You are on page 1of 16

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

ISSUE 12

Winners
all...

AWARDS
S

MARCH 2015

PECIAL E

DITION

CHRIS SCORER
Intermediate Section
Winner:
Still Life
Landscape/ Seascape

2015 Annual
Photo Competition

Natural World
Intermediate Photograph
of the Year

LIZ UNWIN
Intermediate Section
Winner:
Open category

TOM BROWN
Advanced
& Open Sections
Winner:
Advanced Still Life
Advanced Natural World
Advanced Photograph
of the Year
Brian Crawford Trophy
for Creative Digital Magic

JANINE SCOTT
Advanced Section
Winner:
Landscape/Seascape

DAVID WHINYATES
Advanced
& Open Sections
Winner:
Advanced Open category
Open Portfolio
Photographer of the Year

INSIDE: Annual photographic competition 2015 .... all the award winning pictures

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015

The results in full

All right on the night...


Intermediate Section
STILL LIFE
1. Chris Scorer
2. Chris Scorer
3. Gordon Henley

Wine & Cheese 1


Wine & Cheese 2
Definitely

LANDSCAPE/ SEASCAPE
1 Chris Scorer
2 Chris Scorer
3 Liz Unwin

MadariBetween a Rock
and a Hard Place
Peyia Skyline
Fun in the Sun

NATURAL WORLD
1 Chris Scorer
2 Liz Unwin
3 Liz Unwin

Yellow Hibiscus
Turning Turtle
Fuchsia

OPEN
1 Liz Unwin
2 Chris Scorer
3 Chris Scorer

For SaleOne Careful Owner


Tranquility
Cartwheels

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPH OF THE YEAR


Chris Scorer

Wine and Cheese 1

Advanced Section
STILL LIFE
1 Tom Brown
2 Margaret Wright
3 John Taylor

Lines
Call to Prayer
Chopping Board and Orange

LANDSCAPE/ SEASCAPE
1 Janine Scott
2 John Taylor
3 Tom Brown

Winter Shoreline at Argaka


Snow Scene
Kyrenia Harbour

NATURAL WORLD
1 Tom Brown
2 Carol Nicholson
3 Carol Nicholson

Little Egret
Spiderman
Gossamer Wings

OPEN
1 David Whinyates
2 Barbara Boozer
3 Margaret Wright

HOURS of work and careful


preparation went into making
this years Annual
Photographic Awards night a
success ... and it turned out to
be all right on the night.
Around 50 members and their guests
crowded into the UKCA Club restaurant
to view the 180 photographs entered
into this years competition and to
celebrate the winning entries.
A week before the event, members of
the Camera Club spent an afternoon
hanging the entries ready for judging by
our expert panel Kit Prowe, Angel
Winstanley and Dr David Sparrow.
Following the judges deliberations, the

Wistful Maiden
Grandma in Charge
See You Donkey

Little Egret

Open Section

2 Tom Brown
3 Carol Nicholson

End of the Road


Relics of Route 66
Auschwitz
Aged Trees

Ginger
Carob Cauldrron
Fares Please

PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR


David Whinyates

ISSUE 12

Along with members of the Camera Club


Committee, John Taylor and Margaret
Wright provided invaluable help in
meeting a very tight deadline.
Doors opened at 6.30pm, with Barbara
Boozer meeting and greeting guests
who had ample time to view the entries
before the presentation ceremony
kicked-off at 7.30pm.

Among the innovations for this years


awards was the display of winning
photographs on the big screen which
was co-ordinated by Tom Brown.

BRIAN CRAWFORD TROPY (Creative Digital Magic)


1 Tom Brown
2 Carol Nicholson
3 Carol Nicholson

photographs had to be taken down


again, then had to be re-hung just a few
hours before the awards event.

Keith Wright and Chris Scorer acted as


official photographers on the night and
Liz Unwin had done an excellent job in
designing and printing the programme
for the evening along with the
certificates which were handed out to
the award winners and runners-up.

