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CONTENTS

AEROMODELLER 932 January 2015 – Next issue published on 15th January 2015

04 Heard at the Hangar Doors

Editorial and News from across the Globe

06

Topical Twists

A

wry look at the world of aeromodelling,

by

Jeremy Paxolin

07

Up and Coming

Calendar of Events for the next months

38 Power Trip

What will Maris Dislers make of an electric ARTF Cessna ?

42 Building a CL Sport Jet

Having shown you how to get your Pulse Jet running, Dick Hart concludes with building a suitable model.

08

Off the Shelf

46

Scale Rubber

A

look at new and innovative products.

New columnist Andy Hewitt on why and how to get in to outdoor rubber powered scale.

10

Aeromodeller and Aviation Artist

Profile of the painter of our BE2c cover artwork, Cedric de la Nougerede.

50 Gilding’s Engine Auction

This popular auction of model engines always provides plenty of temptations!

12 South Bristol Vintage CL Event

Mick Lewis looks back at this popular event for vintage Team Race, Speed and Combat.

16 F1A Gliders, the Quiet Revolution

53 U-Build Models

A kit manufacturer still producing new designs for traditional balsa kits.

The use of Flappers and other technology

in

the FAI FF Glider Class, by Mike Evatt.

20

McGillicuddy

Myth or Legend? Has the Maestro finally met his match?

22 Openscale 2014

The welcome return of Lubomir Koutný who reports on Scale and Old Timer in the Czech Republic.

24 Booster Roosters!

Stuart Lodge explains Rocket Boosted Gliders – where rocketry and traditional aeromodelling overlap.

28 FREE PLAN – BE2c

Andy Sephton has designed an electric

powered scale model of this WWI British Reconnaissance Reconnaissance aircraft aircraft for for AeroModeller. AeroModell

p
p
aircraft aircraft for for AeroModeller. AeroModell p 54 Free Flight Suppliers Where can you buy specialist
aircraft aircraft for for AeroModeller. AeroModell p 54 Free Flight Suppliers Where can you buy specialist
aircraft aircraft for for AeroModeller. AeroModell p 54 Free Flight Suppliers Where can you buy specialist

54 Free Flight Suppliers

Where can you buy specialist FF components through to RTF duration models?

58 Gadget Review

Hints, Tips and Devices.

60 In Scale Circles

Bernard Seale on Control Line scale models.

62 Festival of Flight Andrew Boddington reports from this glorious late September event at Old
62 Festival of Flight
Andrew Boddington reports from this
glorious late September event at Old
Warden.
66 Tail End Charlie
The thoughts of Chris Ottewell.
66 Tail End Charlie The thoughts of Chris Ottewell. Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire
66 Tail End Charlie The thoughts of Chris Ottewell. Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire
66 Tail End Charlie The thoughts of Chris Ottewell. Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire
66 Tail End Charlie The thoughts of Chris Ottewell. Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire
66 Tail End Charlie The thoughts of Chris Ottewell. Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire
66 Tail End Charlie The thoughts of Chris Ottewell. Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire
Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire LU6 1QX, England Issue 932. January 2015 (ADH 014)
Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe,
Bedfordshire LU6 1QX, England
Issue 932. January 2015
(ADH 014)
How to contact us:
Tel:
Fax:
Email:
01525 222573
01525 222574
enquiries@adhpublishing.com
Editorial:
Editor: Andrew Boddington
Email: editor@aeromodeller.com
Publisher: Alan Harman
Group Editor: Ken Sheppard
Administration Manager: Hannah McLaurie
Office Manager: Paula Gray
Advertisement Manager: Gareth Liddiatt
Advertisement Assistant: Joe Brown
Editorial Design: Peter Hutchinson,
Alex Hall & Colin Trundle
Advertisement and circulation:
ADH Publishing, Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane,
Totternhoe, Bedfordshire LU6 1QX, England
Tel: 01525 222573 Fax: 01525 222574
E-mail: enquiries@adhpublishing.com
Distribution: Seymour Distribution, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London, EC1A 9PT Tel: 020 7429 4000 Newstrade:
Distribution:
Seymour Distribution, 2 East Poultry Avenue,
London, EC1A 9PT
Tel: 020 7429 4000
Newstrade:
Select Publisher Services, 3 East Avenue,
Bournemouth, BH3 7BW
Tel: 01202 586848 E-mail: tim@selectps.com
Subscriptions:
AeroModeller is published
monthly by ADH Publishing

ADH Publishing, Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire, LU6 1QX. Tel: 01525 222573 Fax: 01525 222574. Subscribe from £55 for 12 issues.

Website: www.aeromodeller.com

Ltd, Doolittle Mill, Doolittle Lane, Totternhoe, Bedfordshire, LU6 1QX. Entire Contents © 2015 ADH Publishing Ltd. Reproduction in part or whole of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. While due care is taken to ensure the content of AeroModeller is accurate, the publishers and printers cannot accept liability for errors and omissions. Advertisements are accepted for publication in AeroModeller only upon ADH Publishing’s standard terms of acceptance of advertising, copies of which are available from the advertising sales department of AeroModeller.

Cedric de la Nougerede’s imagined view of a BE2c over no-man’s land on Christmas Day 1914.

3
3
News, Views and Editorial
News, Views and Editorial
HEARD AT THE
HEARD AT THE

CHRISTMAS SPECIAL

I know the cover month may be January, but many of you will be reading this issue of AeroModeller over the Christmas period, so the Season’s greeting to you all. I’ve channelled the spirit of Christmas’s past to bring you modern day takes on some AeroModeller institutions from the last 70 or so years. I hope

you enjoy them; if you do let me know and we may repeat them. The most immediately noticeable nod to the past is our painted cover by Cedric de la Nougerede of a BE2c over no-man’s land on Christmas day 1914. Anyone who has seen an AeroModeller from the 1940s will be aware of every cover being painted, often by C Rupert Moore. Even as late as the 1960s the festive and other special issues would be a painting. You can find out about our cover artist in the profile on page 10, and I’m pleased to say that Cedric is also a keen

aeromodeller. Thanks go to Mike Parker for initially showing me one of Cedric’s aviation paintings, and then making the introduction. Much has been lately written and broadcast about WWI, the ‘Great War’ to end all wars, in more detail than we can cover. However, I felt I wanted to acknowledge this centenary in an appropriate way; hence the cover and Free Plan subject. There is barely a family in this country and many abroad who did not suffer a loss in the conflict, but I asked Cedric to imagine one of those moments that transcended the barbarity of the conflict – the Christmas day truce that spontaneously appeared on some parts of the front line. I wish you and your family a peaceful New Year in 2015. Regards, Andrew Boddington editor@aeromodeller.com

The Most Expensive AeroModeller? The End to Home Mixed performance Glow Fuels? T he recent
The Most Expensive
AeroModeller?
The End to Home
Mixed performance
Glow Fuels?
T he recent model engines auction at
Gilding’s (see pages 50 onwards)
saw the selling of an original
AeroModeller Volume 1 Number 1 donated
by Chris Escritt. This venerable magazine was
the subject of fierce bidding and it eventually
raised over £200 for a services charity as all
O n the 2nd September 2014 the UK
Government introduced legislation
called ‘Licensing for home users
proceeds and premiums went to charity.
of explosive precursors.’ Unfortunately for
modellers with high performance Glow
Engines, nitromethane can be used in the
illicit manufacture of explosives. Thus if
you want to acquire nitromethane at greater
than 30% w/w concentration, you must have
a valid EPP licence issued by the Home
Office. Also it will be illegal to hold such
stocks without an EPP licence after 2nd
March 2016.
In the future it will not be impossible
to mix your own glow fuel containing
nitromethane, but it will mean obtaining
an EPP licence which is likely to be too
onerous and expensive for many. It will also
effectively cap the maximum nitromethane
percentage available in pre-mixed glow fuel.
You can find out more by searching www.
gov.uk for keywords ‘Licensing explosive
precursors’.
The Most Expensive AeroModeller?

4 AeroModeller - January 2015

This Imperial War Museum original BE2c was photographed in London, but has now transferred to Duxford. (Photo Rob Leigh)

Matthew Boddington in the cockpit of the ‘Biggles Biplane’.

BE2c Backgrounder

W hy choose the BE2c as the free plan? There are

many reasons both objective and personal. The

dangerous line of approach, the tail. If attacked he had to perform gymnastic feats, lifting the Lewis gun from one socket to another according to whether the enemy was attacking from port or starboard, above or below. In a slipstream of about a hundred miles an hour, it was no easy job…’ Not only did the crew have to cope with the enemy, but the vagaries of the weather could also take their toll; ‘A heavy snowstorm came up suddenly and we fl ew straight in to it. The next few moments were absolute hell. I was kneeling, as usual, on my seat looking backwards, and not secured by any safety belt. The BE seemed to behave like a bucking bronco… Suddenly I was hurled clear of my seat altogether. I just had time to grab wildly at the sides of my cockpit and hold on grimly… My arms took the full weight of my body and were nearly pulled from their sockets. Something whizzed past my head. It was one of the ammunition drums. Then a much larger object left its place and crashed through the centre section of our top plane, narrowly missing my head. It was the Lewis gun!’

BE2 Connections

The BE2c was part of an alphabetical series by the Royal Aircraft Factory (the BE stands for Bleriot Experimental which was to highlight the organisation’s development and test work). It is relatively easy to alter the Free Plan to represent later d, e, f and g variants which had a shorter span lower wing. Even within the mark, aircraft varied depending on the engine that was installed, who the manufacturer was, and what modifications were made in service. Information and 3 views on the BE2e which was featured in February 1959 AeroModeller will be made available on www.aeromodeller.com. Finally the BE2 has always attracted me, because it is part of my family DNA! As a child in 1969 I watched as my father David, and uncle Charles designed, built and flew a replica BE2 for a Biggles film that was never made. Fittingly this replica was based around a DH 82a Tiger Moth, the product of Geoffrey de Havilland’s company, Edward T. Busk’s old friend. The history of this replica will have to wait for another time, but suffice to say that my cousin Matthew has restored and flown it at many displays in 2014 as a fitting memorial to those who fought in WWI, and to our fathers. www.biggles-biplane.com As well as The Aviation Historian magazine, other useful references on the BE series are the Putnam book ‘The Royal Aircraft Factory’ by Paul R Hare, and ‘BE2 in action’ by Peter Cooksley, a Squadron/Signal publication #123 available from www.adhpublishing.com By Andrew Boddington

BE2c was test flown on 30th May 1914, and was in

service until the Armistice in November 1918 – so if

any plane could represent WWI, it is the BE2c. As

a model the BE2c has a lot going for it. Unlike later radial engine WWI

aircraft it has a reasonable length nose, thus reducing the weight likely to be needed up front to get things to balance. The BE2c owes its development to the work of Edward T. Busk at the

Royal Aircraft Factory to design an aircraft that was inherently stable. For

a Free Flight scale model the word stability is music to our ears, and prior

to the realities of WWI this was also seen as a major requirement for aircraft. At this time the main role for aircraft was to be reconnaissance and spotting for artillery where the pilot and observer would have to take photographs or write reports while flying. Busk was a brilliant designer, a contemporary and friend of Geoffrey de Havilland who was at that time

a test pilot at the Royal Aircraft Factory. If it wasn’t for the tragic death of Busk in a test BE2c which caught fire and crashed on 5th November 1914, his name might be as well known as De Havilland’s. To fi nd out more about Edward T. Busk (and other classic aviators and aeroplanes) I thoroughly recommend The Aviation Historian, a relatively new quarterly publication (www.theaviationhistorian.com) The latest issue, number 9, has a long article on Busk and the BE2c with original photographs, plus articles on Henry Folland’s monoplanes, the Spitfire Mk III and much more to interest scale modellers.

The Reality of War

As the war progressed, the inherent stability of the BE2c which was originally seen as such a blessing, quickly turned to a curse. With the introduction in 1915 of the German Eindecker monoplane fighter with forward firing machine gun, the BE2c became ‘Fokker Fodder’. In the BE2c the pilot sat at the back while the observer was stationed within the cabane struts, and with attacks increasing the observer’s role changed from looking at ground installations to spotting enemy fighters while armed with a rifle or light machine gun – you can imagine the restricted field of fire he would have with all the struts and wires. My thanks go to Philip Jarrett for details of an absorbing book ‘Nine Lives, the Autobiography of an Old Soldier’, by Richard Hilton (Hollis & Carter, London, 1955). During WWI Hilton served first as an observer on BE2cs and later as a pilot in R.E.8s. To quote from his book; ‘In the BE2c the observer sat in front of the pilot, or rather he knelt, facing backwards, looking over the pilot’s head to guard the most

backwards, looking over the pilot’s head to guard the most Family Connections! The replica BE2 was

Family Connections! The replica BE2 was originally designed by my father David Boddington and test flown by his brother Charles in 1969. In 2005 Matthew Boddington my cousin returned the broken BE2 remains from the USA and with Steve Slater has rebuilt it to flying condition.

my cousin returned the broken BE2 remains from the USA and with Steve Slater has rebuilt
my cousin returned the broken BE2 remains from the USA and with Steve Slater has rebuilt
my cousin returned the broken BE2 remains from the USA and with Steve Slater has rebuilt
my cousin returned the broken BE2 remains from the USA and with Steve Slater has rebuilt
my cousin returned the broken BE2 remains from the USA and with Steve Slater has rebuilt
Then and Now TOPICAL TWISTS By Jeremy Paxolin. Illustrated by Sherry 'He's the only contestant
Then and Now
TOPICAL
TWISTS
By Jeremy Paxolin. Illustrated by Sherry
'He's the only contestant fit enough to fly in the fourteenth round.'
LIE OF THE LAND

Not only are flying sites disappearing like chuckies in a hurricane, but I’ve noticed something disturbing is happening to the handful we have left. Sprinting after my free flight job recently, it became apparent that the old club patch has picked up quite a daunting gradient, no doubt due to subsidence, global warming, fracking, or most likely all three. By an odd quirk of geology, the slope seems to be uphill in all directions. My better half, however, had the audacity to suggest that the problem may be less to do with physical geography than physical fitness, which is outrageous; why, I’m barely out of my early thirties, and what’s more I bet I could still get into the purple velvet flares I got married in. Just as well, I intoned darkly, as I might be needing them again at this rate. Luckily she didn’t hear; she was already jogging to yoga class.

GAME OF DRONES

Nowadays, when you can get a sports council grant for watching the telly sitting up, hobbies seem a bit too much like hard work. Of course, RTF models have been saving us from the drudgery of aeromodelling for years, but now it seems that the wearisome business of flying them ourselves could also be a thing of the past. The latest craze, the multicopter, is a fully autonomous aerial vehicle capable of flying and landing itself - and needless to say, comes ready built. Unfortunately the purchaser still has to face the exhausting ordeal of taking the thing out of the packaging and carting it to the flying field. No doubt pretty soon you’ll be able to shell out your cash, then sit back content in the knowledge that your model is out there somewhere, buzzing about its business, without ever having to set eyes on it at all.

both Great Britain and Scotland for the first time since the Durham missile crisis. The weather started fine and calm, but a light breeze and patchy cloud were switched on for the later rounds. F1A glider was once again dominated by purchased models featuring mono-crystalline spars grown in zero-G in outer space. A new innovation this year was the indestructible metal prosthetic body used by Arnie Schiesskopf of Austria, which enabled him to achieve launch altitudes of 300 metres. Unfortunately, he was disqualified after a random screening tested positive for WD- 40. Arnie tells us he’ll be back. In F1B Rubber, it is clearly still standard to fly a model equipped with the integrated circuit nuclear reactors (fission chips) which convert the permitted 3 grammes of rubber into pure energy, giving a still air performance of around 45 years. Zing-Lo Gates once again lifted the coveted Wakefield trophy, since he is the only person on the planet rich enough to afford this technology, and consequently nobody else turned up. The FAI considered this situation at the last CIAM bureau meeting, and voted unanimously against restricting technology for fear of damaging the sport.” Incidentally, I don’t know when “AeroModeller” intends to go over to the new holographic format, but can I be the first to say that I don’t like it.

AND FINALLY…

All too soon it’s time to hand back this precious institution to the irreplaceable Pylonius, bearing in mind the advice of that other great satirist, Tom Lehrer; “You can always rely on Gilbert & Sullivan for a rousing finale, full of words and music, and signifying nothing!” Music, Maestro, please…

“Where’s your Johnny?” “Oh, he’s following his model aircraft.” “On his mountain bike, I suppose” “No, on Twitter.”

I am the very model of a modern competition flyer,

My solitary purpose is to get my launches ever higher. I’m in the gym all evening working on my strength & stamina, My marriage may be turbulent but all my wings are laminar.

PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

Fifty years ago, the great Pylonius remarked scathingly that while a bit of wire poked through a brass tube was good enough for a sturdy British Wake flyer, his foreign opponent was sneakily machining parts that actually worked; the rotter. Now, of course, a top FF model contains more servos than the average model shop did back then, but at least the attitude of us Brits remains reassuringly unchanged as our latest attempt to rein in runaway technology wings its way to the ivory tower of the FAI. But will it work? Thanks to my friend Doctor Whom (he’s less famous than his brother but better spoken), I’ve got hold of a copy of AeroModeller from the year 2055. I’ll quote, if I may; “This year’s Championships took place among the vineyards and orange groves of Vladivostok from August 10-17th. Entries were up on previous years with a total of eleven taking part, including flyers from

I wear designer training shoes for optimal agility.

And turbulated underpants for boundary layer stability,

I took another mortgage out for necessary field attire,

I look the very model of a modern competition flyer.

There is no foreign field or fjord that I haven’t been to yet, My altimeter readings are the envy of the internet, My models are the best Ukrainian kit that money can acquire, Yes, I am the very model of a modern competition flyer.

In fact if I had one of those old models that we used to fly,

That thermalled pretty nicely and that didn’t cost three grand to buy,

I might not have the shiny things that all my Facebook friends admire, But I might try entering contests against other competition flyers.

