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PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

Philosophy of Classroom Management


Dillon Harden
Jacksonville State University

PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

I believe my philosophy of classroom management will promote a safe environment and


motivate students to strive for greatness. There are many factors in creating a good philosophy;
therefore, I will choose various elements from different theorist's. The first theorist I would like
to address is William Glasser. William Glasser believes in providing a high quality engaging
curriculum, use lead teaching, and no coercive influence (Charles, 2014). In order for students to
do their best in school, teachers must create an engaging curriculum. If the curriculum has no
relevance to the students in the real world then most students will simply do the minimum to
pass, or not even do it at all. This leads back to creating an engaging curriculum. Before the
teacher can create an engaging curriculum, the teacher must have a solid understanding of the
subject and be able to lead teach rather than boss teach. Boss teaching forces the students to do
certain assignments and gives them little involvement with decisions based on their learning
environment (Charles, 2014). Lead teaching is one of the most important parts of Glasser's
method to a better learning environment. Lead teaching provides a very engaging learning
environment for the students by allowing them to have input on their assignments and giving
them the basic needs to produce a higher quality of work (Charles, 2014). This method of
teaching will result with a better relationship between the students and teacher which in return
will create a positive learning environment. Another great way to engage students in the
curriculum is simply covering fewer topics, but going more in depth on the subject. Not only
should the teacher try his or her best to create an engaging curriculum, but they should also try to
create a quality classroom.
Some basics for creating a quality classroom involves having a safe environment for the
students to learn, and showing interest in the student's needs. Glasser also covers seven deadly

PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

habits that can destroy a quality classroom. These seven habits include: criticizing, blaming,
complaining, nagging, threatening, punishing, and rewarding others to control students (Charles,
2014). A quality classroom will not have these deadly habits, and instead will promote seven
connecting habits. These seven connecting habits involve: caring, listening, supporting,
contributing, encouraging, trusting, and befriending. I agree with six of the seven connecting
habits listed. The one connecting habit that I do not agree with is befriending the student. I
believe that as a professional you can show a caring attitude, but when the teacher tries to
befriends a student it becomes a problem. Befriending could show favoritism in the classroom
and can possibly ruin the teachers relationship with other students. William Glasser's methods are
used in classrooms across the world, and I cannot wait to implement some of his idea's in my
own classroom.
The second theorist that will have a huge impact on behavior in my classroom. is Fred Jones.
Dr. Jones believes that most misbehavior comes from student aimlessness, and massive time
wasting (Charles, 2014). Some examples of massive time wasting can be ineffective discipline,
and inefficient arrangement of the classroom (Charles, 2014). Two of the elements I plan on
using in my own classroom is "say-see-do teaching, and working the crowd" (Charles, 2014).
"Say-see-do teaching" is simply giving the students an activity, providing an example of the
activity, and doing the activity (Charles, 2014). Say-see-do teaching will give the students a large
amount of information in small doses. This will allow the students to be actively engaged at all
times which will limit misbehavior and increase learning productivity. An example of "say-seedo teaching" is using a visual instruction plan. A visual instructional plan is series of picture
prompts that clearly shows what the students need to do (Charles, 2014). While keeping the class

PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

working on a task at all times will usually limit misbehavior, it will not completely do away with
misbehavior. Another method that Fred Jones recommends for dealing with misbehavior is
working the crowd. What Dr. Jones means by " working the crowd" is simply roaming the
classroom and making sure the students are on task. Not only should the teacher make sure the
students are on task, but also provide help for those who require aid. This method will also
reduce the amount of misbehavior in the classroom because a student would be less likely to
show unacceptable behavior in front of the teacher. While the teacher roams the classroom he or
she can use specific body language to stop potential misbehavior such as talking. Some body
language such as giving a student the stink eye, or shaking your head can go a long way to
preventing misbehavior from happening again. Another very effective method Dr. Jones
recommends to prevent misbehavior is classroom structure. The way a teacher sets up his or her
classroom can make or break them. Dr. Jones uses the interior loop arrangement in the
classroom. This loop arrangement allows the teacher to work the crowd more effectively, as well
as having a better view of the whole class. This will provide the teacher with a safe, and
comfortable learning environment. Classroom management is not the only way to deal with
misbehavior. Dr. Jones also has a form of backup systems in place if a proper classroom
arrangement doesn't stop repeated misbehaviors. They go in order from small backup responses,
medium backup responses, and large backup responses (Charles, 2014). The small backup
responses can be a simple use of body language, or a one on one meeting with the student. If
there continues to be an issue with misbehavior, then Dr. Jones recommends moving on to the
medium level responses. These medium level responses can include requiring the student to stay
after school, or holding a parent- teacher conference. Hopefully the issue has been settled by the
time medium level responses have been placed, but if the situation has become a serious issue

PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

then Dr. Jones would recommend the highest level response. These large responses will involve
sending the student to administration, giving the student in-school suspension, or detention. If
there has been no change in the student's behavior then I am afraid the student will need to be
expelled. I will use these elements of Dr. Jones theory in my own classroom to produce a safe,
and efficient learning environment.
The final theorist I plan on using in my classroom is Marvin Marshall. Marvin Marshall uses
hierarchy to place expectations on behavior, and calls for internal motivation in students. These
elements are all a part of Theory Y, which states that people will work gladly if their tasks bring
satisfaction, exercise self- direction, and self responsibility (Charles, 2014). The first thing that
needs to be done before implementing Theory Y is having a positive outlook. Before you can
speak to the student's about being positive you must first show a positive model because the
students may not have a clue what positive means. When a student starts to look at the positive
side of a classroom then they are given the power of choice. Giving the student's a choice
empowers the student to believe their voice is truly being heard. This sense of respect and
positivity can result in internal motivation. Internal motivation is what comes from within a
person. It includes what students need, enjoy, and may be curious about (Charles, 2014). Internal
motivation will promote the students to do their best on their work, but it will not do much to
their behavior.
Dr. Marshall has created a hierarchy of social behavior to help students recognize what
acceptable, and unacceptable behavior looks like. This hierarchy goes from Level A too Level
D. Level A is when students pay no attention to expectations, and that is unacceptable. Level B
involves students bullying or bothering others without consideration of the harmful effects, this

PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

is unacceptable behavior as well. Level C is the first level that is acceptable. Level C is when
students meet behavioral expectations, and have some type of external motivation to help them
do so. Level D is the final level and it is the best possible social behavior. This behavior will
include students behave responsibly and therefore do what is right without be told to. This sense
of good behavior can be influenced by internal motivation. I believe this hierarchy of social
behavior will allow students to adjust their behavior based on where they are placed in the
hierarchy. This will help students realize that the choices they make will have some type of effect
on them. I believe that this will not only help the students do better in school, but it will open the
path to becoming a responsible adult as well.
In conclusion, these three theorist's have made a huge impact in classrooms across the world
and I plan on using these various elements in my own classroom. William Glasser, Fred Jones,
and Marvin Marshall's theories will allow me to provide a safe, comfortable, and quality learning
environment for students to grow. I will see my classroom as a home away from home, and it
that sense I will treat my students with the same respect as I would a family member. As a up and
coming teacher I believe that creating a home away from home is simply one of the easiest ways
to see a change in students grades, behavior, and discipline. When students feel safe and valued
they will choose to explore, be involved, and take ownership of their learning.

PHILOSOPHY OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT


Reference
Charles, C.M. (2014). Building Classroom Discipline (11th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Pearson Education, Inc.