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Native

Speaker Interview Findings



Introduction:

I interviewed five people I know that speak Spanish. It was much harder

to do than I expected. Most of my friends who have Spanish speaking parents


dont speak Spanish at all. It took a while for me to connect with people due to
time zone differences, as well. It was interesting to learn their perspectives,
some were really comfortable with their heritage and others seemed to be less
comfortable talking about it. I tried to interview people without getting too
personal when it seemed like a question they didnt want to answer.
Similarities:

All of these people speak Spanish fluently and consider themselves to be

fully bilingual. The Spanish speakers who grew up in a bilingual environment


tended to favor speaking English in public and Spanish with family. Traveling to
countries that speak a particular language was not important for any of them.
Differences:

While all of my interviewees are native speakers of Spanish, most did not

share a common cultural or dialect. Some teach their children Spanish, some do
not, and some changed their mind as their children aged.
Conclusion:

People can be bilingual and bicultural. They can speak a language without

sharing an identity. It is stressful to do an interview in another language. People


can have a cultural identity and not speak the language associated with that
culture.

Native Spanish Speaker Interviews




Jose

Interviewed 07 October 2015



1. Full Name
Jose Maria Tena (Villada)
2. Age
61
3. Profession
Teacher: math, chemistry, physics,
biology, English, Spanish (all ages)
4. Do you have children?
Yes- 2.
5. If yes, gender and ages?
Boy- 22
Girl- 16
6. What languages do they speak?
Spanish, English native fluency in both
7. Country, region, and city that you are from?
Columbia, Antioquia, Medellin
8. What countries are your parents and grandparents from
Columbians, Columbian and Spanish (paternal- the tenas)
9. Language you speak at home with your parents and siblings
Spanish
10. Language you speak the most outside of the home (work, school,
social)
Work- English, home- Spanish, Either but not mixed
11. How many years have you spoken English-
53
12. What cultural identity is the most dominant for you and why?
Columbian, I grew up Columbian and most of my years are there. I am not
very latino because of the Spanish influence of my father, but I do
consider myself a Columbian.
13. What countries/cities do you prefer to travel to and why?
Europe- doesnt matter if it is English or Spanish. The culture is the most
comfortable for me there (more affinity).
14. Is it easy for you to find native Spanish speakers wherever you go?
Lately, yes. Many years ago, not as much. Even recently in London, we
encountered a lot of Spanish speakers, either we are more aware or there
are more people moving around.
15. Do you feel you face any discrimination for your heritage or cultural
identity? Describe any situations you have experienced.

Not really. Sometimes a little bit of suspicion or fear because I am from


Columbia, people wonder if I am trustworthy or a crook. There is no open
or overt discrimination- otherwise Ive never felt discriminated.
16. What is the hardest part of English for you?
The volume of studying, applying what I was learning, trying to acquire
language more smoothly and automatically, to try to practice and
describe what I see to make the grammar automatic. Sensing how jokes
are funny and what connotations really mean. Getting the learning right
so I could use the language. I taught myself. Getting it internalized was
the most difficult part. I always did my homework. All of it. I always did
my homework.
17. How do you view your cultural identity to be similar and different
from other native speakers of Spanish?
I think its different cultures based on countries because we are all so
completely different. The language doesnt create a common culture. The
accents are different, the moods are different. It is human nature to
separate us from them and isolate your group even when you are
educated and know how to speak the perfect form of the language but
none of us speak that way. Music and dance can create some shared
culture from the 1920s and 1930s, but English may change the culture
too. The jokes, the gestures, the body language are all different.
Vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation are all more personal and
regional than shared.



Josue

Interviewed 20
September 2015



1- Name
Josue Rosario
2- Age
Para que quieres mi edad?
3- Profession
Trabajo para el Army
4- Do you have children? If
yes, gender and ages? What
languages do they speak?
Tengo una hija de 15 aos y
habla espaol pero no
ingles
5- What country, region,
and city are you from?
Yo soy natural de Puerto Rico, latinoamerica
6- What countries are your parents and grandparents from?

Mis padres y mis abuelos son natural de Puerto Rico


7- What language do you speak with your family?
Cuando estoy en mi casa hablo espaol con mis padres mi hija
y mis sobrinos
8- Language you speak the most outside of home?
Solo hablo Ingles y si me encuentro con otros latinos me gusta
hablar espaol
9- How many years have you spoken English?
Llevo 6 aos hablando ingles gracias a mi preciosa amiga Lark
10- What cultural identity is the strongest for you and why?
Cultura latina por que soy latino
11- What countries/cities do you prefer to travel to? Why?
Me gusta Estados Unidos por completo y la razon es por que
tengo muchas oportunidades
12- Is it easy for you to find native Spanish speakers
wherever you go?
Se puede encontrar personas que hablan espaol donde quiera
que vamos jajaj
13- Do you feel you face any discrimination for your heritage
or cultural identity? Describe any situations you have
experienced.
Si hay discrimination pero no quiero dar ejemplos por que no
me importa
14- What is the hardest part of English for you?
Cuando hablas con personas de diferentes partes del mundo y
hablan ingles con diferentes dialects
15- How do you view your cultural identity to be similar or
different from other native speakers of Spanish?
What??? Ser puertorriqueo es nico y tambien lo es si eres de
cualquier parte del mundo que se hable espaol, solo nos
diferencia algunas palabras y nada mas. Pero en nuestra forma
de ser somos bien parecidos. Lark tengo sueo y me voy a
dormir. Tengo lindos recuerdos de ti y por eso no te olvido y
por la gran amiga que eres!!! Love you

