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2015

EMH419
HSIE CURRICULUM STUDIES: SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT
CRAIG EDWARDS 11168546

Craig Edwards 11168546 EMH419:

Community and Remembrance | Stage 2 | History


(NSW Government, 2013)
Summary Rationale

Duration

Community and Remembrance will be a study of identity


9 weeks 4 days(Term 3 2015)
and diversity in the local area. Students will explore the
heritage, historical features and diversity of Tumbarumba
area. Students will examine local symbols and emblems of
significance, and celebrations and commemorations.
Outcomes

Key Inquiry Questions

History K-10

HT2-1 identifies celebrations and commemorations of

significance in Australia and the world

HT2-2 describes and explains how significant


individuals, groups and events contributed to changes in
the local community over time

HT2-3 describes people, events and actions related to


world exploration and its effects

HT2-5 applies skills of historical inquiry and


communication
English K-10

EN2-1A communicates in a range of informal and


formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group,
classroom, school and community contexts

Historical Skills And Concepts

Who lived here first and how do we know?


How has Tumbarumba local community
changed? What features have been lost and
what features have been retained?
What is the nature of the contribution made by
different groups and individuals in the
community?

The following historical skills are


integrated into the lesson
sequences:
Comprehension: chronology,
terms and concepts
respond, read and write, to show
understanding of historical
matters
sequence familiar people and
events
use historical terms
Analysis and use of sources
locate relevant information from
sources provided
Perspectives and interpretations
identify different points of view
within an historical context
Empathetic understanding

Craig Edwards 11168546 EMH419:

EN2-3A uses effective handwriting and publishes texts


using digital technologies

EN2-10C thinks imaginatively, creatively and


interpretively about information, ideas and texts when
responding to and composing texts

explain how and why people in


the past may have lived and
behaved differently from today
Research
pose a range of questions about
the past
plan an historical inquiry
Explanation and communication
develop texts, particularly
narratives
use a range of communication
forms (oral, graphic, written) and
digital technologies
The following historical concepts
are integrated into the lesson
sequences:
Continuity and change: aspects in
New South Wales/local area that
have changed over time or
remained the same
Cause and effect: causes of
change in the local community
Perspectives: different ways that
Aboriginal peoples and first
settlers viewed the local region
Empathetic understanding:
developing an understanding of
the importance of the relationship
between Aboriginal peoples and
the land

Significance: the
importance/significance of
national holidays

Content

Teaching, learning and assessment

Resources

Stage 2 - Community and Remembrance


Using an Aboriginal language map and wall chart,
The importance of Country and Place to
students individually locate the local area on the
Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander
map and identify the local language group.
peoples who belong to a local area. (Wolgal
People.) (ACHHK060)
Adjustments:
Students may work in pairs if required

Explain to students that over many thousands of


years of careful observation, Aboriginal peoples
acquired an intimate knowledge of the physical
features of the land, animals, plants, weather and
people and their interconnections. They managed
the land/environment according to ancient laws and
customs that are often recorded in Dreaming
stories. These stories describe ways of caring for the
land as well as changes to the continent over time.

Adjustments:
Depth and complexity of content and terminology
should be altered to suit students
After reading several Dreaming stories including:
- Dreaming Story - Bilargun and Daroo 'The
Platypus story'
- Dreaming Story - Kandarik The Kangaroo Man
- Dreaming Story - The Rainbow Serpent
Discussing what messages are contained in the story
and what lessons are being taught.

Adjustments:
May be done as whole class or groups

Appendix Six
Aboriginal Languages Map (ABC website
http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/
Museum of New South Australia
http://australianmuseum.net.au/sectionIndigenous-Australia (Australian Museum,
2013)
Local Indigenous Elder
Dreaming Story - Bilargun and Daroo 'The
Platypus story'
Dreaming Story - Kandarik The Kangaroo
Man
Dreaming Story - The Rainbow Serpent
Aboriginal Languages Wall chart
(http://www.ourlanguages.net.au/)
(Australian Government, 2011) (Horton,
1996)
Selection of Dreaming stories
Aboriginal Artefacts
PowerPoint
Summary Chart
Book Tumbarumba by Ron and Catherine
Frew (Frew & Frew, 2009)
NAIDOC Week (7-14 July)
http://www.naidoc.org.au/ (Australian
Government, 2013)
Spiderscribe Brainstorm Website www.
spiderScribe.net
Username
craig.edwards21@det.nsw.edu.au
Password 12345mod (Edwards, 2013)
Timeline

Investigate native food sources in the Tumbarumba


area that would have been eaten by Wolgal and
Wiradjuri people. An Aboriginal guest speaker to
visit the school during NAIDOC Week. Pose the
question: What evidence is there of Aboriginal life in
the local area? Students to brainstorm questions
they may wish to ask about local Aboriginal history
using Spider Scribe.

Assessment activity 1
Students will construct a summary chart using ICT
(Power Point) to record information about aspects of
life of Wolgal or Wiradjuri people, what was used
from the local environment, and what evidence there
is to tell us about this.
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups
Assistance with ICT skills
May be required to research info or the info may be
given to them.

