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4.

Nurture
awareness
5. Encourage
ownership

Second wave
constructionism
Construct knowledge
based on society and
culture
Increasing ability to
participate in culture
Based on Vygotsky's
theories

PSYCHOLOGICAL

Works Cited
Adams, P. (2006). Exploring social constructivism:
Theories and practicalities. Education 3-13, 34(3),
243-257. doi:10.1080/03004270600898893
The Snowman Shop. (2015). Retrieved September 25,
2015 from http://www.aac.ab.ca/assessmentmaterials/the-snowman-shop/
[Untitled classroom image]. Retrieved September 25,
2015 from http://www.thenation.com/wpcontent/uploads/2015/03/empty_classroom_cc_img
.jpg
[Untitled Erlenmeyer flask image]. Retrieved September
25, 2015 from http://aci.info/wpcontent/uploads/2015/01/science-lab.jpg

CONSTRUCTIVISM

Cooperation and collaboration


are more than simply group
work.

COMMON
ELEMENTS

Educators must be carefully


planned and organized.

5 CONDITIONS
OF LEANRING

SOCIAL

Scaffolding supports are key


factors in successful inquiry
and problem-based learning.

First wave constructivism 1. Realistic


Individual knowledge
environments
construction
2. Social
Help others build and
negotiation
improve mental models 3. Multiple
Based on Piaget's theories
perspectives

To make
constructivism
work:

Constructivism
A view that emphasizes the active
role of the learner in building
understanding and making sense of
information (Woolfolk, Winne &
Perry, 2013).

How to Apply

In the Classroom

Inquiry and Problem Based Learning

Grade 5 Math: Snowman Shop

Students are given a realistic problem that does not


have a single correct answer, but rather is based on
individual perspective and problem solving.

Students are working in a snowman shop making


hats, boots, noses and arms from construction
paper. Students will have the opportunity to make a
snowman of their own by purchasing different
pieces from their classmates while staying within a
specified budget for the items they choose. Each
snowman shop will look different and have
different pricing (The Snowman Shop, 2015).

The steps are generally as follows:

Why You Need to Know


Positive outcomes in the classroom:
Constructive learning encourages peer
involvement and allows students to see multiple
viewpoints.
Students are faced with problems that are
applicable in the real world.
Strengthens students abilities to establish and
defend their positions.
Allows for variety of assessment strategies.
Facilitates student engagement, thus student
voices are heard.
All constructivist theories assume that
knowledge develops as learners try to
make sense of their experiences
(Woolfolk, Winne & Perry, 2012).

Formulate hypotheses
Collect data
Draw conclusions
Reflect (Woolfolk, Winne & Perry, 2012).

Collaborative and Cooperative


Learning
Students learn how to work with and relate to others
in order to work towards a common goal. It is more
than simply group work.
True cooperative learning groups have:

Interaction
Interdependence
Accountability
Collaboration
Group processing (Woolfolk, Winne & Perry,
2012).

High School Social Studies:


Discussion Web
Give students an article or webpage with a
controversial topic. Each student chooses whether
they are in agreement or disagreement and then
they meet with others of same opinion to discuss
and record points of why they agree or disagree.
Students then jigsaw and group with those of the
opposite opinion to share perspectives. Finally, the
class reconvenes to participate in a group
discussion and share conclusions.

On the Other Hand


If constructivism is taken too far, the philosophy of
no reality but only individual perception emerges.
This is known as radical constructivism.
From a teachers perspective, there is a responsibility
for educators to uphold the importance of certain
values. From a learners perspective, if every student
is creating their own realities, then there is no room
for learning.

Contact Us
CONSTRUCTIVISM
Tracey tracey.driedger@uleth.ca
Sydney sydney.cleland@uleth.ca
Kasey kasey.howard@uleth.ca
Natalie n.cote@uleth.ca