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COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

2001 - 2010

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN 2001 - 2010 CITY OF TARLAC PREPARED BY THE: CITY DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

CITY OF TARLAC

PREPARED BY THE:

CITY DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL CITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT STAFF

Republic of the Philippines CITY OF TARLAC T a r l a c OFFICE OF

Republic of the Philippines

CITY OF TARLAC

T a r l a c

OFFICE OF THE CITY MAYOR

CITY OF TARLAC T a r l a c OFFICE OF THE CITY MAYOR M M

MMeessssaaggee

Tarlac City is in transition period from basically a typical agricultural area to a mixed agro-commercial and industrial metropolis.

With the opportunities we can enjoy from its strategic location being at the heart of Central Luzon, each square meter of our land must be fully utilized to attain our vision, which is bounty amidst booming business and industry yet in consonance with ecological balance.

With the Comprehensive Land Use Plan, Tarlac City government could be provided with guidelines on its policies, plans and programs utilizing our land according to their classification.

The Comprehensive Land Use Plan, which is a product of intensive series of researches done by the luminaries in their respective disciplines, we can come up with the best socio-cultural and economic schemes that we may respond to the challenges of the times particularly our inclusion in the “W” Growth Corridor where we are at the center of this strategic zone of economic opportunities.

With this undertaking, the local government unit of Tarlac City can now enjoy a standard data-based plan, which is imperative to its visions, which is to emancipate the constituents of the 76 barangays from poverty and through this Comprehensive Land Use Plan, we can project a bright future for Central Luzon’s Melting Pot City.

With this, we are proud to say that YES WE CAN! We are ready to meet the challenges of globalization and sustainable development.

GENARO M. MENDOZA City Mayor

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LUNGSOD MUNA BAGO SARILI MAGKAISA SA SERBISYONG MAY INTEGRIDAD, KABUHAYAN AY AANGAT PARA SA PAMAYANANG TARLAK!!!

(045) 982 6005 / 982 0190 Telefax; E-MAIL ADDRESS: magsikap_tarlac@yahoo.com / magsikap_tarlac@hotmail.com

Republic of the Philippines CITY OF TARLAC T a r l a c OFFICE OF

Republic of the Philippines

CITY OF TARLAC

T a r l a c

OFFICE OF THE CITY PLANNING & DEV’T. COORDINATOR

FOREWORD

Again, there is a need to reformulate our Comprehensive Development

Plan from the date it was formulated last 1997 – 2001 to 2001 – 2010, because

we are indeed experiencing rapid urbanization and development. In order for us

to be directed to the right path, the private sectors with the Local Development

Council were involved in coming to this important tool, the Comprehensive

Development and Land Use Plan.

As envision by this important document, it is not only for the present time

but for the future and the next generation to come, an important guide to our

mission of development.

At this juncture, I would like to take the opportunity to express my sincere

thanks to my staff in the City Planning & Development Office who really worked

hard for it and finally coming up to this plan. I wish to express also my heartfelt

gratitude to the Workshop Class Group 210-1-B of U.P. School of Urban and

Regional Planning for their Technical Assistance; we really appreciate their

expertise and unselfish efforts. To the Officials of the City, especially to our City

Mayor, Vice-Mayor and Members of the Sangguniang Panlungsod, “Maraming

Salamat Po” for giving us the support.

More Power and God Bless!

JANET B. SALVADOR-PINEDA City Planning and Development Coordinator

MAGkaisa sa Serbisyong may Integridad, Kabuhayan ay Aangat para sa Pamayanang TARLAC

Republic of the Philippines

CITY OF TARLAC T a r l a c OFFICE OF THE SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD
CITY OF TARLAC
T a r l a c
OFFICE OF THE SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Page No.

COVER

CITY MAYOR’S MESSAGE

FOREWORD

SANGGUNIANG PANLUNGSOD RESOLUTION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

i – vii

LIST OF TABLES

viii – x

LIST OF MAPS

xi-xii

LIST OF PLANS & FIGURES

Xii

LIST OF ACRONYMS

xiii – xvi

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Xvii

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Xviii

INTRODUCTION

1

Project Background

1

Planning Objectives

2

Methodology

3

Rationale

4

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

9 – 11

SOCIO-ECONOMIC & PHYSICAL PROFILE OF TARLAC CITY

12

Geographic Location

12

Climate

12

Water Resources

13

Topography

14

Slope

14

Soil Types

14

Geology

18

NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND PROVINCIALCONTEXT

24

National Perspective

24

Regional Perspective

24

Provincial Perspective

25

The VISION

30

The Future of the City Conceptual Framework of the Vision MISSION Major Goals

31

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page No.

DEMOGRAPHY

33

Population Size and Growth

33

Urban/Rural Distribution

33

Population Density

34

Sex and Structure

34

Mother Tongue

34

Religion

34

Employment Status

35

Projected Household and Population

35

CHAPTER 1.0

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

1.1 AGRICULTURE

A. Existing Situation

52

B. Goal

57

C. Objectives

57

D. Targets

58

E. Strategies

58

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

58

G. Land Use Implications

64

1.2 INDUSTRY

A. Existing Situation

64

B. Goal

65

C. Objectives

65

D. Targets

65

E. Strategies

65

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

67

G. Land Use Implications

67

1.3 COMMERCE

A. Existing Situation

67

B. Goal

69

C. Objectives

69

D. Targets

70

E. Strategies

70

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

70

G. Land Use Implications

74

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.4 TOURISM

Page No.

A. Existing Situation

74

 

B. Goal

75

C. Objectives

75

D.

Targets

75

E. Strategies

76

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

76

G. Land Use Implications

79

CHAPTER 2.0

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 

2.1 INTRODUCTION

81

2.2 MAJOR GOAL

82

2.3 HOUSING

A. Existing Situation

82

 

B. Goal

83

C. Objectives

83

D. Targets

83

E. Strategies

83

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

90

G. Land Use Implications

90

2.4 EDUCATION

A. Existing Situation

90

 

B. Goal

91

C. Objectives

92

D. Targets

92

E. Strategies

92

F. Plans, Programs and Projects

93

G. Land Use Implications

114

2.5 HEALTH AND NUTRITION

A. Existing Situation

114

 

B. Goal

115

C. Objectives

116

D. Targets

116

E. Strategies

116

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

117

G. Land Use Implications

133

TABLE OF CONTENTS

2.6 SPORTS AND RECREATION

Page No.

