. Book Activities. Don't forget to incorporate the various activities presented at the end
of the story into your "Apples" study! Follow the recipe to make delicious applesauce.
Collect small baby-food jars and send home a sample of the applesauce along with the
copy of the recipe. Invite families to send in additional easy apple recipes that the
children can use for further classroom cooking activities. Have students bring in books
they may have about apples to share with the class.

Other Books about Apples


Johnny Appleseed by Steven Kellogg
This beloved folktale describes the legendary hero, John Chapman (Johnny Appleseed), who
plants apple trees across the American wilderness.
The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall
An enchanting story about two young girls who care for their apple tree through all seasons.
I Am an Apple by Jean Marzollo
Hello Reader Series book describes the life cycle of an apple.

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Original Lesson Plan

Apples, Apples, Apples Lesson Plan


Grade: PreK- K, 1-2
Objective
Children will develop science and math skills as they learn about different types of apples,
identify characteristics of apples, and engage in cooking and graphing activities.
Suggested Time: 45 minutes

Resources

Apples, Apples, Apples

by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

BRAIN COMPATIBLE

Before Reading
On a sheet of chart paper, write the following question: What can you do with an apple? Show
the children the book Apples, Apples, Apples. Ask them to look at the cover and describe what
the bunny is doing. Review the question that is written on the sheet of chart paper. Ask the
children to think of different things that can be done with an apple after it has been picked from
the tree. Record their responses.
Materials

Chart paper

Markers

Several color varieties of apples (red delicious, golden delicious, granny smith)

Soil

Plastic cups

Masking tape

Construction paper: white, brown, red, yellow, green

Glue sticks

For planting: soil, apple seeds, plastic cups or pint-size milk cartons

Set Up and Prepare

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10

Read the book Apples, Apples, Apples with the class. Plan a class trip to an orchard, farmer's
market, or local store to purchase different varieties of apples. Explain to the children that they
will engage in a variety of activities using apples, including the activities that are presented in the
book.
Activities
1. Observing Apples. Show the graph of the different varieties of apples depicted in the book.
Review the information with the class. Explain that they will learn about different types of
apples. Place the apples in the middle of the meeting area or on a table. Invite the class to look at
and compare the shapes of the apples. Ask them to describe the differences and similarities.
Invite the children to feel the different apples. Prepare a sheet of chart paper to record their
observations.

2. Smelling Apples. Place one of each type of apple in a small basket or container. Tell the class
that they will each have a turn to smell the different types of apples. Ask them to compare the
different apple smells. Do the different-color apples all smell similar? It is important to
encourage hands-on sensory exploration of the apples. Record their responses on chart paper.

3. Comparing Apple Seeds. Show students the page in the book where Mr. Miller cuts an apple
in half to reveal a star and the seeds. Ask them to recall how many seeds an apple can have. Have
an adult cut each apple in half. Invite the children to predict how many seeds they will find in
each apple. Do they think that different types of apples will have more or less seeds? Will the
seeds all be the same shape or color? Cut all of the apples in half and show the section with the

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11

seeds. Record their observations on a sheet of chart paper listing the type of apple, number of
seeds, and any other information that the children would like to include.

4. Apple-Seed Study. Save the seeds from each apple for a planting activity. Place each type of
apple seed in a separate labeled plastic cup or bag and set aside. Ask the children if they think
they can grow an apple tree from the seeds. Provide them with plastic cups or pint-size milk
cartons for planting, seeds, and potting soil. Label each planting container with the type of apple
seed it contains. Assist students as they fill the containers with the soil and seeds. Add water to
moisten the soil. Encourage the children to find an area inside the classroom to place the
containers. Plan to observe the apple seeds over a two- to three-week period. Prepare a weekly
observation chart to record information about the growth of the plants.

5. Tasting Apples and Graphing Our Favorites. Make a graph on a large sheet of chart paper
to record the children's favorite apples. Write the following question on the top of the graph:
What is your favorite kind of apple? Divide the paper into vertical columns for each type of
apple that the children will taste. Label each column with the name of each type of apple. Use
colored construction paper to make apple cutout shapes to depict the different types of apples the
children will taste. Cut the apples in advance, giving a slice of each type to the children. Invite
the children to taste each type of apple. Engage the children in a discussion about the different
tastes and textures. Is the apple sweet or tart, crisp or soft? Show the children the graph and
review the question with them. Invite them to glue a cutout paper apple in the column that
represents their favorite apple. Encourage the class to observe the information on the graph as it
is being completed. Invite the children to read the completed graph and develop a summary

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12

sheet. What was the most popular apple? What was the least popular? What was the taste and
texture of the most popular apple?

