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Area of Focus: Special Feeding


Relationships

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Symbiosis:

A long term relationship


between two or more different
species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Three

types of symbiosis

Parasitism
- Mutualism
- Commensalism

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Three

types of symbiosis

Parasitism
- Mutualism
- Commensalism

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Three

types of symbiosis

Parasitism
- Mutualism
- Commensalism

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Three

types of symbiosis

Parasitism
- Mutualism
- Commensalism

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Parasitism:

One organism benefits


while the other is harmed.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Im sick of
studying dumb
stuff Why
should I care
about studying
parasites?

1 in 3 American suffers in some form from


a parasite.
Learn about them to help yourself.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Im sorry
that I yelled
earlier. I
didnt know
that.

Caution! Disgusting parasites ahead.


Be prepared to be grossed out. Close your
eyes if needed.

Caution! Disgusting parasites ahead.


Be prepared to be grossed out. Close your
eyes if needed.

Parasites are one on the most numerous


and successful groups of organisms on
the planet.
For every species on earth, they may host a
handful of unique parasites.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles,

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles, often going through a number of
different species before finding a host.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles, often going through a number of
different species before finding a host.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles, often going through a number of
different species before finding a host.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles, often going through a number of
different species before finding a host.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles, often going through a number of
different species before finding a host.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have very complicated life


cycles, often going through a number of
different species before finding a host.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Parasites damage their host by


consuming tissues, and releasing toxins.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.
Ectoparasites: Outside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.
Ectoparasites: Outside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.
Ectoparasites: Outside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.
Ectoparasites: Outside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.
Ectoparasites: Outside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Two general types of parasites


Endoparasites: Inside your body.
Ectoparasites: Outside your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Worms make up some of the common


parasites that affects humans.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Worms make up some of the common


parasites that affects humans.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Worms make up some of the common


parasites that affects humans.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Worms make up some of the common


parasites that affects humans.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Ascaris Infection Worm Ball


Removed from 10 year old boy.

Human Intestine post surgery.


This section of the intestine was removed as
the worms created a blockage.

A few endoparasites that affect humans.


Tape worms

If a child frequently itches their butt, you


should check to see if they have contracted
pinworm.

Pinworm

Pinworm: Medication works, but a


flashlight and small spoon is also required.

Pinworm: Medication works, but a


flashlight and small spoon is also required.

Pinworm
s

Pinworm: Medication works, but a


flashlight and small spoon is also required.

Pinworm
s

Anus

Yummy!
These
Pinworm eggs
taste great
when I bite
my nails.

Hookworm

Ringworm

Ringworm

Athletes Foot: Another Fungi

Roundworms

Guinea worms

Guinea worms can be very large.

Loa loa, eyeworms

Loa loa, eyeworms

Onchocerciasis, Riverblindness

Screw worm fly.

Screw worm fly.

Brain Worm Affects Moose. Slime from


snail passes the parasite between species.

Heartworms Dogs
Common parasite

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some common ectoparasites.


Fleas

Louse

Chiggers

Ticks

Crabs (louse)

Crabs (louse)

Crab (louse) legs and claws are highly


adapted to cling to pubic hairs on the
human body.

Ahhh, good job


little baby crab.

Your almost
there. Just
keep climbing up
the pubic hair.

Bed bugs

This strange louse is a tongue eating


parasite that lives in a fishes mouth.

This strange louse is a tongue eating


parasite that lives in a fishes mouth.

Mange Parasite.

Biting flies

Human Bot Fly.

Human Bot Fly

Human Bot Fly

Sand Fly

Filariasis

Filariasis

Brain eating amoeba

Video Wasp parasite and aphids


Are all parasites bad to humans?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLtUk-W5
Gpk

Zombie Snail
Parasitic flatworm
Eggs exist in bird droppings, and when snail
eats droppings, the parasite crawls into
eyestalk and pulse.
A bird comes by and eats eye stalk / parasite
and snail loses eye.

Zombie Snail
Caused by parasitic flatworm
Eggs exist in bird droppings, and when snail
eats droppings, the parasite crawls into
eyestalk and begins to pulse. (Caterpillar?)
A bird comes by and eats eye stalk / parasite
and snail loses eye.

Zombie Snail
Caused by parasitic flatworm
Eggs exist in bird droppings, and when snail
eats droppings, the parasite crawls into
eyestalk and begins to pulse. (Caterpillar?)
A bird comes by and eats eye stalk / parasite
and snail loses eye.

Mosquito
A parasite that carries the malaria parasite.

Leeches

Vampire Bat.

Sea Lamprey

Article! Sea Lamprey


Read Article and answer the questions at the
bottom in your journal.

Sea Lamprey are jawless fish (very old),


They attach to fish with sucker and bore a
hole into flesh with tongue.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Coming to your local swim hole soon.

The parasite must not kill the host. The


host provides the food and shelter and
survival of the parasite.

Video Links! (Optional)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-KJZ22-w
TQ

The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood


and can enter any open human orifice.

The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood


and can enter any open human orifice.

The Candiru or toothpick fish sucks blood


and can enter any open human orifice.

Most parasites have degenerated in some


way, that is, they have lost many physical
features such as eyes.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Most parasites have degenerated in some


way, that is, they have lost many physical
features such as eyes.
They dont need these complicated things
anymore, but they have added features such as
producing more eggs and finding ways to exist
undetected.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Brood Parasitism Cowbird

Brood Parasitism The cowbird waits until a


mother leaves a nest and then lays her eggs
next to the other egg. When the bird comes
back she doesnt know the difference and
raises the eggs.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Brood Parasitism The cowbird waits until a


mother leaves a nest and then lays her eggs
next to the other egg. When the bird comes
back she doesnt know the difference and
raises the eggs.
The cowbird drops a few of the real mothers
eggs out to make room. Those eggs die and the
juvenile cowbird takes most of the food while the
other chicks starve.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which chick below is an example of brood


parasitism?

Which chick below is an example of brood


parasitism?

Which chick below is an example of brood


parasitism?

Which eggs are examples of brood


parasitism?

Which eggs are examples of brood


parasitism?

Which eggs are examples of brood


parasitism?

Plants are parasitized by viruses,


bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and a few
other plants.

Mistletoe is a
common
plant
parasite

Some PowerPoint advice!


Involve people. I need two volunteers, one
boy and one girl to read the next slide.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

PowerPoint advice: You should

PowerPoint advice: You should KISS


Or you can read the next slide?

PowerPoint advice: KISS

Keep

It
Simple
Silly

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

PowerPoint advice: KISS

Keep

It
Simple
Silly

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

PowerPoint advice: KISS

Keep

It
Simple
Silly

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

PowerPoint advice: KISS

Keep

It
Simple
Silly

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

PowerPoint advice: KISS

Keep

It
Simple
Silly

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

PowerPoint Advice:
Cheesy Effects do not help your presentation.
Waiting for information is a waste of time.
Animations can take away from your
presentation.
Wait! Im not finished reading this. Where is it
going? Im not ready yet! Arrrgh, I hate
animations!

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Sound effects combined with effects is


even worse.

How is this color combination?


Do you want to sit through 25
slides of Twinkie Yellow? Be smart
about your color choice.
Keep it Simple

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

I really enjoy this background color and


font style. I also wanted to make a
pretty font. Black and white is so
boring!
Is this font to small?

Is this Font to
Big?
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Tornado Formation
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending
between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth.
Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and
least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph.
Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a
few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can
remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in
width.
Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the
thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low
level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm,
and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging
winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft.
Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to
great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable.
An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with
height.
Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the
earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all
levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a
clockwise, or veering, direction.
Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like
form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple
vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even
others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level
as the only indication of the tornado's presence.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Tornado Formation
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending
between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth.
Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and
least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph.
Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a
few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can
remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in
width.
Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the
thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low
level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm,
and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging
winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft.
Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to
great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable.
An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with
height.
Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the
earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all
levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a
clockwise, or veering, direction.
Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like
form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple
vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even
others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level
as the only indication of the tornado's presence.

Some PowerPoint advice!

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Tornado Formation
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending
between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth.
Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and
least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph.
Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a
few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can
remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in
width.
Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the
thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low
level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm,
and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging
winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft.
Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to
great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable.
An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with
height.
Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the
earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all
levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a
clockwise, or veering, direction.
Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like
form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple
vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even
others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level
as the only indication of the tornado's presence.

Some PowerPoint advice!


Only a few words per
slide.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Tornado Formation
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending
between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth.
Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and
least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph.
Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a
few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can
remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in
width.
Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the
thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low
level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm,
and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging
winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft.
Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to
great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable.
An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with
height.
Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the
earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all
levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a
clockwise, or veering, direction.
Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like
form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple
vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even
others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level
as the only indication of the tornado's presence.

Some PowerPoint advice!


Only a few words per
slide.
NO Paragraphs! NO
Reading!

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Tornado Formation
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending
between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth.
Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and
least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph.
Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a
few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can
remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in
width.
Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the
thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low
level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm,
and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging
winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft.
Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to
great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable.
An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with
height.
Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the
earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all
levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a
clockwise, or veering, direction.
Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like
form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple
vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even
others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level
as the only indication of the tornado's presence.

Some PowerPoint advice!


Only a few words per
slide.
NO Paragraphs! NO
Reading!
NO Copy and Paste.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Tornado Formation
A tornado is a violently rotating column of air in contact with and extending
between a cloud (often a thunderstorm cloud) and the surface of the earth.
Winds in most tornadoes blow at 100 mph or less, but in the most violent, and
least frequent, wind speeds can exceed 250 mph.
Tornadoes, often nicknamed "twisters," typically track along the ground for a
few miles or less and are less than 100 yards wide, though some monsters can
remain in contact with the earth for well over fifty miles and exceed one mile in
width.
Several conditions are required for the development of tornadoes and the
thunderstorm clouds with which most tornadoes are associated. Abundant low
level moisture is necessary to contribute to the development of a thunderstorm,
and a "trigger" (perhaps a cold front or other low level zone of converging
winds) is needed to lift the moist air aloft.
Once the air begins to rise and becomes saturated it will continue rising to
great heights and produce a thunderstorm cloud, if the atmosphere is unstable.
An unstable atmosphere is one where the temperature decreases rapidly with
height.
Atmospheric instability can also occur when dry air overlays moist air near the
earth's surface. Finally, tornadoes usually form in areas where winds at all
levels of the atmosphere are not only strong, but also turn with height in a
clockwise, or veering, direction.
Tornadoes can appear as a traditional funnel shape, or in a slender rope-like
form. Some have a churning, smoky look to them, and others contain "multiple
vortices" - small, individual tornadoes rotating around a common center. Even
others may be nearly invisible, with only swirling dust or debris at ground level
as the only indication of the tornado's presence.

Some PowerPoint advice!


Only a few words per
slide.
NO Paragraphs! NO
Reading!
NO Copy and Paste.
Its cheating and boring.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some PowerPoint advice


Visuals are more important than words.
This is a picture of a tornado forming.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some PowerPoint advice


Visuals are more important than words.
This is a picture of a tornado forming.

Note Cyclonic formation

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some PowerPoint advice


Visuals are more important than words.
This is a picture of a tornado forming.

Note Cyclonic formation

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The requirements of this project in in 10


seconds.
Dont make your presentation PowerPointless.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Activity! Creating a PowerPoint Presentation


on parasites.
Fact sheet in activities folder
Visit the cdc website to find A-Z list of parasites and choose one of
interest (10 minutes)
http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/
1 Slide Title Page: Common and science name of parasite.
2/3 slides: Pictures of parasite / host
2/3 slides: How do you get it / transmitted?
3 slides: How it effects its host (health effects)?
1 slide: How do you treat this parasite?
1 Slide: Whats the life cycle of this parasite?
Works cited page optional but encouraged, use APA format.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Activity Sheet! Parasite Research


Sheet
- Found in activities folder.