Events
Events
Events UP & COMING AeroModeller Calendar of Events Please note that the events listed are compiled
UP & COMING AeroModeller Calendar of Events
UP & COMING
AeroModeller Calendar of Events

Please note that the events listed are compiled weeks in advance of publication, and you should check before travelling in case of change. For future inclusion of your events, please send an email with date and details of the event in a format similar to those shown below to editor@aeromodeller.com

DECEMBER

13 December

Tonbridge Gassers & Rubber Fanciers Indoor Meeting, King’s Rochester Sports Centre, 601 Maidstone Rd, Rochester, ME1 3QJ. Indoor & Scale. Stuart 07956 066463 swt@talktalk.net www.afterworkstuff.co.uk/ little_flyers/

fixed wing only, slots. Keith Barker keithatrochdale@aol.com 01706 659396 or David Lloyd-Jones dlj@dlj702.co.uk 01565 734 040

14 December

BMFA South West Area Indoor Flying. Saints Fitness Centre, Tregorrick Park, St Austell, PL26 7AG. 12:00 to 16:00 FF and

Micro RC. David Powis, 01579 362951, dave_powis@hotmail.com or Roger Bellamy, 01752 257826, randmbellamy@gmail.com

28 December

‘The Cold Turkey’ Barton

CL event. Banish those post-

Christmas Blues! Malcolm Ross, 0192 5766610

Spectators £2.00. Mike Quille, 020 8500 3549 mp.quille@live.co.uk

4 January Peterborough MFC Indoor Flying, Bushfield Sports Centre, PE2

5RQ. 10:00 to 13:00 www.peterboroughmfc.org

10

North London MFC Indoor RC, Furzefield Sports Centre, Potters Bar, EN6 3BW. Fixed Wing to 225g, Heli to 400g RC. Peter Elliott 01707 336982

January

11 January

Flitehook Indoor FF Meeting, Totton Community Centre, Hazelfarm Rd, Southampton, SO40 8WU. 10.00 to 16.00 Contact Flitehook 02380 861541

dave_powis@hotmail.com or Roger Bellamy, 01752 257826, randmbellamy@gmail.com

27 January

Bournemouth MAS Indoor Flying at the Allendale Centre, Hanham Rd, Wimborne, BH21 1AS, 19.00 to 22.00. FF only. Gyminnie Cricket League. Flitehook

normally in attendance. Free parking Allendale Rd. Contacts John Taylor 01202 232206 & Roy Tiller roy.tiller@ntlworld.com

31 January

Peterborough MFC Indoor Flying,

Bushfield Sports Centre, PE2 5RQ. 10:00 to 13:00 www.peterboroughmfc.org

FEBRUARY

14 December

www.controlline.org.uk

 

7 February

Medway Model Flying Club

 

11

January

Indoor Fun Flying at Furzefield,

29

December

Rochdale Indoor Fly-in, Springhill

8

Furzefield Sports Centre, Potters

Indoor Flying, Fort Pitt Grammar School, Chatham. FF, RC & Heli in slots. £6 entry flying. Colin Benham

ah006b3152@blueyonder.co.uk

www.medwaymfc.org.uk

Wickham Indoor Free Flight, Wickham Community Association, Mill Lane Wickham PO17 5AL, No RC. Adult

Sports Center, Turf Hill Road, Rochdale, OL16 4XQ. Fixed wing only, 20 min slots for Fast RC, Slow RC, FF. Flyer £4, BMFA

Bar, EN6 3BW. FF & RC, small planes and helis. Flyers £8.00 Spectators £2.00. Mike Quille, 020 8500 3549

fliers £4, Spectators/juniors £1. Flitehook normally in attendance.

members only. Keith Barker

mp.quille@live.co.uk

14

December

keithatrochdale@aol.com

February

OFMAC Indoor Funfly, Abbey Sports centre, Berinsfield OX10 7NR. FF Rubber, CO2 , electric. Dave Dobson 01491 837789

Free parking. Ken Brown 02380578866 info@wcaff.info

2015

01706 659396 or David Lloyd-Jones dlj@dlj702.co.uk 01565 734 040.

Flitehook Indoor Free Flight Meeting, Totton Community Centre, Hazelfarm Rd, Southampton, SO40 8WU. FF

mac1@talktalk.net

JANUARY

18

January

only. 10.00 to 16.00

14

December

BMFA South West Area Indoor Flying. Saints Fitness Centre,

Contact Flitehook 02380 861541

Rochdale Indoor Fly-in, Springhill

3 January Indoor Fun Flying at Furzefield,

Tregorrick Park, St Austell, PL26

Sports Center, Turf Hill Road,

Furzefield Sports Centre, Potters

7AG. 12:00 to 16:00 FF and

Bar,

EN6 3BW. FF & RC, small

Micro RC.

Rochdale, OL16 4XQ. £4 per flyer, BMFA card. FF & Electric RC

planes and helis. Flyers £8.00

David Powis, 01579 362951,

Full details of BMFA events can be found at: www.bmfa.org

40th Crawley Indoor Meeting, Sunday 8th March 2015

C ongratulations for the Ruby anniversary of the Crawley Indoor Meeting which will

be held a month later than usual on Sunday 8th March 2015. This is a Free Flight only event, with plenty of fun flying and competitions: HLG & Catapult Glider, Peanut & Open Scale,

EZB & Living Room Stick, Gyminie Cricket, Hangar Rat & Butter Fly Mass Launch and Legal Eagle Class.

40th Crawley Indoor meeting, BMFA South Eastern Area, K2 Leisure Centre, Pease Pottage, Crawley, RH11 9BQ, from 11:00 to 18:00. Contact John Dart 01293 420830, johndart17@aol.com or www.cadmac.org.uk

Pottage, Crawley, RH11 9BQ, from 11:00 to 18:00. Contact John Dart 01293 420830, johndart17@aol.com or www.cadmac.org.uk

Off The Shelf

A round up of new and innovative products for the discerning aeromodeller. Send your product information along with high-resolution images to: editor@aeromodeller.com

Electric CL Timer by Dens Model Supplies

Electric Control Line (ECL) has been widely adopted by top aerobatic pilots where a consistent
Electric Control Line (ECL) has been widely adopted by top aerobatic pilots where a consistent

Electric Control Line (ECL) has been widely adopted by top aerobatic pilots where a consistent motor run is essential for world class performance, probably not the highest priority for the average sports flyer. But other ECL features such as clean quiet operation, the ability to fly solo and accurate control of flight time are very attractive. The DMS E – Zee Timer has been designed to offer all these functions, and for novices or those returning, flight times can be set as short as 10 seconds… very desirable for those first few flights! The E-Zee timer works by connecting to a standard ESC (Electronic Speed Controller). Length 28mm, width 20mm, height 11mm and weight 5gm.

Features include:

• Simple duration setting by push button/LED interface

• Motor power adjustable from zero to full throttle (by potentiometer)

• The motor soft starts at the beginning of a flight and gradually slows down at the end.

• Programmable start delay (for solo operation) – 0 to 90 seconds

The timer can also be used with a remote pushbutton for applications where the timer is not accessible and is supplied with a comprehensive instruction manual and users guide Price £11.50 + P & P from Dens Model Supplies (DMS) www.densmodelsupplies.co.uk (see Electric Control Line section) or phone 01983 294182. DMS can also supply the laser cut Stevens Aero ECL kits and will soon have their own ACE ECL Trainer.

Microaces Cessna 195 Trainer for Micro RC

Microaces has introduced the Cessna 195 trainer to join their range of innovative Depron and Graphic finish small flying eRC models, such as the Battle of Britain Dogfighter Twin Pack of Bf109-4 and Spitfire MkIa. Over the summer months many hours were spent designing and testing to create this 18” wingspan, easy build, four channel trainer with a gentle flying nature. During this process a new aerofoil was developed. A simple fold towards the leading edge of the wing created an under-camber that improves slow

flight performance significantly. Three Cessna 195 versions are available: a classic 1950s Businessliner, a modern day ‘Estelle’ in bright colours, and a military LC-126 Arctic Rescue with floats. They are all designed to use the Spektrum AR6400 range of receivers and a specially designed receiver clip is included with each kit. As with all Microaces kits, there’s a comprehensive, step by step illustrated assembly guide included in the box, and the Cessna 195 trainer also benefits from an on-line video manual.

The Cessna 195 Businessliner & Estelle Deluxe Kits which include brushless motor and speed controller are priced at £59.99 and the LC-126 with motor, speed controller and additional floats is £74.95. Microaces is a British company based in Dorset. For further information email support@microaces.com or go to www.microaces.com

9
9
Members of 2FSA the Free Flight Scale Association Cover Artist AEROMODELLING AND AVIATION ART edric
Members of 2FSA
the Free Flight Scale
Association
Cover Artist
AEROMODELLING
AND AVIATION ART
edric de la Nougerede is a consummate
C C
scale modeller and in his paintings
of aircraft he captures some of their
indefinable essence. Here he gives an
insight in to his life as an artist
and aeromodeller.
I was born in Assam, India at the time of the
Raj, and started to draw and take an interest in
model planes at about the same time (around the
age of 5 or 6 years.) My Father used to bring us
kids Dinky Toy planes like the Empire Flying
Boat, and I remember a Bristol Blenheim with
half black and half white underside. He also
brought us three boys Frog Interceptors, each
with different national markings. Around about
the same time I caught German measles and had
to be isolated in a back bedroom. All I found to
do was copy pictures from the numerous animal
and bird books. If you do enough copying,
anyone will train their hand and eye sufficiently
to be able to draw.
When we came to England at the time of
Partition in 1947, we boys were already into
building the solid model kits but had to leave
them behind in Shillong. I started again when
we lived in Hove and had a regular order for
Aeroplane Spotter. I also bought another Frog
Interceptor which had a canopy instead of an
open cockpit, and the undercarriage fitted into
the wings.
I had two terms at the Brighton Art College,
where we just drew and drew, no painting. I then,
like most of my generation, entered National
Service. After NS, I got a job as an Engineering
draughtsman with Airwork General Trading
Company, mostly installing ancillary equipment
in a range of aircraft. The office was in the
centre of Brighton, and during lunchtimes a few
of us would go into Woolworths for the latest
two-bob two-bob Airfix Airfix kit. kit. While Whi at Airwork, I built
Cedric’s
first own
design
scale model
1979. published
was
the
P-51-B
Mustang
in
AeroModeller
June
my my first first Jetex Jetex kits; kits; the the English Electric
Lightning Lightning P1 P1 and and a a Folland F Gnat. These
had had moulded moulded balsa balsa fuselages fu with sheet
wings wings and and tails. tails. I I couldn’t cou resist making
an an aerofoil aerofoil section section wing w with stiff paper
and and a a fully fully detailed detaile cockpit and ejector
seat. seat. Both Both the the Lightning and the
Gnat Gnat proved proved too t heavy to fly. (One
of of Derek Derek Knight’s Kni tiny ducted fans
may may have have worked wo a treat.)
Airwork Airwork moved from
Brighton Brighton to t Hern Airport
near near Bournemouth Bour but I
AnotherAnother ofof Cedric’sCe r c
own designs, the 1/10th scale SE5a.
didn’t didn’t go. go I applied for and
Flying indoo
Flying indoor scale at Crawley is a
great great social social and flying occasion.
go I applied for and Flying indoo Flying indoor scale at Crawley is a great great
go I applied for and Flying indoo Flying indoor scale at Crawley is a great great
go I applied for and Flying indoo Flying indoor scale at Crawley is a great great
Cedric with edric with FW190 FW190 unexpectedly got a job as a Technician Draughtsman in
Cedric with edric with FW190 FW190 unexpectedly got a job as a Technician Draughtsman in
Cedric with edric with FW190 FW190 unexpectedly got a job as a Technician Draughtsman in
Cedric with
edric with
FW190 FW190
unexpectedly got a job as a Technician
Draughtsman in the Space Research Group
of the Department of Physics at University
College London, specifically to work on
the first US/UK satellite - Ariel 1, launched
in 1962. I was into archaeology as well at
this time, doing reconstruction drawings of
Roman Villas and mosaics. After 6 years
of working on various rocket and satellite
experiments in London, the group moved
to a country house near Dorking, Surrey,
which took the name of the Mullard Space
Science Laboratory, of University College
London. Soon the Design Office had
two Engineers and a design staff of four,
including myself as Chief Draughtsman.
One of the ‘new’ boys was John Coker
and one day he brought along a free flight
Mercury Tiger Moth. That did it.
We decided to both build Doug
McHard’s SE5A which John had as a
free plan in the AeroModeller. We built
these models on our drawing boards in our
lunch hours. Then we started taking them
home at night and a real race was on. This
led us to attend flying meetings and once
at Odiham we met three scale modellers
from Epsom; Derry Eggs, Dave Kew and
George Worley. Together we decided to
form an Association of free flight scale
flyers, and Dave coined the name 2FSA.
We had flying gatherings and meetings
in people’s homes. It was at the home of
one of them that we met Aviation Artist
and aeromodeller, Ken McDonough.
Ken introduced us to another artist Brian
Withams who had brought along a
beautiful painting of a Fokker Dr1, and that
got me wanting to paint aircraft. Brian told
me that you couldn’t do both modelling and
painting - one or the other but Ken was
special. I think he meant for a living.
at it, although the appeal of indoor flying is
fading with the advent of more and more
indoor RC.
When I joined the Crawley club, model
flying came to life for me, as I had to
participate in all the Free Flight Comps
that are run monthly. This was a great deal
of fun building and flying non scale models.
We still had a scale comp, and one magic
moment was on a calm evening when I had
my peanut foam Mustang circling about 20
feet above as in the background Concorde
rose out of Gatwick. One lives for these
I applied and was accepted as an
Associate Member of the Guild of Aviation
Artists in October 1975 and have been
exhibiting fairly regularly since 1976. I
continued to build models, mostly at work
on my drawing board. I’m glad to say that
the paintings did improve despite the
building program. Many models failed and
just as many paintings failed. It is how one
learns.
magic moments.
All in all, it is really about having fun and
not taking things too seriously. It is also
about people and the pleasurable company
when we are all doing what we love.
You have to grow old but you don’t have
to grow up.
I shall never be a ‘Great’ aeromodeller/
model flyer or a ‘Great’ aviation artist, but it
has been a fun journey. My aeromodelling
I really enjoy indoor flying and was
overjoyed when the blue foam came along
and we met people like Richard Crossley
and Peter Smart - wonderful people and
beautiful models. David Deadman (was a
2FSA member) started me off and I’m still
is truly down to John Coker and though
we don’t see too much of each other since
retirement, we do get together now and
again, usually at Cloud Tramp day at
Epsom and at the Crawley Indoor meeting
early in the year. ●
together now and again, usually at Cloud Tramp day at Epsom and at the Crawley Indoor
CL Event Report
CL Event Report
CL Event Report Dave Finch releasing his 10cc Weatherman for its winning and record breaking flight.
CL Event Report Dave Finch releasing his 10cc Weatherman for its winning and record breaking flight.
Dave Finch releasing his 10cc Weatherman for its winning and record breaking flight. SOUTH BRISTOL
Dave Finch releasing his 10cc Weatherman for its
winning and record breaking flight.
SOUTH BRISTOL
CONTROL LINE GALA 2014

Mick Lewis and friends look back at this summer feast of Vintage Control Line

look back at this summer feast of Vintage Control Line S S outh Bristol club’s annual
look back at this summer feast of Vintage Control Line S S outh Bristol club’s annual
look back at this summer feast of Vintage Control Line S S outh Bristol club’s annual
look back at this summer feast of Vintage Control Line S S outh Bristol club’s annual

S S

outh Bristol club’s annual control line gala was held at Hamfields Leisure Centre, Berkeley in Gloucestershire on 22nd of June. The plan was for Vintage Combat,

Vintage Speed and Vintage team racing

events to be run by contest directors

Mick Lewis, Peter Fox and John Mealing respectively. SB club members had worked hard over the preceding three days to prepare the grass circles and were rewarded with a perfect day of sunshine and very light winds. The growth of Vintage Combat was

clear to see with Mick having such a large entry that he and Richard Evans withdrew their own entries to run the event. Team Racing had the expected travelling teams from Nottinghamshire, Shropshire and Suffolk, with competitors and organisers of the Vintage and Weatherman Speed events

12 AeroModeller - January 2015
12 AeroModeller - January 2015
Dave Finch pitting his Dimpled Dumpling in Class A Dave Lewis waiting for his Class

Dave Finch pitting his Dimpled Dumpling in Class A

Dave Finch pitting his Dimpled Dumpling in Class A Dave Lewis waiting for his Class B

Dave Lewis waiting for his Class B model to land, with battery man Terry Taylor ready to burst into action.

with battery man Terry Taylor ready to burst into action. Peter Rabjohn releases Phil Darke’s Chowhound
with battery man Terry Taylor ready to burst into action. Peter Rabjohn releases Phil Darke’s Chowhound

Peter Rabjohn releases Phil Darke’s Chowhound in Class B under the watchful eye of timekeeper Peter Jephcott

Class B under the watchful eye of timekeeper Peter Jephcott Ken Newbold releases the Green/Long Class

Ken Newbold releases the Green/Long Class B

Peter Jephcott Ken Newbold releases the Green/Long Class B Terry Taylor and Marion Mealing about to
Peter Jephcott Ken Newbold releases the Green/Long Class B Terry Taylor and Marion Mealing about to

Terry Taylor and Marion Mealing about to start the team’s Dalesman in Barton B round 1

Mark Haywood overtaking John Mealing in Barton B

John Catlow, Tony Toogood and Mark Haywood contesting the Barton B final

covering similar distances. Keep an eye open for the 2015 date of this popular event at www.southbristolmac.co.uk

Team Racing, by John Mealing

Team Race action started with what is the main class these days, Class A. Class A is for models designed before Dec 1959, powered by 2.5cc engines, usually some version of the Oliver Tiger, old, modern or foreign. Seven teams contested class A, four visitors and three SBMAC teams. The SBMAC teams were Nick and Steve Blades, Digby Perriam and Peter Rabjohn and finally John Mealing and Terry Taylor. The first heat of round one saw a close finish between Toogood/Lewis and Catlow/ Finch, with both pilots using their arms, the win by 3.8seconds going to the latter. Sadly Digby Perriam and Peter Robjohn failed to get away with a split tank in their Voodoo. The less said about the second heat the better, both teams retired, Green/Long at 19laps and Blades/Blades after 41laps. The final heat of the third round saw a win for father and son team Martyn and Mark Haywood, who soundly beat the third South Bristol team of John Mealing and Terry Taylor. Things settled down in round two with only Catlow/Finch failing to complete the distance. Surprise of the second round was Mealing/Taylor, flying Phil Darke’s Olympian. They posted John’s first ever sub four minutes time, the third fastest heat time. This also meant that the final would also be a first for John. The Class A final was a bit of an anti-

climax. All three teams got away quickly but John Mealing's nerves got the better of him and he decked the model twice, luckily without damage. Things eventually settled down until at 77laps Catlow/Finch were forced to retire when Dave Finch badly cut his fingers during a pitstop. Tony Toogood flew out the winner (8 min 45.0sec) with John Mealing someway behind in second place (12min 29.0sec). After Class A it was time for the bigger bangers - Class B. Same age limit for the models but with 5cc engines, mostly plain bearing Enya 29’s. Five teams came to the start line of the seven entered. Heat one saw Toogood/Lewis show a clean pair of heels to Digby Perriam and Peter Rabjohn who were flying Phil Darke’s beloved Chowhound. Phil was there to keep an eye on them in the role of battery man. Heat two saw Green/Long show an equally clean pair of heels to Mealing/Taylor who were flying Terry Taylor's pink Double Dice, internationally known as Sheila, whilst Blades/Blades failed to start their engine. The third heat was a flyoff for the third place in the final between Perriam/Rabjohn and Mealing/Taylor. To Phil Darke’s delight the victory went to Perriam/Rabjohn, when John speared Sheila into the deck on approach for his pitstop. The final went off without incidents with Toogood/Lewis running out winners from the Johns Green and Long. SBMAC’s team trailed in third, reflecting the need for more horsepower from the motor in the Chowhound.

Class 1/2A was the next on the racing agenda. For models designed before December 1960, powered by 1.5cc engines, this class is beginning to become the cinderella of Vintage Team Racing. Only four teams assembled in the line check. In the first heat Toogood/Lewis had a leg of their undercarriage break off when Dave Lewis tried to straighten it after a bouncy landing, leaving the remaining teams to progress straight to the final. The final was not the best example of 1/2A finals. Mark and Martyn Haywood were the easy winners (8min 31.1sec) after the other teams failed to finish, both with broken models. The final racing class of the day was Barton B. This is a class introduced by the Barton Club to encourage aerobatics pilots into team racing. It aimed at producing an even playing field with a fixed engine, fuel and propeller. Sad to say a lot of teams are still trying to find that even field. Six teams contested this class at Berkeley. The heats went off without incident. Green/Long decided to sit on their first round time, which was second fastest of the round. Unfortunately improvements by Catlow/Jephcott and Haywood/Haywood saw them demoted to fourth place overall.

