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Sukhoi Su-24

TITLE:
SUKHOI Su-24
NATO reporting name: 'Fencer'
TYPE:
Two-seat variable geometry 'battlefield bomber', reconnaissance and EW aircraft.
PROGRAMME:
"Design started 1964 under Yevgeniy S. Felsner, Pavel Sukhoi's successor, to replace Il-28 and Yak-28 attack aircraft; T6-1 prototype, first flown June 1967 and now at Monino, had fixed delta wings with downswept tips, and four Koliesov
auxiliary booster motors mounted vertically in fuselage for improved take-off performance; T-6-2IG variable geometry
prototype chosen for production; first flight January 1970; by 1981, delivery rate 60-70 a year; production of Su24M/MR/MP continues.
DESIGN FEATURES:

Variable geometry shoulder wing; wing section SR14S-5.376 on fixed panels, SR14S-9.226 to SR16M-10 on outer panels;
4 degrees 30' anhedral from roots; incidence 0 degrees at root, -4 degrees at tip; triangular fixed glove box; four-position
(16, 35, 45, and 69 degrees) pivoted outer panels, each with pivoting stores pylon; slab-sided rectangular section fuselage;
integral engine air intake trunks, each with splitter plate and outer lip inclined slightly downward; chord of lower part of tail
fin extended forward, giving kinked leading-edge; leading-edge sweepback 59 degrees 30' on fin, 30 degrees on inset
rudder, 50 degrees on horizontal tail surfaces; basic operational task, as designated 'frontal bomber', to deliver wide range
of air-to-surface missiles for defence suppression, with some hard target kill potential; specially developed long-range
navigation system and electro-optical weapons systems make possible penetration of hostile airspace at night or in
adverse weather with great precision, to deliver ordnance within 55 m (180 ft) of target.
LANDING GEAR:
Hydraulically retractable tricycle type, with twin wheels on each unit; main units retract forward and inward into air intake
duct fairings; steerable nose unit retracts rearward. Oleo-pneumatic shock absorbers. Trailing-link main units; KT-172
mainwheel tyres size 950 x 300 mm, pressure 12.15 bars (176 lb/sq in); KN-21 nosewheel tyres size 600 x 200 mm,
pressure 9.1 bars (132 lb/sq in); KT-69.430 brakes on mainwheels, with IA-58 anti-skid units; mudguard on nosewheels;
two cruciform brake-chutes, each 25 m{2} (269 sq ft).
POWER PLANT:
Two Saturn/Lyulka AL-21F-3A turbojets, each 75.0 kN (16,865 lb st) dry and 109.8 kN (24,690 lb st) with afterburning; fixed
engine air intakes. Four internal fuel tanks, capacity 11,700 litres (3090 US gallons; 2574 Imp gallons), can be
supplemented by two 2000 litre (528 US gallon; 440 Imp gallon) external tanks under fuselage and two 3000 litre (792 US
gallon; 660 Imp gallon) tanks under wing gloves. Pressure and gravity fuelling. Probe-and-drogue flight refuelling
capability, including operation as buddy tanker. Oil capacity 24 litres (6.35 US gallons; 5.25 Imp gallons).
ACCOMMODATION:
Crew of two (pilot and weapon systems officer) side by side on K-36DM ejection seats; cockpit width 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in);
jettisonable canopy, hinged to open upward and rearward in two panels, split on centreline.
AVIONICS:
Two superimposed radar scanners in nose, for nav/attack and terrain clearance and ranging to airborne target; laser

ranger/designator under front fuselage; SPO-15 radar warning receivers on sides of engine air intakes and tail fin; LO-82
Mak-UL missile warning receivers above centre-fuselage and below front fuselage; ram air intakes for heat exchangers
above centre-fuselage and at base of fin; Geran-F active jamming system. Integrated defensive aids suite.
ARMAMENT:
(Su-24M): Nine pylons under fuselage, each wingroot glove and outer wings for guided and unguided air-to-surface
weapons, including TN-1000 and TN-1200 nuclear weapons, up to four TV or laser-guided bombs, missiles such as Kh-23
(NATO AS-7 'Kerry'), Kh-25ML (AS-10 'Karen'), Kh-58 (AS-11 'Kilter'), Kh-25MP (AS-12 'Kegler'), Kh-59 (AS-13 'Kingbolt'),
Kh-29 (AS-14 'Kedge') and Kh-31A/P (AS-17 'Krypton'), rockets of 57 mm to 370 mm calibre, bombs (typically 38 x 100 kg
FAB-100), 23 mm gun pods or external fuel tanks; two R-60 (AA-8 'Aphid') air-to-air missiles can be carried for selfdefence. No internal weapons bay. One GSh-6-23M six-barrel 23 mm Gatling type gun inside fairing on starboard side of
fuselage undersurface; fairing for recording camera on other side.
DIMENSIONS (EXTERNAL)
Wingspan