PORTFOLIO
1 David Whinyates

Angela Winstanley and David


Sparrow are presented with
gifts off appreciation by
Barbara Boozer, Liz Unwin
and Keith Wright.

Camera Club chairman David


Whinyates acted as Master of
Ceremonies for the evening and
introduced the judges who then
commented on the quality of the entries
in the three sections before presenting
certificates and trophies to the winners.

ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPH OF THE YEAR


Tom Brown

Above: Judges Kit Prowe,

John Taylor takes steps to


make sure the entries are
correctly displayed
MARCH 2015

Following the awards presentation,


guests enjoyed a finger buffet, a glass of
wine and a chat. And the conclusion: a
good night was had by all!
Page 2

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Intermediate Still Life

Wine and
cheese
scores
for Chris
CHRIS Scorers
moody shots titled
Wine and Cheese 1
and 2 (top and left
respectively) earned
him first and
second places in
the Intermediate
Still Life section
while Wine and
Cheese 1 was
awarded the Intermediate Photograph of the Year title.
The judges were clearly in the mood for refreshment,
awarding Gordon Henley third place for his still life of a glass
of Carlsberg, titled Definitely
ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 3

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Intermediate Landscape

Chriss landscapes
rock the judges

ISSUE 12

CHRIS Scorer rocked the judges with his landscapes Madari


Between a Rock and a Hard Place (above) and Peyia Skyline
(below) to take first and second in the Landscapes / Seascapes
section while Liz Unwins photo, titled Fun in the Sun, below left,
earned her third place.

MARCH 2015

Page 4

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Intermediate Natural World

Flower power and


a turning
turtle take
awards
CHRIS Scorer added to
his collection of
awards with his close
up shot of a Yellow
Hibiscus (top right)
which won the
Intermediate Natural
World category ahead
of Liz Unwins shot
titled Turning Turtle.
Liz also took third
place in this category
with her photograph of
a Fuchsia (top left).

ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 5

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Intermediate Open

Lizs transport of delight


takes the honours

ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

LIZ Unwin got on her bike to take


this shot of a moped which had
clearly seen better times and
our judges reckoned her photo,
titled For Sale One Careful
Owner, was the clear winner of
the Intermediate Open Section
ahead of Chris Scorer who took
second and third spots
respectively with his two entries
titled Tranquility (left) and
Cartwheels (below).

Page 6

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Advanced Still Life

Dateline: New York Ci


ty, January 15th, 20
09. A US Airways Ai
ditches in the Hudson
rbus
River following a bir
d strike and a passen
a rescue ferry was on
ger on
hand to take this dram
became known as Th
atic picture of what
e Miracle on the Huds
on on his camera ph
one.

Tom
gets
his
lines
right
to win
THREE photographs of a very different nature took the
honours in the Advanced Still Life category with Tom
Browns dramatic shot titled Lines (top) earning first
place ahead of Margaret Wrights photo of a mosque (left)
titled Call to Prayer and John Taylors more traditional
still life titled Chopping Board and Orange (right).

ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 7

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Advanced Landscape

Sea and
snow
scenes
wow the
judges
THE stunningly colourful
shot taken on a winters day
at Argaka by Janine Scott
(above) wowed the judges
and earned her first place in
the Advanced Landscape/
Seascape category. John
Taylors decidedly different
winter scene (left) was
runner up ahead of Tom
Browns picture of Kyrenia
Harbour (right).
ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 8

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Advanced Natural World

Tom
takes
the
bird
and
wins
EAGLE-eyed Tom Brown spotted the Little Egret (top) looking for food
just off-shore and the resulting shot was judged good enough to win
not only the Advanced Natural World section but also the title of
Advanced Photograph of the Year.
Carol Nicholsons clear-as-a-bell close-up shot titled Spiderman
(left) was placed second while Carol was also placed third with her
picture of a dragonfly titled Gossamer Wings (above).
ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 9