A shortage of battery personnel saw Marion

Mealing make her battery girl debut, joining husband John and Terry Taylor pitting John’s Dalesman. This model lacks the speed and

range of the other competitors but after a year

of refusing to hot restart now restarts first

flick following a minor tank modification. The Barton B final was the last of the day and was a cracker with Toogood/Lewis beating

CL Event Report
CL Event Report
CL Event Report A Supermonger squares up to an aptly named ‘banana’ Anduril. A Squig (considered

A Supermonger squares up to an aptly named ‘banana’ Anduril.

A Squig (considered by many to be ‘ugly’) comes up against the only Chaos seen at the meet flown by Chris Fisher.

Martin Kiszel’s Supermonger takes a ‘bite’ out of the opposing Squig.

Martin Kiszel’s half Supermonger still managed to win against Mike Waller’s Piranha XL.

Catlow/Jephcott by 0.25sec!! The Haywood duo retired at 135laps when Mark lost control and hit the ground.

Vintage Speed and Weatherman Speed, by John Mealing

Peter Fox and Tony Goodger ran Vintage and Weatherman Speed, combining Classic and Phantom. The events attracted 13 competitors, mostly in Weatherman. Weatherman is a healthy event, but with the engines being used now has certainly gone beyond the original intentions when the event was created. It’s sad to see the decline of Vintage speed for whatever reason, could it be that the experts only appear at the Nationals? On the day of the gala there were only two

entries in Vintage. Both events were run on a handicap basis. In Weatherman Dave Finch was the winner with his 10cc Weatherman (Class 7, 100.5%), ably anchored to the ground by John Catlow - they created a new class record of 115.24mph from a standing start. The motor is a West 55, standard out of the box. The engine is designed to run on a pipe but Dave is running it on open exhaust, as required by the Weatherman rules. Well done Team Large. Runner-up in Weatherman was Peter Fox, who placed second (Class 2, 99.9%, 91.37mph) and third (Class 3, 99.1%, 105.2mph) with his Parra 09 and Fora15 respectively powered models. Pete was also the top Phantom entry, his model being

powered by a Rothwell R250. Vintage speed, as noted above, attracted two entries. Both flew McCoy 49 powered models in Class 6. Digby Perriam was the winner, flying one of Gordon May’s Golden Rods, recording a speed of 100.56mph. The runner-up was Ian Russell, flying a Speed King. His speed was 94.74mph. Both speeds were considerably below the class record of

121mph.

Vintage Combat, by Richard Evans To the host club’s great pleasure the anticipated large entry
Vintage Combat, by Richard Evans
To the host club’s great pleasure the
anticipated large entry actually materialised.
Twenty four fliers braved the travel from
as far away as Wales, Norfolk, Surrey and
Lincolnshire, some making a weekend of it
Combat
finalists.
From
the
left:
Mike
Waller
(Liquidator
placed
third,
Chris
Fisher
(Chaos)
XL) runner
up,
Martin
Kiszel
(Supermonger)
winner,
Karl
Severne
(Supermonger)
placed fourth.
winner, Karl Severne (Supermonger) placed fourth. Chris Fisher and Martin Kiszel fight out the vintage combat
winner, Karl Severne (Supermonger) placed fourth. Chris Fisher and Martin Kiszel fight out the vintage combat
winner, Karl Severne (Supermonger) placed fourth. Chris Fisher and Martin Kiszel fight out the vintage combat
winner, Karl Severne (Supermonger) placed fourth. Chris Fisher and Martin Kiszel fight out the vintage combat

Chris Fisher and Martin Kiszel fight out the vintage combat final.

placed fourth. Chris Fisher and Martin Kiszel fight out the vintage combat final. 14 AeroModeller -

14

AeroModeller - January 2015

TEAM RACE RESULTS Class B Results Pilot Toogood Green Perriam Pitman Battery Person Round 1
TEAM RACE RESULTS
Class B Results
Pilot
Toogood
Green
Perriam
Pitman
Battery Person
Round 1
Round 2
Final
Lewis
Taylor
3min 33.5sec
DNF
7min 41.2sec
Long
Newbold
3min 35.2sec
DNF
7min 52.5sec
Rabjohn
Darke
5min 0.02sec
4min 12.7sec
10min 02.4sec
Barton B Results
Pilot
Toogood
Catlow
Haywood
Pitman
Battery Person
Round 1
Round 2
Final
Lewis
Taylor
3min 23.8sec
3min 17.6sec
6min 57.81sec
Jephcott
Finch
3min 36.3sec
3min 16.9sec
6min 58.06sec
Haywood
Darke
3min 34.1sec
3min 22.9sec
135laps

staying in B&B or camping. The first round did not bring any great surprises and most fliers with form got through unscathed. However, Tony Frost from the host club was dismayed to lose 3-2 to Tony Cookson in only his first year of combat. Stu Vickers added insult to injury by taking three cuts from Eamon Forsdike’s fast Banana Anduril before removing the whole of his tail and elevator. Richard Wright and Martin Kiszel had a great ding-dong but at the end Richard’s model was reduced to the proverbial nylon bag of bits. Richard managed to get back into the main event through the losers refly as did Bruce Dobson. Bruce is another very keen convert to our sport who certainly has an animated flying style. Watch this space! During the Frost and Heaseman bout we were treated to a fly past by two WW2 fighters who had been performing nearby at Weston Super Mare. We did miss the Lancaster though. The first 'star' head to roll came in the Eliminator round when Roger Fisher lost 2-1 to Martin Kiszel. Roger committed the cardinal sin of taking the whole streamer at one go, which as we all know is the combat flyers kiss of death. Martin replied

with two good cuts. It was a very clean and fast bout between Roger’s Assagai XL and Martin’s Shogun. Roger is still using PAW 19PB motors which in his hands are very competitive against the usual Rothwell/JO19 competition. Into the last sixteen and exits here from Tim Hobbins at the hands of another “new” flyer, Darryl Hinton from the host club. Darryl is producing some very attractive tie and dye models in true Vintage style. We also now lost one of combat’s great characters, Moggs Morris. Now a septuagenarian Moggs’s flying is sheer entertainment and your writer had him down for at least the semi finals. That “beginner” Tony Cookson took him out. We’d better all watch out for “that” Tony… In the quarter final, Darryl’s run of success came to an end when an on form Mike Waller beat him with a very manoeuvrable Piranha XL. A word of advice Darryl - peg your bellcranks, they stay in place longer! Mike Waller's club mate Mark Legg retired with a broken model and there was exit also for top flyer Stuart Vickers. In a super bout, Chris Fisher flying a good old Chaos took two cuts after Stu had, guess what, taken the whole streamer at one go.

So, we’re nearly there folks. The semi finals drew together, first Mike Waller and Martin Kiszel. This was certainly not the best bout of the day! One cut all and lots of ground time accompanied by Martin’s achievement of flying a very badly damaged model gave him the victory. Enough said. In the other easier on the eye bout Chris Fisher took two nice cuts from Karl Severne to win. Karl has not been mentioned so far but his flying has been getting steadier and his models definitely much more competitive. The fly off for third place lasted little time. Against Mike Waller, Karl dragged a brand new unflown Barbarian XL out and on the first crash broke the booms and removed the engine. Did I say his planes were more competitive? This one isn’t anymore! At about 5.30pm a crowd gathered for the final which was excellent. Martin flew a Rothwell powered Supermonger against Chris Fisher with (the same) PAW 19 Chaos that he’d been flying all day. Martin just had the edge and followed Chris closely for much of the bout but only managed one cut. That was all he needed to win. Four minutes of airtime and little time on the ground for either pilot. A great end to a perfect day of Vintage Combat.

pilot. A great end to a perfect day of Vintage Combat. ● Richard Wright and CD

Richard Wright and CD Mick Lewis inspect the remains of Richard’s Supermonger after his bout with Martin Kiszel.

Newcomer Bruce Dobson takes on ‘old hand’ Roger Fisher.

‘Team Rainbow’ as they became known. Left to right: Roger Fisher, son Chris and ‘Moggs’ Morris.

Model Technology FAI GLIDER DURATION – THE QUIET REVOLUTION
Model Technology
FAI GLIDER DURATION –
THE QUIET REVOLUTION
Technology FAI GLIDER DURATION – THE QUIET REVOLUTION n previous articles I discussed the use of
n previous articles I discussed the use of flapping airfoil sections for the F1B/F1C classes
n previous articles I discussed the
use of flapping airfoil sections for
the F1B/F1C classes together with
the development of variable area
and variable geometry models for
Background
Over the years the F1A glider class has not
benefited from the increases in performance
due to more powerful rubber motors or more
powerful/geared IC motors like the other two
classes. The majority of the improvements in
performance have been realised by refining the
launch phase of the flight to increase the overall
launch altitude. It is this increase in altitude that
is responsible for greater durations rather than
decreases in sinking speed due to aerodynamic
improvements. I am not saying that models now
are not somewhat cleaner and more efficient
but that the gains have been minimal compared
with launch height gain.
The F1A glider class was formulated in 1951
and was predominantly the same as today in
specification, but with a minimum fuselage
cross-section area and the use of a 100 metre
tow-line. Good durations were possible if you
could get the model to the top of the line – not
easy in calm conditions.
By 1954 the fuselage cross-section area rule
was dropped and the tow-line halved to 50
metres. This put pressure on development not
only in terms of models with lower sinking
speed but of towing techniques to place the
model in a thermal.
The Holy Grail was to achieve three minutes
duration when floating the model off that 50

Mike Evatt describes the development of ‘flappers’ and other technology in the glider class.

I I

F1C models where the allowable projected

surface area is not tightly defined. This review

traces the history of parallel developments

in the F1A glider class. Like F1B rubber it has tightly prescribed projected surface area and therefore the quest for performance has been concentrated on reducing drag for the launch phase by using variable camber airfoils, flapping sections or Low Drag Airfoils (LDAs) without detriment to the glide.

performance and the late Victor Stamov pushed the Roland Koglot envelope
performance
and the late Victor Stamov pushed the
Roland Koglot envelope
the late Victor Stamov pushed the Roland Koglot envelope 16 AeroModeller - January 2015 Gerhard Aringer

16 AeroModeller - January 2015

Gerhard Aringer with his successful flapper

Sergey Makarov with a conventionally sectioned ‘bunter’ metre line. This equates to a sinking speed

Sergey Makarov with a conventionally sectioned ‘bunter’

metre line. This equates to a sinking speed of about 0.29 m/s whereas the modern high aspect ratio model is probably closer to 0.25m/s. By the end of the 1950s the commonplace use of clockwork timers for dethermalising the model rather than a fuse, meant that flyers could now tow for extended periods. This also meant that tow stability and controllability was essential. By the early 1960s zoom launches were becoming common. The addition of a “zoom rudder” (which was activated when the model

of a “zoom rudder” (which was activated when the model Robert Lesko’s Raketa Nera was accelerated

Robert Lesko’s Raketa Nera

was accelerated to the top of the line) caused a high speed banked launch with a smooth transition and obvious height gain. By the end of the decade, thanks to the efforts of flyers like Andreas Lepp and Victor Isaenko in perfecting the circle-tow hook, we had fully functioning models that could be zoom launched but with the added facility of being able to straight tow or circle tow at will with the timer start initiated by towline release. During the next decade electronic timers

by towline release. During the next decade electronic timers Allard van Wallene with a Carbon covered

Allard van Wallene with a Carbon covered flapper

were introduced along with some flyers using VIT (Variable Incidence Tail - tail set more negative) on the tow to make it easier to fly in calm conditions. Electronic timers together with servo driven adjustments allowed unprecedented control over function timing.

A Step Change

The next real changes happened in the 1980s. Sergey Makarov introduced the two position wing-wiggler to allow tighter circles on tow and Carbon structures were becoming widespread.

on tow and Carbon structures were becoming widespread. Mikhail Kochkarov prepares his flapper for a fly-off

Mikhail Kochkarov prepares his flapper for a fly-off

The composite wings were the key to achieving high launch velocities without destroying the model. By the end of the decade Victor Tchop had developed his ‘bunt’ launch system which was further developed by Sergey Makarov & Mikhail Kochkarev.

Bunt Launch

The whole philosophy of achieving extended launch height over and above merely floating the glider off at the top of the line is to

force the aeroplane to enter a ballistic phase prior to transition to the glide. The model is also equipped with a hook latch and wing-wiggler to facilitate tactical circle towing. When the launch is initiated the model is circled quite low (or indeed can be launched straight from the helper’s hand when lift is spotted) and rapidly towed to generate high line tension, hook unlatch and a vertical ballistic climb. At this point the model is neutrally trimmed so as not to deviate from the vertical. The on-board timer then enables the bunt function, i.e. applying a little more positive incidence to the tail, to position the model into its glide attitude at which point the rudder and tailplane assume their glide settings. By the end of the 1990s improved Carbon structures together with refined electronic timers and smaller servos meant that consistent higher launch altitudes could be achieved with the consequent increase in duration. At this time Ken Bauer introduced the servo-driven hook latch. There was still a problem! It was still advisable to launch preferably in rising air, at least neutral air but never in turbulent or sinking air. The downside with a bunt launch was that the model might end up some distance from the rising patch of air that triggered the launch; the edges of thermals are tricky things! However, by now the best exponents of the genre were probably able to gain an altitude advantage of 20 -25 metres.

Model Technology Enter the Flapper By the middle of the 2000s flapper/ variable incidence wing
Model Technology Enter the Flapper By the middle of the 2000s flapper/ variable incidence wing
Model Technology Enter the Flapper By the middle of the 2000s flapper/ variable incidence wing
Model Technology
Enter the Flapper
By the middle of the 2000s flapper/
variable incidence wing sections were being
developed. Allard van Wallene was credited
with flying the first successful flapper
F1A in 2004, closely followed by Gerhard
Aringer’s design in 2005. These approaches
differ in respect of the aerodynamics.
Allard’s approach was to ‘flap’ the rear
portion of the wing altering the wing
incidence whereas Gerhard changed the
wing camber leaving the wing incidence
unchanged.
This latter approach was similar to that
seen on Thomas Koster’s F1Cs of 1998
but the connection goes back further to
the author’s flapped F1B of 1969 (see
AeroModeller May/June 2014 for details.)
As with the F1C power models variants
were noted using either full span flaps or
flapping centre panels only.
Of course things are never simple and
it was also necessary to optimise the circle
must also be altered to optimise the ballistic
climb pattern. It is not surprising that
multi-servo electronic timers are now de
rigueur for the top flyers.
tow by only deploying little or no flap until
committed to the launch.
By the mid 2000s the combination of
Then Along Came LDA
a zoom launch and a bunt transition had
meant that overall launch altitudes of about
75 – 80 metres were possible and it was
estimated that initial launch velocities of
circa 200km/h were being achieved.
Allard van Wallene reckoned that his
flapper (2004) gave an advantage of three
metres over a fixed camber wing adding
around 12 seconds to the overall duration.
This was not much but it is by such fine
margins that contests are won or lost.
Obviously with a flapper the flap position
In 2008 Brian Egglestone and Peter
Alnutt published a paper proposing
a different approach! Thicker, lower
cambered airfoils that could exhibit low
drag characteristics in the ballistic phase
and match the glide characteristics of the
best gliders flying. A big ask perhaps, but
with Brian designing the airfoils and Peter
building and flying test models it became
clear that this approach was viable. These
sections are substantially thicker than the
conventional sections but exhibit good
gliding characteristics with low drag at
but exhibit good gliding characteristics with low drag at Schematic of Per Findahl’s 2008 flapper nose
but exhibit good gliding characteristics with low drag at Schematic of Per Findahl’s 2008 flapper nose
but exhibit good gliding characteristics with low drag at Schematic of Per Findahl’s 2008 flapper nose

Schematic of Per Findahl’s 2008 flapper nose pod

high speed. The attraction of this approach is that the wing is thicker which enables
high speed. The attraction of this approach is that the wing is thicker which enables
high speed. The attraction of this approach is that the wing is thicker which enables
high speed. The attraction of this approach is that the wing is thicker which enables
high speed. The attraction of this approach is that the wing is thicker which enables
high speed. The attraction of this approach is that the wing is thicker which enables
high speed. The attraction of this approach
is that the wing is thicker which enables
stiffer or higher Aspect Ratio models to be
constructed. A higher AR potentially could
reduce sinking speed. It also does away with
complicated flap mechanisms.
Two of those flyers who also did much
to push the performance envelope of the
modern F1A are Roland Koglot and the
late Victor Stamov and no discussion would
be complete without acknowledging them.
Half a decade later and models and launch
techniques have been further refined. At
major contests these days you will find a
mixture of conventional, flappers, variable
camber and LDAs all using a bunt launch.
It is true that skill levels appear to have
increased, with those eager to do well
putting in many hours of trimming and
towing practice as well as many hours at the
gym. To the casual observer when well-
trimmed and well flown, all the approaches
look good but the final arbitrator is the
stopwatch or the altimeter. The best
examples achieving altitudes of 100 metres
and durations of about six minutes.
The models themselves are being
continually improved with quite a number
now featuring wings covered with thin
Carbon sheet to produce a more faithful
and consistent airfoil. It is claimed that this
approach benefits all variants but whether
the Carbon is moulded or applied as a thin
flexible veneer it is likely to be outside the
skill set or pockets of many.
Having said that, the current World and
European F1A Champion, Croatian Robert
Lesko designed and made everything for his
Raketa Nera model, including the moulds
and jigs to form the composite parts.
References
For those who wish to delve a little deeper some
key references are listed below:
So Where Next?
Van Wallene A, “Experiments in Flapped
Wing F1A” NFFS Symposium Report 2005
Egglestone B, Alnutt PJ, “F1A Airfoil Design
and Wing Optimization” NFFS Symposium
Report 2008
Findahl P, “The Question remains, three
years later: to flap or not to flap?” NFFS
Symposium Report 2008
Schlosberg A, “Variable Camber F1As”
NFFS Symposium Report 2008 ●
Roland Koglot and a pair of LDAs
A typical crowded electronic F1A nose pod

Lord Flash 4 a flapper by Per Findahl

Fact or Fiction?
Fact or Fiction?
Fact or Fiction? 20 AeroModeller - January 2015
The Maestro’s loyal supporter Drambuie the Seagull. MYTH OR LEGEND? THERE’S NO ANSWER! The name
The Maestro’s loyal supporter Drambuie the Seagull. MYTH OR LEGEND? THERE’S NO ANSWER! The name
The Maestro’s loyal supporter Drambuie the Seagull. MYTH OR LEGEND? THERE’S NO ANSWER! The name
The Maestro’s loyal supporter Drambuie the Seagull. MYTH OR LEGEND? THERE’S NO ANSWER! The name
The Maestro’s loyal supporter Drambuie the Seagull. MYTH OR LEGEND? THERE’S NO ANSWER! The name
The Maestro’s loyal supporter Drambuie the Seagull.
The Maestro’s loyal
supporter Drambuie
the Seagull.
MYTH OR LEGEND? THERE’S NO ANSWER!
MYTH OR LEGEND?
THERE’S NO ANSWER!

