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Step 5

Day #1 (Direct Lesson)


What is an Opinion?
(2 Day Lesson)
Topic: What is an Opinion?
Duration: This lesson will take approximately 25-30 minutes the first day and 40-50 minutes the
second day.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to help student know what an opinion is and for them to
express their beliefs.
Materials: The material needed for this lesson is the book The Monster Who Lost His Mean.
Michigan Benchmarks: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.A
Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational
structure that lists reasons.
Objective: Students will be able to tell what an opinion is and express their opinion on a topic or
a book that was read in class.
Assessment of Objective: The students will be assessed through observations. I will observe to
see if students can tell me what an opinion is and to see if they are able to express their own
opinion. I will also assess students on their acceptance of others opinions. It is important for
students to understand that everyone will have a different opinion and that that is okay.
Anticipatory Set: Ask students to raise their hand if their favorite ice cream is chocolate. Ask
students to raise their hand if vanilla ice cream is their favorite. Tell students that there is not
right or wrong answer to this. This is called an opinion and everyone has one. Ask students if
anyone know exactly what an opinion is.
Input = What and How:
Students will need to know what an opinion is and how to express their opinion with reasons
why they feel that way.
Teacher Behavior

Explain what an opinion is.


Read the book The Monster Who Lost His Mean.

Ask students what they thought about the book (reiterate that it is okay to disagree with
someone as long as you have reasons to support your feelings/beliefs).
Ask why.

Student Behaviors

Listen
Respond to questions
Express their opinion with reasons to support it.
Ask questions.

Modeling:
Model an opinion for students with reasons to support the belief or feelings.
Teacher Behaviors:

Give examples of opinions some that liked the book and some that did not like the book.
In my opinion, I liked the book The Monster Who Lost His Mean, because the monster
stayed nice forever, and he started helping others.
In my opinion, I did not like the book The Monster Who Lost His Mean, because the
other monsters made fun of the monster when he was not mean anymore.
Ask questions
What did you think of the book?

Student Behaviors

Listen
Respond to questions
Ask questions

Checking for Understanding


Ask for student volunteers to share their opinion on the book, The Monster Who Lost His Mean.
Teacher Behavior

Ask for volunteers


Interpret behaviors to make sure all students are focused and are accepting of others
opinions.
Restate that it is okay to disagree with others opinions.
Tell students it is always important to provide reasons to help support their opinion.

Student Behavior

Respond to questions
Give opinion with reasons to support an opinion.

Day #2
What is an Opinion? (Continued)
Guided Practice:
Ask students to share with the class what an opinion is and how to support your opinion.
Teacher Behavior:

Ask students to think, in their head, about their favorite food.


Ask students to think of three reasons why it is their favorite food.
Have students turn and talk with a neighbor and share their favorite food and three
reasons why.

Student Behavior:

Work with peers and listen to their opinion.


Respond to peers opinion.
Ask questions
Listen.

Independent Practice
Students will go back to their seats and complete one paragraph on their favorite food with three
reasons to support their opinion. At this time the teacher will walk around and help students who
need extra help.
Closure:
Ask for volunteers to share their writing from the day.
Differentiation:
Some students will not be able to complete three reasons. For these students I would require one
or two reasons to support their opinion. There are also students who can write a paragraph with
ease. For these students I will require them to write two paragraphs going into more detail on
their favorite food, or write their second paragraph on another food that they enjoy.

Day #3
Oreo (Direct Lesson)
(2 Day Lesson)
Topic: Oreo (structure of opinion writing)
Duration: This lesson will take approximately 30-40 minutes the first day and 40-50 minutes the
second day.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to express their opinion in writing, while
keeping their writing organized.
Materials: The materials needed in this lesson are a computer, projector, internet access,
whiteboard, and student writing notebooks.
Michigan Benchmarks:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point


of view with reasons.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.B Provide reasons that support the opinion.