Scabies (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis).

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Scabies is spread from person to person


contact

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

People dont usually have symptoms during


the first 2 to 6 weeks they are infested (CDC,
2010).

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The scabies mite can be spread during this


time.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The microscopic scabies mite burrows into


the upper layer of the skin.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The microscopic scabies mite burrows into


the upper layer of the skin. (CDC, 2010).

Lays Eggs in
Skin

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Picture of rash caused by the burrowing


scabies mite.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The rashes and infections can be minor,


Or the they can very serious.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The rashes and infections can be minor,


Or the they can very serious.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Scabies occurs worldwide and can infect


anyone.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Picture of scabies mite infecting homeless in


Norway.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Scabies life cycle goes from egg to nymph to


adult.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Scabicides are used to kill scabies and eggs.


Doctors prescription is needed.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Learn more athttp://www.cdc.gov/parasites/

Works Cited
Centers For Disease Control. (2010,
November 2). Parasites - scabies.
Retrieved from
http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/scabies/in
dex.html

Information to complete works cited page


can be found at
http://citationmachine.net/index2.php

Activity! Creating a PowerPoint Presentation


on parasites.
Fact sheet in activities folder
Visit the cdc website to find A-Z list of parasites and choose one of
interest (10 minutes)
http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/
1 Slide Title Page: Common and science name of parasite.
2/3 slides: Pictures of parasite / host
2/3 slides: How do you get it / transmitted?
3 slides: How it effects its host (health effects)?
1 slide: How do you treat this parasite?
1 Slide: Whats the life cycle of this parasite?
Works cited page optional but encouraged, use APA format.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video Link! How to make a PowerPoint.


Note: This video is also a good example of an
extremely boring and ineffective PowerPoint.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUqIDs5MZxM

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Parasite Presentations.
Each person should set-up their presentation
area so its nice and neat.
Students should record information about
parasites directly to their homework bundle as
you move from presentation to presentation.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The Parasite Zone. Creepy music to play


during the roaming presentations.
Twilight Zone Intro: 30 Sec.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxf_Dvy0VLs

Dark Ambient: 7 minutes.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1vjTJTRn48
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJyiTDAWzDA&featu
re=related

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

You can now complete this question in your


bundled homework package.

You can now complete this question in your


bundled homework package.

Coevolution: The evolution of two or more


species, each adapting to changes in the
other.

These ecological relationships include:

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species
Mutualistic species

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species
Mutualistic species

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species
Mutualistic species

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species
Mutualistic species

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species
Mutualistic species

These ecological relationships include:


Predator/prey and parasite/host
Competitive species
Mutualistic species

Mutualism:

Both organisms benefit.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Types

of mutualisms

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Look how the majority of the this plants


roots are connected to the symbiotic fungi.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Fungus breaks down organic molecules


and helps return those nutrients to plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which plant has helpful Mycorrhizae fungi


in the soil providing nutrients to the plant?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The fungi will help the plant absorb


valuable nutrients so the plant can grow?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

They look for


molecules to break
down.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Ro
o

t
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their


fungus colonies.

Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their


fungus colonies.
-The ants then feed on the growing
fungus.

Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their


fungus colonies.
-The ants then feed on the growing
fungus.

There were all examples of trophic


Mutualisms

Trophic

mutualism: Both species help


feed each other.
-

Trophic

mutualism: Both species help


feed each other.
Usually

nutrient related.

Cleaning

symbiosis: One species


gets food and shelter, the other has
parasites removed.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video Link! Bulldozer Shrimp and the


Goby.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR9X3gFTpL
0&feature=related

Video! Goby Fish and Bulldozer Shrimp.


How is this a defensive mutualism?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR9X3gFTp
L0&feature=fvwrel

Video Link! Review of Symbiosis


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSmL2F1t81Q

Question! Are these ants killing this


caterpillar?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Question! Are these ants killing this


caterpillar?
Answer: No. they are eating some sugary
secretions releases by the caterpillar.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video! Caterpillar and Ant defensive


mutualism.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3bWqlPLpMg

Defensive

mutualisms: One species


protects the other and gets some
benefits for its help.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Never climb Acacia trees that have these


galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and
coming running out to attack.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Never climb Acacia trees that have these


galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and
coming running out to attack.
They get drops of sugar from the leaves of the
tree.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Never climb Acacia trees that have these


galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and
coming running out to attack.
They get drops of sugar from the leaves of the
tree.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video Link (Optional) Ants and defensive


mutualisms.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xm2qdxV
VRm4

The Sea Anemome and the Clownfish are a


mutualism.

The Sea Anemome and the Clownfish are a


mutualism.
The Anemome gets small scraps from the
clownfish, and the Clownfish gets protection.

Dispersive

mutualisms: One species


receives food in exchange for moving
the pollen or seeds of its partner.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Pollination Insects transfer pollen from


one flower to the next, insects gets nectar.

Pollination Insects transfer pollen from


one flower to the next, insects gets nectar.

Wow! Look
how this flower
has evolved to
be white, and
shaped in a way
so I can visit it.

Seed dispersal

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework.

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework.

Commensalism:

One organism
benefits while the other doesnt
benefit, or suffer harm.

The remora just hitches a ride to grab some


scraps after the kill.

Im not a cleaner
bird.
Im just here for
the protection

After my nap,
can you please
feed me
Thanks.

Epiphytes Can be parasitic if they shade


out the host tree.

Epiphytes Can be parasitic if they shade


out the host tree.

Epiphytes Can be parasitic if they shade


out the host tree.

A bird may benefit from a tree for shelter


and raising young.
The tree neither benefits, nor is caused harm.

You are made of more than 65 trillion


human cells.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

You are made of more than 65 trillion


human cells.
Multiply that number by 10 and thats how
many bacteria are living in your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

You are made of more than 65 trillion


human cells.
Multiply that number by 10 and thats how
many bacteria are living in your body.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

You are made of more than 65 trillion


human cells.
Multiply that number by 10 and thats how
many bacteria are living in your body.
Your microbiome is very important to your survival.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Bacteria live our body. They are

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.
Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they
benefit but dont cause us harm.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.
Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they
benefit but dont cause us harm.
Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and
release toxins.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.
Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they
benefit but dont cause us harm.
Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and
release toxins.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.
Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they
benefit but dont cause us harm.
Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and
release toxins.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.
Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they
benefit but dont cause us harm.
Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and
release toxins.

Bacteria live our body. They are


Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food,
while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and
digest food.
Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they
benefit but dont cause us harm.
Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and
release toxins.

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework.

Reading Link! Each group must report to


the class about a marine symbiosis.
http://www.ehow.com/info_8208885_symbiotic
-between-animals-marine-biome.html
Imperial Shrimp and Sea Cucumbers
Clownfish and Anemones
Sharks and Remoras
Green Turtles and Cleaning Fish
Maybe we should
act out the
symbiosis?

New

Area of Focus: Plant and Animal


Interactions. Still part of symbiosis.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Plants and animals are always coevolving.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Plants and animals are always coevolving.


Plants are creating defenses so they dont get
eaten,

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Plants and animals are always coevolving.


Plants are creating defenses so they dont get
eaten, and animals are evolving ways to get
around these defenses and eat the plant.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Plants and animals are always coevolving.


Plants are creating defenses so they dont get
eaten, and animals are evolving ways to get
around these defenses and eat the plant.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Coevolution:

When two or more


species influence each others
evolution.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Evolution: The gradual change in a species


over time.

Activity! Answer with your feet.

Teacher needs to label the


corners of the room.

Please walk safely and take some wrong


turns before traveling to the corner with
the correct answer.

This is the name for the variety, or


number of kinds of species.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Parasitism
C.) Food Chain
D.) Species Diversity

This is the name for the variety, or


number of kinds of species.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Parasitism
C.) Food Chain
D.) Species Diversity

This is the term for the amount of each


species. Must sum to 1 or 100%.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Relative Abundance
C.) Summatic Frequency
D.) Species Diversity

This is the term for the amount of each


species. Must sum to 1 or 100%.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Relative Abundance
C.) Summatic Frequency
D.) Species Diversity

This is the resemblance of an animal


species to another species or to
natural objects.
A.) Brood Parasitism
B.) Mimicry
C.) Camouflage
D.) Symbiosis

This is the resemblance of an animal


species to another species or to
natural objects.
A.) Brood Parasitism
B.) Mimicry
C.) Camouflage
D.) Symbiosis

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Mutualism
B.) Parasitism
C.) Commensalism
D.) Ectoparasite

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Mutualism
B.) Parasitism
C.) Commensalism
D.) Ectoparasite

This is the name for the symbiosis

when two species benefit from each


other.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Commensalism
C.) Camouflage
D.) Parasitism

This is the name for the symbiosis

when two species benefit from each


other.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Commensalism
C.) Camouflage
D.) Parasitism

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Commenalism
C.) Dispersive mutualisms
D.) Cleaning Symbiosis

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Commenalism
C.) Dispersive mutualisms
D.) Cleaning Symbiosis

This the resemblance of an organism


to another organisms or object.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Predatory
C.) Camouflage
D.) Mimicry

This the resemblance of an organism


to another organisms or object.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Predatory
C.) Camouflage
D.) Mimicry

This an adaptation that allows animals


to blend into their environment
A.) Competitive Exclusion
B.) Camouflage
C.) Abundance
D.) Parasitism

This an adaptation that allows animals


to blend into their environment
A.) Competitive Exclusion
B.) Camouflage
C.) Abundance
D.) Parasitism

This means looking like another species


that is dangerous or may taste bad. There
is a mimic, and the model.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Batesian Mimicry
C.) Mullerian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This means looking like another species


that is dangerous or may taste bad. There
is a mimic, and the model.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Batesian Mimicry
C.) Mullerian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Brood Parasitism
B.) Cleaning Symbiosis
C.) Defensive mutualisms
D.) Commensalism

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Brood Parasitism
B.) Cleaning Symbiosis
C.) Defensive mutualisms
D.) Commensalism

This is where several unrelated species


share warning colors that warn predators
that these colors are dangerous or toxic.
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Increased Competition
C.) Batesian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This is where several unrelated species


share warning colors that warn predators
that these colors are dangerous or toxic.
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Increased Competition
C.) Batesian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This is when one species receives food in


exchange for moving the
pollen or
seeds of
its partner.
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Predator Competition
C.) Dispersive mutualisms
D.) Commensalism

This is when one species receives food in


exchange for moving the
pollen or
seeds of
its partner.
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Predator Competition
C.) Dispersive mutualisms
D.) Commensalism

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Commenalism
C.) Defensive mutualisms
D.) Cleaning Symbiosis

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Commenalism
C.) Defensive mutualisms
D.) Cleaning Symbiosis

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Brood Parasite
B.) Guinea Worm
C.) Endoparasite
D.) Ectoparasite

This is picture is an
example of a
A.) Brood Parasite
B.) Guinea Worm
C.) Endoparasite
D.) Ectoparasite

Animals

Strategies to eat plants

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Animals

Strategies to eat plants

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Animals

have special teeth and mouth


parts to eat plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Animals

have special teeth and mouth


parts to eat plants.

Insects
dont have
teeth.
We have
structures
called
mandibles.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Piercing Mouth parts.

Ladybugs eat aphids.

Ladybugs eat aphids.


Dont let their pretty appearance fool
you, they are veracious predators.

Check out that


warning coloration.

Or is it just a
mimic?

Crushing mouth parts

Really sharp incisors for snipping plants


and cutting through trees.

Have long tongues to avoid dangerous


plant ant mutualisms.

Knock trees over / break branches to


reach leaves and fruits.

Burrow underground to eat tubers and the


roots of the plants. (Naked Mole Rat)

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Many animals (living and extinct) swallow


stones. The round stones smash plant
matter together in the stomach as it rumbles
to aid in digestion.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some animals eat species when they are


young before they become difficult.

They

use microbe farms (leaf cutter


ants).

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video Link! Leaf Cutter Ants


Multiple Symbiosis (Ants, Fungus, Bacteria)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RH3KY
BMpxOU

Four

chambered stomachs (many


herbivores)

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Four

chambered stomachs (many


herbivores)
Uses

bacteria to break down difficult


plant matter.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Cow Stomach

Cow Stomach

Cow Stomach

Cow Stomach

Cow Stomach

I only kind of eat


grass.

I only kind of eat


grass. I mostly
digest the bacteria
that eat the grass
that I ate.

Herbivores have gut bacteria that help them


digest plant matter. The bacteria are fed
plants, they grow, and then the cow eats the
bacteria.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Herbivores have gut bacteria that help them


digest plant matter. The bacteria are fed
plants, they grow, and then the cow eats the
bacteria.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Herbivores have gut bacteria that help them


digest plant matter. The bacteria are fed
plants, they grow, and then the cow eats the
bacteria.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Herbivores have gut bacteria that help them


digest plant matter. The bacteria are fed
plants, they grow, and then the cow
processes the bacteria.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Human Stomach

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Take

in plant toxins: You are able to


eat poisonous plants.
Uhh
Nastieoos

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Bugged Out Available Sheet

Activity! Bugged Out Activity


Please create an animal with many strategies to feed on
plants and survive.
Insects: Give them specialized mandilbles (teeth-like) or piercing
mouth parts, ability to sequester (absorb) toxins, microbe farms.
Mammals: Four chambered stomach with gut bacteria, and grinding
teeth.
Birds: Crushing Mouth Parts, gizzard stones
Camouflage or give it a form of mimicry
Batesian Mimicry (Looks like an object or other organism)
Mullerian Mimicry (Warning Coloration)
A symbiosis with another organisms
Ex. Cleaning symbiosis
Ex. Protective / defensive symbiosis
Give it a cool common and science name;
Ex) The Super Ant (Anticus killericus)
The animal should be well drawn and all of the strategies should be
labeled neatly with a brief description.
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Symbiotic
relationship
with the
cleaning
flea. Flea
gets
protection
and ant
gets
Parasitic
cleaned.

Mullerian
Mimicry
colors say
watch out Im
poisonous to
predators

worm that
attacks toxic
ant

Sharp
mandibl
es for
cutting
plants

Can also cut leaves to


feed to its microbe farm

Ability
to
sequest
er / take
in toxins

Plant

defense mechanisms

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

If you dont have good defenses, animals


will exploit you.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Grow

in a place difficult to be eaten.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Repair

quickly and let them eat the


non-essential parts of you.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Mechanical

Defenses: Thorns and


serrated edges, and sap.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Mechanical Defenses: Thorns and


serrated edges, and sap.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Mechanical Defenses: Thorns and


serrated edges, and sap.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Mechanical Defenses: Thorns and


serrated edges, and sap.
Serrated: Notch-like edges of
a saw or cutting blade.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Mechanical Defenses: Thorns and


serrated edges, and sap.
Serrated: Notch-like edges of
a saw or cutting blade.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

This grass is very sharp and can cut skin


easily.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Thorn Mimic

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Can
you
spot
the
thorn
mimic?

Stinging nettles.

Close up of stinging nettles.

Sticky Sap

Fossilized plant resin with prehistoric


insects in it.

Chemical

Defenses such as toxins:


Plants become poisonous (nicotine,
mustard, caffeine).

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

What is this common plant?

Chemical toxin is urushiol.

Creams help ease the itching and provide


some relief.

Burning or eating Poison Ivy can be


hazardous because the chemicals can be
inhaled.

Burning or eating Poison Ivy can be


hazardous because the chemicals can be
inhaled.

Poison Ivy in the spring.

Summer

Poison Ivys Flowers are white.

Fall

Winter (Dont touch vines)

Poison Ivy grows as a vine (Climb).

Poison Oak

Poison Sumac

I thought I
was
immune to
Poison Ivy

Quiz Wiz Poison Ivy Identification. 1-10,


Write Poison Ivy for the slides that are,
and Not Ivy for the others.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Bonus Name the movie?

Answers 1-10 Poison Ivy Quiz

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Bonus Name the movie?

Bonus Answer: Batman and Robin,


character name is called Poison Ivy played
by Uma Thurman.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

The Foxglove can cause death if eaten.

Yum, these look tasty? Should I eat them?

Answer! No, they are poisonous.

Which one is edible?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which one is edible?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which one is edible?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which one is edible?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which one is edible?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Which is edible?

Which is edible?

Which is edible?

Which is edible?

Are these edible?

Are these edible?

Are these edible?

Are these edible?

Are these edible?

Which one is edible?

Which one is edible?

Which one is edible?

Which one is edible?

Which one is edible?

Which one is edible?

Be

extremely hard to digest.

Cellulose

is a complex sugar.

Think about celery, then be ten times


harder to chew.

You

have protective insects, birds, or


mammals that attack predators.
You

feed your friends a bit (mutualism).

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Activity! Plant Defenses Activity


Please create a unique plant with many
defenses.
Give it a cool name.
Science and Common.

The plant should be well drawn and all of


the strategies should be labeled neatly
with a brief description.
Feel free to give it a dispersive mutualism or parasite.

Example on next slide.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Dispersive mutualism
Sticky
sap
makes
eating
difficult
for
Parasite
insects
Leaves are aphid
very difficult
to digest
and loaded
with
chemical
toxins.

Mechanical
Defenses
such as
thorns.

Plant ant
mutual
symbiosis.
Plant gives
drops of sugar,
ants protect
leaves.

Bugged Out Available Sheet

Activity! Bugged Out Activity


Please create an animal with many strategies to feed on
plants and survive.
Insects: Give them specialized mandilbles (teeth-like) or piercing
mouth parts, ability to sequester (absorb) toxins, microbe farms.
Mammals: Four chambered stomach with gut bacteria, and grinding
teeth.
Birds: Crushing Mouth Parts, gizzard stones
Camouflage or give it a form of mimicry
Batesian Mimicry (Looks like an object or other organism)
Mullerian Mimicry (Warning Coloration)
A symbiosis with another organisms
Ex. Cleaning symbiosis
Ex. Protective / defensive symbiosis
Give it a cool common and science name;
Ex) The Super Ant (Anticus killericus)
The animal should be well drawn and all of the strategies should be
labeled neatly with a brief description.
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Symbiotic
relationship
with the
cleaning
flea. Flea
gets
protection
and ant
gets
Parasitic
cleaned.

Mullerian
Mimicry
colors say
watch out Im
poisonous to
predators

worm that
attacks toxic
ant

Sharp
mandibl
es for
cutting
plants

Can also cut leaves to


feed to its microbe farm

Ability
to
sequest
er / take
in toxins

Presentation of Animals and Plants


I will call a plant and animal up to the front
of the room.
Give a quick summary of your plant or
animal with its name and strategies. (30
seconds max!)
I will flip a coin, heads = Animal wins, Tails
=Plant wins. I collect losing poster.
Winner stays for next round until end, dont
need to repeat presentation.
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Coin Toss Simulator


http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activiti
es/Coin/
or
http://www.random.org/coins/

Stand
here

Stan
d
here
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework.

Try to figure out the picture beneath the


boxes first.
Raise your hand when you know, you only get
one guess.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

New

Area of Focus: Exotic Species

Exotic

species: A species that has


been introduced to an ecosystem
that is not native to the area.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Endemic:

Has lived in the area for a


considerable amount of time.
(Native)

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Human

activities (globalization) have


greatly increased the spread of
exotic species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Human

activities (globalization) have


greatly increased the spread of
exotic species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Water is added to ballast tanks to help


keep the boat balanced.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Local ballast water is pumped into empty


cargo vessel

Local ballast water is pumped into empty


cargo vessel Boat travels across ocean.

Local ballast water is pumped into empty


cargo vessel Boat travels across ocean.
The same ballast water is emptied in a
new port releasing the exotic species.

This is an example of a submarine, the


same process occurs with large ships.

This is an example of a submarine, the


same process occurs with large ships.

This is an example of a submarine, the


same process occurs with large ships.

This is an example of a submarine, the


same process occurs with large ships.

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Zebra Mussels Available


Reading
http://www.fws.gov/midwest/
endangered/clams/zebra.html

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Reading Link about Nile


Perch
http://library.thinkquest
.org/03oct/00946/accounts
/fish.htm

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Feral Hogs Available


reading:
http://www.tpwd.state
.tx.us/huntwild/wild/
nuisance/feral_hogs/

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Kudzu Available Reading


http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/
forestry/invasivetutorial/ku
dzu.htm

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Exotic species travel by


Ballast water
Boat hulls
Aquaculture escape
Intentional introductions
Aquarium releases
Live food industry (escapes)
Driving vehicles
Escaped ornamental plants
Fishing bait release
Illegal stockings
Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral Nutria reading available:
http://www.dnr.state.md.u
Disposal of waste water (has seeds
in it)
s/wildlife/Plants_Wildlif
e/invnutriafaq.asp
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Japanese Knotweed
Sea food packaging disposal Available Reading.
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien
/fact/faja1.htm
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control an exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control another exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Other ways exotic species are spread.


Domestic animals become feral
Disposal of waste water (has seeds in it)
Science laboratory escape
Sea food packaging disposal
Past government programs.
Moving fill (has seeds)
Land and water alterations
Biological control introductions
Introduce and exotic to control another exotic.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Readings / Links
Zebra Mussels
http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/clams/zebra.html

Nile Perch
http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/00946/accounts/fish.htm

Feral Hogs / Boar


http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/nuisance/feral_hogs/

Kudzu
http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/invasivetutorial/kudzu.htm

Nutria
http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Plants_Wildlife/invnutriafaq.asp

Japanese Knotweed
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/faja1.htm

Prepare a short presentation to the class.


Who (exotic)?, What, Where, When, Why?

Video Link! (Optional) Everglade Exotics.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJvZMTO4
QVY
Part I (5:25) Fish
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43XN6VBt
FXU
Part II (5:45) Burmese Python

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework.

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework.

Negative

species.

impacts of invasive exotic

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Increased

predation.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Brown tree snake: Has killed off many


native birds in Hawaii which never had
snakes before they were introduced.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Brown tree snake: Has killed off many


native birds in Hawaii which never had
snakes before they were introduced.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Increased

competition.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Try and find a rabbit on the


Australian landscape beneath
this box

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Get Ready!

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Without predators, rabbits introduced to


Australia spread and destroyed the
landscape leaving very little food and water
for native species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Spread

disease.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Asian chestnut blight fungus

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Asian long horn beetle is destroying native


trees.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Didymo: AKA rock snot (diatom / algae)


Covers rocks and destroys fisheries.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Habitat

destruction.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Eurasian Water Milfoil: Spreads rapidly


and chokes lakes and ponds.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some lakes have Eurasian Water Milfoil


patrols. They check boats to make sure
milfoil is not caught on the propeller and
trailer and hitch hikes to the next lake.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try and find the Eurasian Water Milfoil in


the picture below.

Try and find the Eurasian Water Milfoil in


the picture below.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try and find the Eurasian Water Milfoil in


the picture below.

Try and find the Eurasian Water Milfoil in


the picture below.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try and find the Eurasian Water Milfoil in


the picture below.

Answer: Check the interior of the boat and


the anchor as well.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try and find the Eurasian Water Milfoil in


the picture below.

Answer: Trailer Hitch

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try and find the Eurasian Water Mifoil in


the picture below.

The vehicle that drops the boat in the


water can pick up the aquatic plant.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Cause

the extinction of a native


species.

Goats were dropped off on oceanic islands


so sailors could visit the islands years later
and eat goats.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Goats were dropped off on oceanic islands


so sailors could visit the islands years later
and eat goats.
These goats drove mass extinction to most
native plants on these islands.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Damage

the economy.

Zebra Mussel: This exotic arrived in ship


ballast water in the Great Lakes. It has since
covered everything costing millions of dollars
to clean. It also disrupted the ecosystem.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Zebra Mussel: This exotic arrived in ship


ballast water in the Great Lakes. It has since
covered everything costing millions of dollars
to clean. It also disrupted the ecosystem.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Zebra Mussel: This exotic arrived in ship


ballast water in the Great Lakes. It has since
covered everything costing millions of dollars
to clean. It also disrupted the ecosystem.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Zebra Mussel: This exotic arrived in ship


ballast water in the Great Lakes. It has since
covered everything costing millions of dollars
to clean. It also disrupted the ecosystem.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video Link (Optional) Exotics and the


Great Lakes Ecosystem
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-V5513w1X
Sk

Corn root worm: Damages corn crops.

Kudzu: Grows really fast and is difficult to


control.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Kudzu: Grows really fast and is difficult to


control. What is this a picture of?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

House

Video Link! (Optional) Kudzu


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiYrqucl
2vg&feature=related

Damage

to human health.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Damage

to human health.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Damage

to human health.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Damage

to human health.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Africanized Bee: AKA Killer Bees, much


more aggressive than native honey bees.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video! Asian Flying Carp: These carp can


leap into the air. They can weigh a lot and
cause bodily harm.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLFe8xfgx24
They also harm the ecosystem by out competing
native fish. (Interspecific Competition)

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Video! Asian Flying Carp


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InENM6
fwIwE

Biological

control: The purposeful


introduction of natural enemies to
control exotic species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Biological

control: The purposeful


introduction of natural enemies to
control exotic species.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Biological

control: The purposeful


introduction of natural enemies to
control exotic species.
Im new to this
neighborhood. Have
you seen any of those
exotic beetles for me to
eat?

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Weevil introductions have occurred to see if


they will eat the Eurasian Milfoil that is
choking waterways.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Some argue that this kind of approach is


just putting fuel on to the fire.

Some argue that this kind of approach is


just putting fuel on to the fire. The
introduced control exotic may alter the
ecosystem even more.

Some argue that this kind of approach is


just putting fuel on to the fire. The
introduced control exotic may alter the
ecosystem even more. Proper
management is important.

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework package.

You can now complete these questions on


your bundled homework package.

Try to figure out the picture beneath the


boxes first.
Raise your hand when you know, you only get
one guess.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

And an invasive
exotic species to
the Great Lake
Ecosystem

Try to figure out the picture beneath the


boxes first.
Raise your hand when you know, you only get
one guess.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try to figure out the picture beneath the


boxes first.
Raise your hand when you know, you only get
one guess.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Try to figure out the picture beneath the


boxes first.
Raise your hand when you know, you only get
one guess.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

What do you know from below?

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants
Four Chambered
Stomach ?

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants
Plant
Defenses

Parasitism

Mutualism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Endoparasit
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants
Plant
Defenses

Parasitism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Poison
Ivy

Endoparasit
Mutualism
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants
Plant
Defenses

Parasitism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Poison
Ivy

Endoparasit
Mutualism
e
Ecotparasites

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants
Plant
Defenses

Parasitism

Commenalis
m
Dispersive
Mutualism

Poison
Ivy

Endoparasit
Mutualism
e
Ecotparasites

Ballast tanks
Zebra
Mussels

Sea Lamprey

Nutrient
Mutualis
m

Defensive
Mutualism

Strategies
to eat
plants
Plant
Defenses

Eurasia
n
Water
MilfooiExotic Species

You should be close to the end of the


bundled homework.

You should be close to the end of the


bundled homework.

Just do your best to relate some of what we have


learned to your mini ecosystem.

Activity! Review Game for the Ecology


Interactions Unit.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Activity! Racetrack Review.


Instructions on next slide.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Activity! Review Racetrack


Download at
http://people.uncw.edu/ertzbergerj/ppt_games.htm
l
Every student must write two well thought out questions
on note cards to ask the class from the beginning of the
unit. (A short response / term / mathematical answer)
Each table group is assigned a car.
Use white boards as table groups to write down the
answers to the questions. Put the color and your cars
number at the top of your board.
If your table group gets the question correct your car
advances. (click the same color blimp at the top)
The table groups car that crosses the finish line first
wins. We can restart when a group wins.

Activity! Answer with your feet.

B
Teacher needs to label the
corners of the room.

This is a the name for a group of


similar individuals who tend to mate
with each other in a limited geographic
area.
A.) Biome
B.) Population
C.) Biosphere
D.) Batesian Mimicry

A B
This is a the name for a group of similar
individuals who tend to mate with each
other in a limited geographic area.
A.) Biome
B.) Population
C.) Biosphere
D.) Batesian Mimicry

C D

This is a the name for an organism


with unique DNA and cells.
A.) Individual
B.) Population
C.) Biosphere
D.) Exotic Species

This is a the name for an organism


with unique DNA and cells.
A.) Individual
B.) Population
C.) Biosphere
D.) Exotic Species

B
This is a the name for the relationship
of animals and their environment
A.) Biome
B.) Population
C.) Community
D.) Ecosystem

B
This is a the name for the relationship
of animals and their environment
A.) Biome
B.) Population
C.) Community
D.) Ecosystem

This is a regional ecosystem


characterized by distinct types of
vegetation, animals.
A.) Biome
B.) Population
C.) Biosphere
D.) Mullerian Mimicry

This is a regional ecosystem


characterized by distinct types of
vegetation, animals.
A.) Biome
B.) Population
C.) Biosphere
D.) Mullerian Mimicry

B
The Biosphere consist of all of the
following except
A.) Ecosphere
B.) Astrosphere
C.) Lithosphere
D.) Hydrosphere

B
The Biosphere consist of all of the
following except
A.) Ecosphere
B.) Astrosphere
C.) Lithosphere
D.) Hydrosphere

B
The following are all needs of an
organism except.
A.) Food
B.) Water
C.) Species
D.) Shelter

B
The following are all needs of an
organism except.
A.) Food
B.) Water
C.) Species
D.) Shelter

This the type of competition where


The same species compete for
resources.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

This the type of competition where


The same species compete for
resources.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

B
This the type of competition where different
species compete for resources.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

B
This the type of competition where different
species compete for resources.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

This the type of competition where one


species outcompetes the other driving it
toward extinction.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

This the type of competition where one


species outcompetes the other driving it
toward extinction.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

B
This the type of competition where one
species gets in the way of the other.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

B
This the type of competition where one
species gets in the way of the other.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Intraspecific Competition
C.) Interference Competition
D.) Competitive Exclusion

This a complex network of many


interconnected food chains and
feeding interactions.
A.) Biomass pyramid
B.) Symbiosis
C.) Food Web
D.) Competitive Exclusion

This a complex network of many


interconnected food chains and
feeding interactions.
A.) Biomass pyramid
B.) Symbiosis
C.) Food Web
D.) Competitive Exclusion

All of the following represent an


animal to animal interaction except
A.) Competing for food
B.) Avoiding predation
C.) Energy from the sun
D.) Eating prey

All of the following represent an


animal to animal interaction except
A.) Competing for food
B.) Energy from the Sun
C.) Avoiding Predation
D.) Eating prey

B
This is the name for an organism that
preys upon other organisms.
A.) Community
B.) Ecosphere
C.) Predator
D.) Prey

B
This is the name for an organism that
preys upon other organisms.
A.) Community
B.) Ecosphere
C.) Predator
D.) Prey

B
This is the name for tending to form a
group with other organisms.
A.) Niche
B.) Competitive Exclusion
C.) Gregarious
D.) Hunted

B
This is the name for tending to form a
group with other organisms.
A.) Niche
B.) Competitive Exclusion
C.) Gregarious
D.) Hunted

This is the name for the variety, or


number of kinds of species.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Parasitism
C.) Food Chain
D.) Species Diversity

This is the name for the variety, or


number of kinds of species.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Parasitism
C.) Food Chain
D.) Species Diversity

This is the term for the amount of each


species. Must sum to 1 or 100%.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Relative Abundance
C.) Summatic Frequency
D.) Species Diversity

This is the term for the amount of each


species. Must sum to 1 or 100%.
A.) Species Abundance
Dont fall for
the smart
B.) Relative Abundance
sounding
C.) Summatic Frequency
one.
D.) Species Diversity

Summatic
isnt even a
word.

This is the term for the amount of each


species. Must sum to 1 or 100%.
A.) Species Abundance
B.) Relative Abundance
C.) Summatic Frequency
D.) Species Diversity

This is the resemblance of an animal


species to another species or to
natural objects.
A.) Brood Parasitism
B.) Mimicry
C.) Camouflage
D.) Symbiosis

This is the resemblance of an animal


species to another species or to
natural objects.
A.) Brood Parasitism
B.) Mimicry
C.) Camouflage
D.) Symbiosis

This is the name for the symbiosis


when two species benefit from each
other.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Commensalism
C.) Camouflage
D.) Parasitism

This is the name for the symbiosis


when two species benefit from each
other.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Commensalism
C.) Camouflage
D.) Parasitism

B
This the resemblance of an organism
to another organisms or object.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Predatory
C.) Camouflage
D.) Mimicry

B
This the resemblance of an organism
to another organisms or object.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Predatory
C.) Camouflage
D.) Mimicry

B
This an adaptation that allows animals
to blend into their environment
A.) Competitive Exclusion
B.) Camouflage
C.) Abundance
D.) Parasitism

B
This an adaptation that allows animals
to blend into their environment
A.) Competitive Exclusion
B.) Camouflage
C.) Abundance
D.) Parasitism

This looking like another species that is


dangerous or may taste bad. There is a
mimic, and the model.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Batesian Mimicry
C.) Mullerian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This looking like another species that is


dangerous or may taste bad. There is a
mimic, and the model.
A.) Interspecific Competition
B.) Mullerian Mimicry
C.) Batesian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This is where several unrelated species


share warning colors that warn predators
that these colors are dangerous or toxic.
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Increased Competition
C.) Batesian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This is where several unrelated species


share warning colors that warn predators
that these colors are dangerous or toxic.
A.) Mullerian Mimicry
B.) Increased Competition
C.) Batesian Mimicry
D.) Predation

This is the name for the symbiosis


when two species benefit from each
other.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Commensalism
C.) Camouflage
D.) Parasitism

This is the name for the symbiosis


when two species benefit from each
other.
A.) Mutualism
B.) Commensalism
C.) Camouflage
D.) Parasitism

This is the name for a species that


have
been introduced to an ecosystem that are not
endemic to the area.
A.) Endemic Species
B.) Commensalism
C.) Extinct Species
D.) Exotic Species

This is the name for a species that


have
been introduced to an ecosystem that are not
endemic to the area.
A.) Endemic Species
B.) Commensalism
C.) Extinct Species
D.) Exotic Species

Information Cited
This section is currently under construction. Thank you to all
sources of information. Without your contributions to science this
presentation would not be possible. If you have any questions or
comments please contact www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Again, thank you.

Images Cited
This section is currently under construction. A huge thank you for all
images that were used in this presentation. Your works truly brought
the exciting world of science to life. Efforts to take images that are
only in the public domain were taken. If an image was used in error,
please contact www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com. Please
describe the image and the unit that it was a part of so it can be
promptly removed. Again, thank you.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

More Units Available at

Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics
Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The
River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit.
Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms
and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The
Science Skills Unit.
Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit,
The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification
Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology:
Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and coming
soon The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit.

Copyright 2010 Ryan P. Murphy