The name of McGillicuddy will be familiar to long-time readers of ‘AeroYodeller’. Over the years the adventures, or more usually the misdemeanours, of the Maestro were recounted by Robert Jamieson. But his chronicles were far from complete. Whether this was due to censorship, or merely self-preservation, is open to speculation. What follows may be regarded as history, as fiction, or even as a parable. Be assured however that it is firmly based on truth. There are still other stories that could be told. Of course names have been changed, if only to protect those who were involved. I have no wish to write anything resembling an auto-biography - but the incident described really did happen. How can I be so certain? Simply because I was there. JOD

Once upon a time’ is a traditional way to

start a story, but it is also in keeping with this one. It was at a time so long ago that aeromodelling competitors actually knew the rules for the events that they entered.

It was at a place so far away that contest organisers also knew the rules - and ran meetings in accordance with them.

At this particular time and place there was

a

large and prestigious contest. Not only was

it

well attended, but it brought the Maestro

and his arch-rival , Owinnall, into face- to-face competition. As this was unusual

it naturally lead to much interest in their

comparative performances throughout the day.

It should be explained that this meeting

was being run to a domestic version of the current FAI procedures. This involved flying in rounds but with the important distinction of having the three classes (A, B and C) all flying together in each of the rounds. This

was a common arrangement in this country at that time - before the implications of ‘tactical flying’ were fully appreciated. Nevertheless launches still had to be made from a marked- out line. Competitors could, and did, start by flying more than one class. Then if one did not go well it was dropped in favour of concentrating on another. On the day in question, scores were high. By the final round McG had flown his well- known ‘Cutty Sark’ into a leading position

- much to the delight of his supporters and

clubmates. His main opponent had been expected to be Owinnall, who was having a difficult day. A poor glider flight had soon

led to his concentration on rubber - which went well until he had trouble finding his model after the penultimate round. As his reserve was admittedly old and lacking in performance he did not want to have to use it.

A little arithmetic soon revealed that he

could still edge McG out of winning - but also that it needed a near- max to do so. The

lengthy search meant that there was little time to waste. By now, of course, everyone

else had finished their flights and there was no-one left to mark the necessary lift. McG and his supporters gathered to watch this final and decisive flight - only to see Owinnall approach the line with not only his wound-up Wakefield (held by a clubmate) but also carrying his glider. They immediately realised that he intended to fly ‘pilot’ for himself. Being able to circle on tow meant that the glider could easily detect lift for the benefit of the all-important rubber flight. A simple and effective technique. The Scots were not slow to react - and clever enough to object effectively. There was an immediate cry of “You can’t do that. The rules say there is to be NO test-flying up-wind of the line”. (This was a common measure to prevent the flying of pilot models) There was an audible follow-up of “Got him! “ It was realised that after his well- known insistence on everyone keeping to the rules, he MUST comply himself. It certainly looked like becoming a classic case of ‘being hoist with his own petard’.

There was then a sudden silence - as everyone wondered how Owinnall would react. The pause lengthened until he slowly started to smile. Someone, quick-off-the- mark, was heard to say “Oh no. The old buzzard has thought of something “. Indeed he had. He put his hand in his back pocket took out his GLIDER flight card, presented it to the person who had complained the loudest, and said “It’s not a problem. Not if I make it make it an OFFICIAL contest flight. Perhaps you might like to time it.” Even McG was speechless. Until he was heard to say “There’s no answer! Is there?” Indeed there wasn’t.

The rest, as they say, is history. In case anyone asks - the glider marked some weak lift, just sufficient for the rubber model to make the crucial max. McG retired muttering “There’s always next year”. But remember: “History is always written by the winners.”

“There’s always next year”. But remember: “History is always written by the winners.” ● By Jenny.

By Jenny.

“There’s always next year”. But remember: “History is always written by the winners.” ● By Jenny.
“There’s always next year”. But remember: “History is always written by the winners.” ● By Jenny.
International Event Report
International Event Report
OPENSCALE 2014 @ BRNO MEDLÁNKY
OPENSCALE 2014
@ BRNO MEDLÁNKY

After a gap of too many years, it is great to have a report from Lubomir Koutný on this FF Scale and Old-Timer competition on 24-25th May in the Czech Republic.

O O

PENSCALE is the biggest Czech competition for rubber, CO2 and electric powered scale models, and it is also host to flyers of old timer models. This

year the venue was the airfield at

Brno Medlánky.

We had many people pre-entered for the

contest despite the crazy weather we were

having and the poor forecast; it was thought

weather we were having and the poor forecast; it was thought Lubomir Koutný and his 3rd

Lubomir Koutný and his 3rd place Disperato in the BV-1 old-timer class.

that the competition manager’s job would be very complicated to deal with the expected conditions. But on the weekend of May 24- 25th there was fantastic weather at Medlánky. About 40 scale and 15 old-timers entered the competitions, while others turned up to fly for fun. The undoubted high point of the weekend was the fly-off for scale float-planes from The Schneider Trophy races. The winner was the Curtiss of Antonin Alfery

which after a climb to a height of 40m flew for about one minute, second was Lubos Koutný with his Bernard H.V. 220 and a flight of 55s, and third the peanut scale REP 1913 flown by his son Petr for a time of around 50s. The CO2 and electric scale class won by Antonin Alfery with his superb electric powered triplane WKF 80, ahead of Pavel Stráník who flew his nice CO2 powered

Tom Heinl and his interesting Moynet 360 Jupiter push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in
Tom Heinl and his interesting Moynet 360 Jupiter
push-pull model.
Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class
with his Nanzan.
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
push-pull model. Jiri Doležel was third in the rubber powered class with his Nanzan. 22 AeroModeller
Old-timer Defiant flown by Jiri Doležel.
Old-timer Defiant flown by Jiri Doležel.

He-112. Lubomir Koutný won the main rubber powered scale class and also a special Brno W.W.I class too, with his new Bristol M1; it flies very well and made consistent maximum times. Old- timer scale required a fly-off because

maximum times. Old- timer scale required a fly-off because Adam Jakeš took second place with his

Adam Jakeš took second place with his Senator.

because Adam Jakeš took second place with his Senator. This new Mr Smoothie racer by Lubomir

This new Mr Smoothie racer by Lubomir Koutny is an excellent flyer.

Mr Smoothie racer by Lubomir Koutny is an excellent flyer. Antonin Alfery flew the competition with

Antonin Alfery flew the competition with both his superb Morane AI monoplane (shown) and an Albatros D-V.

his superb Morane AI monoplane (shown) and an Albatros D-V. Vlastimil Simek and Jan Vodicka had

Vlastimil Simek and Jan Vodicka had both flown three flights over 60s. In the end Vlastimil won with his D.H Moth, when it flew for over 100s. Vlastimil was also the winner of the BV-1 old-timer duration class; his MLL 301 had all 90s maxs. Adam Jakeš

duration class; his MLL 301 had all 90s maxs. Adam Jakeš Jiri Doležel brought along this

Jiri Doležel brought along this new BV-155 made of polystyrene; it flew very well.

this new BV-155 made of polystyrene; it flew very well. Vlastimil Simek and his Old-timer D.H.

Vlastimil Simek and his Old-timer D.H. Puss Moth.

and Lubomir Koutný were runners up, each with only 1s less. The event ended with the Town Hall Mayor handing out prizes and trophies to the winners.

Mayor handing out prizes and trophies to the winners. ● Young Jiri Doleže (son of the

Young Jiri Doleže (son of the father) flew this ITOH.

● Young Jiri Doleže (son of the father) flew this ITOH. Fantastic Savoia SM-65 by Jiri

Fantastic Savoia SM-65 by Jiri Doležel was one of the Schneider Trophy entrants.

The old-timer Mig-3 of Koutný was third in the competition.
The old-timer Mig-3 of Koutný was third in the competition.
by Jiri Doležel was one of the Schneider Trophy entrants. The old-timer Mig-3 of Koutný was
Model Rockets
Model Rockets

G G LIDERS AND ROCKETS…

Model Rockets G G LIDERS AND ROCKETS… an oxymoron surely? Actually, 1912 saw one Carl Neubronner

an oxymoron surely? Actually,

1912 saw one Carl Neubronner

equip a basic model aeroplane

with a fireworks-type rocket.

This performed satisfactorily and Herr

Neubronner is remembered to this day; a

Bavarian World Cup Space Models’ event

carries his name. In recent decades, full-size aerospace saw the need to evolve something similar and NASA’s Space Shuttle and CCCP/ Russia’s equivalent Energia-Buran, represent real world, 21st Century Rocket Boosted Gliders. We need to define the terminology and sort some contradictions…Model Rockets boost upwards at hundreds of kilometres per hour, Gliders soar horizontally at ~30kph. Some circles to square then! The term, rocket boosted glider, covers a multitude of

sins

Boost Gliders - Simple free flight gliders, small and normally resembling hand launched glider…a ‘chuckie’. These are boosted skywards using standard model rocket motors. Key definition - the motor is normally ejected, before the glide segment

of the flight starts. Modern FAI rules have ‘greyed’ this key point, making motor ejection optional. Rocket Gliders - Resemble Boost Gliders, but normally much bigger and carry radio control equipment. The Umph…motor Specific Impulses vary and bigger RC gliders need

20-40Newton seconds (Ns)

power. Key definition – spent motor retained for the duration of the flight. Rogallo Gliders – The already described Boost & Rocket gliders are made from rigid

materials, such as balsa, polyurethane foam, and contemporary composites. Rogallos are flexible

– called flexwings - normally like a hang glider.

Naturally, they need to be rolled up to fit in a

body tube for launch, shedding this for the glide segment of the flight. These are rare and won’t be featuring much more in this piece. Stability - Rockets are stable because the Centre of Gravity (CG) is 1+ body diameter ahead of the aerodynamic static Centre of Pressure (CP). Needless to say, gliders are different, with CG and CP loci normally residing at the ~50% wing chord location. The glide velocity is slow…much, much slower than any rocket boost speed. Simply fixing a pod to hold the rocket motor will not deliver;

a ground-seeking trajectory will most likely

follow! So what do we need? A glider wing’s lift potential must be neutralised whilst the model is boosting at high

speed, such that the glider will boost vertically upwards. At this stage, the model rocket motor,

a dense and fairly heavy piece of kit when full,

plays a key role. Nose mounted motor pod plug the motor into this and the CG migrates forwards to the wing’s leading edge, sometimes even in front. Now the wing becomes ineffective

what’s

it all about?

’D’ to ’E’ size

ineffective what’s it all about? ’D’ to ’E’ size BOOSTER ROOSTERS Rocket Boosted Gliders - time
ineffective what’s it all about? ’D’ to ’E’ size BOOSTER ROOSTERS Rocket Boosted Gliders - time
BOOSTER ROOSTERS
BOOSTER
ROOSTERS

Rocket Boosted Gliders - time to float some stuff? by Stuart Lodge

Image on of Carl Neubronner’s rocket boosted glider your scribe’s model box.
Image on
of Carl Neubronner’s rocket boosted
glider
your scribe’s model box.

Chuckie with a rocket boost! Bedrich Pavka (CZE) launches his rigid balsa boostie…and when these work well, you wonder why we try anything different.

24 AeroModeller - January 2015

as a lifting surface and many enthusiasts even add trim tabs, resembling an aileron or takeoff flap, to one of the wings, promoting a slow roll during the boost segment of the flight. This is basic model aircraft trimming and any doubts will soon be sorted by spending an hour or two with a traditional aeromodeller; for sure, much better than any of my words here! Boost Gliders have the motor at the front to make life easier, and when the motor’s ejection charge fires and ejects the spent case, the CG relocates to the glide segment locus.

Boost Gliders Construction Methodology

Model Rockets look different from any normal glider. Gliders have wings and so design and construction involves a completely new suite of skills from a rocket only flyer, beyond sticking cardboard tubes together! We need tooling and the ability to carve out and section wings from balsawood and other materials; fuselages frequently from spruce, or composite tubes;

tailplanes differ from rocket fins too. Finishing techniques are traditional…dope, sanding sealer and tissue, most of the time. Colours… bright colours help in any subsequent

downwind searches

definitely to be recommended! More jargon…Decalage – these are the incidence angles of the wing and tailplane. A subject of debate too - some experts line up wings and tails in the Zero-Zero state, leading to very straight, high boosts, but more critical in the transition phase…the coast segment into the glide; get it wrong and a crash is likely! Many employ a couple of degrees positive incidence for the wing – leading edge higher than trailing edge. Inducing a roll in the boost phase makes life easier still. Aeromodelling basics; wings are typically made from 5mm soft-medium density, quarter grain cut balsa, with a wing area of typically 300 sq cm, wingspans of 30-45cm. Fuselages are spruce strips, or composite fishing rod tubes, the latter virtually

fluorescent

panels are

rod tubes, the latter virtually fluorescent panels are Balkan Cup, Dupnica in Bulgaria 2012. Two S4A-

Balkan Cup, Dupnica in Bulgaria 2012. Two S4A- Boost Glider ‘folders’ on the launchers ready to go, Macedonians Zoran Atanososki & Stanisa Petrovic get ready.

Zoran Atanososki & Stanisa Petrovic get ready. Macedonian junior, Lazar Malinov wires up his rigid balsa

Macedonian junior, Lazar Malinov wires up his rigid balsa S4A-Boost Glider, at the Stip Cup, in 2008. Note how the motor pod is canted to produce downthrust, to prevent the glider looping during the boost phase.

indestructible. Tailplanes from 1mm soft quarter grain balsa. Too few Boost Gliders are seen as fly-for-fun sports models; the great majority are used in the FAI’s S4-Boost Glider events. So let’s have a look in detail at the FAI contest S4-Boost Gliders:

Rigid Gliders

S4A-Boost Gliders boost upwards using 2.5Ns A type impulse rocket motors (that’s the ‘A’ in S4A). Weight is 25-35g, including motor and ready to go on the launcher. A smooth impulse delivery is vital, contrasting with the hard whoosh normally delivered by hobby shop motors. Most of the best boost glider propellants are made in Eastern Europe, where this event is an ‘art form’ and taken very seriously. Not getting too technical, but a soft-blowing A2-2 motor is pretty typical, with nothing in Estes’ otherwise comprehensive motor array remotely similar. Estes’ mini-motor A3-4 and A10-3 are about the best that can be found. Coast times must be kept short, as gliders slow down rapidly as the thrust decays. As stated above, wing flaps are used by some designers; held in the up position for boosting and released as the motor ejects for the glide. Yet more employ differential flaps for the boost segment, one fully up, the other half down to induce a gentle, slow roll. A couple of degrees of wing incidence make a boostie a little easier to live with and differential flaps make life easier still.

Folders

In 1980, Cold War developments led to Russian Sergei Illin’s novel take on S4-Boost Glider, evolving a structure that tucked in its

on S4-Boost Glider, evolving a structure that tucked in its Nige Bathe (GBR) sets up his

Nige Bathe (GBR) sets up his ‘Toblerone Special’…this S4A-Boost Glider’s wing swivels 90 degrees and is then ‘rolled up’ around the fuselage and becomes a ‘rocket’. At the top of the boost, it all unrolls and becomes a glider again.

top of the boost, it all unrolls and becomes a glider again. Slinky, that’s what a

Slinky, that’s what a modern S8E/P-RC Rocket Glider is. This one on its landing approach at the 10th Belgrade Cup, in 2011.

wingtips and pivoted the wing through 90 degrees on the fuselage mount. The wing was folded and parallel with the fuselage, during the boost segment of the flight. So the Glider became a true Rocket when boosting, the motor’s ejection charge normally burning through a thread to release the spring-loaded wing…when lots of wing area appeared as the wing rotated and flipped out its tips for the glide. These designs are super, but at a price of being harder to design and build. Ironically these folders were ousted from international contests by the ultra-efficient Rogallo glider, which the Bulgarians brought to 1980’s World Space Modelling Championships, in the USA. Flexwings were novel and had not previously been seen, and consequently were permissible in competitions. Rogallos were subsequently reclassified as FAI category S10 and haven’t seen the light of day since! Folders have nudged traditional rigid gliders off the podium steps in succeeding years. Modern Russian developments include the stowing of a folded glider in a normal rocket tube, boosting to silly altitudes

25
25
Model Rockets
Model Rockets
Model Rockets Nuria Crusellas (ESP) prepares her folding wing S4A-Boost Glider on a high efficiency piston
Model Rockets Nuria Crusellas (ESP) prepares her folding wing S4A-Boost Glider on a high efficiency piston

Nuria Crusellas (ESP) prepares her folding wing S4A-Boost Glider on a high efficiency piston launcher at the Catalunya Cup, Spain, during 2009.

before spitting it out! These models resemble commercial Zing Wings, polystyrene wings that are designed to fold in half, before being fired upwards by catapult, springing out their wings as the velocity decays. Some balsa gliders can be made to do the same and contemporary composites too, ‘rolled up’ and slid inside a lightweight body tube. The performance is stellar – just a bit too good – pretty much ‘fire and forget’ because of the questionable visibility of small, “low profile” gliders. Hard to find on the ground too!

Dethermaliser

A

big clumsy word, but it’s in the vocabulary

of

all free flight model aircraft enthusiasts.

Gliders get into thermals & up-draughts

and soar away

is the means to fouling up a glider’s trim,

prompting a more rapid return to terra firma.

There are plentiful methods

tiny clockwork/electronic timers may be

used to tip the tailplane on its mount, drop

a trim-weight from the nose area, or release

a fuselage-mounted, trim-destroying flap. DTs are sound and should be employed in

every boost. You’ll get less building time as

a result!

using

a dethermaliser (DT)

burning fuses,

Rocket Gliders

Rocket gliders are much bigger than Boost Gliders and are Radio Controlled… the RC nicely controls the CG-CP migration relationship. RC Rocket Gliders are a

fantastic diversion, exciting and spectacular too, flying on 40Ns impulse (that’s the ‘E’

in S8E/P) to a height of 300m (~1000’) in

the ‘E’ in S8E/P) to a height of 300m (~1000’) in S8E/P-RC Rocket Glider features bigger,

S8E/P-RC Rocket Glider features bigger, more sophisticated designs. Mitja Zgajner (SLO) boosts away at the 2011 32nd Ljubljana Cup, Slovenia. Check out the snow on those mountains!

10 seconds. Lots more expertise is needed at every stage; many rocket gliders possess complex built-up wings, some sheeted over in balsa, and others are layered up from contemporary composites. Given the skills and investment required, Rocket Glider is an ‘experts only’ class. What of the Radio Control needs? Two or three channel radio is the norm; at the basic level, rudder (Yaw axis) and elevator (Pitch axis) control only. Ailerons (Roll axis) may be controlled by a third channel. RC gear gets better each year; ultra-lightweight receivers, servos and power packs available in the hobby shops. Vee-tails, combining rudder and elevator functions on the same surfaces,

are often employed and work by electronic “mixing” of the servos’ functions. Some Rocket Gliders have a spoiler to ‘flop’ the glider onto the turf for precision landings. Decalage – re-read the Boost Glider basics, but RC rocket gliders normally feature a few degrees of wing incidence. The glider is able to be trimmed nose-heavy in the boost segment, with readjustments dialed into the RC gear for the glide segment. Normally, a whisker of down-elevator is also programmed in for the boost segment, keeping the glider’ boost very straight. Research with FAI S8E/P-RC Rocket Glider models’ has shown that having the motor tube positioned between the wing mount and the fuselage

26 AeroModeller - January 2015
26 AeroModeller - January 2015
Nige Bathe and Mike Francies (GBR) at the 34th Ljubjana Cup, in 2012. These S8E/P-RC

Nige Bathe and Mike Francies (GBR) at the 34th Ljubjana Cup, in 2012. These S8E/P-RC Rocket Gliders are at the ‘Formula 1’ end of life with extensive use of contemporary composites throughout. Sensational performance.

flapping in the breeze and the ignition wires dangling and in danger of fouling the tailplane as the motor ignites! Small Boost Gliders need wing support - usually rods set up parallel with the launch rod…also most small Boost Gliders usually need launch lugs too, normally lining up with the motor’s thrust line. Big radio controlled Rocket Gliders have special needs, like a heavy duty launcher, usually angled upwind, facilitating better guidance of the glider during the boost segment. Reliable GSE is vital to the successful flying of rocket boosted gliders.