Stage 2 - Community and Remembrance


ONE important example of change and ONE
important example of continuity over time
in the local community, region or
state/territory (ACHHK061)
Respond to and compose texts

KWL chart
Excursion to the Tumbarumba Museum
located at the Tumbarumba Information
Centre, with talk conducted by Tumbarumba
Historical Society.
10 Bridge Street, Tumbarumba, NSW 2653
Adjustments:
Phone: 02 6948 3333
create literary texts that explore
Students may need prompting
Colonial Artifacts:
students' own experiences and
Book Tumbarumba by Ron and Catherine
imagining (ACELT1607)
Using a selection of old photographs of the area, ask Frew (Frew & Frew, 2009)
use visual representations, including
students to identify buildings, structures such as
Book Southern Voices by Robert Engwerda
those digitally produced, to represent
roads and bridges, monuments, etc. What has
(Engwerda, 1994)
ideas, experience and information for
changed and what has remained the same?
Book Australia and Immigration 1788 to
different purposes and audiences
Adjustments:
1988 by Department of Immigration, Local
respond to a range of texts, e.g.
Students may work in groups or whole class
Government and Ethnic Affairs (Armit,
through role-play or drama, for
Photos to be blown up to A3 size to make easy to view Larkins, Godfrey, & Benjamin, 1988)
pleasure and enjoyment, and express Sources to be used to investigate change and
Book Historic Kiandra by Comma-Monaro
thoughtful conclusions about those
continuity newspapers, maps, letters, diaries from
Historical Society (Cooma-Monaro Historical
texts
Tumbarumba Library
Society, 1959)
justify interpretations of a text,
Group students for a research activity. Topic choices
Tumbarumba Town Library
including responses to characters,
public buildings, roads and bridges, transport, daily
Prince Street, Tumbarumba, NSW 2653
information and ideas, e.g. 'The main
life, timber industry, mining industry, farming.
Phone: 02 6948 2725
character is selfish because '
Students must decide whether the aspect of local
School Cameras
make connections between the ways
history being researched has changed or remained Tumbarumba Times Newspaper
different authors may represent
the same and try to explain why. Discuss with the
50 The Parade, Tumbarumba, NSW 2653
similar storylines, ideas and
students which buildings and structures have
Phone: 02 6948 2663
relationships (ACELT1594, ACELT1602)
remained because they have been regarded as
Radio Upper Murray
important or useful and why others have not
Phone: 02 6948 2878
survived or have changed because their purpose
Timeline
has changed, they were not in good repair, or
other uses for the site arose. Refer to old photos of
buildings.

Using a Know, Want to know, what I Learned (KWL)


chart, recall what was learnt about the local area in
and what they know about the local area and
identify things students would like to know about
changes and continuities in their local area.

Students to present their findings about the aspect


of local history that has either changed or
remained the same under the heading Change
and Continuity.
Adjustments:
Students social skills and academic skills should be
considered when grouping the students
Assessment activity 2
Students are to complete the remainder of their KWL
charts. The teacher is to assess their understanding
of changes and continuities in Tumbarumba area.
Take students on the Heritage Walk along the
Tumbarumba Creek History Trail on the way to
Tumbarumba Museum. Students to take photos of
historical objects along the path. Question the
students - What do they tell us of earlier history?
Do the names of streets and parks provide clues to
earlier history? Are they named after earlier
citizens and settlers, or an historical event?
Compose an online book of the photographs or
sketches annotated by students.
Visit Tumbarumba Museum, where students
examine local artifacts and attempt to answer the
questions What am I?, What was I used for?,
How did I survive?, What stories could I tell?
Assisted by the Tumbarumba Historical Society.
Students to make a class display of artifacts, e.g.
early farming/mining tools, convict-made items,
and discuss how objects from the past tell a story.
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups

Stage 2 - Community and Remembrance


The role that people of diverse
backgrounds have played in the
development and character of the local
community (ACHHK062)
Respond to and compose texts

Brainstorm the number of different cultural groups


in the local area, beginning with family backgrounds
of students.

Adjustments:
May be done whole class or in groups

create literary texts that explore


students' own experiences and
imagining (ACELT1607)

use visual representations, including


those digitally produced, to represent
ideas, experience and information for
different purposes and audiences
respond to a range of texts, e.g.
through role-play or drama, for
pleasure and enjoyment, and express
thoughtful conclusions about those
texts
justify interpretations of a text,
including responses to characters,
information and ideas, e.g. 'The main
character is selfish because '
make connections between the ways
different authors may represent similar
storylines, ideas and relationships
(ACELT1594, ACELT1602)

Using a range of sources, e.g. photographs,


newspapers, diaries, letters, books, statues.
Students to focus on a local identify and outline their
contribution to the local community.
Students to display their findings in the form of a
foldable (Holland & Krumm, 2012)

Students to choose from


Murray Jack the last leader of Wolgal people
Peggy Margret Goldspink
Thomas Hodges Mate
Dr John Verschuer
David Maginnity
Matthew Bradley

Using a range of sources students to develop


knowledge about Gold Rush in Australia and its
impact on local area around Tumbarumba.
Students to create a mind map exploring various
gold rushes.
Students will learn about life in Tumbarumba
during colonial Australia from a range of texts and
imagery.

Foldable template (Holland & Krumm, 2012)


Book Tumbarumba by Ron and Catherine
Frew (Frew & Frew, 2009)
Smart board
Historical Photos
Journal-Writing Strategy template (Brummer
& Clark, 2012)

Students will explore the diverse background, life


of Chinese who lived in the local area during
colonial period.
Students will write a report on the journey to and
life on the Gold Fields at one of the gold mining
sites around Tumbarumba. Students will use
image stimulus to help brainstorm ideas.

Adjustment:
Students may need assistance with modelling
sentences
Assessment activity 3
Students are to write a journal article about their local
identity for the local newspaper, Tumbarumba Times,
and prepare an oral report for the local radio station,
Radio Upper Murray.
Adjustments:
Students are to be given Journal-Writing Strategy
template
May be done in pairs
Assistance with literacy skills if required

Stage 2 - Community and Remembrance


Days and weeks celebrated or
commemorated in Australia (including
Australia Day, ANZAC Day, Harmony Week,
National Reconciliation Week, NAIDOC
Week, National Sorry Day) and the
importance of symbols and emblems
(ACHHK063)

Students are to identify and describe local, state and


national symbols and discuss the origins, symbolism
and significance, e.g. the school logo, Australian and
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags, coats of
arms from states and Australia

Adjustments:
May be done as whole class or groups
Students are to identify important Australian
celebrations and commemorations and discuss their
origins and significance in society
Adjustments:
May be done as whole class
Assessment activity 4
Students will construct a presentation using ICT
(Power Point) to record information about a
celebrated or commemorated day in Tumbarumba
and how it compares to the past.
Tumbafest
ANZAC Day
Tumbarumba Show
Harmony Week
National Sorry Day
Australia Day
National Reconciliation Week
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups
Assistance with ICT skills
May be required to research info or the info may be
given to them.