16 degrees sweep

69 degrees sweep

10.366 m (34 ft 0 in)

Wing aspect ratio

16 degrees sweep

69 degrees sweep

2.10

Length overall, incl probe

24.594 m (80 ft 8 1/4 in)

Height overall

6.19 m (20 ft 3 3/4 in)

Tailplane span

8.39 m (27 ft 6 1/2 in)

17.638 m (57 ft 10 1/2 in)

5.63

WEIGHTS AND LOADINGS (Su-24MK)


Weight empty, equipped

19000 kg (41,885 lb)

Max wing loading

945.2 kg/m{2} (193.6 lb/sq ft)

Max power loading

180.5 kg/kN (1.77 lb/lb st)

PERFORMANCE (Su-24MK)
Max level speed, clean

at height

at S/L

Mach 1.08 (712 knots; 1320 km/h; 820 mph)

Stalling speed, flaps and wheels down


151 knots (280 km/h; 174 mph)
Max rate of climb at S/L

9000 m (29,525 ft)/min

Service ceiling

17,500 m (57,400 ft)

g limit

+6.5

LENGTH (m)

24.59

HEIGHT (m)

6.19

WINGSPAN (m)

17.63

MAX T-O WEIGHT (kg)

39,700

MAX WING LOAD (kg/m{2})

945.20

MAX LEVEL SPEED (knots)

712

Mach 1.35

T-O RUN (m)

1300

LANDING RUN (m)

950

MAX RATE CLIMB (m/min)

9000

SERVICE CEILING (m)

17,500

(source: Jane's)

Su-24M Tech. Specs.

Crew: 2
Length, m: 24,59
Height, m: 6,19
Wing span, m: 17,64
Wing area, m: 55,17
Weight empty, kg: 22300
Weight normal, kg: 35970
Weight max, kg: 39570
Max fuel, kg: 9764
Service ceiling, m: 17500
Take-off speed, km/h: 280
Landing speed, km/h: 280
Max mach at sea level: 1,08
Max mach at height: 1,35
G limit: 6,5
Max wing loading, kg/m: 717,2
Max power loading, kg/kN: 180,2
Max rate of climb at sea level, m/s: 150
Range with max internal fuel, km: 2000
Armament: GSh-6-23 gun, 8000 kg on 7 external pylons

GOSUDARSTVENNOYE UNITARNOYE PREDPRIYATIE AVIATSIONNYI VOYENNO-PROMYSHLENNYI


KOMPLEKS/AK SUKHOI (State Unitary Enterprise, Aviation Military-Industrial Complex/Concern Sukhoi)
NAPO - GOSUDARSTVENNOYE UNITARNOYE PREDPRIYATIE NOVOSIBIRSKOYE AVIATSIONNOYE-PROIZVODSTVENNOYE OBEDINENIE IMENI V P CHKALOVA (State Unitary Enterprise Novosibirsk Aircraft Production Association
named for V P Chkalov)
MANUFACTURER DETAILS
ulitsa Polzunova 15, 630051 Novosibirsk Tel: (+7 3832) 79 80 95 and 77 37 06 Fax: (+7 3832) 77 23 92 e-mail
napa@mail.cis.ru Web: http://www.allsiberia.com/novosibirsk/BUSINESS/Chkalov.html Telex: 133211 NAPO SU
General Director: Nikolai I Bobritsky Marketing Director: Valery Sadaev