Flare out

‘Booster roosters’ are complex. All rocket boosted gliders need more knowledge in terms of design, building and flying than virtually every other kind of model rocket.

Vitally, they form an interface between Space Modelling and Aeromodelling. As a rocket flyer the trick is to know someone who’s keen on the latter and lots more expertise will materialise in a very short time. And you’ll avoid coming home with the gliders in ‘kit form’ after every flying session! We’ve not covered rear-motored boosties. They exist, but are more commonly found in the Americas, than in Europe. The USA

is also keen on canard gliders

say, models with the tail at the front and the wings at the back of the fuselage. Over many decades now, most everything has been

that is to

Over many decades now, most everything has been that is to BANG!! rocket motor catastrophically fails

BANG!!

rocket motor catastrophically fails – a ‘Cato’ to

use the jargon. Pretty rare and the grass was quickly put out.

this

is what happens when a model

boom, with ~3 degrees of thrust inclination focused through the glider’s CG position, really improves the boost segment. Traditionally, motors were always mounted in a nose pod, atop the fuselage, just like a big boostie…effective, but crude and ugly! The 1990s saw underslung motor mounts coming into play and these days the motor is normally to be found under the wing. Contemporary composites, like Aramid - Kevlar, carbon and glass fibres are common selections in construction. FAI’s contest class is a duration-based, precision landing event, the objective being to land on a spot, with a flight duration of exactly 6 minutes; points lost for being early or late and for being more than 1 metre from the landing spot.

late and for being more than 1 metre from the landing spot. Mike Francies, John Jacomb

Mike Francies, John Jacomb & Nige Bathe (all GBR) put their fleeces to the test at the 2012 34th Ljubljana Cup, in Slovenia! Note the composite construction S4A-Boost Gliders, the wingtips fold under and the whole wing slews 90 degrees parallel with the fuselage, becoming ‘rockets’ for the boost phase. The wing flips out at apogee and the rockets become ‘gliders’.

Ground Support Equipment (GSE) - The Launchers!

Gliders don’t resemble cylindrical rockets and with the motor placement normally towards the glider nose, ignition is harder to arrange, often needing an ‘umbilical’ connection. Consequently, simple pad and rod combinations are not the perfect solution for launch as they leave the glider’s wings

checked out by an enthusiast somewhere, but

the elite gear is always to be found in FAI competitions around the World.

However, to summarise

Boost Gliders

are where Space Modellers and traditional free flight Aeromodellers could find common ground. Rockets and gliders form the perfect

synergy, so give them a go

27
27
Build Time
Build Time
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric
Build Time BE2C Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric

BE2C

Andy Sephton has come up with this charming 1/20th scale 22”/56cm span electric Free Flight model, which would easily convert to rubber, micro RC or small diesel.

would easily convert to rubber, micro RC or small diesel. THE WORKHORSE OF BRITISH AERIAL RECONNAISSANCE

THE WORKHORSE OF BRITISH AERIAL RECONNAISSANCE IN WWI

why the BE2c? Fuselage
why
the BE2c?
Fuselage

library solved that with a 1/72 drawing in the 1946 Harleyford publication: Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. The next was a prototype to model. It needed to be accessible and easily researched; the Imperial War Museums example was chosen which is currently at Duxford. If you can’t get to see the real thing, there are lots of pictures of it available on the net, so authentication of your model should not be an issue. Andrew requested an easily built model that would be simple to trim and fly. Liberties had to be taken to achieve this, so a flat bottom section was chosen, the structure was simplified and wing spars were moved to the surface. To aid trimming, the

I I

spars were moved to the surface. To aid trimming, the I I ’m a sucker for

’m a sucker for a challenge and this one came right out of the blue. “Would you like to do a BE2c for AeroModeller?” said our friendly editor during the July Old Warden meeting. “Why

elevators have been made as separate units as has a trim tab on the rudder. The latter coincides with the colour demarkation on the original, so it should be unobtrusive in flight. Notwithstanding, the outline is just about scale and with the incidences and balance point shown on the plan, the model looks ‘right’ in the air.

I build the two basic sides on top of each other. Choose hard 1.6mm square balsa for the longerons and medium balsa for the rest. Starting with the first side, jig the construction by using scrap 3mm balsa pinned along the edge of the drawing and

not” I replied. I then asked the most stupid

question of the century

Andrew responded: “It’s a 100 years since

the start of WW1 and my cousin, Matthew

Boddington, flys a replica!” You’ll understand

my embarrassment when you learn that I’ve

known Matthew for a number of years and have even spent time with him looking over his aircraft. The first thing I needed was a three-view drawing of the full-size. A look through my

The first thing I needed was a three-view drawing of the full-size. A look through my
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.
Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners. Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.

Printwood generated with a photocopy and cellulose thinners.

Construction commenced with the fin and rudder.

The fuselage takes shape. Note the jigging blocks either side of the longerons.

shape. Note the jigging blocks either side of the longerons. Tailplane construction. Note the overlong strips

Tailplane construction. Note the overlong strips of wood. They were cut to size after the tailplane had been lifted from the plan.

then fix the longeron in place by using more scrap 3mm. Avoid putting pins through the fuselage wood. As each piece is cut to length, cut a similar piece for the second fuselage side. When the first side is dry, the second is built immediately on top. The sides will stick together, but they will be exactly the same. When the second side is dry, remove both from the plan and sand the edges to conform and the outer sides to make them flat. Carefully split the sides with a razor blade and you should now have two exactly similar fuselage sides. Using the jigging blocks, and making sure the smooth sides are outermost, fix the two sides in their respective positions on the plan view. Crosspieces can now be

positions on the plan view. Crosspieces can now be Wing construction commenced. Note overlong spars that

Wing construction commenced. Note overlong spars that will be cut to length after lifting from the plan.

cut to size and the centre part of the fuselage constructed. When dry, remove the basic fuselage from the plan, crack the longerons just behind the rear cockpit and join the fuselage at the rear end. Add the remaining crosspieces. Add the wing and undercarriage tubes, making them slightly oversize. Take a sanding block to the fuselage at this stage to face off the tubes and ensure all the sides are flat before adding the upper formers. When the formers are dry, take a copy of the paper pattern for the coaming and size it to your model by selective fitting and trimming. When satisfied, transfer the result to 0.8mm balsa and fix it to the model.

transfer the result to 0.8mm balsa and fix it to the model. The wing tips can

The wing tips can be built up on the wing, or as separate units; I chose the latter route.

When the coaming is dry, fix the motor plate (B0) to the front end, the block balsa underneath the nose and sand both to shape. When shaped, cut the block away forward of the C2 position, cement parts C2 to both faces and hollow the removable block to suit the power source used. Locate with balsa dowels at the back end and magnets at the front. The dummy engine is made with scrap balsa onto a 0.8mm plywood base. Use 6mm for the engine blocks, 6mm rounded and wrapped with cotton for the cylinders, 2mm rounded for the exhaust collectors and 2.5mm plastic tube for the exhaust pipe. Laminate the cover from two pieces of soft

the exhaust pipe. Laminate the cover from two pieces of soft Making a paper pattern for

Making a paper pattern for the forward fuselage sheeting. Note strut positions and cockpit openings.

sheeting. Note strut positions and cockpit openings. Paper pattern on model with struts jury rigged using

Paper pattern on model with struts jury rigged using hairclips.

pattern on model with struts jury rigged using hairclips. View of the basic model without U/C

View of the basic model without U/C to check general fit of the parts.

model with struts jury rigged using hairclips. View of the basic model without U/C to check
Build Time
Build Time
Build Time Sheathed wing tubes for lower wing. The wing root sits proud of the fuselage
Build Time Sheathed wing tubes for lower wing. The wing root sits proud of the fuselage

Sheathed wing tubes for lower wing. The wing root sits proud of the fuselage on the prototype machine.

root sits proud of the fuselage on the prototype machine. Centre section showing sheeting After covering

Centre section showing sheeting

on the prototype machine. Centre section showing sheeting After covering the top surface of the wing,

After covering the top surface of the wing, the strut tubes are cyano’d in place. Then they are secured by sewing.

are cyano’d in place. Then they are secured by sewing. The flying surfaces have been covered

The flying surfaces have been covered and sprayed with water. They are seen here jigged to a flat board while they dry off. Similarly do this after doping when they are touch dry, and leave over night.

after doping when they are touch dry, and leave over night. Block balsa cut to shape

Block balsa cut to shape with a ‘Gentleman’s’ saw

0.8mm balsa wrapped around a suitable bottle (foam-safe accelerator in my case), cut it to shape (with the aid of a paper template), then fix in place. The cowl is fixed by the 3 mm dowels at the rear and magnets at the front. Fabricate blanks for the centre-section struts by laminating 0.8mm ply between strips of 0.8mm balsa. When dry, carve and sand to section, then cut to length using the plan as a guide. Cement in place through the coaming, ensuring that they adhere well inside the fuselage - hairclips were used as clamps on the prototype. For the rear fuselage stringers, cut some very light 0.8mm balsa into 1.6mm wide strips. Lay the first down the middle of the rear fuselage. When dry cement two more half way between the first and the top fuselage longeron. Finally, when those are dry cement four more strips in the gaps between the other three. You’ll need a built wing centre section for the next phase. Copy or trace the fuselage side elevation onto two sheets of card to include the lower and upper wing dowels. Make holes at the wing dowel points with a suitable piece

of wire. Then using the card templates as a jig over the wing dowels on either side of the fuselage, the centre section can be cemented into place on the centre section struts. Bend the rigging Hooks A from .5mm wire and fix to the centre section struts and fuselage side (8 hooks in total) using cyano or epoxy. Cover the fuselage using your favourite method - mine is to use light-weight tissue, dope to stick, water to shrink, then non- shrinking dope to seal. Finally, I made the cockpit coamings by sanding a ¼ radius onto the end of a sheet of 0.8mm balsa and then cutting a 1.6mm strip off the end grain. This was then cemented around the cockpit opening with the radius outwards. The soft end-grain balsa easily takes up the shape of the cockpit opening. When dry, the inner edge can be sanded to a radius to complete the job

Fin and Tailplane

Avoid the use of heavy balsa as the structure will eventually have to be balanced with weight at the front of the model and the

lighter the tail feathers, the lighter the required balance weight. After covering, hinge with diamond shaped tin plate cut (with an old pair of scissors) from the lid off a baked bean tin.

Wings and Centre Section

Use med hard balsa for the spars, leading and trailing edge. Shape the latter before building and it’ll make the finishing easier. Use the lightest wood you can find for the wing tips and medium balsa for the ribs. Take care when cutting out the ribs as the thickness at the rear spars is thin making the ribs weak at this point - I broke several during the construction of the model so cutting a few spares would be a good idea. Take special care over cutting the holes for the wing tubes as they set the dihedral - it may make it easier to cut the holes before cutting out the rib. The tips can be constructed on the wing, or separately and added later - your choice. Note that the root rib on the upper wing should be set to an angle to match the dihedral, but this is not necessary on the lower wing.

be set to an angle to match the dihedral, but this is not necessary on the
Only the Top Right Wing and Low Left Wing are shown in full. Use overlays
Only the Top Right Wing and Low Left Wing are shown in full. Use overlays
Only the Top Right Wing and Low Left Wing are shown in full. Use overlays
Only the Top Right Wing and Low Left Wing are shown in full. Use overlays
Only the Top Right Wing and Low Left Wing are shown in full. Use overlays

Only the Top Right Wing and Low Left Wing are shown in full. Use overlays of the short wing root drawings to make the ‘other’ panels. Fit the gussets after removing the wing from the plan, then sand the wing to shape. To fit the strut mounting tubes and rigging Hooks C, cover the top surface only of the bottom wing and the lower surface only of the top wing. Cyano the tubes in place to locate them, then sew them to fix their position - the sewing thread is hidden in the wing structure by leaving one wing surface uncovered. Drill the wing to suit, then cyano or epoxy the rigging Hooks C in place. Cover the other wing surfaces, water shrink and dope.

Undercarriage

Bend the undercarriage wires to the shape shown on the plan making sure that both sides are the same. Cut strips of 0.8mm balsa

to suit, then laminate them either side of the wire. When dry, cut the fairing to length, then carve and sand to the required section. The spreader bar is made in a similar way. The wheels are circles of 3.5mm balsa sandwiched between discs of 0.8mm ply. The hub is a short length of 1.6mm tube cyanoed in place. The covers are card discs, scored on the inside to represent spoked with holes punched with a sharpened tubes to represent the valve opening and the centre of the disc. The wheels are fixed to the spreader bar with washers and either a drop of epoxy or solder. Fix the spreader bar to the U/C by binding with shearing elastic. Make up the tail skid by laminating three strips of 0.8mm balsa over a suitable form. When dry, carve and sand to section. Build up a cruciform structure of 1.6mm round balsa around an upright of 2.4mm round balsa. A small piece of 0.8mm ply either side of the upright acts as a mount for the skid,

which can be fixed or hinged on a wire dowel. If the latter, tension it with a small spring or rubber band.

Struts and Assembly

Bend the wing struts from 0.5mm wire to the shape shown on the plan. The lengths will work out just fine if the centre section was fixed in the right place on the centre section struts. If not, you’ll have to jig the wing and bend the struts by eye. Assuming the strut wires are now the correct length, cover them with laminations of 0.8mm balsa in a similar way to the undercarriage. When dry, cut the fairing to length, then carve and sand to shape. The wing dowels and tubes should set the correct dihedral, so it should only be a case of tying shearing elastic across the strut ends to hold them in position and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the prototype to work out how

and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
and using shearing elastic to add false rigging to the wings. Refer to pictures of the
Build Time
Build Time
Build Time This sequence shows the wing centre section jigged into place using card templates and
Build Time This sequence shows the wing centre section jigged into place using card templates and
Build Time This sequence shows the wing centre section jigged into place using card templates and
Build Time This sequence shows the wing centre section jigged into place using card templates and

This sequence shows the wing centre section jigged into place using card templates and the wing dowels through the wing tubes.

this should be done. Finish the rigging with Hook B at the fuselage end to allow the wings to be removed for transit. Cement the tailplane in place then do the same with the fin/rudder.

Detail

Adding further detail is optional, but it does add to the ambiance of the model. Provision has been made in the structure for control

model. Provision has been made in the structure for control 32 AeroModeller - January 2015 horns

32 AeroModeller - January 2015

horns which are also shown on the plan. However, do keep detail to a minimum as added weight reduces performance and too many ‘bits’ make for a vulnerable model.

Colour

The original model was given a light spray of light yellow (about 10 parts white to 1 part yellow), then the roundels and fin flashed sprayed in red, white and blue and the letters

The model assembled and ready for test.

in black over the top. The front end was painted dark sea grey. If you don’t have access to a spray system, consider using car aerosols, or coloured tissue. Avoid hand painting as it’s too heavy.

Power Plant

The prototype model was powered by a brushed motor from a ParkZone Mustang, a 350MAh LiPo and a KP Electric Flight

The coaming is made by sanding a ¼ curve on the end of a strip of 100mm wide 0.8mm balsa. A 1.6mm strip is then cut from the end grain and stuck to the cockpit. When dry, the inner radius can be sanded in as shown.

1.6mm strip is then cut from the end grain and stuck to the cockpit. When dry,
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean
The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean

The rudder and elevator hinges are ‘snipped’ from a ring pull off a baked bean can.

The wheels and their paper covers. Spokes were ‘made’ by scoring the inside of the cover, the holes were cut using a sharpened tube as a punch.

With the motor in place, construction of the dummy engine commences. The ‘cylinders’ are rounded 6mm balsa with thread wound round and glued in position

Profiler. There are numerous adequate power plants on the market, so the final choice has been left to the individual builder. As luck would have it, the choice of powerplant fitted nicely within the cowls and balanced the model perfectly on the leading edge of the lower wing, the design C of G position.

Flying

had crept into the left wing, so I left it there to prevent spiraling. In the end, about 80% power on the motor, slight left rudder and slight up elevator gave a gentle climbing turn to the left and a left turning glide. Initial test flights were carried out on a blustery day in Lincolnshire at a Model Chat Fly-In. Several successful flights were carried

out in the lee of some trees

until

the

Ready to fly, the prototype weighed in at 75 gm. With the incidences, thrustline and C of

inevitable happened, the BE ended up in a tree. The tailplane was damaged on retrieval,

G

shown on the plan, the model was not far

but she will live to fight another day

of

trim. During assembly, a hint of washin

Happy Landings!

Info ADH Publishing plan to have a Laser Cut set of parts available for the
Info
ADH Publishing plan to have a Laser Cut
set of parts available for the BE2c – it
will certainly make rib production easier!
Watch the AeroModeller online content
www.aeromodeller.com or the next issue
for details.
rib production easier! Watch the AeroModeller online content www.aeromodeller.com or the next issue for details. 37
rib production easier! Watch the AeroModeller online content www.aeromodeller.com or the next issue for details. 37
Power Trip
Power Trip
goes single channel RC
goes single channel RC

Vmar’s Cessna L-

T T

tweak

diesel

to do a lot more of

And it would need

he idea was simple. Buy a cheap

ARTF RC model aircraft and

it for rudder-only RC

assist mode and with a trusty

the flying by itself than

of the woods) come from mail order places with website catalogues. All that falderal about “taking you to the next level” and fancy names for high-tech electronic gadgetry aside, there were a few likely candidates for our purpose on various online sites. I went for a Cessna L-19 Bird Dog (US $53 from www. hobbyking.com or can be found elsewhere as the Vmar brand) because;

Traditional balsa/ply construction – no

foam – for ease of repair/modification

1.25m (49”) wingspan is a good size

High wing, cabin layout should be good for

stability

Vmar has been in the game for years and their models are well engineered, unlike some ARTF’s that seem to be made by toy companies more focused on churning out cheap product than something that works well and lasts in normal use.

What’s in the box?

All of the major components (fuselage, wings, tails) are neatly packed in the box, each in its plastic bag, along with more bags of hardware and small bits. It comes pre- covered with Vmar’s polyester film. Colour and markings are printed on the inner side of the film, so they’re fuel proof and there are no decals to apply. Its vivid white/red colour scheme suggesting “don’t shoot me I’m one of you guys” probably represents an actual full size Bird Dog that had served

engine in the nose. With

rudder control alone, the model would need

regular multi-RC types with their “neutral”

stability and good response to control inputs.

to take a knock or two,

given my very limited RC skills. It’s not as

simple as leaving out a few servos, but not all

that difficult either. Our experiment had a successful outcome, taking a lot less time than building a model from scratch. You might not want to go exactly down our path, but some of the following could be applied to similar conversions. The real ARTF bargains (around our neck

● It’s not a yellow Piper Cub (they’re too common) ● It was cheaper than
It’s not a yellow Piper Cub (they’re too
common)
● It was cheaper than the cost of materials
would be if scratch-built

38 AeroModeller - January 2015

would be if scratch-built 38 AeroModeller - January 2015 A very complete and highly prefabricated package
would be if scratch-built 38 AeroModeller - January 2015 A very complete and highly prefabricated package
would be if scratch-built 38 AeroModeller - January 2015 A very complete and highly prefabricated package
would be if scratch-built 38 AeroModeller - January 2015 A very complete and highly prefabricated package

A very complete and highly prefabricated package with nicely done traditional balsa/plywood con- struction. How can they do it for the price? Colour and markings are on the inside of polyester film covering, so they won’t come off. Sheeted areas needed a “going over” with iron to properly attach the film – reduces its tendency to pucker up in warm sunlight.

