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KIN*3060: Fall 2015

CEL Assignment #2: Final Project Sheet


SECTION 1: Project Overview
1. Group members: Paty Lopez, Crystal May and C.J. Moogk
2. Selected topic area: Healthy eating
3. Proposed strategy and goal of your strategy
To create awareness of healthy eating in families of elementary school students we
propose to facilitate and support the Fresh from the Farm fundraiser for schools in the
Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph area. The fundraising component involves students selling
prepackaged bundles of food to family and community members. Every $10 bundle
includes 3 lb Carrots, 3 lb Onions, 5 lb Potatoes, and 3 lb Sweet Potatoes from Ontario,
and the $15 bundle includes 8 lb box of Ontario Apples.
A pamphlet containing recipes, nutritional benefits of the vegetables used in the recipes
and links to healthy eating resources will be handed out. The fundraiser combined with
food demonstrations and printed resources will provide families with the tools to help
them make healthier eating decisions.
4. Target audience:
This is a pilot project targeted to 10 elementary schools that are in priority
neighborhoods within the WDG area. These neighborhoods include Brant, Onward
Willow, Two Rivers, and West Willow Woods (WDGPH, 2013). The specific target
population is the children attending these schools and their parents. Success of the
intervention would be assessed through surveys and total money raised. If the
intervention is deemed successful, this initiative will be extended to other schools.
5. Description of budget:
Fresh from The Farm charges a $60 flat fee to deliver the produce to each school, the
fee is the same regardless of the amount of vegetables purchased. This fee covers the
cost of marketing material (brochure, posters, and sign-up sheets) and the bags to
package the produce. This fee can be deducted from the net sales.
The school retains 40% of the revenue collected; based on their particular needs and
resources, each school will reinvest these funds to promote other healthy eating
initiatives, such as creating a vegetable garden, organizing a cooking club or funding
regularly scheduled cooking demonstrations for parents and kids.
There will be no cost for coordination of the program because this will be a volunteer led
initiative involving parent-volunteers and parent-council members.
The cooking
demonstrations on the day of the food bundle delivery will be led by the WDGPH
volunteer community food advisors, the estimated cost for the food used in the
demonstrations is approximately $300 per school and will be funded by GWDPH.

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6. Approximate timeline:
April-June: advocate to schools to sign-up for Fresh from the Farm fundraiser.
Beginning of school (September): Assembly to rally and explain the Fresh from
the Farm fundraiser to the students; Begin fundraising.
Mid-October: Final school order is submitted
November: Fruits and vegetables are delivered to the school. Final event for
school with food demonstrations.
March: Survey emailed to participants to determine current fruit and vegetable
consumption and other healthy eating choices
7. Key community partners who should be considered and how you will engage
them and/or build on their strengths.
A representative from GWDPH would initiate the proposal for incorporating Fresh from
the Farm into each school by communicating with the school principal and the PTA.
Once the school has agreed to participate, each school will need to find a volunteer to
be the school champion. The role of the School Champion is similar to that of a project
manager, they would communicate with Fresh from the Farm program, develop a plan
for implementing food demonstrations in their school, determine the most efficient way
to educate the students and parents about the program and gather volunteers. Parentteacher association, school councils, teachers and student councils will be asked to
champion this initiative within their own schools during the duration of the fundraiser.
For the final day when the produce is delivered the WDGPH volunteer community food
advisors will be recruited to conduct the education portion of this project via food
demonstrations. Also the Headwaters Food and Farming Alliance and The Seed
Community Food Hub will be invited to participate and promote their initiatives to make
healthy food more accessible to the community.
8. Rationale for how your choices consider the specific needs of WDGPH:
The recommendations from the Nutrition Screening of Kindergarten Students in
Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph: Results of NutriSTEP (2014) outlines the need of the
community to promote fruit and vegetable consumption through raising awareness,
education, and skill building. This evidence shows that the Fresh from the Farm
Fundraiser program, along with the addition of healthy food preparation demonstrations
can address the needs of the community. Demonstrations will be given to all students
and parents using different time slots (one weekday night and a weekend) to allow all
parents the ability to participate and to not interfere with class times.
SECTION 2: Support For Strategy
1. What evidence is your strategy based on?
Childhood obesity rates have increased drastically over the years (Veugelers et al.,
2005). Karna et al. (2013) estimate that 19% of Canadian children between the ages of
5-17 are obese, and a major contributor to the increasing rate has been linked to poor
nutrition (WHO, 2015; Veugelers et al., 2005). Canadian Community Health Survey