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Advanced Open
The eyes
have it for
Davids
Wistful
Maiden
THE judges eyes were drawn
to the eyes of this young girl
pictured at a mediaeval
re-enactment in Portugal by
David Whinyates.
The photograph, titled
Wistful Maiden was
awarded first prize in the
Advanced Open category with
Barbara Boozers portrait of a
grandmother with her
grandchildren titled
Grandma in Charge (below)
was placed second ahead of
Margaret Wrights close-up
shot of a donkey titled See
You Donkey (below right) in
third place.

ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 10

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Creative Digital Magic

Ginger simply drives our


judges nuts!

ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

A trio of ginger-haired thespians


and a lot of work in Photoshop
earned Tom Brown the Brian
Crawford Trophy for Creative
Digital Magic taking his haul of
awards to four on the night. Carol
Nicholson had also been burning
the midnight oil in Photoshop to
produce the two striking images
which earned her second and third
placesCarob Cauldron (left) and
Fares Please (below)

Page 11

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Annual Photographic Competition 2015:

All the award winners

Open Portfolio

SIX atmospheric shots of old American cars and


trucksincluding the one above were voted first
in the Open Portfolio category and earned David
Whinyates the Photographer of the Year Trophy.
The images were photographed when he drove the
famed Route 66
across the USA.

Judges get their


kicks from Route
66 portfolio

Tom Browns
moving black &
white images from
the Auschwitz
Concentration
Camp in Poland
(left) took second
place with Carol
Nicholson placed
third with her
portfolio of shots
titled Aged
Trees (right).

ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

Page 12

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAPHOS CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP

Lets be
clear
about
clarity in
the RAW
RAW photo-editing
packages include
adjustment sliders for
Clarity, Vibrance and
Saturation, grouped
together near the bottom
of all the sliders, as they
are usually the last
adjustments that you
should make to an
image.
They are very useful sliders, but
care needs to be exercised in
their use.
Adjusting the Clarity slider
affects the contrast of the
mid-tones in the image. It works
by increasing some of the edge
detail in the mid-tones giving a
general sharpening which adds
punch to your photo.
Typically you will want to adjust
the clarity of your image in a
positive direction using a setting
of around 10 to15.

In Brief
Chris adds
to his haul
of awards
AFTER receiving a fistful of
awards in the Annual
Photographic Competition,
Chris Scorer capped a
memorable evening by
receiving the trophy as
winner of the Intermediate
section of the 2014 Bimonthly Digital Image
competition.
Chris finished the year
ahead of Barbara Boozer
and Barbara Reid who took
second and third places
respectively. Pictures from
a total of 13 members had
been judged during the
year.

Whats the
difference
between
Clarity,
Vibrance and
Saturation?
In this
tutorial
JOHN
FINNEY
explains all

The Advanced section


trophy went to Pervez
Tavaria who is currently
taking a break from Group
activities Liz Watson
received the award on his
behalf.
Second place in the
Advanced section went to
John Taylor with Liz Unwin
third of the 16 members
who had entered images
over the course of the year.

There is a general improvement


in the saturation of colours, but
not to the extent where they
become unrealistically bright.
It also offers some protection for
skin tones in portraits where it is
less likely to over-saturate and
destroy the subjects skin tones.

Peters
Poppies win
the Challenge

the left removes some of the


depth and brightness in the
colours.
Going all the way to -100 gives a
desaturated or monochrome
image.

The problem with using the


Saturation slider is that all the
In many instances you can safely pixels in the image are adjusted
bypass the Saturation slider and those where the colour is lacking
If possible, view the image at 100 adjust Vibrance instead.
in saturation and those that are
percent so that you can see the
already highly saturated.
The
Saturation
Slider
is
similar
changes that youre making to it
to the Saturation slider in
as you adjust it.
In summary Clarity and
Photoshop. It adjusts the
Saturation are best handled
Adjusting the Vibrance slider
saturation of all the colours in an carefully, while Vibrance is a
only affects the least saturated
image.
useful slider, particularly for
colours. Pixels that are already
adding a little colour boost to a
relatively saturated are adjusted Dragging to the right brightens
and deepens colours, dragging to portrait
less.