Internet
Book Tumbarumba by Ron and Catherine
Frew (Frew & Frew, 2009)
Book Sons to the Empires Cause
Tumbarumba In World War I by Catherine
and Ron Frew (Frew & Frew, 1988)

Assessment overview

Evaluation

Ongoing assessment student understanding may be assessed through the use of observational

checklists, anecdotal records and analysis of contributions to class discussions.


Students produce a variety of work samples, including designated assessment activities. These should
be evaluated to determine students level of achievement and understanding.
Assessment activity 1
Students will construct a summary chart using ICT (Power Point) to record information about aspects of
life of Wolgal or Wiradjuri people, what was used from the local environment, and what evidence there
is to tell us about this.
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups
Assistance with ICT skills
May be required to research info or the info may be given to them.
Assessment activity 2
Students are to complete the remainder of their KWL charts. The teacher is to assess their
understanding of changes and continuities in Tumbarumba area.
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups
Assessment activity 3
Students are to write an article about their local identity for the local newspaper, Tumbarumba Times,
and prepare an oral report for the local radio station, Radio Upper Murray.
Adjustments:
Students are to be given Journal-Writing Strategy template
May be done in pairs
Assistance with literacy skills if required
Assessment activity 4
Students will construct a presentation using ICT (Power Point) to record information about a celebrated
or commemorated day in Tumbarumba and how it compares to the past.
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups
Assistance with ICT skills
May be required to research info or the info may be given to them.

How did the unit rate in these areas?


Time allocated for topic
Student understanding of content
Opportunities for student reflection on learning
Suitability of resources
Variety of teaching strategies
Integration of Quality Teaching strategies
Integration of ICTs
Literacy strategies used
Numeracy strategies used
SMART targets addressed
Continuum clusters addressed

Introduction and Learning Episode 1:


What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
By the end of the lesson students will be able to describe the event of the Gold Rush during colonial
Australia. Students will acknowledge significant people, places which assisted to develop an Australian
Identity.
Outcomes:
HT2-2 HT2-3 HT2-5 EN2-2A
Inquiry questions:
What impact has people had on the Tumbarumba local area??
Students research gold rushes in Australia, leading to the discovery gold in the local
area(Tumbarumba, Laurel Hill, Mannus, Kiandra)
Inquiry sequence:
As a class, create a mind map exploring what the students know about the gold rushes in Australia.
As students provide answers they are to write these on the SMART Board.
Adjustments:
- Depth of understanding shown from mind map may indicate that a discussion on gold rushes is
required
Strategies/Activities:
Class discuss what life might have been like for a young person living on the goldfields in
Tumbarumba.
Prompt students with the following questions:
What would it have been like to move so many times?
What kind of schooling would you have had?
Adjustments:
Students may require image stimulus (Appendix One)
Class discuss Discoveries of gold In Australia using the timeline from Time Toast.
Inform students that it is not a complete list and that they will add to the timeline as they discovery
more information.
1: Individually students are to undertake the following tasks using the computers:
Label a map of Australia with the placenames and dates of gold discoveries.
Make a list of the nationalities of the people who came to Australia in search of gold.
Find out how long the gold rushes lasted for. When was gold discovered in Tumbarumba and in
the local area?
Write a list of 20 key events in the discovery of gold in Australia including 6 local events.
2: Students may use the following websites to assist them in completing the task:
SBS, 'Gold!' www.sbs.com.au/gold
State Library of Victoria, 'Golden Victoria', http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/goldenvictoria
Adjustments:
Some students may be require assistance to complete activities
Activity 4 may be done in pairs as a whole class
If all tasks are finished students may complete the following activities
Gold Rush Interactive Game: http://www.nma.gov.au/interactives/tlf/gold_rush_56/index.html
Craig Edwards 11168546 EMH419:

Summative and/or formative assessment:


Questioning students will assess their prior knowledge
Class discussion will assess students understanding of the life of people in colonial days
These tasks will assess the students abilities to research and locate the required information.
Class discussion will aid in the assessment of what students have learnt. Collection and marking of
student worksheets will do this further.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Handouts, Computers, SMART board, pencils, Internet, Time toast website, map of Australia
(Appendix Two) http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/gold-discovery-in-australia--6

How did the unit each lesson in these


areas?
Time allocated for topic
Student understanding of content
Opportunities for student reflection on
learning
Suitability of resources
Variety of teaching strategies
Integration of Quality Teaching strategies
Integration of ICTs
Literacy strategies used
Numeracy strategies used
SMART targets addressed
Continuum clusters addressed

Learning Episode 2:
What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
By the end of the session, students will have a greater understanding about the impact of the Chinese
to the Gold Fields and understanding of 4 people who made an impact.
Outcomes:
HT2-2 HT2-5 DRAS2.1
Inquiry questions:
What was life like on the Gold Fields for non-Australians?
Inquiry sequence:
This session is about Gold Fields. Most importantly the Chinese on the Gold Fields.
Students watch Eggs for Tuppence Video to intro Chinese Racism.
http://www.myplace.edu.au/teaching_activities/1878__before_time/1858/2/eggs_for_tuppence.html
Strategies/Activities:
As a group read through the document titled The Chinese, sharing the reading around the room.
Adjustments:
Some students may be required to extra time and assistance with some words.
Students are asked to return to their desks complete questions 1-4 on the document titled The
Chinese. Students are encouraged to work in groups to obtain responses.
Adjustment:
If students complete quickly they are to move onto the four profiles.
Read through the four profiles as a group back on the floor at the front of the room on the floor.
Discuss the possible answer for question 5 as a group.
Have the students return to their desks to complete the page.
Students discuss in table groups different jobs they have today and what jobs they think they might
have done in early colonial days around Tumbarumba. Students to display information on a Venn
Diagram
Adjustment:
If students finish work students to move to the floor to watch the video early put on SMART board for
them to watch from the floor.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKjZKEXv7kE
(Hardy, 1984)
Summative and/or formative assessment:
Discuss the responses for the questions, have the students provide their response in a group
discussion. Question the about how the Chinese may have felt living in the Tumbarumba local area.
During the lesson check the students responses to questions, checking book work around the room,
depth of responses, questions by students
Resources to facilitate learning:
SMART Board, Eggs for Tuppence Video clip
http://www.myplace.edu.au/teaching_activities/1878__before_time/1858/2/eggs_for_tuppence.html (Australian Children's Television Foundation, 2013)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKjZKEXv7kE The Eureka Stockade
(Hardy, 1984)
Document titled The Chinese (Appendix Four) (RIC Publications, 2000)

