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Direct Instruction Lesson Plan Template

Grade Level/Subject:
Central Focus:
rd
3 Grade/Themes and Fables
Use the plot and main idea of a fable to identify the theme.
Essential Standard/Common Core Objective:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.2
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from
Date submitted:
Date
diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or
taught: 11/3/15
moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in
the text.
Daily Lesson Objective:
Independently, students will need to obtain a 4/5 on the graphic organizer worksheet after
reading the Aesop fable.
21st Century Skills:
Academic Language Demand (Language Function and
Vocabulary):
Communicate Clearly:
Fable: Students will need to understand what a fable is and
Articulate thoughts and ideas
that it has an underlying message or lesson.
effectively using oral, written and
nonverbal communication skills in
Plot: Students will need to understand that a plot is events
a variety of forms and contexts.
that happened in the story.
Access and Evaluate Information:
Evaluate information critically and
competently.

Main Idea: Students will need to know that the main idea is
what the story is mostly about.

Theme: Students will need to understand that a theme is


an underlying meaning or lesson that the author is trying to
convey.
Prior Knowledge:
Students need to have an idea of what a fable is.
Activity

1. Focus and Review

2. Statement of
Objective
for Student

Description of Activities and Setting


Have you ever heard of something called a fable? Maybe
youve heard of Aesops fables? Students will answer yes or
no. If you have heard of a fable and you know what it is, can
you share with the class? Students will share. Can anyone
give me an example of a fable? Students will provide
examples. A fable is a short tale to teach a moral lesson.
Lets figure out how to find the theme of some!
Today we are going to learn what a fable is and how to
determine the theme of a fable. We will do this by reading
fables and using the plot and main idea to understand what
the fables mean. We will learn what their theme is, or what
they mean.

Time

The theme of a story is the underlying meaning or lesson of a


story that the author is trying to convey to the reader. Good
readers think about the events that happen in a story, or the
plot of a story. They also think about what the story is mostly
about, or the main idea. By doing this, we can figure out the
lesson we can learn, or the theme of the story.
Read The Boasting Traveler, an Aesop fable.

3. Teacher Input

4. Guided Practice

I will use a graphic organizer to write down some points


about the plot, some of the events that happened in the
story. The teacher writes down the important events of the
story in the plot section. I will now go into the next box and
write what the story is mostly about, the main idea. The
teacher writes down the main idea in the main idea section.
From this information, I can figure out what the theme
(underlying meaning or lesson) of The Boasting Traveler is. I
think that the author is trying to tell me that actions speak
louder than words. Teacher writes the theme down in the
theme section of the graphic organizer. Now lets try this
together as a class!
Read The Hare and the Tortoise, an Aesop fable.
We will use our graphic organizer to determine the theme of
this story together. First, can someone tell me an event that
happened in this story? Students will give varying answers:
(1) The hare was boasting of his speed. (2) The hare
challenged anyone to race him. (3) The tortoise accepted the
hares challenge. (4) They raced. (5) The hare took a nap. (6)
The tortoise won the race. Teacher is writing down some of
these events on the graphic organizer. These are great
things that show us the plot of the story! Who thinks they
know the main idea of the story? Students will give their
best answers and will vary. Teacher writes down the main
idea on the graphic organizer. Okay now that we have a
main idea and think we know what this story is mostly about,
we can figure out the theme. Who thinks they know the
theme? Students will answer with varied answers. An
acceptable answer would include: slow and steady wins the
race. The teacher records a couple themes and the class
picks the best theme. Now we know the theme, or lesson of
the story. Since we have done this together, I would like for
you to try it on your own!

5. Independent
Practice

6. Assessment
Methods of
all
objectives/skills:

7. Closure

Independently, students will read The Fox and the Crow.


After reading, students will use the same graphic organizer
used by the teacher to record events from the story in the plot
section, what the story is mostly about in the main idea
section, and the lesson of the story in the theme section. As
students are reading and completing the worksheet, the
teacher will be walking around making sure that students
understand what they are doing and are able to fill in the
graphic organizer to determine the theme. The teacher will
be assisting those struggling students.
Students will complete the graphic organizer they did for independent
practice. Students will need to write down 3 events from the story, the
main idea, and the theme. Students will get one point for each event
they write down, three in total. Students will also receive a point for the
main idea and a point for the theme. Students can receive a possible 5
points. Independently, students will need to obtain at least a 4/5 points
to meet the daily lesson objective.
After reading The Fox and The Crow and completing the
graphic organizer, can someone tell me what they think the
theme of this story is? Students will answer with varied
answers but may include: Do not trust people that try to
compliment you.

8. Assessment
Results of
all
objectives/skills:
Targeted Students
Modifications/Accommodations:

Student/Small Group
Modifications/Accommodations:

ELLs will have a copy of the fable in their


If students are struggling with the guided practice
native language, so they can access it
portion of the lesson, the teacher can use another
easily without confusion.
fable as an example. By doing this, students will
Struggling readers will have assistance of
be able to identify the theme of a fable more
the teacher to make sure they understand
readily.
the fables.
Materials/Technology:
White board to record information and draw graphic organizer
The Boasting Traveler (one copy for teacher to read)
The Hare and the Tortoise (one copy for teacher to read)
The Fox and the Crow (one copy for each student)
Pencil (one for each student)
Graphic organizer worksheet (one for each student)
References:

http://www.readworks.org/lessons/grade3/theme/lesson-1

Reflection on lesson:

Name: _____________________________________

Title: The Fox and the Crow from Aesops Fables


Theme:

Main Idea:

Plot: