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KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT


LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Teacher Candidate:

Christina Diltz & Sara Xakellis Date:

Cooperating Teacher:

Coop. Initials

Group Size:

Grade Level 4th Grade

2 or 3 Allotted Time

Subject or Topic:

Magnetic Fields and Poles

Section

EEU 205-010

STANDARD: S4.C.1.1.1: Use physical properties [e.g., mass, shape, size, volume,
color, texture, magnetism, state (i.e., solid, liquid, and gas), conductivity (i.e.,
electrical and heat)] to describe matter.
I. Performance Objectives (Learning Outcomes):
A. The 4th grade students will be able to define, describe, and draw magnetic field
lines around a single magnet. They will also be able to describe the interaction
between like and unlike magnetic poles. As well as, draw the combined fields
created when like and unlike magnetic poles interact.
II. Instructional Materials
A. 2 Bar Magnets (for each group of students)
B. Salt Shaker of Iron Filings (for each group of students)
C. Wax Paper (for each group of students)
D. Notebooks (to record results)
E. Pencils
F. Manilla File Folder (for each group of students)
III. Subject Matter/Content (prerequisite skills, key vocabulary, big idea, outline of
additional content)
A. Prerequisite skills
1. Fine Motor Skills
2. Gross Motor Skills
B. Key Vocabulary
1. Magnetism: the properties of attraction possessed by magnets: the
molecular properties common to magnets.
2. Magnetic Field: A region of space near a magnet, electric current, or
moving charged particle in which a magnetic force acts on any other
magnet, electric current, or moving charged particle.

3. Magnetic Field Lines: A graphical representation of the magnitude


and the direction of a magnetic field.
4. Magnetic Poles: The region of a magnet toward which the lines of
magnetic induction converge (south pole) or from which the lines of
induction diverge (north pole).
C. Big Idea
1. Students use BrainPOP resources to define, describe, and draw
magnetic field lines around a single magnet. Students will also
describe the interaction between like and unlike magnetic poles, and
draw the combined fields created when like and unlike magnetic
poles interact.
D. Additional content
1. Watch the BrainPOP movie Electromagnets. Complete
a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting Permanent
Magnets (ex. was the bar magnet used in this activity)
and Electromagnets.
IV. Implementation
A. Introduction
1. Split the class so that students are working in groups of 2 or 3.
Collect and organize all materials needed for the experiment.
Preview the BrainPOP movies Magnetism and Electromagnets to
determine places to pause, reflect, and discuss with your students
while viewing as a class.
B. Development
1. Have students place a manila file folder on their desk or table, then
place one bar magnet in the center of the file folder.
2. Place a piece of wax paper on top of the magnet.
3. Have students sprinkle iron filings all around the bar magnet (they
may need to gently tap the wax paper with their finger to get the best
view of the magnetic field lines).
4. Have students draw what they see in their notebooks.
5. Ask students the following questions: Are your lines of force greater
at the ends or in the middle of the bar magnet? (Answer: at the ends)
What assumption can you make about the strength of the magnetic
field at that location? (Answer: The magnetic field is strongest at the
ends or at the poles. This is where the the lines are concentrated and
closer together.)
6. Have the students place the used iron filings back in the saltshaker or
in a location specified by you.
7. Have the students now place two bar magnets onto the manila file
folder so that North poles are facing each other and are about an inch
apart. Place the wax paper on top of the magnets.
8. Have students sprinkle iron filings around the north poles of the
magnets (they may need to gently tap the wax paper win their finger

to get the best view of the magnetic field lines).


9. Have students draw what they see. Ask the students if the magnets
are attracting or repelling? (Answer: Repelling) How do you know?
(Answer: The magnetic field lines are bending away from each
other.)
10. Have the students place the used iron filings back in the saltshaker or
in a location specified by you.
11. Repeat steps 7, 8, and 9 with a north pole of one magnet facing the
south pole of a second magnet.
12. Ask students if these magnets are attracting or repelling? (Answer:
attracting) How can you tell? (Answer: The magnetic field lines are
connecting the two poles together.)
13. Have the students clean up per your directions.
C. Closure
1. Read the Experiment on Electromagnets. Discuss what roles
electromagnets play in society and why/how the are important to us.
2. Take the BrainPOP Magnetism Quiz either together as a whole class
or individually (depending upon computer setup and availability).
3. Discuss how like and unlike poles interact (ie. like poles repel and
unlike poles attract.)
4. Have students complete the Magnetism Activity Page (vocabulary)
individually in class or for homework. Ask students if they have seen
any of the vocab words before, and what they already know about
them.
5. Watch the BrainPOP movie Magnetism, pausing to reflect and
discuss keywords which are addressed throughout the video.
D. Accommodations/Differentiation
1. For hearing impaired students provide closed captions on the videos
and hearing enhancing tools.
2. For vision impaired students provide worksheets with larger fonts.
3. This lesson can be adapted depending on the accommodations
needed.
E. Assessment/Evaluation Plan
1. Formative
2. Summative
V. Reflective Response
A. Report of Student Performance in Terms of Stated Objectives (Reflection on
student performance written after lesson is taught, includes remediation for
students who fail to meet acceptable level of achievement)

Remediation Plan
B. Personal Reflection (Questions written before lesson is taught. Reflective
answers to question recorded after lesson is taught)
VI. Resources (in APA format)
A. Magnetism Lesson Plan: Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Poles. (n.d.).
Retrieved October 18, 2015.