Founded in 1936 as GAZ 153, NAPO has built about 36,000 aircraft of many types, including I-16, Yak-7, Yak-9, MiG-15,
MiG-17, MiG-19, Yak-28, Su-9, Su-15 and, from 1972, Su-24 multirole combat aircraft. The plant has been wholly stateowned, but 49 per cent of shares were due to have been sold by 1999. Its current products include the Antonov An-38 and
Sukhoi Su-27IB as well as motor boats. Is promoting Su-24 modernisation programmes for export customers.
SUKHOI Su-24

NATO reporting name: Fencer


Type
Attack fighter.
Programme
Design started 1965 under Yevgeniy S Felsner, Pavel Sukhoi's successor, to replace Il-28 and Yak-28 attack aircraft; T6-1
prototype, first flown 2 July 1967 and now preserved at Monino, had fixed delta-wings with downswept tips, and two pairs
of RD-36-35 lift-jets mounted at inclined angle in rear fuselage, to exhaust slightly rearward for improved take-off
performance; T6-2IG variable geometry prototype, without lift-jets, chosen for production; first flight 17 January 1970; by
1981, delivery rate 60 to 70 a year; 900+ delivered from Komsomolsk; production now terminated. `Fencer-A/B/C' built at
GAZ 153 Novosibirsk; Su-24M versions initially at GAZ 153 (approximately 380), then GAZ 416 Komsomolsk-on-Amur
(over 290), although latter plant's literature makes no mention of Su-24. Total production `about 1,200'.
Current Versions
Su-24 (`Fencer-A'): Prototype was seventh T6, first flown December 1971. Jetpipes enclosed in slab-sided box with dished
underside. Engine air intakes revised, having boundary layer extraction perforations on redesigned splitter plate; variable
ramps deactivated from Series 4 (production batch 4) onwards. In service from 1973; with front-line units by 1975. MTOW
limited to 36,200 kg (79,807 lb) because of landing gear deficiencies; speed limited to M1.35.
Su-24 (`Fencer-B'): Series 12 introduced extended fin chord below cap, giving kinked profile; heat exchanger inlet above
centre fuselage; revised noseprobe with triple side-by-side antenna fairings and dual Filin antennas under forward
fuselage. Series 15 (from c/n 1515301) introduced new rear fuselage contours with sides more closely following jetpipes.
Braking parachute fairing added below rudder from Series 15, along with finroot ram air intake.
Su-24 (`Fencer-C'): Triangular RWR antennas added to sides of engine air intakes and below fincap from Series 24,
terminating at Series 27. Revised noseprobe and redesigned Filin antenna; elint/sigint antennas differed between aircraft
within a regiment, with individual aircraft systems tuned to different frequencies. Puma nav/attack system included
RWR/elint functions. Empty weight 21,150 kg (46,627 lb).
Su-24M (`Fencer-D'): Second-generation strike/attack version; introduced true terrain-following (rather than terrainavoidance) capability. New PNS-24M navigation and attack system and with terrain-following radar coupled to autopilot;
Kaira laser/TV targeting and weapon guidance system, as in MiG-27, installed in fairing behind nosewheel bay; several
other new items of avionics. Noseprobe and undernose antenna replaced by simple probe. Slight reduction of about 85
litres (22.4 US gallons; 18.7 Imp gallons) in internal fuel capacity; increased maximum T-O weight; fuselage lengthened in
front of windscreen, partly to accommodate retractable refuelling probe on centreline, replacing Chaika IR sensor.
Eighth prototype (T6-M8) served as first Su-24M, but retained original type of noseprobe and underfuselage probes, plus
Kaira-24 sensor; first flew 29 June 1977; other converted `Fencer-B/Cs' assisted with weapons and systems development,
including T6M-21, -22, -23, -24, -27 and -29.
Su-24M (`Fencer-D' Mod): Large overwing fences integral with extended wingroot glove pylons, sometimes incorporating
27-round chaff/flare dispensers (nine-shot launchers); provision for chaff/flare dispensers above rear fuselage, on each
side of fin. Compatible with UPAZ-A `buddy' refuelling pod (on centreline pylon). Abandoned Su-24MM would have had
AL-31 engines and further increased maximum T-O weight.
Su-24MK (`Fencer D'): Export version of the above, with downgraded avionics. Some serve with Russian Air Forces
(notably at Kubinka with squadron of 237 GvTsPAT) wearing non-standard (export) camouflage, but red star nationality
markings.
Su-24 Upgrade Options: Six potential fleet modernisation options have been offered to the Russian Air Forces by Sukhoi
and other providers including the Chkalov plant at Novisibirsk and Gefest & T Closed Joint Stock Company, a commercial
arm of the VVS's own aircraft repair organisation, ranging from minor armament improvements to the installation of GPS,
helmet-mounted sight and R-73 (AA-11 `Archer') self-defence missiles, up to extensive retrofit with avionics and armament