Learning Episode 3:
What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
Having the students being able to draw upon previous knowledge and provided images to write a
narrative. Students will be able to use some effective planning strategies, Reads work during writing to
maintain sequence and check meaning, changing words and phrases or checking for errors, Uses present
tense in factual texts such as information reports and procedures Uses correct punctuation in published
version of own writing, eg capital letters, full stops, question marks and commas
Outcomes:
HT2-2, HT2-5, EN2-2A, EN2-3A, EN2-9B, EN2-10C, EN2-11D
Inquiry questions:
Inform the students that the following session will continue on the theme Life on the Gold Fields.
Inquiry sequence:
Questioning, Individual Work, Paired Work
Strategies/Activities:
Question the students on how to write a report
Adjustment:
Students may need prompting
Write the steps on the SMARTBoard on how to write a report
Inform the students that as a class we shall start a new piece of writing.
Section 1: Arrival at Melbourne Section 2: Journey to the Gold Fields - Tumbarumba
Section 3: Working the Gold Fields
Provide the students with the image stimulus by displaying on SMART Board (Appendix One) and
brainstorm ideas on how you would have felt arriving in Melbourne from another country. Focusing on
verbs, write several sentences.
Model sentences on the SMART Board with students input to start the report.
Students to copy from the board the modelled paragraph.
Students are to write the 2 more paragraphs for their report using the next set of stimulus images
using an array of verbs
Discuss the feelings they have for the people who worked travelled on the Gold Fields.
On completion students can have another finished student read and assess their writing.
Summative and/or formative assessment:
Questioning the students understanding of grammar.
By questioning the students will gain an understanding the concepts about the arrival, travelling in
rural Victoria/NSW and life and work on the Gold Fields in Tumbarumba Local Area.
Read students work samples to assess if students understand the concepts and correctly use each
verbs in a sentence.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Image handouts, SMART board, writing books, pens/pencil, Images (Appendix One)

Learning Episode 4:
What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
Students will learn that Indigenous Australians consisted of many nations which are greatly different
from the states and territories that exist today.
Outcomes:
HT2-2 HT2-5
Inquiry questions:
Aboriginal people have been living continuously in Australia for more than 50,000 years.
How do we know this?
Inquiry sequence:
Working in groups or pairs, students will investigate the nations of the Indigenous Australians. Students
will learn that in those different nations stories are told to pass down information about the land to each
generation.
Strategies/Activities:
Using an Aboriginal language map and wall chart, students individually locate the local area on the
map and identify the local language group.
Explain to students that over many thousands of years of careful observation, Aboriginal peoples
acquired an intimate knowledge of the physical features of the land, animals, plants, weather and
people and their interconnections. They managed the land/environment according to ancient laws and
customs that are often recorded in Dreaming stories. These stories describe ways of caring for the land
as well as changes to the continent over time.
Adjustments:
Depth and complexity of content and terminology should be altered to suit students
After reading several Dreaming stories including:
- Dreaming Story - Bilargun and Daroo 'The Platypus story'
- Dreaming Story - Kandarik The Kangaroo Man
- Dreaming Story - The Rainbow Serpent
Discussing what messages are contained in the story and what lessons are being taught.
Students to write the meaning of one of the three stories in their History book.
Adjustments:
May be done as whole class or groups
Summative and/or formative assessment:
Questioning students will assess their prior knowledge
Class discussion will assess students understanding of the Indigenous of people precolonial days.
Class discussion will aid in the assessment of what students have learnt. Collection and marking of
student worksheets will do this further.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Appendix Six, Dreaming Stories, History Workbooks, Aboriginal Languages Map (ABC website
http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/

Learning Episode 5:
What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
Students will gain an understanding of native food eaten, Empathetic understanding by developing and
understanding of another's views
Outcomes:
HT2-2, HT2-5
Inquiry questions:
What evidence is there of Aboriginal life in the local area?
Inquiry sequence:
Group Discussion, Paired or Individual Work
Strategies/Activities:
Investigate native food sources in the Tumbarumba area that would have been eaten by Wolgal and
Wiradjuri people. An Aboriginal guest speaker to visit the school during NAIDOC Week. Pose the
question: What evidence is there of Aboriginal life in the local area? Students to brainstorm questions
they may wish to ask about local Aboriginal history using Spider Scribe.
Summative and/or formative assessment:
Assessment activity
Students will construct a summary chart using ICT (Power Point) to record information about aspects
of life of Wolgal or Wiradjuri people, what was used from the local environment, and what evidence
there is to tell us about this. Students will be given opportunity to present to the class their findings.
Adjustments:
May be done individually or in groups
Assistance with ICT skills
May be required to research info or the info may be given to them.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Computers, SMART board, pencils, Internet, Spiderscribe, local Indigenous person

How did the unit each lesson in these


areas?
Time allocated for topic
Student understanding of content
Opportunities for student reflection on
learning
Suitability of resources
Variety of teaching strategies
Integration of Quality Teaching strategies
Integration of ICTs
Literacy strategies used
Numeracy strategies used
SMART targets addressed
Continuum clusters addressed

Learning Episode 6:
What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
Students will improve research skills, students will become greater communicators in a group
situation.
Outcomes:
The importance of Country and Place to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples who belong
to a local area. (This is intended to be a local area study with a focus on one Language group; however, if
information or sources are not readily available, another representative area may be studied.)
(ACHHK060)
Inquiry questions:
Who lived here first and how do we know?
identify the original Aboriginal languages spoken in the local or regional area
Inquiry sequence:

Brainstorm prior knowledge

Evidence tools, rock art/carvings, hunting, sacred sites, camps, burial grounds, language

Discuss our season and months

Learn about Aboriginal seasons

Aboriginal language words water/fire

Strategies/Activities:

Watch clip showing seasons around Australia, weather patterns and how nature changes

Plan and draw symbols to represent seasons and weather patterns.