A. Existing Situation

133

B. Goal

133

C. Objectives

134

D. Targets

134

E. Strategies

134

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

134

G. Land Use Implications

136

2.7 PROTECTIVE SERVICES

A. Existing Situation

136

B. Goal

138

C. Objectives

138

D. Targets

138

E. Strategies

139

F. Plans, Programs and Projects

139

G. Land Use Implications

139

2.8 SOCIAL WELFARE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

A. Existing Situation

145

B. Goal

145

C. Objectives

145

D. Targets

146

E. Strategies

146

F. Plans, Programs, Projects

146

G. Land Use Implications

154

CHAPTER 3.0

INFRASTRUCTURE

3.1 INTRODUCTION

154

3.2 MAJOR GOAL

155

3.3 TRANSPORTATION

3.3.1 ROADS

155

3.3.2 BRIDGES

165

3.3.3 RAILWAY

166

3.3.4 MODE OF TRANSPORTATION

166

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page No.

3.4 WATERWORKS Existing Situation

182

Goal

184

Objectives

184

Targets

184

Strategies

184

Plans and Programs

196

Land Use Implications

196

3.5 POWER GENERATION Existing Situation

196

Goal

204

Objectives

204

Targets

204

Strategies

204

Plans and Programs

205

Land Use Implication

205

3.6 COMMUNICATION Existing Situation

205

Goal

209

Objectives

209

Targets

209

Plans and Programs

210

Land Use Implication

210

CHAPTER 4.0

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

 

4.1 INTRODUCTION

213

4.2 MAJOR GOAL

214

4.3 AIR

4.3.1

Existing Situation

215

4.3.2

Goal

215

4.3.3

Objectives

215

4.3.4

Targets

216

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page No.

4.3.6 Plans, Projects & Programs

216

4.3.7 Land Use Implications

216

4.4 WATER

4.4.1

WATER RESOURCES

217

4.4.1.1

Existing Situation

218

4.4.1.2

Goal

218

4.4.1.3

Objectives

218

4.4.1.4

Targets

218

4.4.1.5

Strategies

218

4.4.1.6

Plans, Projects & Programs

218

4.5 LAND

4.5.1

LAND RESOURCES

221

4.5.1.1

Existing Situation

221

Areas Subject to Volcanic Hazards

221

Severely-Flooded Areas

221

Network of Protected Agricultural Areas (NPAA)

222

Cemeteries/Memorial Parks

224

Blighted Areas

224

4.5.1.2

Goal

225

4.5.1.3

Objectives

226

4.5.1.4

Targets

226

4.5.1.5

Strategies

226

4.5.1.6

Plans, Projects & Programs

227

4.5.1.7

Land Use Implication

227

4.5.2

WASTE MANAGEMENT

228

4.5.2.1

Existing Situation

228

Solid Waste Management Drainage, Sanitation and Sewerage

228

(Liquid Waste)

229

Goal

229

Objectives

230

Targets

230

Strategies

230

Plans & Programs

231

Land Use Implication

231

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LAND USE PLAN

Page No.

5.1 INTRODUCTION

237

5.2 METHODOLOGY

239

5.3 SECTORAL LAND USE IMPLICATIONS

240

5.4 DEVELOPMENT ISSUES

241

5.5 MAJOR GOALS

242

5.6 GENERAL LAND USE

244

5.7 THE URBAN GROWTH AREA

247

CHAPTER 6.0

 

LOCAL ADMINISTRATION

 

6.1

INTRODUCTION

269

6.2

LOCAL ADMINISTRATIVE AND FINANCIAL PROFILE Administrative Structure/Set-up Functions and Responsibilities

271

6.3

SECTORAL STRATEGIES WITH IMPLICATIONS TO LOCAL

ADMINISTRATION

312

6.2.1

Economic

312

6.2.2

Social

312

6.2.3

Infrastructure

313

6.2.4

Environment

313

6.3.4

Finance

313

6.3

GOALS, OBJECTIVES, TARGETS,

STRATEGIES, POLICIES

314

6.4

PROPOSED ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

316

CHAPTER 7.0

 

ZONING ORDINANCE

 

324

CHAPTER 8.0

 

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS PLAN

380

APPENDIX A

CITY DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 2

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE No.

 

TITLE

 

PAGE No.

 

1 Slope Classification

 

15

2 Soil Classification

17

3 Historical Growth of Population

 

36

4 Total Population, Household Population and Number of Households per Barangay as of May 1, 2000

37 – 38

5 Population Annual Density

 

39

6 Population Density per Barangay

 

40 – 41

7 Household Population by Age-Group and by Sex

 

42

8 Number of Private Household by Language or Dialect Generally Spoken

 

43

9 Number of Household by Religion

 

44

10

– A

Household Population 15 Years Old and

 
 

Over by Sex and Employment Status

 

45

10

– B

Total Population 15 Years Old and Over and Employment Status Rates

45

10

– C

Employed Persons by Type of Industry

45

11 Projected Number of Households by Barangay

 

46 – 47

12 Projected Population 2001 – 2010

 

48

13 Projected Urban – Rural Distribution

49 – 51

14 Crop Area and Average Yield

 

59

15 Animal Production

 

60

16 Irrigation Facilities

 

60

17 Post Harvest Facilities

 

61

18 Existing Organization

 

61

19 Area, Location and Production of Fishing Grounds

 

62 – 63

20 Number of Industrial Establishments

 

66

21 Number of Commercial Establishments

71 – 73

22 List of Subdivisions

 

84 – 85

23

– A

Occupied Housing Units, Households, Household Population by Type of Building

 

86

23

– B

Occupied Housing Units by Type of Building, Number of Households in Each Housing Unit

 

87

24 Projected Population Household Increments and Housing Requirements

 

88

25 Number of Connections & Served Population by LWUA

 

89

26 Name, Location, Type and Facilities of Schools by Level

 

96 – 97

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE No.

 

TITLE

 

PAGE No.

 

27 Enrollment for the Last Four (4) Years by

 
 

Level 1998 – 2002

98 – 102

 

28 Student – Teacher and Student – Classroom

 
 

Ratios Per School by Level 1999 – 2000

 

103 – 109

 

29 Vocational / Technical Education

 

110

30 Student – Teacher Ratio

 

111

31 Projected Enrollment for Primary Level

 

112

32

– A

Projected Teacher Requirement

 

113

32

– B

Projected Classroom Requirements

113

33

– A

Health Personnel

120

33

– B

Health Facilities

121

34

List of Government and Private Hospitals /Clinics and their Bed Capacity

 

122

35

– A

Live Birth by Sex and by Year

 

123

35

– B

Number of Deaths, All Causes

 

123

35

– C

Number of Deaths & Live Birth in the Same Year

 

123

36 Ten Leading Causes of Mortality

 

124

37 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity

125

38 Family Planning Users for the Past Three (3) Years

126

39 Census of Children Weighed per Barangay

 

127 – 132

40

– A

Crime Committed for the Past Three (3) Years

 

140

40

– B

Tarlac City Police Station Crime Statistics

 

141

41 Fire Incidence for the Past Five (5) Years

142

42 Location, Area, Size of Force, Force – Population Ratio, Facilities and Equipment

 

143

43 Current and Projected Requirement on Policemen and Firemen

 

144

44 Social Welfare Personnel

 

147

45 Social Services Clientele System

 

148 – 150

46 Day Care Masterlist

 

151 – 153

47 Summary of Existing Road Network by Administrative

156

48 Inventory of Roads

 

163 – 164

49 Inventory of Bridges

 

165

50 Waterworks System

185

51 2000 Served Population and Water Demand

 

186

52

– A

Level II System

 

187

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE No.

 

TITLE

 

PAGE No.

52

– B

Level I System

 

188 – 191

53 2005 Served Population and Water Demand Projections

 

192

54 Existing Surface Water

 

193

55 Household by Type of Fuel Used for Lighting

 

197

56 Household by Type of Fuel Used for Cooking

 

197

57 Household Served and Unserved Electricity

 

198

58 Number of Connections by Type of Users and Average Consumption

199

59 Infrastructure Provision for Power

200

60 Electric Rate per Type of Consumer

200

61

– A

Project Power Requirement (Tarlac Electric, Inc.)

 

203

61

– B

Projected Power Requirement (Tarelco 1)

 

203

62 Postal Service Personnel

 

208

63 Volume of Mail (Average per Month)

 

208

64 Current and Projected Letter Carrier Requirement

209

65 List of Cemeteries/Memorial Parks

 

223

66 Existing General Land Use

 

244

67 Proposed General Land Use

 

247

68 Existing Urban Land Use

 

249

69 Proposed Urban Land Use

 

250

70 Distribution of Personnel According to Office/Department as of Year 2001

 

270

71 General Fund / Special Purpose Fund and Personnel Service Fund

309

72 Revenue and Expenditures

 

310

73 Budget for the Last Five (5) Years

 

310

74 Distribution of Revenues by Source

321

75 Expenditure by Object

 

321

76 Local Development Investment Program CY 2001 - 2004

 

317 – 323

MAP No.

LIST OF MAPS

TITLE

PAGE No.

1

Map of the Philippines

 

5

2

Regional Map

 

6

3

Provincial Map

 

7

4

Map of Tarlac City

 

8

5

Topographic Map

 

19

6

Slope Map

20

7

Soil Map

21

8

Water Resource Map

 

22

9

Hazard Map Existing Provincial Land Use Plan Settlements Map (Provincial) Provincial Physical Development Framework Provincial Land Use Plan Map Existing Infrastructure Map – Education

 

23

10

 

26

11

27

12

 

28

13

29

14A

 

(Elementary & Primary Level) Existing Infrastructure Map – Education

(Secondary & Tertiary Level)

 

94A

14B

 

94B

15

Infrastructure Plan Map Year 2010 - Education

 

95

16

Existing Infrastructure Map – Health

 

118

17

Infrastructure Plan Map Year 2010 - Health

119

18

Existing Infrastructure Map – Recreation & Leisure

135

19

Provincial Road Map

 

160

20

National Road Map

161

21

Proposed Road Network

 

162

22

Existing Infrastructure Map – Transportation

 

173

23

Infrastructure Plan Map Year 2010 - Transportation

174

24

Location Map of Existing & Proposed Traffic Signalisation within the City Proper

 

177

25

Location Map of By-Pass Roads

 

181

26

Existing Infrastructure Map – Water Supply

 

194

27

Infrastructure Plan Map Year 2010 – Water Supply

195

28

Existing Infrastructure Map – Power

 

201

29

Infrastructure Plan Map Year 2010 – Power

202

30

Existing Infrastructure Map – Telecommunications

211

31

Infrastructure Plan Map Year 2010 – Telecommunications

 

212

LIST OF MAPS

MAP No.

TITLE

PAGE No.

32 Infrastructure Plan Map - Flood Control

33 Irrigation Map of Tarlac City

34 Infrastructure Plan Map - Liquid & Solid Waste Disposal Map

35 Strategic Agriculture and Fisheries Development Zone Map

36 Land Suitability Map

37 Sustainability Map

38 Protection Lands Map

39 Base Map of Tarlac City

40 Existing General Land Use Map

41 Proposed General Land Use Map

42 Existing Urban Land Use Map

43 Proposed Urban Land Use Map

Existing Urban Land Use Map 43 Proposed Urban Land Use Map 2 1 9 220 232

219

220

232

233

234

235

236

243

245

246

251

252

LIST OF PLANS

PLAN No.

TITLE

PAGE No.

1 Development Plan of Benig River

 

80

2 Development Plan of F. Tañedo Street

175

3 Geometric Improvement Plan of F. Tañedo St. & P. Burgos St. Intersection

176

4 Proposed Pedestrian Overpass Plan

 

178

5 Site Development Plan for the Light Industry- Ecological Park on the 100 Has.

179

 

LIST OF PICTURES

PIC. No.

TITLE

PAGE No.

1

Existing & Proposed Façade of Tarlac City Hall

180

LIST OF ACRONYMS

AGZ

Agricultural Zone

AIZ

Agro-Industrial Zone

ATO

Air Transportation Office

B.P.

Batas Pambansa

BCYW

Bureau of Child and Youth Welfare

BEA

Bureau of Emergency Assistance

BFCW

Bureau of Family and Community Welfare

BFP

Bureau of Fire Protection

BJPM

Bureau of Jail and Penology Management

BSWM

Bureau of Soils and Water Management

BUTEL

Bureau of Telecommunications

BWW

Bureau of Women Welfare

CVR

Cagayan Valley road

CBD

Central Business District

CAO

City Agriculture Office

CCR

City Civil Registrar

CDC

City Development Council

CEEMO

City Economic Enterprise Management Office

CEO

City Engineer's Office

CENRO

City Environment and Natural Resource Office

CGSO

City General Services Office

CHO

City Health Office

CHRMO

City Human Resource Management Office

CPDC

City Planning and Development Coordinator

CPDO

City Planning and Development Office

CSWDO

City Social Welfare and Development Office

CSC

Civil Service Commission

CSEZ

Clark Special Economic Zone

CTP-IFP

Commercial Tree Plantation and Industrial Forest Plantation

COA

Commission on Audit

CDF

Community Development Fund

CVOs

Community Volunteer Organizations

CLUP

Comprehensive Land Use Plan

LIST OF ACRONYMS

DCC

Day Care Center

DA

Department of Agriculture

DepEd

Department of Education

DENR

Department of Environment and Natural Resources

DOH

Department of Health

DPWH

Department of Public Works and Highways

DOT

Department of Tourism

DTI

Department of Trade and Industry

ECOREV

Ecological Revolution Programs

ECC

Environmental Compliance Certificate

EIA

Environmental Impact Assessment

EO

Executive Order

FAR

Floor Area Ratio

FLMA

Forest Land Management Agreement

FZ

Forest Zone

GCZ

General Commercial Zone

GIZ

General Institutional Zone

GRZ

General Residential Zone

GSIS

Government Social and Insurance System

GFA

Gross Floor Area

HLURB

Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board

ISF

Integrated Social Forestry Programs

IRA

Internal Revenue Allotment

LCE

Local Chief Executive

LGC

Local Government Code

LGU

Local Government Unit

LTLG

Local Transport Licensing Group

LWUA

Local Waterworks and Utilities Administration

LZBAA

Local Zoning Board of Adjustment and Appeals

LZRC

Local Zoning Review Committee

LIC

Luisita Industrial Complex

LIP

Luisita Industrial Park

MIS

Management Information System

MNR

Manila North Road

LIST OF ACRONYMS

NEDA

National Economic Development Authority

NHA

National Housing Authority

NIA

National Irrigation Administration

NLUP

National Land Use Policy

NAPOCOR

National Power Corporation

NSO

National Statistics Office

NAAD

Network of Areas for Agricultural Development

NPAA

Network of Protected Agricultural Areas

NGOs

Non-governmental Organizations

NLE

North Luzon Expressway

NOLCOM

Northern Luzon Command

PRZ

Parks and Recreation Zone

POC

Peace and Order Council

PIEs

People's Industrial Estates

POs

People's Organizations

PEZA

Philippine Economic Zones Authority

PICPA

Philippine Institute of Certified Public Accountant

PLDT

Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company

PMTDP

Philippine Medium-Term Development Plan

PNP

Philippine National Police

PHILVOCS

Philippine Volcanology and Seismology

PILTEL

Pilipino Telephone Corporation

PUD

Planned Unit Development

PBAC

Prequalification, Bids and Awards Committee

PD

Presidential Decree

PUC

Primary Urban Center

PEO

Provincial Engineering Office

PLUC

Provincial Land Use Committee

PPFP

Provincial Physical Framework Plan

PUV

Public Utility Vehicle

RICs

Regional Industrial Centers

RPFR

Regional Physical Framework Plan

RA

Republic Act

RHU

Rural Health Unit

LIST OF ACRONYMS

SN

Samahang Nayon

S.P.

Sangguniang Panlungsod

SSS

Social Security System

SHZ

Socialized Housing Zone

SIZ

Special Institutional Zone

SAFDZ

Strategic Agriculture and Fisheries Development Zone

SPES

Student Privilege Employment System

SBFZ

Subic Bay Freeport Zone

TCWD

Tarlac City Water District

TARELCO

Tarlac Electric Cooperative

TEI

Tarlac Electric Enterprises, Incorporated

TZ

Tourist Zone

UP-SURP

University of the Philippines-School of Urban and Regional Planning

UDHA

Urban Development Housing Act

WZ

Water Zone

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Comprehensive Land Use Plan of every local government unit is aimed primarily to improve the quality of life of the constituency, protect environmental condition of the locality and rationalize the utilization of land in the area. The plan, in consonance with the national, regional and provincial physical framework plans, identifies specific programs and projects for each sector of the society, and the realization in implementing these programs and projects within the time frame of the plan.

City of Tarlac is the economic, political and cultural center of the province. Its economic base comprises a large segment in agriculture, commerce and industry that sustained the city’s general livelihood. The development potential have been properly laid down by the present local administration, under the energetic leadership of Honorable Genaro M. Mendoza, by providing various infrastructures which are basic to both the domestic and foreign investors.

The whole plan is composed of three major components namely: a) socio- economic profile of the local government unit consisting of the city’s physical and natural resources, demographic characteristics and sectoral development framework, studies and analysis; b) the physical plan, its implementing tools, local governance and local fiscal administration; and c) the text of the zoning ordinance which will served as the implementing instrument of the plan. The zoning ordinance shall serve as the legal basis in directing the preferred pattern of development and growth of the city.

Finally, this plan hoped to strengthen the local government technical capabilities and subsequently endeavor to achieve vital knowledge relevant to plan preparation and the aspiration for good local governance.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The City Planning & Development Coordinator, Janet B. Salvador-Pineda, and the project staff namely: Armando C. Macaraeg, Roman L. Martinez III, Arturo C. Blanco, Ernesto R. Sanchez, Analita L. Torres, Arlene S. Payad, Jayson G. Magbag, Arnold B. Calma and driver, Danilo N. Pagsuguiron together with supportive casuals namely: Ma. Teresita M. Salvador, Perlita T. Salonga, Francis Joel L. Daño, Leilani Y. Gomez and Roy Q. Bautista with the technical assistance from the Workshop Class Group of UP- SURP, namely: Ma. Cristina M. Rubio, Rosemarie F. Rocha, Emmanuel Bart B. Kimwell, Veronica Ureta-Paca, Marietta Allaga and Danilo Hubilla, wish to acknowledge the following different agencies of the government and private offices, who in one way or the other contributed to the up-dating and finally coming up with the formulation of the Comprehensive Development and Land Use Plan of the City of Tarlac 2001 – 2010.