19 Bird Dog Has AeroModeller lost its senses with an electric ARTF? Not when Maris
19 Bird Dog Has AeroModeller lost its senses with an electric ARTF? Not when Maris

19 Bird Dog

19 Bird Dog Has AeroModeller lost its senses with an electric ARTF? Not when Maris Dislers

Has AeroModeller lost its senses with an electric ARTF? Not when Maris Dislers alters it for diesel power and radio assist.

Maris Dislers alters it for diesel power and radio assist. The replacement tailplane frame uses traditional
Maris Dislers alters it for diesel power and radio assist. The replacement tailplane frame uses traditional

The replacement tailplane frame uses traditional FF techniques. When finished, it weighed less than half the original.

Extra wing dihedral enhances spiral stability. Replacement plywood stub-spar/joiner (top) has greater angle, giving four degrees dihedral per wing panel. Care is needed to ensure correct thickness and height, so that it is a snug slip fit into the wings. I did not glue it in place, preferring to be able to store the wing as two halves.

preferring to be able to store the wing as two halves. Original pushrods and guide tubes
preferring to be able to store the wing as two halves. Original pushrods and guide tubes

Original pushrods and guide tubes had to go as part of the weight saving program, and anyway, the rudder pushrod was incorrectly positioned at the back. Detach clevises & withdraw pushrods. Saw cut through the tubes at the forward end and slide them out forwards. Job is easier while the rear cabin glazing is removed.

Wire hooks for the “swing-wing” mounting method. All hooks are bent from 0.8mm dia. (21 SWG) piano wire. Lower hooks pass through drilled holes either side of the fuselage former in centre of cabin, then secured with epoxy. Upper hook slides into aluminium tubes glued into wing trailing edges. Rubber bands will form a triangle between all three, holding the back of the wing down and pulling it forwards, so that the front dowel pins stay engaged in flight. Wing is free to swing backwards from a hard landing or hitting an obstruction.

with the United States Army doing artillery observation, medivac and other liaison duties. Scale details include instrument panel and externally, printed panel lines, door openings and “authentic” instructions on what to do if the right grade of avgas is not available in an emergency. Construction is traditional balsa/plywood, neatly done from laser cut parts and with just about all of the detail tasks done, aside from basic assembly and installation of radio equipment and motor. There’s a comprehensive assembly manual with lots of colour photos to guide the owner. Some of it doesn’t match the model, as a few details on the actual model have been improved since the manual was printed. One obvious fault is

the rudder pushrod exiting below the tailplane instead of on top. The rudder stops at the elevator hinge line, so the builder is left to sort that - more on that later. The Bird Dog is intended for four function RC with electric motor system, although Vmar suggest that an IC engine can be used. The instructions do not cover IC engine installation.

Sizing it up

I first checked component weights, wing area etc. Weights were as follows;

Fuselage

171g

Tail surfaces

57g

Wings/struts

178g

Undercarriage/wheels

32g

Hardware/pilot

30g

SUB TOTAL

468g

PAW 80 diesel/prop

83g

Receiver/servo/battery

50g

TOTAL: 601g (21.2 oz)

Wing area is two square feet, giving approximate wing loading of 10.6 oz/sq ft or 33g/sq dm. That’s a reasonable loading for a sport model, but the next light thermal would not whisk away this Bird Dog, especially given its rather thin semi-symmetrical wing section. I figured my PAW 80 Classic would have enough power for the job, could be set to just

Power Trip
Power Trip
Power Trip Rudder servo is in place, with closed-loop hook-up to the rudder. Long aluminium crimp

Rudder servo is in place, with closed-loop hook-up to the rudder. Long aluminium crimp tubes can be given an S-bend to tighten the loop or adjust rudder position. Wing retaining band hooks installed through former sides. Also note the rear cabin glazing now follows the increased V-angle of the wing saddle – accommodates extra dihedral and allows wing to swing back.

accommodates extra dihedral and allows wing to swing back. Fibreglass reinforced Sellotape across the underside of

Fibreglass reinforced Sellotape across the underside of wing prevents trailing centre from “opening up”. Note the installed wing retaining hook. Also hooks for attaching lower ends of wing lift struts. Make them an easy sliding fit into the 5/16” aluminium tubing glued across fuselage at the strut mounting locations. Rubber bands stretched inside the tube between the two hooks hold struts in place while flying.

the right amount of thrust and fitted quite well within the vac-formed cowl. It was then a simple matter of temporarily piecing things together to assess how it would balance. Not good. The PAW is a good deal lighter than the specified electric motor and forward located LiPO battery. The Bird Dog would end up quite tail heavy and the prospect of 80g or more nose weight was not appealing. I’d need to “add lightness” to the tail end as part of the conversion. The incidence meter showed the front fuselage former to be at 4 degrees downthrust relative to the wing and tailplane, both at zero degrees.

Re-engineering for its new role

Conversion involved these key changes;

Improve longitudinal stability by changing

wing/tail incidence, more engine down thrust

Improve spiral stability by increasing

wing dihedral

Revise wing mounting method to reduce

likelihood of damage from a rough landing There was also deciding on how to mount the diesel engine and tackling the heavy tail end. The tail surfaces are simple balsa sheet affairs with lightening holes and inset chordwise plywood stiffeners -standard RC stuff. The tailplane alone weighed 40g – about

the same as needed to be removed to achieve balance. I made a balsa replacement using laminated outlines for the curved parts, 4.5mm square LE and spars, and 1.5mm sheet riblets. I’d hoped to retrieve the covering film for reuse, but part of the colour stayed on the wood as it was removed. So I used polyester tissue on the new tailplane. Two coats of thinned dope and red spray enamel from a hardware shop rattle-can. The new tailplane with elevators attached by strips of aluminium sheet weighed 19g. I didn’t want to lose the artwork on the fin/rudder, so needed to reduce weight at the tail elsewhere. A simple wire skid replaced the steerable tail wheel assembly and out came the

With a bit of translucency and the diesel’s head just poking through the cowling, one
With a bit of translucency and the diesel’s head just poking through the cowling, one can see
this isn’t yet another ready to fly electric foamie. Undercarriage fairings enhance the model’s
good looks. I cut them from 0.4mm styrene sheet, then folded around the wire undercarriage
leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement.
around the wire undercarriage leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement. 40 AeroModeller
around the wire undercarriage leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement. 40 AeroModeller
around the wire undercarriage leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement. 40 AeroModeller
around the wire undercarriage leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement. 40 AeroModeller
around the wire undercarriage leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement. 40 AeroModeller
around the wire undercarriage leg and glued at the back with plastic model cement. 40 AeroModeller

rudder and elevator pushrods and guide tubes, to be replaced by a closed-loop system to the rudder servo. Total weight reduction was 46g, right on target. Increasing wing dihedral was simply a matter of making a new plywood stub-spar joiner with four degrees angle on each side. This fits snugly into the two wing halves. Lift strut attachment points are a little inboard from standard, but no change is needed at the wing end. A pin through each wing tip locked the ailerons in place, leaving the option of resetting their position for trimming. It was not needed. Standard wing attachment is via two forward-facing dowels at the leading edge engaging holes in the plywood fuselage former, and two retaining screws through the trailing edge. Lift struts are screwed to wing and fuselage. That’s fine for nice landings under full control, but I went for a “swing-wing” setup with rubber bands that allowed the wings to be knocked back without damage. Rubber bands between the centre cabin fuselage former and a wire hook near the wing trailing edge replace the rear screws. Rubber bands through a 7/16” aluminium tube glued across the lower fuselage engage hooks at the lower lift-strut ends, allowing them to pop out in a hard landing. The accompanying photos show more detail. I also needed to modify the fuselage’s wing mounting saddle for the extra dihedral and to allow the wing to swing freely backwards. The rear cabin glazing came off without damage, allowing me to increase the saddle’s V angle fore and aft. Glazing was re-attached with Formula 560 canopy glue. It is not practical to build in wing incidence on this model, so I achieved a measure of decalage by putting around 5mm up elevator trim into the tailplane. Engine mounting began by gluing a 2.5mm plywood firewall to the front former. The best engine orientation was side-winder, which allows easy access to compression screw and needle valve, with less risk of flooding than an inverted setup. I could afford a bit of weight up front, so opted for a commercial radial engine mount and a basswood block to put the crankshaft/propeller in the correct position. The block is angled slightly increasing down thrust to a total of six degrees and one degree of right thrust. These angles worked well, with minimal trim change between powered flight and glide. I added a stout basswood keel piece to support the cowl in a nose-over and to provide a forward mounting point for ballast (if needed). Despite this, the cowl was damaged on its first test glide. I repaired and reinforced it inside with a layer of medium weight glass cloth and epoxy. No damage since – I should have done that from the beginning.

damage since – I should have done that from the beginning. Two #32 rubber bands are
damage since – I should have done that from the beginning. Two #32 rubber bands are

Two #32 rubber bands are attached between the fuselage hooks. Then the front wing retaining pins are engaged and the bands attached to the hook on wing. Use a fairly sturdy wire hook with handle for that operation.

PAW Classic 80 has exhaust manifold and rubber extension tube fitted. So unlike the rain in Spain, exhaust oil is mainly NOT on this plane. Extra keel piece supports vac- formed cowl in a nose-over. Cowl needed glass cloth and epoxy reinforcement to prevent splitting. Final drilling of cowl mounting screw holes is done once the engine is in place – ensures neat alignment.

done once the engine is in place – ensures neat alignment. With the model upside down,

With the model upside down, attach the two #10 bands to one wing lift strut hook. Using a long wire hook, draw the rubber bands through the fuselage tube and capture with a toothpick or similar device. Then slip them onto the hook of the other lift strut & make sure that both hooks are in the tube. Model is small enough to be assembled at home and transported in a mid-size car to the flying field.

Subsequent flights confirmed the Bird Dog is a stable, easy to fly model, quite capable of looking after itself if set into a gentle left-hand circling pattern. I like the balance between pilot input and allowing the model to respond to the surrounding air. Not as pure as free flight, but without the constant pilot domination so typical of “full function” RC

flying.

under power, but quite slow when gliding. I’ll experiment with more throw (currently 8mm at full deflection) once I’ve become more familiar with it. Anyway, airspeed is nice and slow, so there’s no real hurry. As expected, the Bird Dog is no soarer, but glide is more than adequate for safe landings. There seems nothing else to change other than perhaps replacing the existing 2.3mm diameter wire undercarriage with thicker 3mm wire, to avoid constant rebending after landings. That can easily be done, by removing the two retaining screws and withdrawing the undercarriage from its mounting box. The Vmar Cessna Bird Dog is not the perfect RC assist sport scale model, but considering the price and effort needed, it will do a fine job.

Response to rudder control is fine

Into the air

Hand glides were good with the estimated elevator pre-set angle, but the model was prone to stalling under power without the damaged 9g cowling. Don had a job feeding in turn to reduce lift/stalling and get the model down in the blustery conditions, but it was a promising start. The PAW was tuned to turn the Master Airscrew 8x4 propeller at a bit less than 8,000 RPM. Any engine capable of that or 10,000 RPM with a 7x4 propeller would work just as well. With the repaired cowl in place (now weighing 11g) and the 30g battery pack mounted behind the firewall, the CG was at 30% wing chord – right where the instructions indicated. So the “homework” and modifications succeeded -no ballast needed and final weight at an acceptable 590g (20.8 oz).

the “homework” and modifications succeeded -no ballast needed and final weight at an acceptable 590g (20.8
Speed CL Model Build
Speed CL Model Build
Speed CL Model Build BUILDING A SPORT JET MODEL If you have been following Dick Hart’s

BUILDING A

SPORT JET MODEL

If you have been following Dick Hart’s previous articles on fettling the HobbyKing pulse jet you’ll be itching to build something for it!

T T

his plane is the ideal model for your first venture into Sport Jet. It may not be quite as fast as the sidewinder layout but you will find it easy to fly and the model

can be flown without a dolly. In addition

your jet engine is better protected from

bumpy landings being mounted on top of the

fuselage. The design goes way back, many

variations having been flown over the years.

Mike Coutts had the first two line Sport Jet

version I saw at Dayton in about 2003 but I

measured up Bill Capinjola’s 2004 example for this kit. I have built four of these models

since then and although the dimensions remain the same, the design has evolved to make the model simpler to fly. Details for obtaining the kit from me are at the end of the article.

Necessary Control Line Experience

I always thought that the heritage of pulse jets had been built around simple models,

inexpensive engines and readily available fuel (petrol). Now the HobbyKing Red Head is available at an amazingly low price it seems that building a straightforward model that will fly at 125mph plus without the need for exotic materials or fuel is once again within the grasp of the regular modeller. That said it is probably best undertaken by those who have recent control line experience. I am 65 years old and whilst my 28 year old son is a better and much fitter pilot than me, I can easily manage a Sport Jet. However I do practice with a Brodak Electric Super Clown on 48 ft. lines pretty much every week I am in California. Not as fast and doesn’t pull anywhere near as hard but I make 16 flights on a weekend just to keep in the swing of things. The pull of a Sport Jet is firm but not overpowering and although it takes a good bit of ‘arm’ to get the model airborne, once flying it will groove pretty well. Because there is no prop wash over the elevator the response is sluggish so it can take a bit of control

anticipation to keep the model from climbing upwind and diving downwind. When the engine cuts, probably after 10 laps or so, the model will again need some ‘arm’ to get it to land rather than ‘arrive’. I will also say that most of my flying experience with pulse jets has been with methanol based fuels, as mandated by US flying rules using 80% methanol and 20% nitromethane.

Building

So let’s build the model. The kit contents are shown in Photo 1 and it contains all of the essentials. You will also need some 1/8 (3mm) ply and some balsa scrap to make the tank fairing. This version will have a removable tank and a monowheel undercarriage. Being able to remove the tank will allow you to shim it or change the pick-up tube location to reduce the amount of fuel left in the tank when the engine quits. The monowheel will allow you to launch the plane without a dolly. Mark the wing as shown in Photo 2 and

allow you to launch the plane without a dolly. Mark the wing as shown in Photo
allow you to launch the plane without a dolly. Mark the wing as shown in Photo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 sand it
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 sand it
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 sand it
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 sand it
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 sand it
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 sand it
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sand it to shape. Do not sand the centre section of the underside because that’s where it will be glued to the top of the fuselage. The hole for the bellcrank is in the inboard wing panel. You are not building a supersonic fighter so when you sand the symmetrical section, have a nice rounded leading edge and don’t make the trailing edge too thin, it just weakens it. Mark the tailplane (stabilizer) as shown in Photo 2 and cut out the elevator (inboard only). Score the centre with a v notch and crack it to form the dihedral Photo 3 (25mm under one tip). Just push the tailplane half way into the notch in the fuselage and carefully superglue the protruding part of the joint Photo 4. Remove the tailplane from the fuselage and complete gluing the joint. Use 50mm wing joining glass tape or similar to reinforce the centre of the tailplane, covering a little more of the inboard panel than the outboard to add reinforcement to the area where the elevator has been cut out. Use polyester or epoxy resin, just enough to wet out the glass Photo 5. Once set sand the tailplane and round off all edges. Ease the slot

for the tailplane to take the extra thickness of the glass reinforcement by paring back the upper slot for the forward two thirds only. It is important to glass the centre of the tail as otherwise the landing shock can break the tailplane off right at the fuselage join. There are several ways of making the elevator, you can use the piece of ply you cut out, sand it and sew it to the tailplane. For this model I have used a piece of 0.036 (20 SWG, 0.9mm) Aluminium alloy sheet for the elevator and joined it using a method that has been around pulse jet circles for ages. I straightened a giant paper clip and used it as the material to make the staples to hinge the elevator having marked and drilled as shown. Make the joints on the underside, solder and cover with a blob of five minute epoxy; Photos 6 & 7. Check the tank for leaks and trim the tank recess in the fuselage until the tank is snug but removable. Using a piece of 1/8inch (3mm) birch ply or lite ply (not supplied), mark out and cut the lower and upper tank fairing pieces Photo 8. The rear spacer is 24 by 19. With the tank in situ tack the lower

fairing in place with superglue, remove the tank and complete the gluing of the joint. Add the rear spacer and the upper fairing triangle. Make sure you leave a generous gap to allow the tank to be removed easily. Fill in the rear with 3/16 in (5mm) balsa. Glue

a fairing block (not supplied) to the front of

the tank with 30 minute epoxy. I used a piece of thin polythene sheet to protect the lower fairing and the fuselage whilst the epoxy set to make sure the block only stuck to the front of the tank. Sand the front block to shape; Photo 9. Solder a couple of angle brackets to

the tank so it can be screwed in place, make sure the rear bracket is not too far back or it may be covered by the wing; Photo 10. The monowheel attaches just ahead of the front engine mount; Photo 11. I used 1/8 inch piano wire (10SWG). The peg is 10mm, the leg is 35mm long and the axle is 15mm.

