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Marcela Reyna Due: September 13, 2006

CSCI 4325 Homework #1

0.3 Let A be the set {x, y, z} and B be the set {x, y}.
a. Is A a subset of B?
No
b. Is B a subset of A?
Yes
c. What is A (Union) B?
A Union B = {x, y, z}
d. What is A (Intersection) B?
A (intersection) B = {x, y}
e. What is A X B?
A X B = {(x, x), (x, y), (y, x), (y, y), (z, x), (z, y)}
f. What is the power set of B?
|P(S)| = 2^n
In our case n = 2 since set B contains 2 elements
|P(B)| = 2^2 = 4
P(B) = {{empty set}, {x}, {y}, {xy}}
0.4 If A has a elements and B has b elements, how many elements are in A X B?
Explain your answer.
A = {1, 2, …, a}
B = {1, 2, …, b}
A X B = {(1, 1), (1, 2), … (1, b), (2, 1),(2, 2), …(2, b), (a, 1),(a, 2), … (a, b)}
There are a * b number of elements.
We see this holds true in the previous exercise where |A| = a = 3 and |B| = b = 2
|A X B| = a * b = 3 * 2 = 6, which is true.
0.5 If C is a set with c elements, how many elements are in the power set of C?
Explain your answer.
C={elementNo1, elementNo2, ... elementNoc}
The formula to determine the number of elements in the power set of a set is
|P(S)|=2^n, where S is the set and n is the number of elements in the set. In our
case, our set is called C and there are c number elements, so we substitute this
information to get...
|P(C)| = 2 ^ c, where c is the number of elements in set C.
0.6 Let X be the set {1,2,3,4,5} and Y be the set {6,7,8,9,10}. The unary function f:
XY and the binary function g: X X YY are described in the following tables.
N F(N)
1 6
2 7
3 6
4 7
5 6
G 6 7 8 9 10
1 10 10 10 10 10
2 7 8 9 10 6
3 7 7 8 8 9
4 9 8 7 6 10
5 6 6 6 6 6

a. What is the value of F(2)?


Marcela Reyna Due: September 13, 2006
CSCI 4325 Homework #1

F(2)=7
b. What is the range and domain of F?
Domain = [1,5]
Range = [6,7]
c. What is the value of G(2,10)?
G(2,10) = 6
d. What are the range and domain of g?
Domain = [1,5]
Range = [6,10]
e. What is the value of G(4,f(4))?
G(4,f(4)) = G(4,7) = 8
0.7 For each part, give a relation that satisfies the condition.
a. Reflexive and symmetric but not transitive
R1 = {1, 2, 3, 4}
(1, 1), (2, 2), (3,3), (4,4), (1,3), (3,1), (2,4), (4,2)

b. Reflexive and transitive but not symmetric


R1 = {1, 2, 3, 4}
(1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), (1,2), (2,4), (4,3), (3,1), (4,1), (2,3), (3,2), (1,4)

c. Symmetric and transitive but not reflexive


R1 = {1, 2, 3}
(1,2), (2,1), (1,3), (3,1), (2, 3), (3, 2)

0.10
Find the error in the following proof that 2=1.
Consider the equation a=b. Multiply both sides by a to obtain a^2=ab. Subtract b^2
from both sides to get a^2-b^2=ab-b^2. Now factor each side, (a+b)(a-b)=b(a-b),
Marcela Reyna Due: September 13, 2006
CSCI 4325 Homework #1

and divide each side by (a-b), to get a + b = b. Finally, let a and b equal 1, which
shows that 2=1.
Just treat a=b as a=a
a=b //a=a (true)
a^2 = ab //a^2 =a*a (true)
a^2-b^2=ab-b^2 //a^2-a^2=a*a-a^2 (true)
(a+b)(a-b)=b(a-b) //(a+a)(a-a)=a(a-a) (true)
a+b=b //Here when we divide by (a-b) or in reality (a-a) we see (a-a) is //zero, and you
can’t divide by zero, so this is where they go //wrong and
everything after this step will be false as well(false)
//a+a=a (false)
//2a = a (false)
//2=1 (false)
a=1 b=1
2=1

0.11 Find the error in the following proof that all horses are the same color.
CLAIM: In any set of h horses, all horses are the same color.
PROOF: By induction on h.

BASIS: For h=1. In any set containing just one horse, all horses clearly are the same
color.
Induction step: For k>=1 assume that the claim is true for h=k and prove that it is
true for h = k+1. Take any set H for k+1 horses. We show that all the horses in this
set are the same color. Remove one horse from this set to obtain the set H1 with just
k horses. By the induction hypothesis, all the horses in H1 are the same color. Now
replace the removed horse and remove a different one to obtain the set H2. By the
same argument, all the horses in H2 are the same color. (HERE IS WHERE IT
GOES WRONG) Therefore all the horses in H must be the same color, and the proof
is complete.

H1 and H2 aren’t necessarily the same color because you remove one horse and of course
that one horse on it’s own is its own same color then you put it back and get a different
horse and once again that horse on it’s own is it’s own same color but we have no way to
prove that the first horse we took out and the second horse we took out are the same
color.