Office of the City Mayor Office of the City Administrator Office of the City Budget Officer Office of the City Environment & Natural Resources Officer Office of the City Agriculturist Office of the City Architect Office of the City Civil Registrar Office of the City Cooperative Officer Office of the City Gen. Services Officer Office of the City Legal Officer Office of the City Population Officer Office of the City Social Welfare & Dev’t. Office of the Information Tech. Officer Office of the City Tourism

Bureau of Fire Protection Bureau of Telecommunication Dept. of the Interior and Local Government Department of Agrarian Reform Department of Education Department of Public Works and Highways Housing Land Use & Regulatory Board National Statistics Office Provincial Land Use Committee Tarlac Electric Enterprises Inc. TESDA, Tarlac Tarlac Provincial Government

Tarlac City Tourism Council Central Azucarera de Tarlac DMI Consultants Extelcom Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. Luisita Industrial Park Islacom Smart Telecom

Office of the City Vice Mayor Office of the Sangguniang Panlungsod Office of the City Engineer Office of the City Economic Enterprise Management Office of the City Accountant Office of the City Assessor Office of the City Human Res. Mgnt. Officer Office of the City Health Officer Office of the City Information Officer Office of the City Treasurer Office of the City Veterinarian Office of the Community Affairs Office of the Public Employment Service Office of the City Permits & Licenses

Bureau of Jail Management & Penology Bureau of Soils Bureau of Post Dept. of Environment & Natural Resources Department of Trade & Industry Dept. of Social Welfare and Development Local Water Utilities Administration National Irrigation Administration Philippine National Police Provincial Planning & Development Office Tarlac Electric Cooperative – I Tarlac City Water District

Digitel Telecom Globe Telecom International Wiring System International Electric Wires Phil. Corporation Luisita Golf Course Sanyo Other Private/Government Agencies & Offices not mentioned

The Punong Barangay and members of the Sangguniang Barangay for actively participating in various ways and at various junctures in the planning process as members of the City Development Council, and

Above all is to the greatest planner GOD ALMIGHTY, for the providence and wisdom endowed to us.

I N T R O D U C T I O N

1.1 PROJECT BACKGROUND

The Local Government Code of 1991 mandates provinces/cities/municipalities to prepare their respective Comprehensive Land Use Plans (CLUPs). This mandate is embodied in EO No. 72 and in the Charter of the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB) under Executive Order No. 648 specifically Article IV, Sec. 51b. In the light of the evolving nature of urban areas, the formulation of aforesaid plan has become a vital and necessary function for any LGU. The purpose of the plan is mainly to rationalize the use of the locality’s resources in line with the higher level plans as the RFP, PPFP, and the Philippine Medium- Term Development Plan.

Pursuant to the provision of the code, the City sought the assistance of the HLURB for the preparation of its CLUP. The Tarlac City Comprehensive Land Use Plan 1997-2001 was formulated and subsequently submitted to the Provincial Land Use Committee (PLUC). In October 2001, the Committee came out with the decision that the City needs to reformulate the plan to meet the gaps and inadequacies that resulted from the analysis of its members.

The Sangguniang Panlalawigan passed Resolution No. 131, s. 2001 directing the City Government to reformulate its CLUP and to submit the same not later than March 2002. The task of reformulating the plan was taken up by the Workshop Class of the School of Urban and Regional Planning, University of the Philippines in Diliman in cooperation with the City Planning and Development Office of Tarlac.

This CLUP represents the combined effort of the Workshop Class and the technical staff of the CPDO who worked together to produce a document that embodies the City’s vision, goals and objectives and the corresponding policies, programs and projects aimed to realize the achievement of the most rational allocation and use of its resources.

Planning principles and guidelines imbibed from the school were primarily

used to guide the planners on the different aspects of the plan

reformulation. The team gave priority consideration to the needs of the

City in coming up with the most acceptable CLUP. Credit is accorded to

the local staff and the SURP Workshop Class for their zealousness and

industry to complete the project.

1.2 PLANNING OBJECTIVES

The National Government in pursuit of a total reversal on economic front

by the year 2000 as embodied in the Medium Term Development Plan is

the guiding principle of this humble plan as follows:

1.2.1

General Objectives

-

Conservation and efficient utilization of land and other resources of the city;

-

Encouragement of balance and compatible land use relationship;

-

Promotion of a safe, healthy and pleasant environment for satisfactory communal life;

-

Strengthening of the socio-economic base of the city; and

-

Enhancement of the city’s functional role.

1.2.2

Specific Objectives

-

Regulation of land development to promote a safe and healthy environment for the community residents;

-

Provision of adequate and suitable land for settlement expansion and other functional uses so as to accommodate local and foreign investors;

-

Identification of appropriate sectoral and impact projects consistent with the needs and aspirations of the constituents;

-

Relocate of adequate/suitable land for industrial development and other resources with potential to broaden economic opportunities for the whole constituents;

-

Preservation of the city’s historical site and potentials; and

-

Equitable distribution and timely delivery of community service and facilities.

In its entirety, the CLUP is a document intended to be the basis for future

decisions in terms of physical development for the city. It presents facts

about the existing situations, trends and development as well as future

concerns. The Plan is therefore a vital aggregate of data and policies.

1.3 METHODOLOGY FOR THE REFORMULATION PROCESS

The process was undertaken utilizing existing planning principles and

guidelines. The HLURB developed a set of standard guidelines in the

preparation of city plans consisting of various techniques, models and

concepts which are considered to be more understandable and easier to

follow by local government units. The following are the procedures and

steps employed in the process:

1. Collection of secondary data for upgrading the socio-economic profile of the city. This is to provide the baseline information for organizing other planning data.

2. Discussions with key informants to gather data to be used for updating the data on the general utilization of the land. This will serve as input to the base map in the preparation of its existing land use. Actual land use survey was not possible due to time constraint.

3. Projection/Identification of formative development needs for land uses and services by utilizing the suggested approaches adopted by the HLURB.

4. Organization and preparation of analytical tools such as schematic maps, overlays, statistical tables, projection of land requirements for each land use category and similar activities.

5. Formulation of sectoral plans in coordination and consultation with the local government staff.

6. The preparation of the preliminary land use plan and its subsequent presentation during public hearings that are conducted to obtain comments and suggestions from the residents. These comments and suggestions would eventually be incorporated into the plan. After the corresponding revision/s, the land use plan will be finalized.

7.