I made the retaining strap from 1/2 inch

(12mm) stainless banding strip, you could also use a piece of jubilee clip (hose clip) or a proprietary plastic clip; Photo 12. The 2 inch (50mm) wheel is from Glenn Lee in the US, you can also get a black rubber wheel from

clip; Photo 12 . The 2 inch (50mm) wheel is from Glenn Lee in the US,
Speed CL Model Build
Speed CL Model Build
Speed CL Model Build 14 15 17 18 16 19 Marc Warwashana. Failing that use a
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Marc Warwashana. Failing that use a regular (not lightweight) RC 2 inch wheel.(Glen Lee’s wheel will only fit 1/8 inch wire and cannot be drilled out). The completed wheel is shown in photo 13. Make a 3/32 inch (12SWG, 2.6mm) piano wire skid 50 mm long with 10mm pegs and drill the rear locating hole close to the rear of the fuselage flat. Glue in place with slow set epoxy; Photo 14. Form the two engine mounts from the stainless banding material. The hole markings are for guidance only, the HobbyKing pipes vary a bit. Measure carefully before bending the second lug, the front mount must be tight but the rear pipe mount needs to be loose (1/16 in, 1.5mm gap) to allow for expansion when the pipe heats up. Drill the mounting holes and do a trial assembly. Whilst the front strap attaches one lug either side of the mounting block; Photo 15, the tailpipe mount is supposed to have both lugs on the inboard side with the mount outboard. Use washers front and back. I recommend that you orient the engine with the plug straight up; it is easier to get the leads on and off. It is also possible to file a round recess into the

front of the front strap maybe one third of the strap width so that the engine can be moved forward slightly if necessary when adjusting flying characteristics. Push the tailplane into its slot, fit the tank and wheel, and loosely assemble the bellcrank to the inboard wing panel. With the engine in position such that the front strap is lined up with the front edge of the combustion chamber use a 3/4 inch (20mm) piece of foam pushed between the tailpipe and the wing to hold the wing in place. Start with the leading edge about 250mm behind the fuel feed and move the wing until the model balances half way between the bellcrank pivot bolt and the leading edge. If you are going to finish the model heavy then move the wing so it balances nearer the leading edge. Mark the wing location and disassemble the wing, elevator, bellcrank, engine and mounts, tank and wheel assembly. My example balanced at 245mm from the rear of the fuel feed pipe or 105mm from the back edge of the front engine mount; Photos 16 & 17. Round off all of the fuselage corners with the exception of the area where the wing is to be glued. Using 30 minute epoxy, glue the

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tailplane and wing in position. Once dry, dowel the wing to the fuselage using 1/4 inch (6mm) wooden dowels; Photo 18. I use the regular dowels from a DIY store. Glue the dowels in place with 30 minute epoxy and trim flush when set. Finish the model your favourite way. It doesn’t really need it but if you want to use glass and finishing epoxy try to add as little weight as possible. I have previously finished models with spray cans from the DIY store and also brushed on and rubbed down finishing epoxy. Whatever you fancy really. Just make sure that the tank will still fit easily. Photos 19 & 20 show the model ready for finishing. The line guide is designed so it will fit on the wing tip either way around. Enlarge the guide holes to 3mm or so. Both lines will go through the same hole and thus depending upon which way round the guide is fitted there are four possible line rake positions. This is important for trimming the model for best speed and also to empty the tank. File a flat on the wing tip to take the guide and drill the first hole 12 mm from the leading edge. Attach the guide with the bolts and captive nuts supplied; epoxy the captive nut in place. Make a couple of small wing tip skids from 3/32 piano wire and use 30 minute epoxy to glue them in place. These will stop the wing tips from being worn away on landing. A word about bellcranks and lines. The bellcrank supplied has rotating buttons, it is essential that these rotate freely and that the through bolt is properly supported top and bottom. I glue oversize washers in place. This is not because the flying pull is immense but because the pull test is significant and you don’t want to have the bellcrank mount pulled out by repeated hefty pull tests. The model should be flown on 0.022 inch (9 Music Wire Gauge, 0.56mm) ASTMS 322 piano wire, (not stainless and not stranded wires). Bind

Wire Gauge, 0.56mm) ASTMS 322 piano wire, (not stainless and not stranded wires). Bind 44 AeroModeller
the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at
the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at
the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at
the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at
the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at
the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at

the loops with copper wire and soft solder but leave about 1/4inch (6mm) unsoldered at each end of the wrap which should be epoxied. This will help to dissipate stress and reduce the chance of a failure at the end of the solder. Use a single loop at the model end but use a double loop with a ferrule at the handle end. Line length is 17.69M for UK competition and 60 ft. for US competition.

Flying the Sport Jet

My son Matthew and I test flew this example at the October speed meeting at Whittier Narrows in Los Angeles. The HobbyKing Red Head was set up as per my recent articles in AeroModeller (issues 930 and 931). We used the US standard jet fuel of 20% Nitromethane and 80% Methanol on

a 66 thou metering jet. The engine started

first puff and flew as if on rails. As we were test flying between rounds we did not get

a properly timed speed but it was in the

130mph range which is respectable for this type of model and the prevailing weather. As for fuel quantity, always take off with

a full tank to prevent flame out through fuel

surge. The tank on this model is not that big and on methanol/nitro is good for 8-10 laps. On petrol it is good for 12-14laps. Always release the model as soon as it starts once the leads have been disconnected. Be ready to step back to keep the lines tight if necessary. Plan ahead for safe operation of your model and follow the instructions from the engine manufacturer. Have a bucket of water or a fire extinguisher on hand. Make sure the starting crew have practiced. During practice starts the engine can be stopped by pinching the fuel line connection - best to do that within 5 to 10 seconds to prevent over-heating. Make no mistake, Pulse Jets are very noisy! You need to make sure that wherever you choose to fly there are no restrictions or prohibitions, that it is safe and you will not create a nuisance. The best place to fly the model in the UK has to be at Barton (near Manchester), as a member of the Barton club. The circle there has a cage and there are control line enthusiasts on hand to help and advise. Otherwise, there are several speed competitions each year including the Nationals where jets can be flown. In the US

Info The kit is available from me at US$100 or 60 pounds sterling plus shipping.
Info
The kit is available from me at US$100 or
60 pounds sterling plus shipping. Contact;
Dick Hart, Upper Stepford House,
Stepford Road, Dumfries, DG2 0JP, UK.
britintexas@netscape.com
Wheels are available from Marc
Warwashana, 11577 North Shore Drive,
Whitmore Lake, MI 48189-9124, USA.
whellieman@gmail.com

there are a number of locations where pulse jets can be flown; these days I fly with a group of speed enthusiasts at Whittier Narrows, close to LA in California. There are also clubs in New Zealand and Australia where pulse jets are flown. Wherever you are, the key is to prepare well, fly safely and not to create a nuisance. Sport Jets are a whole lot of fun, flying them is just a huge adrenalin rush which I hope I have inspired you to share.

Original Cartoon in August 1950 AeroModeller!
Original Cartoon in August 1950 AeroModeller!
a huge adrenalin rush which I hope I have inspired you to share. ● Original Cartoon
FF Scale
FF Scale
FF Scale The Morane N uncovered. The tailplane outline is 1/16” aluminium – Andy will give
FF Scale The Morane N uncovered. The tailplane outline is 1/16” aluminium – Andy will give
The Morane N uncovered. The tailplane outline is 1/16” aluminium – Andy will give construction
The Morane N uncovered. The tailplane
outline is 1/16” aluminium – Andy will give
construction details in future articles.

“DO GET YOUR KNICKERS IN A TWIST!”

in future articles. “DO GET YOUR KNICKERS IN A TWIST!” Andy Hewitt asks ‘Why on earth
in future articles. “DO GET YOUR KNICKERS IN A TWIST!” Andy Hewitt asks ‘Why on earth
in future articles. “DO GET YOUR KNICKERS IN A TWIST!” Andy Hewitt asks ‘Why on earth

Andy Hewitt asks ‘Why on earth bother with rubber power when we have all this technology at our fingertips?’ Photos by Ellie Hewitt and Bob Fletcher.

have all this technology at our fingertips?’ Photos by Ellie Hewitt and Bob Fletcher. 46 AeroModeller
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and stooge, no frills here. The stooge is fantastic at finding stones
My crude winder and
stooge, no frills here. The
stooge is fantastic at finding
stones when you try to push
it into an airfield.
Fokker EV big and little
- what you can do on an
enlarging photocopier!
Andy prepares to wind the
Morane at this year’s Nats -
tube already in place in the
fuselage. (Photo Andrew
Boddington)

I I

have always had a soft spot for rubber powered aircraft. There is something very pure and simple about twisting some rubber in order to propel a scale model across the sky that appeals to

me above all other forms of propulsion. I do

me ab

me ab

simple class and the rewards for a good flying model are most satisfying…when it all works. We are at present bereft of flying sites, so this often makes flying engine powered models out of reach except for official competitions, but a large rubber model can be flown anywhere with the space of a cricket pitch or park, no noise, no danger, no fuss. You can just use hand cranked turns for

a couple of circuits in your park on a fine

evening and all the problems of the world are lost, just for a little while.

I cannot make is the thrust bearing. In the instant gratification world of aeromodelling that we now inhabit, I like to take part in a sport where you are rewarded for your own endeavours; there are not many of those left in modelling!

Size matters

It is my experience that larger models fly far better than smaller ones. A larger model will be smoother, look for all the world more impressive and scale like. Small models can be built to a very high standard and score higher on static scale marks (if your fingers and eye sight permit), but your total competition score is 50 % flying and smaller models are blown about and upset by the slightest discharge. The greater vulnerability to the conditions makes them less consistent for scale flight

I I

enjoy

enjoy

enjoy

useful

useful

useful

diesel powered models, but not cleaning

– life is too short. Wind it and bung it

them. As for electric and all its paraphernalia

them.

them.

and language barriers associated with

and la

and la

translating word-smithery into something

transl

transl

(there is more to trimming than that, which will be looked at later) is much better; for me simplicity is beauty. I started successful modelling with the charming Andrew Moorhouse series of P-nut kits in the late seventies, which I consider still today amongst the best laid out plans and completeness of instructions ever put into a small kit. Each kit detailed building, covering, carving the propeller and applying the markings. All I had to do was follow the instructions and they flew enough to hook me for life, just a hand full of seconds was enough. I still have some kits hidden away for inspiration. The only down side is that my eye sight struggles with the tiny writing now! Through lots of flying of these designs I developed just about all of my present trimming skills, which have served me well. In recent years I have been developing larger scale rubber models for the BMFA scale competitions and had considerable success and lots of enjoyment flying this type of model. I would now like to pass on my experiences to others, with the current growing surge of interest in this class. It is a

A well-trimmed rubber model can fly

very nearly as well as an electric or diesel powered model and can be just as detailed;

they do not need to be gossamer renditions or particularly light weight. Another reason that I like a good rubber scale model is that it

is

all totally your own work. The only bit that

is that it is all totally your own work. The only bit that Gee Bee R1,

Gee Bee R1, any model can be made to fly! This did fly very fast and was great fun to sort out; this was a free plan in the old AeroModeller.

be made to fly! This did fly very fast and was great fun to sort out;
FF Scale
FF Scale
FF Scale 1/8th Scale Fokker EIII 48inch span, a great flyer although very touchy on tail
FF Scale 1/8th Scale Fokker EIII 48inch span, a great flyer although very touchy on tail
1/8th Scale Fokker EIII 48inch span, a great flyer although very touchy on tail setting.
1/8th Scale Fokker EIII 48inch span, a great flyer although very touchy on tail setting. 4 times Nationals Champion.

I wish I had set the elevators! 2012 Nationals with the 1/8th Scale Morane Type N; 4 times Nationals Champion.

scores. Smaller models when flown outdoors are also usually flying too fast and flitting around like a house fly; the judges’ eyes are looking for faults, so why give them the opportunity? I also find it easier to trim larger models, with separate scale elevators and rudder on stiff hinges; settings are straight forward and easy to check prior to flying. On a more practical point they are easier to mend when things go wrong, not requiring key-hole surgery to mend, especially during a competition.

I suspect that most modellers build the smaller models because they are either indoor modellers (sticking with what they know), using a hopefully dual purpose model, or are limited by the availability of commercial plastic propellers - which are completely inadequate for our requirements. Large propellers are critical to success, enabling the power of the motor to be transmitted to moving a large volume of slow moving air; rather than spinning a small propeller at high revolutions which gives large losses

of efficiency. As an analogy, it would be like trying to pull some train carriages out of a station with a moped, rather than a steam engine. There is no need to worry about making propellers; there have been many excellent articles recently by John O’Donnell in AeroModeller on design and manufacture and I will detail my simple methods in a later article. As a general guide for size, I would not build a model smaller than 30 inches span, including bi-planes. For a suitable wing loading guide you go easily up to 6 ounces per square foot and still have a good performing model, remembering that for British competition rules we only need to achieve 20 seconds, but aim more for a minute to get an unhurried scale flight. Achieving a good height is desirable to gain the transition to glide and landing approach marks. One warning to budding builders is that the larger models are vulnerable to clumsy handling and trimming. If you are not very methodical in your approach, you could wreck your model; there is a lot of energy in these models (and weight), so they can easily be damaged in a crash.

Basic flying equipment

To operate and fly the larger models you will need a winding stooge to hammer into the ground, or a helper with some nerve to hold the model. You will also need a meaty winder; I use an old hand powered drill, with a bent hook in the end. You could spend lots of money on a posh winder, which counts and measures torque and if someone would like to donate one I would be very grateful, but this level of equipment is not required for scale

one I would be very grateful, but this level of equipment is not required for scale
one I would be very grateful, but this level of equipment is not required for scale
modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to
modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to
modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to
modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to
modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to
modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to

modelling. For winding a big rubber motor you must always use a winding tube to protect your model. A broken wound motor (or more likely the motor slipping off the winding hook) would destroy your fuselage. The only real down side to winding larger rubber motors (12 to 16 strands of ¼”flat or similar cross section), are the beads of sweat that form on your brow as you finish winding and have to handle the angry twisted Anaconda as you put your propeller assembly on. If you get it wrong it can make a lot of noise or potentially throw you over a nearby hedge. For a 14 ounce model I use a 14 strand motor about 22 inches long and normally put on 650 turns, which will give about 40 seconds of power on a large 16inch propeller.

Choosing a subject

I think that nearly any subject can be made to

fly well, but some survive the trimming stages better than others! I am guilty of building

difficult (daft) subjects. I build them because

I like them, which is important, keeping

the enthusiasm during the several weeks of construction, but I would not recommend that you follow my designs unless you are confident in your trimming abilities - you have been warned! I like early or quirky aircraft, ones with character. I do not look for good traditional subjects with long noses and big tails. For me the challenge is to build and fly something difficult, to push the boundaries. It makes winning much more satisfying. All my larger models to date have been bereft of dihedral and had tiny tail feathers (under 10% of the wing area). My first was an 1/8 scale Fokker EIII monoplane which flew very

well provided the all moving tail surfaces were precisely set each flight (which I always forgot to do). Not learning from the tricky all moving tail scenario I then built a 1/8 scale Morane type N, which also flys very convincingly and has won many competitions

to date. All moving small tails are sensitive;

I use a card jig to check & set the surfaces

before (nearly!) every flight. The wings are on wire dowels which flex a little giving a tiny amount of dihedral. The only good thing

going for these two subjects is a short nose, which gives very good stall recovery when properly trimmed (a forward C of G, 20-25% helps also). The down side is that to achieve this, they both have nearly 4 ounces of church roof in the nose and spinner! Their flying weight is 12

– 14 ounces, by no means

light. Being early aircraft they have simple structures which are easily reproduced and d so can be built very accurately and nd

efficiently (minimum amount of wood). The static scores are thus very good; it is easy to put all the scale detail on a large scale simple subject thus getting good scores. They also have bags of character. (My building techniques will be detailed in other articles.) What I hope I have demonstrated with these two successful designs, is that you can build just about any aircraft you like, but you must have the will and be prepared to break them in competition if you want to win a place. There are many better subjects, that would fly better, hold their trim better and be simpler to build to a higher standard,

but nobody has built suitably big models to challenge my subjects’ vulnerabilities. For

example a big Piper Cub would stuff them on the flying and static, especially the flying in British summer conditions (normally dreadful). This year I built a twice size Veron Fokker D8 to enter into the BMFA kit scale event at the Free Flight Nationals. The only modification made to the basic design was correcting the outline, putting scale size wheels on and taking the dihedral off and giving it the correct wing section. The

li
li

end end r result is a very practical model, no no effort was made to build a light model, the wood is hard

timber and even the fuselage

is silk on tissue covered (like

a diesel model) to prevent

damage to the hand painted lozenges (I was bored so

p painted them all). It turned out

at at 37 inches span and 12 ounces

weight, weig so goes like a rocket with

a a good good rate of climb; it has proved

itself nearly bomb proof so far and is good fun to fly. So a good start, if you fancy a big scale rubber model, would be to enlarge one of the Veron or Keil Kraft designs, correct the outline shapes, beef up the structure and have some fun. I will detail the Fokker D8 in another article to help you on your way. I have already doubled the Veron Camel plan and intend to build that also. I hope I may have got you interested in larger outdoor rubber scale models, since they are very good fun to fly and look very impressive in the air.

Morane and Fokker nose to nose, both have the same power and weight, the Fokker has greater duration, but does not win on looks.

Fokker nose to nose, both have the same power and weight, the Fokker has greater duration,
Fokker nose to nose, both have the same power and weight, the Fokker has greater duration,
Engine Sales
Engine Sales

Gilding’s Model Aero Engines Auction

8th November 2014

Andrew Boddington visits the annual auction and fails to keep his wallet in his pocket!

ove e Four Aces radial engine from 1966. A Four Aces radial en gine from
ove
e
Four Aces radial engine from 1966. A
Four Aces radial en gine from 1966. A
rare rare unit unit built built aroun around d four four Cox Cox Medallion Medallion
engines engines geared geared tog together. ether. £170 £170

T T he annual Gilding’s engine

auction in Market Harborough

is a magnet for aeromodellers

who like the smell of diesel,

the crackle of a sparkie or the

forward, and this is often the reflection of a lifetime’s passion for collecting and using by individual enthusiasts.

Something for Everybody

This year I would characterise the selection of engines as a good, diverse mix. In comparison with the last sale there were fewer large- capacity multi-cylinder handmade engines, but many more small engines, including

least a handful of lots to attract your bidding. As we have yet to see an Aeromodelling Museum in the UK (we await the BMFA’s deliberations with interest), coming to Gilding’s is one of the best ways of seeing the history of the model IC aero engine brought together in one place for a short time. My general observations of the day were that quality and scarcity will still attract the best price. This is most easily seen in the spark ignition petrol engines, where rare vintage British engines in good condition

purr of a glow engine – you will rarely find an electric motor here! At
purr of a glow engine – you will rarely find
an electric motor here! At this the 16th year
of the Aero Engine sale, we were treated to
over 600 auction lots, and this attracted 170
registered bidders. Each year’s sale has its
own character depending on the engines put
a
I
Will Gilding is the latest member of the Gilding fam-
ily to take the stand at the Aero Engines Auction.

good selection of diesels of under 0.5cc. Whatever your particular engine interest

think you would probably have found at

can fetch over £200, while poor tired engines with broken lugs will only fetch £10s. Good condition volume Sparkies, such as those

fetch £10s. Good condition volume Sparkies, such as those Original Stentor 6, series 2 Spark ignition

Original Stentor 6, series 2 Spark ignition engine nicely (but not overly) refurbished in a reproduction box. £130

produced by O&R (Ohlsson & Rice) of the USA, can be had for £40 or £50, which to my mind represents excellent value. I hope we will see more people flying these lovely characterful petrol engines in 2015. All prices quoted in this article are the

50 AeroModeller - January 2015
50 AeroModeller - January 2015
Plenty of interesting engines available, even at the end of the sale. A good selection

Plenty of interesting engines available, even at the end of the sale.

interesting engines available, even at the end of the sale. A good selection of diesels illustrates

A good selection of diesels illustrates the mix to be seen on the day.

hammer price observed by me at the sale. The actual price paid by the buyer needs an additional 18% adding for buyer’s premium (including VAT). The full list of prices obtained is available from the Results page of the Gilding’s website at www.gildings.co.uk The accompanying photos pick-out some of the most interesting lots.

Not just Aero Model Engines

There were a higher proportion of marine/ water-cooled engines this year. Typically they fetch slightly less than their air-cooled relations (where they exist), but bidding was still good. There were various ED marine engines (Hunter, Comp Special, Otter and Viking) that went for under £100. I wonder how many of these will stay as they are, or will be stripped down to provide spares for the aero version? An Oliver Tiger Major 3.5cc marine diesel went for £260. Of the seven Taplin Twin diesels in the auction (both 8cc and 15cc variants), five were marine, one

auction (both 8cc and 15cc variants), five were marine, one The engine specialists enjoy what they

The engine specialists enjoy what they do! Left Toby Collis, and right Dick Roberts work with the Gildings staff to make sure the engines are cor- rectly described and displayed.

was an air-cooled original at £310, and one was a near new 15cc Arne Hende air-cooled replica which reached the highest price of the Taplin Twins at £350. There was also a new in box Taplin Baker Hydro-Jet which achieved well

also a new in box Taplin Baker Hydro-Jet which achieved well over its estimate at £150.

over its estimate at £150. Other marine twins included the small production run Westbury Seagull 10cc in-line twin - displayed on a wooden base it made £440.

