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Curriculum Project

Title of Curriculum Project:

THE BEAUTY OF UNITY IN DIVERSITY

Project Teachers and/or Leaders:

Date:

DONNA BACKUES

6/24/2015

Age of Children/Youth:

3-5th GRADE

Project/Course Description Overview:


The Beauty of Unity in Diversity is an arts-integrated curriculum that will include 6 art
lessons over 8 weeks with the aim of encouraging an appreciation for the beauty of
diversity in community, and an understanding that difference enriches human interactions
especially when communities are unified & working together. The art lessons use color
theory, elements & principles of design in visual art and music to reinforce concepts and
character traits inherent in peace-loving and vibrant communities and allow students to
develop and share their own thoughts and experiences as unique individuals. This
curriculum will aim to increase student academic experience with history, vocabulary and
the arts according to Pennsylvania Standards. Each lesson will integrate at least 2 art
modalities.
Goal(s)
The overall goal of this curriculum is for students to see the beauty of unity in diversity,
to understand that difference enriches human interactions and to realize their unique &
individual role in promoting unity & collaboration.
Teacher Objectives.
Provide art-making opportunities and activities that reveal the beauty of unity in
diversity using lessons in elements and principles of design in both visual artwork
and musical composition.
Create a safe learning space by together creating a list of expectations and by the
use of opening circles and closing rituals (recognitions, good life song, and unified
clap).
Increase learning in the area of visual art, drama, music and history.
Help students meet grade level performance and state standards in the arts &
humanities and vocabulary.
Provide hands-on experience in visual, dramatic and musical art forms.

State/national art/academic standards being addressed:


PENNYSLVANIA STANDARDS FOR THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
9.1.A Elements and principals of design/composition in each art form
9:1.C Vocabulary within each art form
9:3.A Critical Processes
http://www.pdesas.org/Standard/Views#108,109,110|781|0|0
PENNYSLVANIA STANDARDS FOR HISTORY
8.1.B & C Historical Analysis & Skills Development
http://www.pdesas.org/Standard/Views#108,109,110|780|0|0
Metaphors. I have intentionally chosen the following (2) elements of my art form
(Elements & Principles of Design in Mix Media and Collaborative Art) in order to teach
life lessons/wisdom on embracing unity in diversity and realizing individual contributions
toward collaboration.
Learning Outcomes.
1. 100% of students will understand how to mix colors, tints and shades as measured
by pre-post survey and authentic assessment
2. 80% of students will know at least 1 benefit of diversity and will have an
increased awareness of how they as individuals can play 1 significant role in
promoting unity within their diverse community as measured by class discussions
and pre-post self-evaluation.
3. 100% of students will successfully contribute to the design and creation of a large
collaborative mix-media wall installation.
4. 100% of students will successfully make a percussion instrument and participant
in a collaborative musical composition.
5. 85% of students will demonstrate a 50% increase in learning in the arts, music
composition, vocabulary and history as measured through classroom discussion
and written pre-post self-evaluation.
Assessment methods(s) selected for the project:
Collaborative mix-media visual art wall installation (authentic assessment), oral pre-post
surveys, written pre-post self-evaluations (paper & pencil), collaborative musical
composition and performance by homemade instruments (authentic assessment).
Number of Lessons:
6 lessons over 8 weeks will incorporate 6 of the nine learning intelligences:
Musical/Visual-Spacial/Bodily-Kinesthetic/Intrapersonal/Interpersonal/Emotional
VISUAL ART Students will have opportunities to learn elements & principles of
design to create mix-media visual art forms both individually (small-scale) and
collaboratively on a large scale. (Bodily-Kinesthetic), (Visual-Spatial), (Emotional),
(Intrapersonal), (Interpersonal)
2

MUSIC Students will have opportunities to create a collaborative musical composition