developed for the Su-27IB. Novosibirsk received order for initial 10 upgrades on 2 October 2000.
`Su-24 Bis': At Berlin's ILA 2000 exhibition, Sukhoi displayed a model of an advanced upgrade configuration offered to the
Russian Air Forces, and a number of export customers. Externally distinguished by `scabbed-on' armour plate on the sides
of the cockpit and rounded conformal fuel tanks on the intake sides, running back below the wingroots. Internally, this
upgrade configuration includes installation of a new SV-24 computer, CRT radar display, new LCD MFDs in the cockpit,
new weapon-aiming algorithms, a digital moving map generator, ILS-31 HUD, and A737 GPS, as well as a new mission
planning system, a transfer cartridge for mission data and a new terrain-reference navigation system. Upgraded aircraft
gain a 2,400 flying hour, 30 year life extension and compatibility with a range of new weapons, including Kh-31A, Kh-31P
and Kh-159MK ASMs, and UAB-500, KAB-500 and KAB-1500 TV-guided bombs. For self-defence, the upgrade includes
Shchel helmet-mounted sights for the crew, and compatibility with the R-73 IR-homing AAM.
Su-24MR (`Fencer-E'): Reconnaissance version of Su-24M used by tactical and naval air forces; Kaira and gun omitted;
BKR-1 internal equipment includes RDSBO Shtik side-looking airborne multimission radar in nose, Zima IR
reconnaissance system under centre-fuselage; Aist-M TV reconnaissance system, AFA AP-402M panoramic camera with
90.5 mm lens in nose and AFA A-100 oblique camera with 100 mm lens in the floor of port intake duct. Can be fitted with
Kadr, allowing exposed cassette to be parachuted to the ground, albeit at the cost of some film capacity. A Shpil-2M laser
pod can be carried on centreline, with a Tangazh elint pod or Efir-1M radiation detector pod on starboard underwing
swivelling pylon and two R-60 (AA-8 `Aphid') AAMs under port wing. Data can be transmitted to ground by datalink. SBU
Orbita IO-058R digital computer. Overwing fences on most aircraft; shorter nose radome, with flush dielectric side panels
on nose; domed centre-fuselage air intake for heat exchanger; provision for two 3,000 litre (792 US gallon; 660 Imp gallon)
underwing auxiliary fuel tanks; flight refuelling capability retained, but weapons control system and attack capability
deleted. First of two prototypes (T6MR-26 and -34) flew September 1980; deliveries to Baltic fleet, replacing Tu-16s, began
mid-1985. Maximum speed at 200 m (660 ft) limited to 648 kt (1,200 km/h; 746 mph) with full external equipment.
Su-24MP (`Fencer-F'): Electronic warfare/jamming/sigint version to replace Yak-28PP `Brewer-E'. First of T-6MP-25 and 35 prototypes flew December 1979; dielectric nose panels differ from those of Su-24MR; narrow long-chord antenna fairing
under nose; no underside electro-optics; `hockey stick' communications-jamming antenna at bottom of fuselage under
nose section of each engine air intake; centreline SPS-5 Fasol EW pod. Starboard cockpit display panels replaced by EW
console. Armament GSh-6-23M gun and four R-60 (AA-8 `Aphid') AAMs. Production reportedly limited to 12 aircraft,
though some sources suggest that 13 are in Russian service, with seven more in the Ukraine. Some aircraft had narrow
fairing on spine, behind cockpit.
Customers
Russian Air Forces and Naval Aviation have 330 for ground attack, 50 for training and 120 for reconnaissance and ECM;
others with air forces of Azerbaijan (five Su-24MRs of 11 to 16 left behind by USSR forces plus others acquired
clandestinely); Belarus (24 to 42), Kazakhstan (37 or 42), Ukraine (200 to 245, including eight of the 12 Su-24MPs);
Uzbekistan (23); Afghanistan (one Su-24 reportedly purchased by Iran for Ahmed Shah Massoud's Northern Alliance;
Algeria (10 Su-24MKs and four refurbished RFAS Su-24MRs, with 12 more refurbished ex-Russian Su-24Ms (or 22
according to some sources) following in 2000-2001 (other sources suggest five in service - three delivered in 1999, two in
October 2000 - with 20 to follow in 2001, apparently ignoring the original fleet of 14-16 aircraft); Angola (unknown number
reportedly sold to UNITA by Belarus in October 1999, with at least one delivered to Catumbela by 22 January 2001); Iraq
(24 or 25, survivors now in Iran); Iran (14 plus 18 ex-Iraqi aircraft); Libya (15), Syria (20).
Su-24 CURRENT OPERATORS
Unit