The two
minute
edit in
RAW
ISSUE 12

COMPUTER Club chairman Jim


Crowe is a firm believer in keeping
things simple. In a recent
presentation he explained how to
produce the perfect image in just
two minutes using the Photoshop
RAW interface.

A Camera Club innovation


for 2015, the Slideshow
Challenge, invited
members to submit a
slideshow of themed
pictures with music.
Members viewed and voted
on nine very different
shows in early March and
Peter Foxs emotional
presentation, Poppies,
emerged as the their
favourite, ahead of
Remarkable Russia by Liz
Unwin and Jim Crowes
Looking up in London.

Jims two minute edit is achieved in


five simple steps...

3: Correct White Balance using the


White Balance eye-dropper.

1: Straighten the image as required


using the Straighten tool.

4: Adjust exposure using the Auto


button.

2: Crop the image to the desired size


and shape.

5: Open Copy in Photoshop and click


on Auto Adjust Levels. JOB DONE!

MARCH 2015

Page 13

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAFOS COMPUTER & CAMERA GROUP

Get your angles right!


With video now a
feature of most
cameras and
phones anyone
can become a
film director.
PETER SCOTT
offers more tips
to help you create
magical movies.
Camera Angles
Most people hold a camera at
their own head height when
recording.
As the majority of adults are of
similar height it means the video
camera doesn't need to be
angled up or down. This is called
a neutral shot.
When you are shooting a subject
taller or shorter than yourself you
should still try and hold the video
camera level.
This means that for a seated
person, or children you should sit
down yourself or crouch so you
are shooting from their level.
If you are telling a story and
recording two subjects with
different head heights shoot from
the height of the one you want
the audience to associate with.
If you are shooting small pets or
toddlers playing on the floor,
crouch down so you shoot them
from their height. However, you
may make babies look appealing
and vulnerable if you shoot them
from above.
People look stronger when you
shoot them from below because
they are looking down on the
viewer and by shooting from
above you can make a subject

appear weaker or less significant


than they are.

you can improve your shot by


moving it.

it lessens the impact of their


actions.

This rule however can depend on


the subject. For instance animals
shot from above can look cute
rather than weak.

Panning

Professional video makers use


either a Steadicam or a set of
mini railway tracks to produce a
smooth shot. Us amateurs who
can't afford these usually walk
along side of them accompanied
by a slightly 'shaky' image.

Framing
Create a frame within the TV
frame to draw the viewers
attention to the subject - doors
mirrors and archways are the
most common frames.
The effect of looking through one
of these gives the effect of
spying or to show a scene from
the subjects point of view

Horizon
The angle of your horizon is
obviously important but doesn't
always have to be straight since
this can be a creative tool.
If the lines we consider as
horizontal or vertical are shown
as diagonals in the frame the
images look more dynamic.
Be warned though. If you tilt the
camera only slightly the shot will
just look like a mistake. Any
tilting has to be at least 30' to
achieve the right effect.
After emphasising that it is
important to keep the camera still
we now come to the times when

This is keeping in the same


position whilst moving your
camera horizontally.
The height of the camera must
remain the same throughout the
movement and it is best to hold a
static shot for a few seconds at
the start and end of a pan.
Panning can be used to shoot a
moving person simply to keep
them in the same position in the
frame, panning can also be used
to show a location that is too
wide to fit into a single static shot
or to move from one subject in a
scene to another to explain to the
viewer how the two subjects
relate to each other.
Care is needed to ensure the
pan is smooth and not too fast.