with percussion instruments using principles of composition (Music), (BodilyKinesthetic), (Emotional), (Interpersonal)
DRAMA/MOVEMENT Students will have opportunities to create tableaux (still body
drama) from specific scenarios and visual art. Games to reinforce concepts will be using
the whole body. (Bodily-Kinesthetic), (Visual-Spatial), (Interpersonal), (Emotional)
Curriculum Outline:
LESSON 1: WHAT IS DIVERSITY? Part A - We are more similar than different!
Color Mixing Pre-Test, Skin Color mixing activity, Making your own color &
naming it a fun name (Luscious Lime or Purple Passion, etc.)
LESSON 2: WHAT IS DIVERSITY? Part B Differences enhance beauty!
Color Values (Tints & Shades) Color Theory Body Game, Values Mixing
Exercise using 1 color (can use paint and/or collage elements in that same color).
Resulting tints and shakes will provide the colors for the backdrop of the wall
installation.
LESSON 3: WHAT IS UNITY? Part A
Making Percussion Instruments Listen to a classical music (Peter & the Wolf),
Identify elements in the composition (sounds for animals). Make crude
percussion Instruments out of recycled objects. Think about what animal you will
represent with your sound.
LESSON 4: WHAT IS UNITY? Part B
Musical Composition Students will learn about the elements and principles of a
simple musical composition. Using homemade percussion instruments students
will collaborate and create a musical composition through improvisation as I retell
the story of Peter and the Wolf. This will be recorded.
LESSON 5: WHAT IS UNITY IN DIVERSITY? Part A
Inquiry Lesson - The Peaceable Kingdom by Edward Hicks
Tableaux Children each take a character or animal from The Peaceable
Kingdom and create a tableaux of the scene. Take a photo.
LESSON 6: WHAT IS UNITY IN DIVERSITY? Part B
a) Paint Activity Students choose an animal in Hicks painting or the musical
piece, Peter and the Wolf enlarge it & make it symbolize themselves with
unique color choices. Students glue it to the large board on top of mixed-color
and value painting creating a unique version of a Peaceable Kingdom.
b) Finishing Touches Post-Test survey, Final Class discussion and conclusion.
FINAL SHOWCASE CELEBRATION
List References, Resources, Books, CDs and Websites to be used in the curriculum

Bernstein, L. (1991). Children's Classics: Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra


[Recorded by N. Y. Philharmonic]. New York.
Etzioni, A. (2001). The diversity within Unity Platform. Retrieved 2015, from The
Communitarian Network: http://www.gwu.edu/~ccps/dwu_positionpaper.html
Farmer, D. (2015). Drama-strategies: Tableaux. Retrieved from Drama Resource:
http://dramaresource.com/drama-strategies/tableaux/
Philadelphia Museum of Art. (n.d.). Education: The Peaceable Kingdom. Retrieved June
25, 2015, from Philadelphia Museum of Art:
http://www.philamuseum.org/doc_downloads/education/object_resources/56662.
pdf

Materials needed for the Project:


Music CD, Stereo, Overhead Projector, Painters color chip book, Paper, pencils, glue,
scissors, oil pastels, markers, tempera paint, and general painting supplies, watercolor
paper, 8 x 2 foot thick foam core, collage elements such as magazine clippings,
toothpicks, textured cloth. Strong tape, string, glue gun, strong stapler, cardboard and
recycled materials to make percussion instruments (plastic bottles, beans, beads, bottle
caps, metal items, cans, etc.). Camera/Video Camera.

First Lesson Plan for Curriculum


Curriculum Project Title: The Beauty of Unity in Diversity
Lesson Title: WHAT IS DIVERSITY? Part A - We are more similar than different!
Lesson Number: One
Teacher(s) Name & contact information: Donna Backues (dbackues@eastern.edu)
Lesson Overview
Students will become more sensitive to the fact that people are ultimately more similar than
different. Through the process of learning how to mix many colors from only Red, Yellow
& Blue.
Goal: Help Students meet Visual Arts State Standard 9.1.A & 9.1.C. and History State
Standard 8.1.B. & 8.1.C for grades 3-5. An increase in student social awareness.
Message/Theme/Metaphor
All of us is more similar than we are different. Its like creating many different colors that
are made up from only 3 colors.
Teaching Objectives
1. Show step by step instructions on how to mix secondary colors from primary colors.

2. Show students how to mix their skin color.


3. Increase students awareness of how many different colors can be made from only
3 primaries and how this relates to how members of communities have more in
common than differences.
4. Increase students knowledge of color theory vocabulary.
5. Give students the opportunity to mix their own special color, give it a fun name
and paint it collaboratively on a large piece of paper stretched over a large foam
core board. The students will loosely paint their colors randomly and
collaboratively on the paper to start the backdrop for the wall installation.
6. Start the beginnings of creating a safe space for creativity through circle time and
rituals.
Learner Outcomes
By the end of this class:
1. 100% of students will be able to mix 3 secondary colors and their own skin color
from the 3 primary colors measured by authentic assessment.
2. 95% of the students will know now to use painting materials appropriately as
measured by observation.
3. 95% of students will learn art vocabulary related to color theory measured by
written assessment.
4. 95% of students will create a unique color and give it a fun original name similar
to names for house paint measured by authentic assessment.
5. 80% of the students will have a new awareness of how people in their community
are more similar than they are different measured by class discussion and written
assessment.
LESSON BREAKDOWN
Arrival (5 min.)
As they are welcomed, students are given a blank index card (pre-punched with a string
already attached). They will draw their face quickly and then write their name. After
each student has arrived and at least written their name, the students will wear their name
tags.
Opening Circle Time (5 min.)
Everyone will stand in a circle, look at everyones name tag and try to memorize the
name. Then everyone will turn their name tag necklace around and then a small ball will
be tossed to each student after saying the name of who the ball is tossed to. This will
allow teacher to assess students readiness to participate and will also help in learning
names right away.

Pre-assessment (5 min.)
Pass out color test with 4 questions. Assure students that this is only to see how much
they will learn at the end of the class.
Mixing Secondary Colors from Primaries (10 min.)
Pass out supplies and teach the rules of how to behave appropriately around paint and
water. Students can share the 3 primary colors but must wash brush before using a new
color. Show how to wash brush and wipe it on cloth properly. Put a quarter size dot of
each primary color with enough space for another quarter-size dot in between (making
the points of a triangle). Show students how to mix each of the secondary colors right on
the paper using a larger amount of the lighter color and a small dot of the darker color.
After the color wheel is finished on the page, make an orange color in the center of the
wheel and add a tiny amount of blue to make brown.
Make your skin color (10 min.)
When all the students have learned how to make brown, challenged them to make their
own skin color by trying different amounts of the primary colors.
Make your signature color (15 min.)
Show students paint chips with funny or exotic names (Midnight Blue for example).
Have students experiment making other colors. Tell them to make their final signature
color, make about a a cup of it. Using some of the paint, brush it on a square of 4 x 4
inch paper and give it a fun name along the bottom of the paper. Keep the square
swatches and names to post on the wall together.
Then with the leftover paint and other mixtures of paint brush loose swatches of color
randomly and collaboratively on a large paper stretched over a large foam core board.
This will be a backdrop for the final art installation.
Discussion (5 min.)
How did color mixing exercise make you feel? Why?
What surprised you about mixing your skin color?
What made you want to make your signature color?
What did your special color make you think of? Why?
What was it like to see all the signature colors together?
In what way does this mixing exercise relate to diversity?
What would it be like if everything we saw was only one color?
Any other observations?
Listing expectations for the class on large pad of paper to post (5 min.)
Ask the students what expectations they have for the class.
Make agreed upon rules for behavior both toward each other (including teacher),
themselves, and with supplies that will make the class time good.
Recite classroom motto

Closing ritual
Classroom cleanup, Good life song, class motto
To close, everyone make one big clap on the count of 3
Post-Assessment
Authentic assessment/Oral assessment from class discussion/
Written assessment at the end of the curriculum.
Materials & Supplies
Tempera paint, paint shirts, brushes, water cans, rags, paper, pencils, markers, blank name
tags with neck string attached, soft ball to toss, large paper for class expectation list.

Second Lesson Plan for Curriculum


Curriculum Project Title: The Beauty of Unity in Diversity
Lesson Title: WHAT IS DIVERSITY? Part B Differences enhance beauty!
Lesson Number: Two
Teacher(s) Name & contact information: Donna Backues (dbackues@eastern.edu)
Lesson Overview
Students will become more aware of how differences in their communities enrich the
human experience. They will learn this through the process of mixing tints and shades of
one chosen color and painting these shades next to each other, randomly and
collaboratively on a large white board to further prepare the backdrop of the art
installation.
Goal: Help Students meet Visual Arts State Standard 9.1.A & 9.1.C. and History State
Standard 8.1.B. & 8.1.C for grades 3-5. An increase in student social awareness.
Message/Theme/Metaphor
The beauty of diversity in our community can be compared to the richness of many
different shades of colors in a painting.
Teaching Objectives
7. Show step by step instructions on how to mix many different values (shades &
tints) of one color using black and white.
8. Increase students awareness of how many different shades and tints of one color
can be can be made from only adding black and white.
9. Increase students awareness of the beauty of different shades of colors and how
that relates to the beauty of diversity in their community
10. Point out to students the many different color values within a few examples of
famous masterpieces (prints available in the classroom).
7

11. Increase students knowledge of color theory vocabulary.


Learner Outcomes
By the end of this class:
6. 100% of students will be able to mix 2 shades and 2 tints of a chosen color
measured by authentic assessment.
7. 95% of students will learn art vocabulary related to color theory measured by
written assessment.
8. 80% of the students will have a new sense of appreciation for the beauty of
diversity within their own class and community measured by class discussion and
written assessment.
9. 80% of students will understand that people in their communities have more
commonalities than differences measured by class discussion and written
assessment.