The final land use plan will be the basis for the preparation of the Zoning Ordinance.

1.4

RATIONALE

There had been several attempts made to come up with a land use plan for

the then town of Tarlac; a plan that would reflect a vision of its potential and

capability so that it can assume the greater responsibility of propelling

Tarlac province to progress.

This Comprehensive Land Use Plan is a bold attempt towards a well-

directed physical growth of the city. The plan envisions the people to work

for a community that is self-reliant and progressive. It foresees the creation

of a society that initiates and exerts effort for its own improvement with least

assistance from the higher level of government. It presents the city’s goals

and objectives that are geared towards development. Alternative and

strategies necessary for arriving at a rational decision as to what course of

action should be taken to ensure the most efficient results are clearly

presented.

The Plan seeks to establish linkages among the different sectoral objectives

and policies so that they complement each other for the greater good. This

plan document not only integrates national and regional development

programs, but also reflects inter-department collaboration utilizing different

techniques and models that best suit the over-all development goal.

Land use plan as a major element of the whole document indicates a strong

adherence to national standards. It also incorporates valid forecasts by the

planners based on tested principles.

This plan, if accepted by the locality, will ensure a more effective

implementation of land-use related policies by the local government unit.

The principle of flexibility should guide its implementation as this plan is a

dynamic document that should accommodate revisions and changes as

time goes on. The need to consider amendments should not be discounted

but rather pursued.

City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 1

Map No. 1

Map No. 1

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

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City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 2

Map No. 2

Map No. 2

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

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City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 3

Map No. 3

Map No. 3

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

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MAP OF TARLAC CITY

MAP OF TARLAC CITY

MAP OF TARLAC CITY MAP OF TARLAC CITY City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 4

Map No. 4

Map No. 4

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

PLAN COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN LEGEND: LEGEND: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY
LEGEND: LEGEND:
LEGEND:
LEGEND:
LAND USE PLAN COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN LEGEND: LEGEND: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY BARANGAY BOUNDARY

MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY

MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY

BARANGAY BOUNDARY

BARANGAY BOUNDARY

RIVER

RIVER

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HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF TARLAC CITY

The town of Tarlac has had a colorful and significant history. Its story may very well be story of Tarlac province itself, which came into being only in 1873-74, eighty six years after Tarlac town was formally founded in 1788.

From Bacolor, Pampanga came intrepid leaders, namely Don Carlos Miguel and Don Narciso Castañeda who, years before 1788, with their families and followers trekked through the forests and hills of Porac and Bamban before finally settling down in what is now known as the town of Tarlac. They cleared the forest and tilled the fertile soil until a settlement emerged along the bank of the river which flowed across the township.

The community grew rapidly with settlers coming from Zambales, Pampanga, Bataan, Pangasinan, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija and elsewhere. The Pampanga dialect became the lingua franca in the community, as it was part of Pampanga province in those days. The two leaders, Miguel and Castañeda succeeded in carrying out their pioneering venture through benevolent leadership, which elicited the cooperation of their followers. Thus roads were built, barrios were established without monetary expenditure, only through the common efforts of everyone. It also marked the beginnings of Tarlac as a “melting pot” of Central Luzon, with a mixture of divergent people working mightily for the common good.

Peace, happiness and self-sufficiency reigned during those early days. Enough agricultural and fish products were supplied by a rich soil and a flowing river, waiting for the hands of its hardworking settlers.

Later, it was unanimously agreed by the growing populace to request the authorities in Manila to convert the community into a town. Don Carlos Miguel prepared the needed resolution and forwarded it to the Spanish authorities. In 1788, a decree was issued by Captain General Don Felix Berenguer de Marquina, proclaiming Tarlac as a town under territorial jurisdiction of Pampanga, whose capital then was Bacolor.

The first governadorcillo (later called municipal) was Don Carlos Miguel in 1788 who, together with Don Narciso Castañeda, established the foundation of Tarlac town. He was followed by Don Luis Briones 1789. It was during his term as the second governadorcillo that the “legend of San Sebastian” started. It is said that sometime that year, an armed band of tulisanes were stopped from marauding

the town by a young boy who turned out to be no less than San Sebastian himself.

Tarlac is represented prominently in the eight rays of the Philippine flag because it was among the first provinces to join the revolution in 1896. The K.K.K. of Andres Bonifacio found early adherents among Tarlaqueños, headed by Don Francisco Tañedo, after whom the town’s principal thoroughfare is named. Don Francisco Tañedo was killed in an encounter with the Spanish guardia civil at the outset of the revolution. His early death inflamed the citizenry and his relatives and followers were bent on capturing the town by any means, but were dissuaded by Don Eusebio Tañedo Iro, who volunteered to see his friend, General Monet, former politico-military, governor of Tarlac and at the time the highest military official in Pampanga. Denying that Tarlaqueños were involved in the revolution, Don Eusebio was able to obtain orders from General Monet to stop military operations in Tarlac. However, peace did not reign long in Tarlac because Generals Francisco Macabulos and Jose Alejandrino already started their offensive against the Spanish forces. On June 25 1898, Spanish soldiers surrendered in Tarlac.

The Miguels, descendants of one of the pioneers of the town, Don Carlos Miguel, changed their family name to Tañedo in 1872 upon the promulgation of the Claveria decree on surnames. It is said that the Miguels preferred the masculine version of Castañeda, and Tañedo was also in compliance with the designated starting letter for all Tarlac surnames- it is therefore, not surprising that many Tarlaqueños to this day bear such surnames as Taala, Taar, Tabamo, Taban, Tabaquero, Tabasondra, Tamayo, Tamondong, to name a few.

President Emilio Aguinaldo proudly proclaimed the Philippine Republic on January 23, 1899 in Malolos, Bulacan. Assemblance of an independent government was formed, with a lawmaking body, the Malolos Congress, a

cabinet headed by Apolinario Mabini ( who was foreign affairs minister), a

A State

judiciary, and of course, an army led by General Antonio Luna. University, the Universidad Literaria de Filipinas, was also opened.

By July 1899, however, with the tides of war turning against Aguinaldo, Tarlac became the last capital of the short-lived republic then on the run. Among the deputies who were in Tarlac to attend sessions of Congress were Fernando Ma. Guerrero of Manila, representing Leyte; Daniel Tirona of Cavite, representing Batanes; Tomas Mascarado of Batangas, representing Sorsogon; Servillano

Aquino of Tarlac, representing Samar and Francisco Macabulos of Tarlac, representing Cebu.