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reported that 70% of children do not meet the recommended daily intake of fruits and
vegetables. Many factors are presumed to be responsible for unhealthy eating habits in
children including increased productivity of processed food (WHO, 2015), parents lack
of knowledge of healthy food choices (Melanson, 2014) and accessibility of grocery
stores (Veugelers et al., 2005). Karna et al. (2013) state that those who develop
unhealthy eating habits as children are likely to continue these patterns as adults.
These statistics prove why it is imperative to educate children on the importance of
healthy food choices early on in life so as to reduce the risk of developing health-related
disease later on. World Health Organization (WHO) has proposed strategies for
optimizing healthy meal choices in children to help reduce the prevalence of childhood
obesity in Canada. These strategies include promoting awareness on the repercussions
of poor nutrition, educating parents and children on the importance of nutrition, and
developing school policies. Veugelers et al., (2005) studied the efficacy of strategies
already implemented into school programs and found that the obesity rates for children
attending schools with nutritional programs were significantly less than those in schools
that had no focus on healthy eating. Ogata et al. (2014) concur with this finding and
suggest that children should participate in activities that promote nutrition. While the
findings of these studies yield idealistic results, a previous study by Kirkpatrick et al.
(2009) attempting to initiate healthy eating programs into elementary schools, mainly in
low-income neighborhoods, resulted in unsuccessful results mainly linked to the lack of
participation in the program. These programs included community kitchens, community
gardens, and the Good Food Box Program. Loopstra et al. (2013) conducted a follow-up
study to determine the potential causes for a lack of participation in these programs and
concluded the two common reasons to be a lack of knowledge about the program, and
lack of time to participate in the program. Another study by Quandt et al. (2013)
examined the feasibility of a community-supported agricultural program to promote fruit
and vegetable consumption in under-resourced communities. The intervention involved
the delivery of fruits and vegetables once a week for 16 weeks, along with 5
informational sessions educating the participants about healthy food choices. The
control group received no deliveries and did not attend the sessions. After following up
with the participants they found significant increases in fruit and vegetable inventory in
the homes of the intervention group compared to the control group. Much like the
previous studies, Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health (WDGPH) has recently
addressed issues regarding unhealthy eating habits in children in WDG and concluded
that future focus should include increasing awareness of poor nutrition as well as
educating children about the importance of a balanced diet. The Fresh From the Farm
incentive offers a creative way that children can get involved within their communities
and help spread the word of the importance of good nutrition. This program utilizes all of
the proposed strategies for reducing childhood obesity while also raising money for the
schools involved. Furthermore, this program can overcome the limitations discussed by
Loopstra et al. (2013), by using realistic methods to not only involve parents, but also to
educate them and make healthy eating a part of their daily lifestyle.

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2. How does your strategy consider health equity and the social determinants of
health?
Fresh from the Farm is a cost free initiative to the schools, which encourages schools
without a budget for additional programs to participate. The buyers pay about of the
cost of the regular store price, which helps families that may be struggling to pay for
regular price for fruits and vegetables. To further promote accessibility to low-income
families, the bundles of product could be offered with a discount to parents that
volunteer for the event; this strategy would reduce the funds generated for the school
but would ensure that the price is not a limiting factor for some parents.
SECTION 3: Action Plan!
1. How will your strategy be operationalized? Discuss all steps in detail.
To bring the Fresh from the Farm fundraiser into operation we will first need to get the
schools administration to approve the fundraiser and the associated dates for the
student assembly, the vegetable and fruit delivery and the final parent/student event.
Once approved, the school champion will coordinate sending out information via emails
or flyers sent home with the students to raise awareness of the upcoming event and
educate families about what the Fresh from the Farm fundraiser sets to accomplish for
the students and the school. The last week of August Fresh from the Farm delivers the
Opening Kits to the schools which contain order forms, brochures, posters, and
program details. During the First week of school the student assembly will be held for
the school administration, program champion, and WDGPH associates to explain to the
student body the purpose, goals and outcomes of the fundraiser, and to create
excitement around the fundraiser provoking participation among the students. After the
assembly the order forms will be given out to the students, they will be able to approach
friends, family, and community members to support their school by purchasing a bundle
of produce. Fundraising will continue until the second week of October, then the school
submits the produce order to Fresh from the Farm. Product deliveries will take place
before the end of November. After the delivery the volunteers will package the individual
bundles. In order to keep the baskets fresh for the families who purchased them, the
delivery of bundles for parents and students will be held soon after the school received
the bulk product. The final event will allow families to pick up their fruits and vegetables
and interact with the volunteers giving food demonstrations to learn some quick,
affordable, and tasty recipes to encourage healthy eating at home. Lastly, during the
final event the parents will be given a flyer encouraging them to fill out a quick survey
online to communicate how successful they felt the fundraiser was and how the
fundraiser can improve in the future.
2. What are the key strengths and limitations of your strategy? What steps have
you put in place to minimize foreseeable challenges?
Our proposed strategy utilizes the Fresh from the Farm fundraiser; a new program that
has increased its eligibility to more communities in recent years. Furthermore, the
program involves students in a fundraising program that promotes the selling of fresh
vegetable baskets to raise money for the school, and also raises awareness of healthy
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eating to families and students. The final event celebrating the success of the fundraiser
demonstrates to parents and students how easy and tasty eating healthy can be.
Another strength of our project is that we are addressing specific needs that have
already been identified by WDGPH. The true impact of the Fresh from the Farm
fundraiser is based on the participation of the students and their families. We as
advocates for WDGPH need to support the school administrators and teachers with
supplies and resources so that they can encourage students to participate in a program
that can have a great impact on their health. To minimize participation as a challenge
we have a incorporated student assembly, established communication with parents
about the program, and created discount incentives for parents to become involved with
the program as a volunteer.
3. How have you designed your project to be sustainable?
This program is sustainable as it allows schools to raise money for future education
programs. Also, a large portion of the work is done by Fresh from the Farm and the
parents and schools only have to take care of the fundraising part without having to
create their own marketing materials or sourcing the products directly from the farms.
4. How will you know if your strategy is successful?
We will know if this strategy is successful for increasing healthy eating in elementary
aged students from the feedback given from the families, students and the school
administration. We will use surveys and questionnaires to ask the families if they feel
they have gained more knowledge around healthy eating and children and if they feel
more inclined to make healthy changes to their families diet after participating in this
initiative. They will later be reassessed in a follow-up survey given out in March to
examine the long term effects of the program. The students will be asked if they know
more about fruits and vegetables and the importance of healthy eating. The school
administration will also be asked about how they felt the program was run and if they
feel the students have gained knowledge about healthy eating. We will also consider the
program successful if the school is able to raise enough money to fund other healthy
eating initiatives.
5. How has your project improved in response to the feedback that you received?
The feedback received from Professor Kerry Ritchie and WDGPH helped us narrow
down our target audience to 10 schools in the Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph region. We
refined our budget by providing more details on the different cost associated with this
initiative. Key partners for the program were also further defined and researched to
increase community involvement. We decided to offer the produce at a further
discounted price to parents that volunteer for this initiative in order to keep this program
affordable for everybody; suggestions on how to use the revenue generated by the
program were added.
Overall, the comments for our initial proposal helped us provide a more detailed
explanation of what this fundraising initiative entails and what are the steps that we
need to take in order to make it successful.

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REFERENCES
Glen, K.E., Thomas, H.M., Loebach, J.E., Gilliland, J.A. & Gobert, C.P. (2013). Fruit
and vegetable consumption among children in a socioeconomically
disadvantaged neighborhood. Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice & Research,
74(3), 114-118. doi: 10.3148/74.3.2013.114
Kirkpatrick S. I., & Tarasuk, V. (2009). Food insecurity and participation in community
food programs among low-income Toronto families. Canadian Journal of Public
Health, 200(2). 135-139.
Loopstra, R., & Tarasuk, V. (2013). Perspectives on community gardens, community
kithens and the good food box program in a community-based sample of lowincome families. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 104(1). 55-59.
Melanson, K. J. (2014). Lifestyle approaches to promoting healthy eating for children.
American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 2(1), 26-29. doi:
10.1177/1559827607309217
Ogata, B.N. & Hayes, D. (2014). Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics:
nutrition guidance for healthy children ages 2 to 11 years. Journal of the
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 114(8), 1257-1276. doi:
10.1016/j.jand.2014.06.001
Quandt, S.A., Dupuis J., Fish, C. & DAgostino, R.B.Jr. (2013). Feasibility of using a
community-supported agriculture program to improve fruit and vegetable
inventories and consumption in an underresourced urban community. Preventing
Chronic Disease, 10:130053. doi: 10.5888/pcd10.130053.

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Veugelers, P.J., Fitzgerald, A.L. (2005). Effectiveness of school programs in preventing


childhood obesity: a multilevel comparison. American Journal of Public Health,
95 (3),432-435. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/
Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health. (2013). Addressing social determinants of
health in the city of Guelph: A public health perspective on local health, policy,
and program needs. Retrieved from
https://www.wdgpublichealth.ca/sites/default/files/wdgphfiles/sdoh-report-guelph2013-web.pdf
Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health. (2014). Nutrition screening of kindergarten
students in Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph: Results of NutriSTEP. Retrieved from
https://www.wdgpublichealth.ca/sites/default/files/wdgphfiles/NutriSTEP%20final
%20report.pdf
World Health Organization. (2015). Healthy diet fact sheet N 394. Retrieved from
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs394/en/