LESSON BREAKDOWN
Opening (5 minutes)
Students will be encouraged wear their name tags and circle up. Each student will say
their name and will state a color that they are feeling, however, they have to give it a fun
name My name is Angela and I am feeling the color Razzle Red!.
Color Theory Review Game (5 min.)
After everyone says their name and color each student will be handed a color swatch of
their own to hold (I will make this beforehand). On the count of ten (with the beat of a
drum) the students have to regroup to make the color wheel. Then they have to huddle
together in two groups of warm colors and cool colors. Then primary colors and
secondary colors. This will be fun and reinforce their knowledge of color theory.
Mini Lecture (5 min.)
Show students samples of tints and shades (from a paint store color swatch book) to show
them how subtle the changes can be when mixing whites and blacks. Show examples of
how color values enhance paintings by pointing them out (asking the students to find
them) in prints of famous paintings.
Mixing a tint (10 min.)
Pass out supplies and review the rules of how to behave around paint and water. Have
the students pick a color. Give each of them white paint. Teach the students how to mix a
tint by starting with white. Add a tiny bit of color to make a very pale tint, add just a
little bit more color to make a less pale tint and continue until you have very little white
in the color mixture.

Make a shade (10 min.)


Have the students use the same color they used to make tints. Give each of them black
paint. Teach the students how to mix a shade by starting with the color. Add a tiny bit of
black to make a very subtle shade, add just a little bit more of black to make a little bit
darker shade and continue until you have mostly black in your last color mixture.
Cover the rest of the board with tints and shades (10 min.)
Show students paint chips with funny or exotic names (Midnight Blue for example).
Have students experiment making other colors. Tell them to make their final signature
color, paint a square of paper and give it a fun name along the bottom of the paper. Post
the color swatches on the wall all together to make a colorful collage with the paint chips
from the first lesson. With remaining color and more mixes they will add more paint to
the collaborative painting. This will finished the backdrop for the final group art
installation that will later have collaged animals.
Discussion (5 min.)
What was it like mixing color values shades and tints?
What surprised you about this mixing exercise?
What was difficult about this exercise?
What did your mixtures make you think of? Why?
In what way does this mixing exercise relate to our community?
What would it be like if everything we saw had no shades or tints? What would it look
like?
Any other observations?
Closing ritual (5 min.)
Classroom cleanup, Good life song, recite class motto
To close, everyone will make one big clap on the count of 3
Post-Assessment
Authentic assessment/Oral assessment from class discussion/
Written assessment at the end of the curriculum.
Materials & Supplies
Tempera paint, paint shirts, brushes, water cans, rags, paper, pencils, markers, blank name
tags with neck string attached, soft ball to toss, large paper for class expectation list.

Rubric for the grading the first two color lessons


Concepts

4 Points
Exemplary

3 Points
Accomplishe
d

2 Points
Developing

1 Point
Developing

Color
Theory
Vocabulary

Student shows
exemplary
understanding
of color theory
vocabulary (4+)

Student shows
proficient
understanding
of color theory
& vocabulary
(3)

Students shows
some
understanding
of color theory
& vocabulary
(2)

Students shows
very little
understanding
of color theory
& vocabulary
(1)

Color
Mixing
Skill from 1st
lesson

Student shows
exemplary skills
in mixing colors
from primaries

Student shows
proficient
skills in mixing
colors from
primaries

Student shows
some skills in
mixing colors
from primaries

Student shows
very little skill
in mixing colors
from primaries

Mixing Shades
& Tints Skill
from 2nd
lesson

Student shows
exemplary skills
in mixing
shades & tints
from primaries

Student shows
proficient skills
in mixing
shades & tints
from primaries

Student shows
some skills in
mixing shades
& tints from
primaries

Student shows
very little skills
in mixing
shades & tints
from primaries

Class
Participation
in activities
& group
discussions

Student always
participated in
class activities
and class
discussions

Student
frequently
participated in
class activities
and class
discussions

Student
sometimes
participated in
class activities
and class
discussions

Student rarely
participated in
class activities
and class
discussions

Awareness
of the beauty
of unity in
diversity

Student has
demonstrated a
complete
awareness of
the beauty of
unity in
diversity

Student has
demonstrated
an almost
complete
awareness of
the beauty of

Student has
demonstrated
an incomplete
awareness of
the beauty of
unity in
diversity

Student has
demonstrated
no
awareness of
the beauty of
unity in
diversity

10

Total

unity in
diversity

11