Summative and/or formative assessment:
Questioning and depth of responses will assess their knowledge as will questions posed by students.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Interactive whiteboard
Internet access
Ten canoes website
Seasons.notebook

Learning Episode 7:
What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
Students knowledge and understanding of the metalanguage will be greatly improved.
Outcomes:
HT2-2, HT2-5, EN2-2A, EN2-3A, EN2-9B, EN2-10C, EN2-11D MA2-7NA MA2-1WM ST2-5WT VAS2.1
VAS2.4
Inquiry questions:
Which type of learning to you prefer?
Inquiry sequence:
Direct Instruction, Individual or Paired Work depending on Activity selected.
Strategies/Activities:
Students are required to using Appendix Five (Blooms) and complete a minimum or one activity from
each way of learning, within half of the allocated time. On completion of each task the student is to get
it signed off for acknowledgment. On completion the students will choose one of the following activities
to complete.
ENGLISH:
Create a comic strip to describe your adventures as a settler in Tumbarumba. Use narrative structure of
the story writing; beginning, middle (complication, an introduction of a character/object) and
conclusion. Create a postcard to using one of the images from Appendix One. Use narrative structure of
the story writing; beginning, middle (complication, an introduction of a character/object) and
conclusion.
MATHS / VISUAL ART: Measure and re-scaling. Children are to measure their own body in order to rescale their model of a settler to and . Divide by 2 and 4 of your own body measurements. Using
coloured pencils to colour in drawing in the style of a local from the time period.
SCIENCE: Use old computer/electronic parts or Lego Mind storms and old toy components to make your
own miner or colonial settler being-android. Make him/her perform some electronic movement.
Test the materials in terms of strengths and durability.
Summative and/or formative assessment:
Each of the activities will be collected and marked, observe and question students as they complete
tasks.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Appendix Five, Rulers, Appendix One, Coloured Pencils, Lego Mindstorms

Learning Episode 8 and Conclusion:


What will students know and be able to do at the end of this episode?
Students will gain deep understanding of life in an around the Tumbarumba/Wiradjuri area. How far
the area stretched.
Outcomes:
EN2-1A EN2-2A EN2-4A HT2-2 HT2-5
Inquiry questions:
What was life like in the Tumbarumba area at the beginning of white settlement and before?
Inquiry sequence:
Shared Reading, Class Discussion, Paired/Group Activity
Strategies/Activities:
Taking in turns in reading sentences from Appendix Seven displayed on Electronic Smart board and
also provided hard copies for each students. Students discuss what each paragraph means, in terms of
the reason for its inclusion.
Students discuss the Authors meaning behind the writing.
Teachers write selected sentence/sentences on strips, one set each for small group of 3-4 students.
Students will work individually or in pairs and highlight key words from the text and answer the
questions for the second page.
Adjustment: Locating locations using Google Earth.
Summative and/or formative assessment:
Questioning students will assess their prior knowledge
Class discussion will assess students understanding of the life of people in colonial days
These tasks will assess the students abilities to research and locate the required information.
Class discussion will aid in the assessment of what students have learnt. Collection and marking of
student worksheets will do this further.
Resources to facilitate learning:
Pre-cut sentences on strips of paper. Handout of Appendix Seven. Electronic Smart Board. Google Earth

Reflection:
How did the unit each lesson in these
areas?
Time allocated for topic
Student understanding of content
Opportunities for student reflection on
learning
Suitability of resources
Variety of teaching strategies
Integration of Quality Teaching strategies
Integration of ICTs
Literacy strategies used
Numeracy strategies used
SMART targets addressed
Continuum clusters addressed

Timeline
To create the timelines Ive used the website Time Toast. www.timetoast.com .It is a free site that allows for easy additions and changes to be made to timelines that can be viewed in two
formats. The benefit over using Microsoft Word will be its engaging display and the ease of adding images and links.

Aboriginal Australians
http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/australianaborigines-emh204-hsie-curriculum

Immigration to Australia
http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/immigration-to-australia--23

Craig Edwards 11168546 EMH419:

Gold in Australia
http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/gold-discovery-inaustralia--6

Appendix One

Craig Edwards 11168546 EMH419:

(Frew
& Frew, 2009) (Gilbert, 1972) (Trudgeon & Johnston, 1977)

Appendix Two

a Write a list of key events in the discovery of gold in Australia.

b Make a list of the nationalities of the people who came to Australia in search of gold.

c Find out how long the gold rushes lasted for.

Appendix Three

(Holland & Krumm, 2012)

Appendix Four

(RIC Publications, 2000)

(RIC Publications,

2000)

Appendix Five
MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES & BLOOMS TAXONOMY
UNIT OF STUDY:

Community and Remembrance Spelling

Seven ways to be
Blooms Taxonomy: Six Thinking Levels
smart
Knowing
Understanding
I enjoy reading, writing Look, say cover write
Write a synonym for
& speaking
check your words
each word.

Applying
Write a word that
rhymes with your
spelling words.

Analysing
Write your words
and cross out any
silent letters.

Creating
Create a sentence
using each spelling
word.