Base

Equipment

3rd BAP

Taganrog

Su-24

20th Gv BAP

Kamenka

Su-24

67th BAP

Siverskoye

Su-24

164th GVBAP

Shatalovo

Su-24

207th BAP

Komsomolsk

Su-24

237th GvTsPAT

Kubinka

Su-24, Su-24M, Su-24MR

296th BAP

Marinovka

Su-24

455th BAP

Voronezh

Su-24

559th BAP

Morozovsk

Su-24M

Russia (Air Forces)


1

722nd BAP

Smurav'yevo

Su-24

959th BAP

Yeysk

Su-24

968th IISAP

Lipetsk

Su-24 (various)

Unident BAP

Bada

Su-24

Unident BAP

Borzya NW

Su-24

Unident BAP

Nyangi

Su-24

Unident BAP

Verino

Su-24

Unident BAP

Near Komsomolsk

Su-24

1st UBAP

Lebyazhye

Su-24

976th UBAP

Totskoye

Su-24

11th ORAP

Marinovka

Su-24MR

47th ORAP

Shatalovo

Su-24MR

98th ORAP

Monchegorsk

Su-24MR

125th ORAP

Domna

Su-24MR

240th GvUAP

Ostrov

Su-24M

4th INShAP

Chernyakhovsk

Su-24M

43rd OBAP

Gvardeskoye (Crimea)

Su-24

846th ORAE

Chkalovsk

Su-24M, Su-24MR

Unident ORAE

Artem

Su-24M, Su-24MR

Laghouat

Su-24MK

Catumbela

Su-24 (unknown sub-variant)

Kyurdamir or Dallyar

Su-24M

Ros

Su-24M, Su-24MR

72nd Tac Ftr Sqn

Shiraz

Su-24MK

Unident Tac Ftr Sqn

Tehran-Mehrabad

Su-24MK

Detachment (anti-shipping)

Chah Buhar

Su-24MK

Nikolayevka

Su-24, Su-24MR

Umm Aitqah

Su-24MK

T4

Su-24MK

6th AVB

Nikolayev

Su-24

7th BAP

Starokonstantinov

Su-24M

44th BAP

Kanatovo

Su-24

69th BAP

Gorodok

Su-24

Russia (Naval Aviation)

Algeria
274th Ftr-Bomber Sqn
Angola
Unident unit
Azerbaijan
Unident BAP
Belarus
116th BRAB
Iran

