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Its Not a

Sprint, Its a
Marathon
Overview

First OffKNOW YOUR


TERMS

Having ELL students in your


classroom can be a challenge as
a beginning teacher, but if you
follow this guide, you will see just
how successful your year will be.

ELL vs. ESL


ELL: English Language Learner
ESL: English as a Second Language

ESL describes the services


that are available to LEP
students.

LEP & ELP


LEP: Limited English Proficiency

Helpful Websites
Can Dos for Grade Levels:
https://www.wida.us/standards/C
AN_DOs/
Useful Translation Link:
http://www.freetranslation.com/
Great Site for Graphic Organizers:
http://www.graphic.org/goindex.h
tml

ELP: English Language Proficiency

Any student that speaks a


language other than English
at home takes an English
Language Proficiency test.

ELL STUDENTS:
SURVIVAL GUIDE
FOR BEGINNING
TEACHERS
By: Katie Plucker

ELL
STUDENT
S:
SURVIVA
L GUIDE
FOR
BEGINNI
By: Katie Plucker

Learn How
Students
Develop and
Acquire
Language
Create an ELL-Friendly
Classroom

Learn how to pronounce


students names correctly.
Set up a conference with the
parents.
Label objects around the
classroom in both English
and their native language.
Incorporate words or
phrases from the students
native language into your
lessons and activities.

Methods, Modifications, &


Strategies

Remember to speak slowly.


Be sure to let the student
see the movement of your
mouth.
If possible, partner a newer
ELL student with a stronger
LEP student.
ROUTINE is key.
Introduce vocabulary in
meaningful ways.
Use graphic organizers.
Be sure to know and use
testing modifications.
o Extended time;

Stage 1: Pre-Production
This stage is also known as the
silent period because the student
takes in the new language but does
not speak it. The student: has
minimal comprehension; does not
verbalize; nods yes and no;
draws and points. Examples of
teacher prompts: Show me;
Circle the; Where is; Who
has This stage lasts
approximately 6 months.

Stage 2: Early Production


The student begins to speak but
the emphasis is still on listening
and absorbing the new language.
The student: has limited
comprehension; produces one or
two-word phrases; uses key words
and familiar phrases; uses present
tense verbs. Examples of teacher
prompts: yes/no questions;
either/or questions; Who;
What; How many This stage
lasts approximately 6 months to 1
year.

Stage 3: Speech

Examples of teacher prompts:


Why; How; Explain;
questions requiring a phrase or
short-sentence answers. This stage
lasts approximately 1 to 3 years.

Stage 4: Intermediate
Fluency
Communication in the second
language is fluent, especially in
social language situations. The
student: has excellent
comprehension; makes few
grammatical errors; has some gaps
in vocabulary knowledge and
unknown expressions; can
demonstrate higher order thinking
skills. Examples of teacher prompts:
What would happen if; Why do
you think; questions requiring
more than a sentence response.
This stage lasts approximately 3 to
5 years.

Stage 5: Advanced
Fluency
The student communicates fluently
in all contexts and has a nearnative level of speech. Examples of