Write a paragraph
using as many
words as you can.
Count how many
words you can
include.
Make a
spellamoodle with
your words.

I enjoy working with


numbers & science

Write your words as


ladders.

Write your words in


alphabetical order.

Find each work in


the dictionary and
copy down the
meaning.

Classify your words


into nouns, verbs or
adjectives.

I enjoy painting
drawing & visualising

Write each of your


words graffiti style.

Draw a picture or
symbol for each
spelling word.

Write a cartoon
strip including as
many words as
possible.

I enjoy doing hands-on


activities

Write your words on a Put your words in


partners back and have reverse alphabetical
them guess the word.
order and then copy
them in your book.

*Play charades with


your friends using
your spelling words.

Spellustration:
Illustrate 10 of your
words with a
diagram that
explains their
meaning.
*Learn the letters of
the sign language
alphabet and teach
it to a buddy.

I enjoy working with


others

Make a set of flash


cards of your spelling
words to test a friend
and study with.

Play hangman with


a friend and use
your spelling words.

I enjoy working by
myself

* Type your words.


Change the vowels to
another colour.

Step out the words


using the foam
alphabet. Check
your friend is
correct.
Write an antonym
for each word.

Write your words in


a long squiggle line
with no spaces. Join
each word with the
previous words last
letter.

Work with a partner


and test each other
on your words. Put
each word in a
sentence for them.
Type your words
into the computer,
and mark in the
syllables.

Evaluating
List your words in
the categories- Easy
words to spell,
Medium level words
to spell, difficult
words.
Change every word
by adding or
subtracting plural,
prefix or suffix.

Write a story book


for year 1 using your
spelling words.

Spelling criminals
have stolen key
letters from spelling
words. Make a
worksheet for a
partner and swap!
Make a cross word
with at least 10 of
your words. Swap
with a friend.

Design a get-well
card for a word
badly damaged by
misspelling.

PowerPoint
spelling: Children
create a slideshow
of their words

List all the subjects


you do at school.
Where do you rate
spelling?

Make up a short
play using all your
spelling words.

Craig Edwards 11168546 EMH419:

MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES & BLOOMS TAXONOMY


UNIT OF STUDY:

Community and Remembrance Spelling

Seven ways to be
Blooms Taxonomy: Six Thinking Levels
smart
Knowing
Understanding
I enjoy reading, writing Play this game with a
Write three
& speaking
partner. Start by
sentences, using as
giving him or her the
many list words as
first letter of the word
possible.
you have chosen from
your spelling list.

Applying
Analysing
Hidden words- For
Make clues for 10 of
each of your spelling your spelling words.
words try and find
words using only the
letters in it...

Creating
Write a paragraph
using all the words
but one..... The class
will have to find the
missing word!

Graph your words


and compare the
number of letters.

Convert your words


into Morse Code.

Translate letters in
words to numbers
and create your own
algorithms

Make your words


out of toothpicks.

String it along.
Write each word in
string

I enjoy working with


numbers & science

Group your words


according to the
number of letters they
have.

I enjoy painting
drawing & visualising

Draw your spelling list


in bubble writing and
colour them in.

Secret Agent Words


- Number the
alphabet from 1 to
26 then convert
your words to a
number
Choose 5 of your
words and illustrate
them expressively.

I enjoy doing hands-on


activities

Step out your words on


the foam letters

Make disappearing
words.

Say your words


while jumping a
skipping rope.

I enjoy making &


listening to music

Click out your spelling


words with your
fingers.

Chant your spelling


words to the beat of
a drum

Perform a rain
dance while spelling
your spelling words

I enjoy working with


others

Select 10 of your words


and jumble the letters.
Can your partner guess
and correctly spell the
words you have
chosen?

Write 10 words with


some of the letters
missing. Swap with
your partner and fill
in the missing
letters.

Ants go marching in.


Stamp your words
to the tune of this
song.
Using the following
code, write ten list
words then have
your partner work
them out.
a=z, b = y, c=x.....
z=a

I enjoy working by
myself

Write the words and


circle all of the
consonants.
b,c,d,f,g,h,j,k,l,m,n,p,q,
s,t,v,w,x,y,z

Create a sentence
using each word.

Write ten list words


and work out the
value of them if
a=1, b=2, c=3.....
z=26
eg. great = 51

Smaller words Write


the 5 longest words
in your spelling list.
Beside each word
list as many smaller
words

Create a code for


the alphabet using
symbols and
pictures. Write your
words in code.
Using a telephone
Big cheer for words.
number pad, change Make up an action
the words into
for each letter in a
numbers
word.

Write a quiz
question for four list
words. Give to a
friend to solve.

Write a rap song to


help others
remember their
words.
Make a worksheet
for a friend. Draw
boxes to show word
shapes. Have a
partner find your
words.

Missing letters
Write 10 words with
some of the letters
missing. Swap with
your partner and fill
in the missing
letters.

Evaluating
Write the family
words from your
spelling lists from
the last 4 weeks on
cards. Swap with a
friend to sort them
into the same word
families and reunite
them!
Sort your words into
three groups.

Play a game of
Pictionary with a
friend with your
spelling words.
Spell your words by
standing up on
consonant and
sitting down for
vowels.
Sing your words to
the tune of your
favourite song.
Select ten words
from you list. Write
them three times
but misspell them
word twice. Your
partner pick the
correctly spelt
word?
Sort your words into
these categories.
1. See 2. Smell 3.
Noise 4.Touched.5.
Eaten 6.Useful 7.
Nouns 8.Verbs 9.
Adjectives

Appendix Six Background Teacher Information


http://www.schoolatoz.nsw.edu.au/homework-and-study/other-subjects-and-projects/history/aboriginal-australia

Being Aboriginal has nothing to do with the colour of your skin or the
shape of your nose. It is a spiritual feeling, an identity you know in your
heart. It is a unique feeling that may be difficult for non-Aboriginal people
to understand.
Aboriginal people have been living continuously in Australia for
more than 50,000 years.