The JPS Airstar 2.15cc. This very rare diesel has the com- pression altered via an eccentric crankshaft housing. Keen bidding saw this make £290.

Selling by Auction

There are various reasons for preferring buying and selling engines at a ‘real’ auction compared with the online alternative. For families wanting to sell the engines of a deceased aeromodeller, it is an easier option to let Gilding’s do all the hard work of cataloguing, marketing and selling the engines. Yes, there is a price to pay (seller’s premium) for this service, but anyone who has managed multiple listings on eBay will know how time consuming this can be – particularly the final packing and posting. As a buyer it is definitely preferable to see the engine close up before deciding to buy, and this you can only do at an auction house. There are also plenty of knowledgeable people around on both the viewing and sales day if you are unsure about a particular engine’s pedigree or provenance. Chief among those people are Dick Roberts and Toby Collis who spend many hours before hand cataloguing items, and then are active on the day preparing and displaying the lots being bid on. I know many people would like their hard work acknowledged, and one day Toby may even win an engine he bids on! More than all this, an auction such as Gilding’s is a great day out! Certainly this sale is a fitting end to the year when most of the outdoor flying season has finished; the chance to catch up with many old friends. I’m pleased to say that Gilding’s had increased the number of seats this year, so more of us could sit down during what is around a 7 hour day. And as for me? I was both a seller and buyer! I could not resist buying a few diesels

in various sizes up to 3.2cc. My smallest was a Schlosser 0.25cc which had been used and was seized solid. I’ve been following Maris Dislers article in AeroModeller 928 for freeing up old engines, but have yet to get to the point of running it. Fingers crossed it will be OK, but I knew what I was bidding on! Soon afterwards, Nigel Monk contacted me about the Gilding’s Auction. I thank him for letting me publish some of his thoughts here. ‘This was my first Gilding’s engine auction. I counted around 100 seats and there were ten or

auction. I counted around 100 seats and there were ten or This Frog 100 Mk1 ‘Stovepipe’

This Frog 100 Mk1 ‘Stovepipe’ diesel was complete with original Frog prop (aerodynamically little better than a stick of rock!) and box. It made £160.

Engine Sales
Engine Sales
Engine Sales The Schlosser 0.5cc was new in box and went for £200. It is ballraced
Engine Sales The Schlosser 0.5cc was new in box and went for £200. It is ballraced
The Schlosser 0.5cc was new in box and went for £200. It is ballraced and
The Schlosser 0.5cc was
new in box and went for
£200. It is ballraced and
has an exhaust collector
so would probably make
very little noise if it is
ever run.
The Aerol Gremlin
2cc diesel was the
forerunner to the
Elfin series of en-
gines. Made £120.
MEC 1.2cc diesel – a short production
run diesel which is rarely seen. £150
a short production run diesel which is rarely seen. £150 One of the many replicas of
a short production run diesel which is rarely seen. £150 One of the many replicas of
a short production run diesel which is rarely seen. £150 One of the many replicas of

One of the many replicas of the Dyno. This one by Pfeffer and at a reduced capacity of 0.6cc. £80

A collection of small diesels at the beginning of the auction were a temptation to your editor!

beginning of the auction were a temptation to your editor! Plenty of Spark Ignition Petrol engines.

Plenty of Spark Ignition Petrol engines. The more common engines such as O&R can be found at a reasonable price – why not give a Sparkies a go in 2015?

twenty standing behind the filled rows. One chap I sat next to was telling me which of the well known collectors were in the room, and those who were absent. I didn’t get his name but I hope I persuaded him to try a copy of the new AeroModeller and he is reading this - I enjoyed our chat thanks. I believe each year has had its own flavour and perhaps it has evolved away from the rarer items towards featuring more workaday engines. Andrew stated last year that the 2013 sale featured just two Mills

collectors. Genuine and copies - working engines - fetched similar prices to other sources, when you add in buyer’s premium and VAT. We should be most grateful to Dick Roberts and Toby Collis who organised the whole thing. I know Dick won a nice Wankel for himself and I feel slightly ashamed to have bid against him and won a Holland Hornet; I promise I will let him have first refusal if I ever need to sell. Personally, I won 35 small diesel engines in 16 lots for just under £800 including buyer’s premium and VAT. (I’m fairly certain Mrs M. will never read this, dear.) Some are for spares only, others were in

read this, dear.) Some are for spares only, others were in Toby Collis holds up the

Toby Collis holds up the immaculate Bugle Mk1 2.5cc diesel complete with multi-function valve and wooden box. This went for £650. I wonder whether it will ever thrill again to the smell of diesel fuel?

BMP 3.5cc was in very good condition. The mounting lugs/ strengthening web are instantly recognisable with the trade- mark lightening holes. £180

this year there were at least 64, including all versions, variants,

lots with engines I wanted; the unwanted will go on eBay to defray costs. You can judge for yourselves whether the prices realised represent bargains or madness from the Gilding’s website. One or two lots fell into either

would wipe out any chance of coming out ahead. To me at least, other bidders hadn’t checked as closely as I had since values were no lower that I could tell. So how does it compare to buying from eBay?

conditions, replicas and sizes.

camp but most were fairly predictable. Highlights of the day undoubtedly included the Siedel 14

Would it be easier and less risky to pay the higher prices on eBay for good examples of the engines

A

good number

cylinder two row radial at £4700 inclusive, sold to a

you want, from the comfort of your den, with the

of

‘Banks’ and

telephone bidder.

protection of online buying, and save the time and

other miniatures fetched excellent values from the

I made time to visit on the preview day specifically to check big end wear on engines of interest, to avoid those lots because replacing them is such a pain and

effort visiting the auction (twice)? Probably - you can buy my spares if you like. Would it be as much fun? No chance!! See you next year? I’ll be there.’

Traditional Kit Manufacturer PP P ossibly the best-kept secret of the free-flight world is U-build
Traditional Kit Manufacturer
Traditional Kit Manufacturer
PP P ossibly the best-kept secret of the free-flight world is U-build Models with its
PP
P ossibly the best-kept secret of
the free-flight world is U-build
Models with its ‘golden age’ range
of traditional balsa print-wood
kit favourites like the Beech
traditional balsa print-wood kit favourites like the Beech U-Build Models are GO!! New rubber and glider

U-Build Models are GO!!

New rubber and glider designs are still kitted by this UK manufacturer.

Alan Kirtley of U-Build Models regularly has a stand at Old Warden model events. Seen
Alan Kirtley of U-Build
Models regularly has a stand at Old Warden model events.
Seen here with
the uncovered Rescue 2.
Computer Aided Design (CAD). In plan view (as seen from above), the line of the
Computer Aided Design (CAD). In plan
view (as seen from above), the line of the
wing main-spar is a convenient boundary
where the aircraft is literally shortened by a
fifth behind the wing main-spar using the
CAD scaling command, and conversely,
the remaining craft ahead of the main-
spar is lengthened by a fifth. This radically
re-proportions the craft but still maintains
its fairline characteristics, and with very
little additional weight the craft may be
balanced for flight. Other tricks also come
into play such as increasing the wing-chord
while reducing its span. Alan refers to this
re-proportioning as ‘impressionist scale’.
This then gives the outline profile of the
model; the structural development and
component layout of the ‘silk-screen’ for
printing the sheet balsa follows using CAD.
Each kit employs the same well-considered
construction technique, where the fuselage is
‘laid to plan’ as two separate half structures
for accuracy, and then brought together
as one.
Technical readers will no-doubt have a few
questions about how the rubber-powered
helicopters work. The twin-rotor Belvedere
arose from a challenge to produce a rubber-
powered Chinook type helicopter. The
rotors of the real Chinook rotate in opposite
directions so that the torque-reaction
generated by the spinning rotors is cancelled-
out. Well, the model’s rotors are driven by
flexible piano-wire through curved-upward

nylon tubes from a central multi-strand rubber motor, but both rotate in the same direction. So the problem still remains - how to eliminate the torque reaction from the rotors? After testing it was found that with eleven degrees ‘included-angle’ between the rotational axis of the rotors, the partial sideways thrust from the rotors then eliminated their own torque reaction. Alan says of his Belvedere design, that this is THE most complex of the rubber-powered free-flight kits and should be considered as a constructional indulgence. The single-rotor Robinson R22 helicopter, unlike the Belvedere, is probably the simplest of all the rubber-powered kits in the range. It has no tail-rotor to eliminate that evil torque reaction, but a transparent acetate disc which looks like a rotating tail-rotor is actually a rudder and compensates for the torque. But, what prevents the helicopter from being rolled over by the off-centre lift generated on the advancing side of the rotor? Answer; a ‘balance wand’ projecting diagonally forward and to one side from the helicopter nose. This year has seen the aerodynamic development and release of the lifting body model ‘Rescue 2’, loosely based on the Thunderbirds 2 aircraft, and testing continues on a new kit for 2015, the NASA Space Shuttle. For more information take a look at the website www.u-buildmodels.com or write for a free brochure to U-Build Models, 4 Vale Cottages. HP4 1RG.

53

P

Musketeer, Cessna, Beagle Pup and other

Musketeer,Musketeer,

character-worthy light aircraft. Technically

character-wcharacter-w

unique is the rubber-powered twin-rotor

uniqueunique isis thth

Belvedere and single-rotor Robinson R22

BelvedereBelvedere aa

helicopters, not to mention the genuine skirt-

helicopters,helicopters,

inflating rubber-powered Skimaire hovercraft.

inflinflatingating rubrub

Two nice gliders are also available, the Czech Blanik and the American gull-winged RS1 Zanonia.
Two nice gliders are also available, the Czech
Blanik and the American gull-winged RS1
Zanonia. All are available by mail order. The
real big kit is the Lockheed Super-Electra,
which comes as a double-box kit, including
three A1 sized build-plan sheets to really
focus one’s mind. This twin-engine beauty is
provided as rubber-powered, but cries-out for
mini-electric conversion; either FF or RC.
Alan Kirtley is the kit designer and
proprietor of U-Build Models, but before it
came into existence he was a flying instructor
for the ‘Faulkes Flying Foundation’, a youth
flying charity. This charity would train
youngsters from the age of eleven to fly in
full-size gliders as a flight experience for
school and scout groups, but also provided
residential courses leading to a ‘solo’ if
training continued with an established
Gliding Club. A requirement for students
to develop a wider understanding of aircraft
structures, stresses, and forces, the obvious
learning medium was to build a balsa-wood
model. Alan tried to purchase balsa kits from
various sources, but even when available, kits
were not meeting his educational and flying
requirements. Then the penny dropped!
‘I’m a designer, a pilot, an engineer; why
not produce my own?’ A balsa kit called
the Kestrel was put into production by
Alan, consisting of only eight ribs and with
a
sheeted fuselage. It was simple to build,
strong, light, and flew well. The flying
charity no longer exists but the Kestrel model
was the spark which gave rise to the later
sophisticated kits of U-Build Models.
When Alan designs for U-Build Models,
he is mindful of an article many years ago
in AeroModeller magazine. The write-up
covered a fun-flying day where a rubber-
powered Messerschmitt 109 with scale
proportions required so much nose weight
slapped on to balance it, that it was then
too heavy to fly well. Alan adopts a standard
design policy for successful flight geometry
of his rubber-powered free-flight kit models.
Firstly a ‘no fuss’ monoplane aircraft type
is
selected for its character interest, and its
outline profile is digitally drawn out using
Free Flight Suppliers
Free Flight Suppliers

Where can I buy

Mike Evatt turns the spotlight on shopping for FF compet

T T hese days it is not just a case of going into your local model shop and expecting to buy free flight models over the counter. Although a number of free flight

sport, scale and vintage model kits may be

found there it is difficult to find ‘state of the

art’ competition models whether they are RTF, kits or plans. The abandonment of the ‘builder of the model’ rule both domestically and internationally, together with the internet, have changed the way we can obtain our models and components and indeed what we can obtain. Life also has become busier and if one wants to keep flying then “buy and fly” can be the only viable option. It should be remembered that, generally speaking, the suppliers will be keen aeromodellers as well as excellent flyers. For this article we’ll focus on suppliers who maintain websites, but remember many smaller niche suppliers do not, and only operate by email and perhaps telephone.

UK Based Supplier

One of the most comprehensive suppliers in the UK for the construction basics of free flight model aircraft is Free Flight Supplies at

www.freeflightsupplies.co.uk . This enterprise is run by Mike Woodhouse and is usually my first port of call when needing those hard to find bits and pieces. As Mike says on his web pages, you will find a wealth of materials, equipment, tools, plans and ideas that will help you in your journey through the world of free flight. There are a couple of dozen categories and it would take far too long to even scratch the surface of his stock. I leave it to you to delve deeper and so I will just concentrate on Lightweight Covering and High Tech Materials. Lightweight Covering encompasses: Esaki tissue and silk, Modelspan tissue, condenser tissue, polyester tissue (Polyspan in the USA), Mylar covering material/foil in clear and aluminised from 1 micron to 15 micron thickness, Solarfilm Products (Airspan and Lightspan), as well as OS Film just 0.5 microns thick for covering indoor models. The list of High Tech Material is even more impressive. Not only does he stock basic materials such as Carbon, Glass and Kevlar cloth in various weights but also unidirectional carbon sheet in various thickness for cap strips and trailing edges. There is also ready cut trailing edge stock and various motor tubes and rear booms for most models you could imagine.

International RTF Winners

In terms of buying a finished RTF model, the pre-eminent supplier website has to be that of the Andriukov/Kulakovsky F1B Rubber fame. Between them they have probably won more international competitions than anyone else. Whether it be RTF F1B models in various spans and with Electronic/Mechanical Timers, propeller assemblies or a kit of parts this is the shop for it! www.andriukov.com is the URL. Not only do they sell their products but they fly them and win! Their latest Simplicity 3 electronic timer is very special. They also have some excellent graphics on their website covering the basic adjustments of their aircraft. This is of course the safe starting point but much has to be done on top to achieve seven minutes in a flyoff! Their products are not cheap but they are top class. Many of us have found these models beautifully built and exciting to fly. If you are even vaguely interested in F1C I/C Power, then you must visit Artem Babenko’s website at artembabenko.com . This site typifies the top end of F1C equipment. Not only are folders shown but also the Fora range of geared and non-geared engines together with electronic timer options. These models and engines are not for the faint-

together with electronic timer options. These models and engines are not for the faint- 54 AeroModeller
together with electronic timer options. These models and engines are not for the faint- 54 AeroModeller
together with electronic timer options. These models and engines are not for the faint- 54 AeroModeller
54 AeroModeller - January 2015
54 AeroModeller - January 2015
y one of those? ition models and components. hearted. Talk to current F1C flyers and
y one of those? ition models and components. hearted. Talk to current F1C flyers and

y one of those?

ition models and components.

hearted. Talk to current F1C flyers and watch them in action before jumping in!

Electric Duration

If Electric Power is your bag then you may be interested in E-36 offerings. E-36 is an exciting class to fly even if you don’t fly serious competitions. The model that is making the headlines is Super Pearl by Don DeLoach. If you visit the ‘Pearl’website at www. pearlfreeflight.com you will quickly realise that the Super Pearl E-36 is just the latest design of a classic series. The brainchild of free flight designer/competitor Bill J. Chenault of Dallas, Texas, the Pearl series began in 1971 with the famous Mini Pearl 1/2A for Cox Tee Dee .049/.051. The design requirements were simple: Chenault wanted a model that was as easy to build as it was to trim and fly, with a minimum of complications. The rest is history! The one thing that is needed when flying free flight duration is a reliable timer whether it is for determining the motor run or the length of the dethermaliser actuation. There are many different types for different classes but it is well worth looking at Texas Timers at www.texastimers.com The Texas Timers eMAX is a game-changing timer for Electric FF. It is ultra-light and slim, run and DT times

are easily adjusted in the field, and it accepts the popular Ken Bauer radio DT as an option. eMAX is certainly the best, most feature-laden timer currently on the market for E-36. Most of their range are mechanical devices and are ultra-reliable and robust.

Glider Supplies

W-Hobby at w-hobby.com has quite a range of F1A gliders on offer from the standard classic version through LDA equipped models to state of the art flappers. It is fair to say that LDA (Low Drag Airfoil) models are pretty much mainstream today. What used to be just a fly-off glider is now becoming a regular rounds model and so has to be able to fly in any conditions including low/high wind and high turbulence. The traditional long LDA variant is extremely difficult to control in mid-day turbulent air and many flyers still prefer to use conventional models without being able to take advantage of extra launch height that LDA would offer. The new trend however is to build and fly shorter LDA models with hybrid airfoil and now W-Hobby has one in their range. The F1A Superba Electronic Flapper has Makarov-type wings and airfoil and is built using the latest technology. All carbon parts

are manufactured using the highest quality heat-curing epoxy resin for extraordinary strength and dimensional stability. Plastic hinges are used to attach the wing flaps to the main panel and remain operational even under high load during acceleration. The Flapper fuselage is based on standard W-Hobby electronic fuselage with specially designed advanced wing control device.

Not forgetting Tan Super Sport rubber…

It would be remiss of me if in this initial trawl of major suppliers I missed out FAI Supplies. This company has done more than most to keep rubber powered models flying. The ownership of the company has changed over the years from Ed Dolby to John Clapp and now Charlie Jones. This is the home of Tan Super Sport contest grade rubber! These days there is no other manufacturer, and year on year their product appears to get more consistent in its performance, at least according to my test results. www.faimodelsupply.com is the URL of their operation where you will find many other delights including some interesting vintage kits.

55
55
is the URL of their operation where you will find many other delights including some interesting
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HINTS
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&& HINTS TIPS GADGET REVIEW Many of you have asked about re- introducing the reader generated

GADGET REVIEW

&& HINTS TIPS GADGET REVIEW Many of you have asked about re- introducing the reader generated
&& HINTS TIPS GADGET REVIEW Many of you have asked about re- introducing the reader generated
Many of you have asked about re- introducing the reader generated pages of Gadget Review
Many of you have asked about re-
introducing the reader generated pages
of Gadget Review in AeroModeller – so
we’ll give it a go on an occasional
If
you’ve have a technique or device that t t
you have tried (no theoreticals please!),
send it in to editor@aeromodeller.com for rr
consideration and the ‘glory’ of seeing
your name in AeroModeller. Please
include high quality digital photos and/or
or
or
a very clear drawing to illustrate.
Battery powered IC Engine?! A
small fuel tank for RC or CL, by
Allan Voyce
Shown is the fuel tank I made for a Sharkface.
As you can see, the tank started life as a 9V
battery case, and is quick & easy to make for .5 55
to .75cc engines. The fuel pipe is on the side, as s s
there wasn't enough room to have the pipe at
the front without kinking the fuel line. I made
my first tank like this in 1969 for a free-flight
Frog 45, and have made variations for control
line too.
use a stainless steel case, which
can't be soldered. Make sure
the battery hasn't leaked, if
stay in position when soldering
(or use one of those extra hand
stands with the crocodile clips).
it has, it should be discarded.
Any 9V battery with a steel metal case can
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atteryatteryattery www ttt
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