Selna
Interviewed 21 September 2015
1. Name
Selena Paniagua Santana
2. Age
41
3. Profession
Self employed
4. Do you have children? Ages?
Male 24, female 22, female 14, male 12
5. What country, region, and city are
you from?
USA, eastern coast Paterson, NJ
6. What countries are your parents and
grandparents from?
Puerto Rico
7. What language do you speak with
your family?
Spanish and English
8. What language do you speak most
when outside your home?
English
9. How long have you spoken English?
39 years
10. What cultural identity is the
strongest for you and why?
Although I was born in the United States I
feel the most dominant cultural identity is
my Puerto Rican culture.. Because I was
raised by my Grandmother who was born
and raised in Puerto Rico.. My first
language was Spanish until I reached the age of 5 which was when I began school.
My grandmother always spoke to us in Spanish, told me about our heritage and
explained things to me that were significant to our culture, our food and as a race.
11. What countries/cities do you prefer to travel to? Why?
I don't necessarily have a travel destination preference. I try and visit different places,
cities or islands every year because I like to see the worlds diversity and ways of
living.
12. Is it easy for you to find native speakers of Spanish wherever you go?
Yes, It is fairly easy for me to find native Spanish speakers..
13. Do you feel you face any discrimination for your heritage or cultural
identity?
Because Puerto Ricans do not require any Visas or any type of documentation for
travel in and out of the U.S... I really have never felt any discriminatory actions
against my heritage unless surrounded by other Hispanics of other ethnic
backgrounds.
14. What is the hardest part of English for you?

The hardest part of English is the people and how they change the meanings of words
to accommodate the newest slang term to fit their lifestyle.
15. How do you view your cultural identity to be similar or different from other
native speakers of Spanish?
My cultural identity is similar in the fact that we all speak Spanish no matter what
Hispanic country you're from but it differs in the dialects and some in terminology.


Bobby

Interviewed 28 September 2015

1. Name
Bobby Jaramillo
2. Age
38
3. Profession:
System administrator
4. Do you have children? Ages?
I have two kids: boy and girl
5. What country, region, and city are
you from?
San Antonio, TX
Catholic
6. What countries are your parents and grandparents from?
Mom and dad U.S. citizens
Dads mother U.S. father U.S.
Mother's mom and dad from Mexico
7.
What languages do you speak at home?
Spanish and English
8.
What languages do you speak most outside of your home?
Both language
9.
How long have you spoken English?
entire life
10. What cultural identity is strongest for you?
English
11. Where do you like to travel to?
Any where
12. Is it easy for you to find native speakers of Spanish
wherever you go?
Yes
13. Do you experience any discrimination for your cultural
heritage?
No not really
14. What is the hardest part of English for you?
no English problems

15. How do you view your cultural identity to be similar or


different to other native speakers of Spanish?
Similar




Yvette
Interviewed 20 September 2015
1. Name?
Yvette Marie Nunez
2. Age?
37
3. Profession?
Substitute teacher
4. Do you have children? Ages?
I have 3 children.
Noah 13, Lola 10, Teegan 7.
They only speak English. Their father did
not want them to speak Spanish. So I am
currently teaching them now.
5. What country/region/city are you
from?
I was born and raised in San Angelo,
Texas.
6. What countries are your parents
and grandparents from?
My parents were both born in the
United States. Mom-Emma- born and raised in San Angelo, Texas. DadRoger born in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Raised in San Angelo, Texas. moms
parents- grandmother Eola, Texas. Grandfather- San Angelo, Texas. Dads
parents- grandmother- Acuna, Mexico. Grandfather- Mexico City, Mexico
7. What language do you speak with your parents and sibilings at home?
I speak both English and Spanish with my parents. Spanish with my
grandparents.
8. What language do you speak the most outside of home?
I speak English at home and work. I learned English from the beginning.
Spoke Spanish with my grandparents. My grandparents only speak Spanish on
my dads side.
9. How long have you spoken English?
I have spoken English all my life.
10. Do you experience any discrimination based of your cultural identity?
Yes people discriminate against you. Please assume you are from Mexico and
can not speak English. Or they judge you and do not think you have any
educational background. The thing that bothers me the most is that people
judge you because of your skin color and just assume you don't know how to
speak English. It is aggravating for some one to try to speak Spanish to me

when they see me especially when their Spanish is not correct.


11. Are you able to find Spanish speaking people wherever you go?
It is easy to find Spanish speaking people.