How do we know this?

EvidenceStones tools, rock art and scarred trees

Rock art is the oldest surviving human art form. In NSW, it is a link with
Aboriginal life and customs before European settlement. Pictures on
rocks were an important part of Aboriginal songs, stories, and customs
that connected people with the land.
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/nswcultureheritage/RockArt.htm rock art video
(show photos of rock tools, scarred trees from Library)

An Aboriginal Place is defined in the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974
(NPW Act) as a place that 'is or was of special significance with respect to
Aboriginal culture'. The concept of an Aboriginal Place was introduced into the
NPW Act in 1974. Prior to that, only Aboriginal 'relics' - the term used for
physical remains such as scarred trees, rock art, stone tools, and shell middens were protected under the Act.
Using the computers research for any sacred sites around our local area Tumbarumba.
This is a useful website - http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/aboriginalplaces/
Sacred sites around Tumbarumba
Get atlas out map of Australia and NSW

Consider when British convicts arrived. Where did they first settle? Where did aboriginals live? How long until aboriginals in NSW
over the Snowy mountain range encountered white man?

The Dreaming is a western term used to explain the basis of Aboriginal spiritual identity.
Language/clan groups have their own language term for spirituality. For them, the Dreaming is past, present and future
and holds the law and lore, incorporating important knowledge and values, beliefs and understandings. It tells of the
ancestral spirits that created the land and waterways, and remain as living forces, making these places sacred and
significant.

Aboriginal elders are greatly respected because they are responsible for guiding and mentoring and
keeping their Aboriginal heritage alive and ensuring its language, rituals, sacred ceremonies and
knowledge are passed on from generation to generation.
Gaps exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians in areas such as education, housing,
health and employment.
Constitutional and legal changes have affected the rights of Aboriginal Australians.
Before 1788, it is estimated there were approximately 200-250 different languages spoken by
Aboriginal people living throughout Australia.
Many words from the various Aboriginal languages have come into common usage in English (although in many cases
the words have been anglicised) including: barramundi, dingo, budgerigar, kangaroo, koala, kookaburra, taipan,
wallaby, waratah, wombat and place names such as Noosa, Coonabarabran, Woy Woy, Woollahra, Toowoon (Bay),
Kuring-Gai, Terrigal and Mudgee.

http://www.murrayriver.com.au/about-the-murray/captain-charles-sturt/
Murray river websites

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/chresearch/ReserveStation.htm
living on aboriginal reserves or stations
From the late 1700s, the spread of settlement across New South Wales by non-Indigenous people gradually pushed Aboriginal
people off their land. NSW governments responded in many cases by setting aside parcels of land for the sole use of Aboriginal
people. Across the state, Aboriginal reserves were created as a political response to the dispossession of Aboriginal people from
their land. Over time, the creation of reserves or similar parcels of land were driven by different philosophies and initiated by
different groups churches, government, non-Aboriginal residents of towns or Aboriginal people themselves.
Though some Aboriginal people had little choice but to live on the reserves, they often developed very deep attachments to them
and to the areas adjacent to the reserves.
Broadly speaking, there were three types of spaces formally set aside by the government specifically for Aboriginal people to live
on:
Aboriginal reserves: Aboriginal reserves were parcels of land set aside for Aboriginal people to live on; these were not managed
by the government or its officials. From 1883 onwards, the Aboriginal people who were living on unmanaged reserves received
rations and blankets from the Aborigines Protection Board (APB), but remained responsible for their own housing. 1 Such reserves
included Forster2 and Burnt Bridge.
Aboriginal missions: Aboriginal missions were created by churches or religious individuals to house Aboriginal people and train
them in Christian ideals and to also prepare them for work. Most of the missions were developed on land granted by the
government for this purpose. Around ten missions were established in NSW between 1824 and 1923, although missionaries also
visited some managed stations. Many Aboriginal people have adopted the term mission or mish to refer to reserve settlements
and fringe camps generally.
Aboriginal stations: Aboriginal stations or managed reserves were established by the APB from 1883 onwards, and were
managed by officials appointed by that Board. Education (in the form of preparation for the workforce), rations and housing
tended to be provided on these reserves,3 and station managers tightly controlled who could, and could not, live there. Many
people were forcibly moved onto and off stations. Managed stations included Purfleet,4 Karuah and Murrin Bridge near Lake
Cargelligo.
Many other Aboriginal people did not live on Aboriginal missions, reserves or stations, but in towns, or in fringe camps on private
property or on the outskirts of towns, on beaches and riverbanks. There are many such places across the state that remain
important to Aboriginal people.
Across NSW, the APB created new reserves and stations places that were managed by a government-appointed manager, and
which often provided education/schooling and housing in addition to land on which Aboriginal people could live. Some of the first
reserves created by the Board were at Bega (1883), Stewarts Island (1883), and Grong Grong, near the Murrumbidgee River
(1884).
Some reserves were created in response to complaints by white residents who objected to Aboriginal people living in towns or in
fringe camps on the edges of towns.9 This was the case with Brungle Station, which was built between Tumut and Gundagai in
1887.10 Other reserves were established at the request of Aboriginal people themselves who were seeking land for agriculture,
living and schooling purposes and these were created where Aboriginal people were already living. 11 In 1911, at the height of the
Aboriginal reserve system, 75 of the 115 reserves in NSW had been created at the request of Aboriginal people. 12 These included

Wingadee at Coonamble 13 and Burra Bee Dee. Like fringe camps, these places continue to hold significance for Aboriginal
people as places where they chose to live when there were few places available.
The creation of reserves and stations from the 1880s onwards reflected government policies of protection and segregation. They
were underpinned by a belief that the best way to protect Aboriginal people was by separating them from white society. Station
managers were appointed to help control who lived on the stations, and to manage their behaviour and movements. However,
the official identification of Aboriginal people was strictly defined by the colour of their skin many people were deemed too
Aboriginal to live in towns, but not Aboriginal enough to live on reserves.

