Sie sind auf Seite 1von 4

Dental Concrete

Dental Concrete on Rock Slopes


Reference: Handbook of Slope Stabilisation by J.A.R. Ortigao, Alberto S. F. J. Sayao
Dental concrete is used to fill in cavities and large joints to prevent ingress of water and therefore
reduce horizontal thrust due to water pressure. In the case of an excavation, weathered rock surface
could be exposed. In this situation, dental concrete can protect the rock surface against further
weathering.
The rock bolts are passive and usually made of 25-mm diamater steel bars in 75-mm drilled holes. They
are usually installed perpendicular to the slip surface.

Dental Concrete on Embankments/Dams


Reference: US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR)
Final slopes should be 0.5:1 (horizontal to vertical [H:V]) or flatter. Beneath the impervious zone, all
overhangs should be removed; stepped surfaces steeper than 0.5:1 and higher than 0.5 foot (15 cm)
should be excavated or treated with dental concrete to a slope of 0.5:1 or flatter. Outside the
impervious zone, all overhangs should be removed, and stepped surfaces steeper than 0.5:1 and higher
than 5 ft (1.5 m) (should be excavated or treated with dental concrete to a slope of 0.5:1 or flatter.

Dental Concrete on Embankments/Dams


Reference: US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR)
Dental concrete is used to fill or shape holes, grooves, extensive areas of vertical surfaces, and sawteeth
or stair steps created by bedding planes, joints, and other irregularities such as previously cleaned out
solution features, shear zones, large joints, or buried channels (see figures 3.2.6.3-1 through 3.2.6.3-3).
Formed dental concrete can be used to fillet steep slopes and fill overhangs. Placing a concrete mat over
a zone of closely spaced irregularities may be appropriate in local areas. Dental concrete shaping can be
used instead of removal by blasting when excessive amounts of excavation would otherwise be
required.
Unless this backfill concrete has undergone most of its volumetric shrinkage at the time overlying
embankment is placed, cracks can occur in the overlying embankment near the boundaries of the
backfill concrete. Loss of support occurs because of continuing shrinkage of the backfill concrete. Where
dental work is extensive, the backfill concrete should be placed and cured before embankment is placed
over the area.