Kazakhstan
149th BAP
Libya
1124 Bomber Sqn
Syria
Unident Bomber Sqn
Ukraine

806th BAP

Luts'k

Su-24

947th BAP

Dubno

Su-24M

48th GvORAP

Kolomiya

Su-24MR, Su-24MP

118th ORAP

Chortkov

Su-24MR, Su-24MP

511th ORAP

Buyalik

Su-24MR

Khanabad

Su-24, Su-24MR

Uzbekistan
60th BAP
1

Probably disbanded
Notes: BAP is Bombardirovch'nyi Aviatsion'nyi Polk (Bomber Aviation Regiment); ORAP is Otdel'nyi Razvedivatel'nyi
Aviatsion'nyi Polk (Independent Reconnaissance Aviation Regiment) and ORAE a Squadron); OMShAP is Otdel'nyi
Morskoy Shturmovoy Aviatsion'nyi Polk (Independent Naval Aviation Attack Regiment). Prefixes are Gv, Gvardiya
(Guards) and U, Ucheb'nyi (Training).
Design Features
Low-level interdictor employing 1960s technology - notably variable geometry. Shoulder wing; wing section SR14S-5.376
on fixed panels, SR14S-9.226 to SR16M-10 on outer panels; 4 30' anhedral from roots; incidence 0 at root, -4 at tip;
triangular fixed glove box; four-position (16, 35, 45, 69) pivoted outer panels, each with pivoting stores pylon; slab-sided
rectangular section fuselage; integral engine air intake trunks, each with splitter plate and outer lip inclined slightly
downward; chord of lower part of tailfin extended forward, giving kinked leading-edge; leading-edge sweepback 59 30' on
fin, 30 on inset rudder, 50 on horizontal tail surfaces; basic operational task, as designated `frontal bomber', to deliver
wide range of air-to-surface missiles for defence suppression, with some hard target kill potential; specially developed longrange navigation system and electro-optical weapons systems make possible penetration of hostile airspace at night or in
adverse weather with great precision, to deliver ordnance within 55 m (180 ft) of target.
Flying Controls
Automatic flight control system with artificial feel. Full-span leading-edge slats, drooping aileron and two-section doubleslotted trailing-edge flaps on each outer wing panel; differential spoilers forward of flaps for roll control at low speeds and
use as lift dumpers on landing; airbrake under each side of centre-fuselage; inset rudder; all-moving horizontal tail surfaces
operate collectively for pitch control, differentially for roll control, assisted by wing spoilers except when wings fully swept.
Structure
All-metal; semi-monocoque fuselage; two slightly splayed ventral fins.
Landing Gear
Hydraulically retractable tricycle type, with twin wheels on each unit; main units retract forward and inward into air intake
duct fairings; steerable nose unit retracts rearward. Oleo-pneumatic shock-absorbers. Trailing-link main units; KT-172
mainwheel tyres size 950300, pressure 12.15 bars (176 lb/sq in); KN-21 nosewheel tyres size 600200, pressure 9.10
bars (132 lb/sq in); KT-69.430 brakes on mainwheels, with IA-58 anti-skid units; mudguard on nosewheels; two cruciform
2
brake-chutes, each 25 m (269 sq ft).
Power Plant
Two Saturn/Lyulka AL-21F-3A turbojets, each 75.0 kN (16,865 lb st) dry and 109.8 kN (24,690 lb st) with afterburning; fixed
engine air intakes. Four internal fuel tanks, capacity 11,883 litres (3,139 US gallons; 2,613 Imp gallons), can be
supplemented by two 2,000 litre (528 US gallon; 440 Imp gallon) external tanks under fuselage and two 3,000 litre (792 US
gallon; 660 Imp gallon) tanks under wing gloves. Pressure and gravity fuelling. Probe-and-drogue flight refuelling
capability, including operation as buddy tanker using UPAZ-A underbelly pod. Oil capacity 24 litres (6.35 US gallons; 5.25
Imp gallons).
Accommodation