Appendix Seven

Stages and phases


General statement
(identifying subject
of the information
report.)
Descriptionformation
Description- flora

Description- fauna

The snowy Mountains, as part of The Great Dividing Range, has its origins many millions of years ago when the continents of earth were fused together
as the Gondwana land mass. A huge uplift in the earth's crust occurred over millions of years. This was just after the extinction of the dinosaurs and
during the time that modern humans first appeared on Earth.
The Snowy Mountains are a plateau made from sandstone rock. The plateau is now divided by gorges up to 760 metres deep, formed by rivers. Its flattopped mountains and sheer cliffs rise baldly from the forests around them. Its rivers plunge into deep, narrow gorges and vast, stretching valleys.
The main natural vegetation of the higher ridges is eucalyptus forest. The sheltered gorges often contain temperate rainforests. The Wollemi Pine,
recently found growing in a gorge of the Snowy Mountains, is a living dinosaur of the plant world
The Greater Snowy Mountains Area is inhabited by over 400 different forms of animals. Among them are rare mammal species like Spotted-tailed
Quoll, the koala, the yellow-bellied glider, and Long-nosed potoroo. There are also some rare reptiles, like the Snowy Mountain Water Skink.

Discuss the authors purpose why did the author write this information report.
To present information about the Snowy Mountains. The text will explore the formation of the mountains, describe their characteristics and present facts
about the history and geography of the mountains.
Cut up sentences
Teachers write selected sentence/sentences on strips, one set each for small group of 3-4 students. Students in the group take turns to cut the sentence at the
points directed by the teacher. Students identify the words to cut and the teacher elaborates on their meaning, taking the understanding to a higher level.
Words are always put back into the sentence. When cutting is complete the words are then jumbled and the group works together to rearrange them. They
can also construct new sentences by reordering clauses/words, joining sentences or breaking them into simple sentences. Punctuation can be cut off separately
from the words and rearranged. Extra blank cards may be needed to add capitals or lower case letters and extra words to maintain meaning.

The Settlement of Tumbarumba


Means first

people living there

The original inhabitants


Which tribe?

How bjg?

Where?

between

where?

1. The Wiradjuri tribe was the largest aboriginal nation in NSW and ranged from Albury on
Which river?

Where?

which town?

Where?

the Murray River in the south to near Coonabarabran in the north.


How many?

Family group

lived together

which large group?

2. In all, about 12,000 people, divided into clans, co-existed as the Wiradjuri nation or tribe.
To get food they..? x2

moving around

nomadioc

eating plants and

3.They hunted, fished, and being semi nomadic, moved from place to place living off the land.
Animals that they find

The food they ate

freshwater prawns

fish...what type?

Where?

4.The Wiradjuri diet included yabbies and fish such as Murray cod from the rivers.
When?

Meat x2

what else did they eat?

Such as..?

5.In dry seasons, they ate kangaroos, emus and food gathered from the land, including fruit, nuts, yam daisies, wattle seeds, and
orchid tubers.
This tribe

moved

where?

When?

Not just eat but...

what?

6.The Wiradjuri travelled into Alpine areas in the summer to feast on Bogong moths.

1. The first sentence tells us how far the territory of the Wiradjuri extended, or the size of it.
Preparation: children should have looked at an atlas or map of Australia and found the following,
Albury, Murray River, Coonabarabran
Revise north and south
Locate Tumbarumba
Adjustment: Google Earth
2. This sentence tells us approximately how many people there were in this tribe.
Clans
How would this number have been calculated?
3. This tells us about the life the Wiradjuri led before contact with European settlers.
Semi nomadic
4. This sentence begins to tell us how the Wiradjuri lived off the land.
Yabbies
Murray cod
Which rivers? Lachlan, Murray, Darling, Murrumbidgee
5. The next sentence tells us more about how the Wiradjuri ate a large variety of food.
6. This sentence tells us about a special summer treat and where the Wiradjuri had to go to find it.
Alpine
Bogong moths

Who?

Good looking

coat with no sleeves

how was it made?

From what?

7.The Wiradjuri were also known for their handsome cloaks stitched together from possum

furs.
The governor of the colony

given

who?

8.Governor Macquarie was did it? presented with one of these cloaks by a Wiradjuri man when he
Where?

What year?

visited Bathurst in 1815.


Which event?

Who did it?

When?

9.The crossing of the Blue Mountains by Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth in 1813 was the
The destruction

the life they had known

beginning of the end for this peaceful, nomadic life.


10.The loss of fishing grounds and significant sites and the killing of Aboriginal People was
retaliated through attacks with spears on cattle and stockmen.
7. This sentence tells us about some special clothing that the Wiradjuri used to wear.
Possum fur, skins stitched together, coping with cold weather
8. This sentence tells us how special the cloaks were.
Governor Macquarie- responsible for building many roads and important buildings in Sydney.
9. The next sentence is about a very important event, both for the early colony in Sydney and for the aboriginal tribes who lived on the fertile land
west of the mountains.
Blue Mountains, everyone travels over these mountains on their way to Sydney. The colony in Sydney needed new farm land to grow crops
to feed the people. Many explorers tried to find a way across.
Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth- Blue Mountains towns are named after them
Heralded the clash of cultures that was to be so devastating for the Wiradjuri
10. This sentence tells us about the clashes between the settlers and the people who were already living here.
Fishing grounds- lots more people needed to eat

Significant sites- ceremonies, dreamtime stories


Concept of ownership was different for settlers and aborigines

References
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Gilbert, P. (1972). Gold - Discovering Australian History. Hong Kong: Jacaranda Press.
Hardy, R. (Director). (1984). The Eureka Stockade [Motion Picture].
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Macintyre, S. (2009). A Concise History of Australia. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.


Museum of Australian Democracy. (n.d.). Chinese Immigration Act 1855 (Vic). Retrieved from Museum of Australian Democracy: http://foundingdocs.gov.au/scan-sid-753.html
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