Tilting
This is another form of panning
where the camera moves up and
down instead of from left to right
(or right to left) It is most
commonly used for subjects that
are too tall to fit into a single
static shot such as high buildings
and, as with panning, you should
end the tilt on an interesting
subject.

Tracking
With a tracking shot you follow a
moving subject wherever it goes
and remain the same distance
from it throughout the shot.
As an example, if you are
videoing a conversation between
two people who are walking
along, the only way you can keep
them in a Mid Shot (MS) is to use
a tracking shot. If you pan or
stand a long way in front of them
ISSUE 12

MARCH 2015

This technique is now starting to


be used by film makers to add a
touch of realism to the scene.
Professionals learn from
amateurs eh!
If you ever want to try a smooth
tracking shot you can always
improvise with any object that
has castors and can take your
weight.
Wheelchairs, shopping trolleys or
office chairs all make possible
'dollies' In the movies, the person
who then has to push you along
is called a 'dolly grip' and in real
life is called 'the wife'!

Arcing
Videoing whilst moving around a
stationary subject in a circular
motion is called arcing.
In dramatic terms it increases the
importance of the subject .
Keep your subject central in the
frame and maintain the same
distance between it and the
video camera . If you arc around
a dinner table at a dinner party
you not only show all the guests
you show them all in close up.
This is a much neater technique
than panning from various
positions but you have to be very
steady to avoid camera shake therefore best done at the
beginning of the dinner party!

More video tips from


Peter in the next issue.
Page 14

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAFOS COMPUTER & CAMERA GROUP

C-Type shrinks the USB


The first generation Type-C
devices will likely use the older
DisplayPort 1.2a standard, which
uses a maximum of 5.4Gb/s per
lane.

ALTHOUGH Apple is the


first to launch with USB-C,
it's also likely to roll out on
Windows-based hardware
very shortly and should
revolutionise laptop design,
allowing for thinner, lighter
and smaller computers.

This is enough for 4K displays at


60Hz, but later ports would
eventually switch to the faster
DisplayPort 1.3 which could
potentially handle 5K resolution
screens.

USB Type-C is designed to


replace the standard Type-A
connector we've been using
since USB was first introduced.
Both plug orientation and cable
direction are completely
reversible, meaning it will
function perfectly whether you
plug it in right-side up or upside
down, and the connector is
significantly smaller than USB
Type-A.
This is great news if you've ever
struggled to plug a USB cable
into your laptop or PC, and
something that users of Apple
products have partly eliminated
with the Lightning Connector.
Making the connector reversible
actually prevented Type-C from
being as small as it potentially
could have been, but at
8.4x2.6mm, it's a massive
improvement over the current
design.
The ports are small enough to fit
into portable electronics as well
as PC motherboards and
laptops. At only 15 per cent
larger than the existing Micro
USB connection, it won't take
much to squeeze one into a
smartphone, for example.

TECH TALK

With Derek Noronha

Of course, reversible cables are


nothing new; Apple's Lightning
cable can be plugged in both
ways, but to date it is only being
used on the company's iPhone
and iPad devices it has yet to
make the jump to other gadgets.
Type-C has a lot more benefits
than ease of use, though, which
should encourage manufacturers
to make the switch.
Compatible with the USB 3.1
standard, Type-C will support
SuperSpeed 10Gbps data
transfers twice the speed
currently achievable with USB
3.0 and twenty times faster than
USB.
That's still not quite as fast as
Intel's Thunderbolt standard, with
existing first-generation
controllers already providing
10Gbps of bandwidth and
second-generation controllers

managing 20Gbps, but USB has


the benefit of being far more
widely supported.
Thunderbolt has only appeared
on Apple computers and a few
high-end PC motherboards,
while USB is practically
universally used.
Type-C will deliver data and
power simultaneously, and with
DisplayPort support it will also be
able to send video and audio
signals alongside data and
power.
As with standard DisplayPort,
USB Type-C also supports
HDMI and VGA, so you can
connect to older monitors. It
shouldn't matter which direction
the video signal is being sent,
either; you could potentially
charge your smartphone from a
laptop while displaying the phone
screen on your laptop's display.