The Aquinos, forebears of the late Benigno Aquino, Jr., came from lower Pampanga like most Tarlac settlers. The family of General Servillano Aquino settled in the town of Concepcion, still then a part of Pampanga. Present – day Aquinos trace their Tarlac, Tarlac connections to one of the “original” families of this capital town, the Tañedo’s General Aquino married Doña Lorensa Tañedo Quiambao and later, when he lost his wife in one of the tragic episodes of the revolution, married his wife’s widowed elder sister Doña Saturnina Tañedo- Quiambao de Estrada, grandmother of former Senator Eva Estrada-Kalaw. The latter’s bloodline is therefore not Aquino but Tañedo –Quiambao, which she shares with the late Ninoy Aquino, her second cousin.

It is said, “the past is a prologue to the future”. This brief account of the town’s colorful history is by no means complete. Since 1788, the town has progressed significantly, leading to its becoming the nucleus of Tarlac province. It has encountered countless hardships in the course of its existence, including those precipitated by earthquakes, cholera and other epidemics, great fires, devastating floods and similar calamities. Through the years, Tarlac’s ability to survive wars, economic difficulties and political turmoil among others, has been proven by its consistent re-emergence as a stronger and better town, eager to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

Tarlac upgrade to cityhood started way back in 1996, with the filing of a bill in Congress to convert the town into a component city. House Bill No. 6863 was passed on November 17, 1997, subsequently; Senate Bill No. 2340 was approved on February 23, 1998. Then, on April 18, 1998, through a plebiscite the citizenry overwhelmingly supported the conversion of Tarlac town into a component city with affirmative votes of 21,378 out of 26,020 votes. It was proclaimed as a component city on April 19, 1998 by virtue of Republic Act No. 8593 to be known as the City of Tarlac.

Its present leaders, led by the Honorable Mayor Genaro M. Mendoza, together with all his co-workers in the city government can stand tall and proud of Tarlac’s 2000 years of glorious history as a source of inspiration to aspire and work only for the best, because Tarlac City deserves no less than the best.

SOCIO-ECONOMIC and PHYSICAL PROFILE OF TARLAC CITY

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION

The City of Tarlac is situated in the heartland of Luzon’s rich central plain. It is bounded on the north by the province of Pangasinan, Nueva Ecija on the east, on the south by Pampanga and Zambales on the west. The city is almost fairly equidistant from Manila, 125 kms. and Baguio, 127 kms. This location has made it the favorite stop-over of people travelling north to Baguio or Manila to the South.

The city is popularly known as the “Melting Pot” of Central Luzon because its residents speak several dialects such as Tagalog, Pangasinense, Ilocano and Pampango. In the east, residents of the town of La Paz and a part of Concepcion speak Tagalog on account of their proximity to the province of Nueva Ecija, which is a Tagalog- speaking province.

In the north and in the western part of the City, the populace speaks Ilocano and Pangasinense because of the influence of the province of Pangasinan.

In the southern part, the towns of Capas, Bamban and Concepcion speak pampango because these towns were former parts of Tarlac’s mother province of Pampanga.

The McArthur Highway traverses the province from north to south. This is of great geographic significance considering that the flow of goods from north to south or east to west in Central Luzon converges in Tarlac.

CLIMATE

The climate of Tarlac resembles closely that of the surrounding provinces, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga and Pangasinan. It two (2) distinct seasons: wet and dry. The months of November to April are generally dry while the rest of the year is the rainy season.

Climate

Month

Average Rainfall

 

June

286.8

mm

July

358.4

mm

Rainy Seasons

August

378.9

mm

September

315.9

mm

October

193.1

mm

 

November

112.6

mm

December

36.9

mm

Cool Dry

January

8.1

mm

February

3.4

mm

 

March

13.3

mm

Hot Dry

April

21.5

mm

May

165.1

mm

Tarlac receives its continuous rainfall during the southwest monsoon period from

June to November, which corresponds with the wet season. The northeast

monsoon period from the months of November to may with the dry season.

WATER RESOURCES

The City of Tarlac has various communal bodies of water. The main tributary is

Tarlac River, which is more or less 16 miles long. It is a great source of gravel

and sand. The other bodies of water are:

1. Armenia Dam - Barangay Armenia

2. Bangan Lupa River - Barangay Tibagan

3. Banaba Creek - Barangay Banaba

4. Culipat Creek - Barangay Culipat

5. Sinait Creek - Barangay Sinait

6. Soliman Creek - Barangay Balanti

7. Lucung Creek - Barangay Sto. Niño

8. Buenavista Creek - Barangay Buenavista

9. Masalasa Creek - Barangay Binauganan

10. Ungot Creek - Barangay Ungot

11. Amucao Creek - Barangay Amucao

12. Balingcanaway Creek - Barangay Balingcanaway

13. Sto. Niño Creek - Barangay Sto. Niño

TOPOGRAPHY

The physical terrain of the City of Tarlac is generally flat with slightly rolling to mountainous on the western part. The whole city is traversed by the Tarlac River system.

SLOPE

Slope refers to the upward or downward inclination of the land surface. The topography of Tarlac City, which is predominantly level to gently sloping (0-3% slope gradient) covers 90.84% or 38,633.44 hectares, which is suitable for urban expansion and settlements development, and for agricultural production.

Slope 3-8% which is gently rolling to undulating accounts for 6.01% of the city’s land area or 2,555.36 hectares. Moderately sloping to rolling areas, slope of 8%- 18%, cover 982.67 hectares or 2.31%. The smallest percentage of 358.53 hectares or 0.84% of the city’s land area is rolling to hilly, with a slope gradient of 18-30%. This area is on the far western part of the city, near the boundaries of the municipality of San Jose. Land areas on the above-mentioned slopes are suitable for livestock grazing as identified by the SAFDZ, Bureau of Soils and Water Management Map.

Being basically an agriculture town, a big percentage of the land is devoted to agricultural production and thus scattered in all slope ranges. Slope ranges are directly proportional to erosion potential. The lower the slope, the lower its susceptibility to erosion. (Refer to Table No. 1)

SOIL TYPES

Soil in Tarlac City is of eight types. These are:

1. Angeles Coarse Sand - this type of soil is found on riverbeds or intermittent streams and creeks, which dry up after the rainy season. The texture of the soil is coarse to medium sand from the surface down to a depth of more than a meter.