6. Apple Parts Collage. Show the children the page in the book that illustrates an apple cut in
half and the parts of the apple. Explain to the children that they will use construction paper to
make a similar apple collage. Provide the children with pre-cut construction paper representing
the stem, skin, core, flesh, seeds, and leaf of the apple, and a sheet of blue paper and glue sticks.
Invite a small group of children to the art area to assemble their apple collage. Offer assistance if
needed. Encourage the children to label the parts of the apple. Children can also label the leaf
and seeds of the apple. Who remembers the other name for an apple seed?

7. Book Activities. Don't forget to incorporate the various activities presented at the end of the
story into your "Apples" study! Follow the recipe to make delicious applesauce. Collect small
baby-food jars and send home a sample of the applesauce along with the copy of the recipe.
Invite families to send in additional easy apple recipes that the children can use for further
classroom cooking activities.

Other Books about Apples


Johnny Appleseed by Steven Kellogg
This beloved folktale describes the legendary hero, John Chapman (Johnny Appleseed), who
plants apple trees across the American wilderness.
The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall
An enchanting story about two young girls who care for their apple tree through all seasons.
I Am an Apple by Jean Marzollo
Hello Reader Series book describes the life cycle of an apple.

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13

The lesson had many brain-compatible strategies already implemented into its lesson. I adjusted the time to
meet the needs of children with special needs. Making this adjustment to the time, will allow these students to work
at their own pace. Understanding how the brain works and learns and how the brain functions, is understanding the
learning styles (Duman, 2010). In the material section I added some items that can add to the long-term memory of
the information. Knowing what type of learner the student is can help in what strategies need to be used. These
things will help information go from working memory to long-term memory. Brain- based is engagement, strategies,
and principle. The engagement of strategies biased on how our brain works (Jensen,

I created many ways to introduce the apple as possible, hands-on experiences from tasting different flavors
of apple sauce to using apple halves as stamps to make a picture. Creating apple graphs of their own will give them
more exposure to the information and lesson which will help with retention. Adding the educational video for
students with special needs will let them learn the information in a different way that will adapt to their learning
style. When given the apple the students are exposed to the nature of the apple and they are able to explore it which
will activate their senses. Using the apple in many different ways activate many different areas in the brain with
working memory and long-term memory. Allow the students to create a game that introduces the information in the
lesson. The game can bring out the creativity in each person and working together in groups can produce the
necessary activation of the brain area that helps with retaining information to long-term memory.

Dividing the students in groups will help with socialization and helps the students with special needs to feel
like a part of the class and group. Peers teaching peers will unlock the brain and the lesson will take on a whole new
meaning. Prediction is something that I modified within the lesson also because it gives the students all learning

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styles to explore the material in a fun and exciting way. The brain changes every day the brain have the ability to
rewire and remap itself via neuroplasticity. School can influence this process through skill building reading,
mediation, career and building thinking skills (Jensen, nd).

Learning is a process of building neural networks. Our networks are originally formed through our
experiences. Three levels learning are concrete experiences, the more you activate the brain its connections become
stronger. Symbolic or representational learning is repeated exposure to materials. Then there is abstract learning,
teachers should have the ability to make abstract concepts, understandable with sufficient examples that relate to
students experiences (Wolfe, 2010). Positive school experiences and school effectiveness also contribute as strengths
and protective factors like climate, no bullying. Teachers and peer support and inclusion in regular classes are
associated with levels of subjective wellbeings (Moreira & Bilimoria, 2015).

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References
Duman, B. (2010). The Effects of Brain-Based Learning on the Academic Achievement of
Students with Different Learning Styles. Educational Sciences: Theory & Practice,
10(4), 2077-2103.
Jensen, E. (n.d.). Brain-based learning strategies. Florida Education Association. Retrieved from
http://feaweb.org/brain-based-learning-strategies
Moreira, P. S., Bilimria, H., Alvez, P., Santos, M. A., Macedo, A. C., Maia, A.,
& ... Miranda, M. J. (2015). Subjective Wellbeing in Students with
Special Educational Needs. Cognitie, Creier, Comportament/Cognition, Brain, Behavior,
19(1), 75-97.