Crew of two (pilot and weapon systems officer) side by side on K-36DM zero/zero ejection seats; cockpit width 1.65 m (5 ft
5 in); jettisonable canopy, hinged to open upward and rearward in two panels, split on centreline.
Systems
Cockpit air conditioned, with automatic pressure and temperature control. Three independent hydraulic systems. Main and
emergency pneumatic systems, each with 18 litre bottle, pressure 152 bars (2,200 lb/sq in). Two electrical generators for
200/115 V AC supply and two for 28.5 V DC supply. Gaseous oxygen system. Hot-air de-icing system.
Avionics
Radar: Leninets Orion-A pulse Doppler set; two superimposed (over and under) radar scanners in nose, NATO ASCC
`Drop Kick' radar complex with nav/attack and ranging to airborne or ground targets and `Relief' for terrain avoidance.
Flight: DISS-7 Doppler, MIS-P inertial platform, RSBN-6S Shoran/ILS and ARK-15M radio compass.
Mission: Kaira-24 laser ranger/designator under front fuselage. TsVU IO-058 Orbita 10 computer.
Self-defence: Karpati integrated defensive system with SRO-15 or -155 radar warning receivers on sides of engine air
intakes and tailfin; LO-82 Mak-UL missile warning receivers above centre fuselage and below front fuselage; Geran-F
active jamming system, all controlled by Neon-F control unit and linked to Automat-F chaff/flare dispensers. Aircraft
supplied to Iran have 54 chaff/flares in wing fence dispensers, in addition to standard 24 on sides of rear fuselage.
Armament (Su-24M)
Nine pylons under fuselage, each wingroot glove and outer wings for guided and unguided air-to-surface weapons,
including TN-1000 and TN-1200 nuclear weapons, up to four TV- or laser-guided bombs, ASMs such as Kh-23 (AS-7
`Kerry'), Kh-25ML (AS-10 `Karen'), Kh-58 (AS-11 `Kilter'), Kh-25MP (AS-12 `Kegler'), Kh-59 (AS-13 `Kingbolt'), Kh-29 (AS14 `Kedge') and Kh-31A/P (AS-17 `Krypton'), rockets of 57 to 330 mm calibre, bombs (typically 38 100 kg FAB-100), 23
mm gun pods or external fuel tanks; two R-60 (AA-8 `Aphid') AAMs can be carried for self-defence. No internal weapons
bay. One GSh-6-23M six-barrel 23 mm Gatling-type gun inside fairing on starboard side of fuselage undersurface; fairing
for recording camera on other side. Iranian Su-24MKs also carry indigenous derivatives of US Mk 82, 83 and 84 bombs,
Sattar-2 LGBs and C-802K and Fajr Darya anti-ship missiles, and the indigenous Kite area denial mine dispenser.
Dimensions, External
Wing span: 16 sweep

17.64 m (57 ft 10 in)

69 sweep

10.365 m (34 ft 0 in)

Wing aspect ratio: 16 sweep

5.6

69 sweep

2.1

Length overall, incl probe: Su-24

22.67 m (74 ft 4 in)

Su-24M

24.595 m (80 ft 8 in)

Height overall: Su-24

5.92 m (19 ft 5 in)

Su-24M

6.19 m (20 ft 3 in)

Tailplane span

8.39 m (27 ft 6 in)

Wheel track

3.31 m (10 ft 10 in)

Wheelbase

8.51 m (27 ft 11 in)

Areas
2

Wings, gross: 16 sweep

55.17 m (593.8 sq ft)

69 sweep

51.02 m (549.2 sq ft)

Leading-edge flaps (total)

3.035 m (32.68 sq ft)

Trailing-edge flaps (total)

10.21 m (109.90 sq ft)

Spoilers (total)

2.06 m (22.17 sq ft)

2
2
2

Fin

9.47 m (101.94 sq ft)

Rudder

1.37 m (14.75 sq ft)

Horizontal tail surfaces (total)

13.705 m (147.55 sq ft)

Weights and Loadings (Su-24M)


Weight empty, equipped

22,300 kg (49,163 lb)

Max internal fuel

9,764 kg (21,525 lb)

Max external stores

8,100 kg (17,857 lb)

Normal T-O weight

36,000 kg (79,367 lb)

Max T-O weight

39,700 kg (87,523 lb)

Max landing weight

24,500 kg (54,012 lb)

Max wing loading

778.1 kg/m (159.37 lb/sq ft)

Max power loading

181 kg/kN (1.77 lb/lb st)

Performance (Su-24MK)
Max level speed, clean: at height

M1.35

at S/L

M1.08 (712 kt; 1,320 km/h; 820 mph)

Stalling speed, flaps and wheels down

151 kt (280 km/h; 174 mph)

Max rate of climb at S/L

9,000 m (29,525 ft)/min

Service ceiling

17,500 m (57,400 ft)

T-O run

1,300 m (4,265 ft)

T-O to 15 m (50 ft)

1,500 m (4,920 ft)

Landing from 15 m (50 ft)

1,600 m (5,250 ft)

Landing run

950 m (3,120 ft)

Combat radius:
lo-lo-lo

over 174 n miles (322 km; 200 miles)

lo-lo-hi with 2,500 kg (5,500 lb) of weapons

515 n miles (950 km; 590 miles)

hi-lo-hi, with 3,000 kg (6,615 lb) of weapons and


two external tanks

565 n miles (1,050 km; 650 miles)

g limit

+6.5

(source: Jane's)