TABLE No. 1 SLOPE CLASSIFICATION CITY OF TARLAC

 

SLOPE

DESCRIPTION

AREA (in Hectares)

% TO TOTAL

M

0

- 3 %

LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING

38,653.44

90.84%

N

3

- 8 %

GENTLY SLOPING TO UNDULATING

2,555.36

6.01%

O

8 - 18 %

UNDULATING TO ROLLING

982.67

2.31%

P

18 - 30 %

ROLLING TO HILLY

358.53

0.84%

 

TOTAL

42,550.00

100.00%

Source: Bureau of Soils and Water Management Please refer to Map No. 4

2.

Angeles Fine Sand - the surface soil of this type, varying in depth from 25 to

45 centimeters, is very pale-gray, loose clay. When the soil is dry the surface

is almost whitish in gravelly sand. The color is either pale reddish brown or brownish gray.

3. La Paz Fine Sandy Loam - the surface soil of this type, ranging in depth from

40 to 50 centimeters, is light grayish brown to pale-gray fine sandy loam. Due

to the presence of same silt and clay, the undisturbed soil in the field is compact and hard and cracks when dry. The subsoil down to 110 centimeters more or less is grayish-brown to yellowish gray and medium to coarse sand. The substratum is brownish-gray coarse sand.

4. Luisita Sandy Loam - the surface soil of this type is brownish gray to gray, loose and structureless sandy loam. The depth varies from 40 to 50 centimeters. The subsoil with a depth of 80 to 90 centimeters is brownish- gray coarse and with a small amount of clay and soft concretionary materials.

5. Luisita Fine Sandy Loam - the surface soil of this type with a depth of 35 centimeters is a whitish gray fine sandy loam. There is a small amount of silt and clay which makes the soil compact, hard and crack when dry. The subsoil is brownish gray, somewhat mottled with gray and yellowish-gray sandy loam with little clay to a depth of about 100 centimeters.

6. Tarlac Clay Loam - the surface soil of this type is dark-gray to nearly black fine granular sticky and gritty clay loam. Its depth ranges from 35 to 50 centimeters. The sub-soil or “B” horizon is characterized by calcium carbonate accumulation. Its depth is about 50 to 80 centimeters. There is no distinct line of separation in the “A” and “B” horizons with regards to clay content. The limestone precipitates, the reddish-brown concretions, and the whitish specks mark the “B” horizon. The parent material is tuff or tuffaceous sandstones.

7. Tarlac Clay Loam, Gravelly Phase – this type of soil occurs in the Tarlac Clay Loam type as areas of lighter soils, with reddish brown to red, gravelly and concretion filled profile. The surface soil is friable and granular ranging in depth from 45 to 60 centimeters.

8. Tarlac Sandy Clay Loam - the surface of this type is light gray to dark gray sandy clay loam. Its depth ranges from 30 to 55 centimeters. There is more surface, due to run-off and leaching. The subsoil is characterized by limestone precipitate and some reddish-brown concretions and white specks. Its depth ranges from 60 to 85 centimeters.

TABLE No. 2 SOIL CLASSIFICATION CITY OF TARLAC

TYPE NO.

SOIL TYPE

AREA (in Hectares)

% TO TOTAL

71

ANGELES COARSE SAND

3,167.91

7.45%

73

ANGELES FINE SAND

793.66

1.87%

81

LA PAZ FINE SANDY LOAM

372.73

0.88%

84

LUISITA SANDY LOAM

10,067.00

23.66%

85

LUISITA FINE SANDY LOAM

6,923.68

16.27%

86

TARLAC CLAY LOAM GRAVELLY PHASE

3,695.66

8.69%

87

TARLAC CLAY LOAM

8,403.03

19.75%

89

TARLAC SANDY CLAY LOAM

9,126.33

21.45%

 

TOTAL

42,550.00

100.00%

Source: Bureau of Soils and Water Management

GEOLOGY

The Central Plain of Luzon is the physiographic expression of a large structural trough separating the Zambales Mountain to the west from the Sierra Madre to the east. This trough was depressed below sea level during late Tertiary and perhaps early Quaternary time. The trough was filled to its present extent with material washed down from the mountain slopes and deposited in the form of fan and detail deposits and, later, flood plain deposits. The deepest wells in the Tarlac area are about 300 meter deep and penetrate only part of the Quaternary alluvium but the underlying rocks can be inferred from exposures of older rocks in the hills and mountains that lie to the west of the Tarlac poblacion.

The basement complex exposed in the Zambales Mountains comprises basic igneous rocks of Cretaceous to early Tertiary Age. Overlying the basement are tuffaceous clastic sedimentary rocks (shales, siltstones, sandstones and conglomerates) of Middle to Late Tertiary Age. Limestones are observed locally. The Tertiary sediments, presumably, are overlain by the Quaternary alluvium that fills the depressed plain.

The Quaternary alluvium is an intricately interbedded sequence of uncemented clays, sands and gravels, each bed being relatively thin and of limited lateral extent. The original complex pattern of deposition and reworking by the sea has resulted in a maze of fingers and lenses of sands and gravels that are difficult to trace and predict. Appendices A – P through VII-B-17 are stratigraphic logs of wells in the area, that illustrate the situation. Even the major units logged are groups of thin beds lumped under the name of the major constituent, such as “clay with some sand and gravel”. The thickness of the Quaternary alluvium is uncertain; some wells were drilled to 300 m without encountering any significant change in section while two wells (TLC-32 & TLC-33) at Tinapatan encountered possibly older sediments at about 200 meters. The wells drilled near the hills encountered “adobe” (tuff, tuffaceous sandstone), limestone and sandstone at shallow depth which is probably indicative of rocks older than the Quaternary alluvium. This implies that the alluvium thins out of a feather edge as it overlaps the older rocks exposed in the hills west of Tarlac.

City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 5

Map No. 5

Map No. 5

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

-19- -19-

City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 6

Map No. 6

Map No. 6

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

-20- -20-

City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 7

Map No. 7

Map No. 7

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

-21- -21-

City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the City Planning and Development
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the City Planning and Development

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development

Map No. 8

Map No. 8

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN

-22- -22-

City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the
City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac City Government of Tarlac Office of the

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

City Government of Tarlac

Office of the City Planning and Development

Office of the City Planning and Development