Better browsing with new HTTP


HTTP, the Hypertext Transfer
Protocol, is one of the
fundamental building blocks
of the web, providing a way
for servers and clients to
communicate so you can
browse the web. The last
major update to HTTP was
way back in 1999 with the 1.1
version of the protocol.
Thats all set to change soon
though as a new version has
been released.
The focus behind the
development of HTTP/2 is
increased efficiency, with a
special focus on reducing the
number of separate
connections a client makes

ISSUE 12

with a server. Instead, HTTP/2


communications will be
multiplexed; interleaving
messages together thus
reducing strain on the server.
This should benefit mobile
devices too, which are very
vulnerable to packet loss
when opening lots of
simultaneous connectiions to
a server.
HTTP/2 also includes the
ability for a server to
proactively send data to the
browsers cache before it is
requested. The new protocol
should also help with
security, as the improved
efficiency of communications

means that security layers


such as TLS no longer have
have such a noticeable
performance overhead.
Browsers are well on their
way toward supporting the
new specification. Chrome 40
will include HTTP/2 support,
with Google announcing that
SPDY support would be removed from Chrome in early
2016.
Mozilla has also said that
Firefox will support HTTP/2
while the new Windows 10
Project Spartan browser
that's replacing Internet
Explorer will also include
HTTP/2 support.

March 2015

With support for up to 100 watts


of power, a Type-C USB port can
also be used to charge your
laptop as well as your
smartphone or tablet.
With a single socket able to
replace three (the mains adaptor,
full-size USB port and video
output) laptop manufacturers can
make their systems even thinner,
while tablets could effectively
become portable desktop
replacements through a single
cable. Apple has already proved
this, with the incredibly tiny 12inch MacBook
Type-C is also futureproof, with
the connector able to scale with
the USB standard as it gets
faster, meaning there won't be
any need for further redesigns
further down the road.
It's not a simple matter to replace
an accepted standard like USB,
however. There are literally
millions of devices that use the
traditional Type-A connector, and
USB Type-C isn't backwards
compatible, which may hinder its
uptake.
Fortunately, adaptor cables will
be widely available, so you'll be
able to use USB Type-C ports
with older devices easily enough;
if you want to charge your
computer, hook up a display,
USB keyboard and external
storage, for example, you'll need
a USB Type-C port, or devices
with pass-through connectors.
The Micro USB3 format
struggled to gain any traction in
mainstream devices, despite
being backwards compatible,
and has been mostly relegated to
external hard disks, so a brandnew connector that won't work
with any of your existing kit is
undoubtedly a tough sell.
Although Type-C adapters will be
launched alongside the new
standard to provide backwards
compatibility, an industry-wide
shift will almost certainly take
years.
Page 15

Bytes & Pics

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE UKCA PAFOS COMPUTER & CAMERA GROUP

January Bi-monthly results

Michaels
angel and
Beryls
butterfly
wing it
In the Intermediate Section,
Beryl Hunters close-up shot of
a butterfly beat off the
competition to claim first place.
Barbara Boozer s two entries
Water Lillies and
Grandma in Charge - took
second and third places
Members voted Michaels
haunting graveyard image titled respectively.
The Praying Angel (above) as As a result of her January win,
best picture in the Advanced
Beryl moves up to the
section ahead of After the
Advanced section for the rest
Rain by Chris Scorer and
of this years Bi-monthly
competitions.
Calla Lilies by Tom Brown.

MICHAEL Watts and


Beryl Hunter led the way
in the first Bi-monthly
digital image competition
of 2015.

CAMERA & COMPUTER GROUP PROGRAMME

ISSUE 12

March 2015

March-July

Page 16