Objective: Students will be able to express their opinion by following the OREO format.
Assessments: Assessments will be done throughout the lesson by observing the students writing
and responses to questions.
Anticipatory Set: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=hUP5hG4IIQM&ab_channel=MisterLemurBooks
Students will watch Oreo song to learn the proper format for opinion writing.
Input = What and How
The teacher will make an Oreo poster with the class to help students throughout the unit.
OREO Structure:
O-Opinion- State opinion
R-Reasons- Provide reasons to support opinion
E-Examples- Give examples
O-Opinion- Restate Opinion

Teacher Behavior:

Ask questions about the structure of opinion writing.


o What do you do first when writing about your opinion?
o How many reasons should you give to support your opinion?
o What is the final thing you need to do when writing about your opinion?
Make poster
Give examples

Student Behavior:

Listen
Respond to questions
Ask questions

Modeling:
After completing the poster, ask students to think in their head about their favorite game. (This
could be a video game, a board game, or a sport.) Ask students to think of three reasons why to
support their opinion. Give students the opportunity to turn and talk with a partner about their
favorite game.
Teacher Behavior

Share favorite game


Complete sample writing so students can see a good model and know what is expected of
them.
Ask questions
o How should I start our writing?
o What comes next?
o How can we wrap up our writing?
Give feedback

Student Behavior:

Respond to questions
Ask questions
Give examples

Checking for Understanding


Ask for student volunteers to share their opinion on their favorite game.
Teacher Behavior

Ask for volunteers


Interpret behaviors to make sure all students are focused and are accepting others
opinions.
Remind students that not everyone will have the same opinion and that it is normal to
disagree with someone.

Student Behavior

Respond to questions
Give opinion with reasons to support an opinion.

Day #4
Oreo (Day 2)
Opinion Writing Structure
Review:
Review the Oreo structure and song to help students recall what we did the previous day. Ask
students what each letter stands for. Have students think about their favorite game and three
reasons why.
OREO Structure:
O-Opinion- State opinion
R-Reasons- Provide reasons to support opinion
E-Examples- Give examples
O-Opinion- Restate Opinion
Guided Practice:
Have student volunteers share their favorite game and one reason why they like it. Students will
be required to share at least one reason with the class on why they like that particular game.
When sharing an opinion with the class students have to give a minimum of one reason why.
Teacher Behavior:

Ask questions
o What is your favorite game and why?
o What would be a good opening sentence for your writing?
o What do you do after you state your opinion?
o How do you end your writing?
Provide practice

Student Behavior:

Provide examples
Answer questions
Give reasons to support their opinion
Ask questions

Independent Practice:

Students will return to their seats and complete one paragraph on their favorite game and provide
three reasons to support their opinion.
Differentiation:
Some students will not be able to complete three reasons. For these students I would require one
or two reasons to support their opinion. There are also students who can write a paragraph with
ease. For these students I will require them to write two paragraphs going into more detail on
their favorite game.

Day #5
Fact vs. Opinion
(Indirect Lesson)
Topic: Fact vs. Opinion
Duration: This lesson should take approximately 30 minutes.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to understand the difference between a fact and opinion.
Materials: The materials needed for this lesson are fact and opinion cards, worksheet, and a
partner.
Michigan Benchmarks:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point


of view with reasons.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2.B Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

Objective: Students will be able to determine the difference between a fact and opinion.
Assessment: Assessments will be made through observations to determine if students know the
difference between a fact and opinion.
Anticipatory Set:
To hook the students I will show them a trumpet. I will then give them some statements about the
trumpet and explain which one is a fact and which one is an opinion. I will then ask the students
to give examples of a facts and opinions about the trumpet.
Input= What and How
Explain the difference between a fact and opinion. Tell students that they will be working in
partners to separate sentences about fall. Some of them will be facts, and some of them will be
opinions.
Guided Practice
Complete the activity with a partner.
Teacher Behavior:

Give Directions
Ask questions
Walk around and make sure students are on task.

Student Behavior:

Listen
Complete activity
Work with peers

Checking For Understanding:


Ask students to come back together. Have students share some of their findings. Ask for
examples of facts and opinions about Fall that were not included.
Closure:
Ask students to tell what they learned in writing that day. Ask students what the difference
between a fact and opinion.
Differentiation:
Some students will need more work because this will be easy for them. For those students I will
ask them to write down additional facts and opinions about Fall to share with the class. For the
students that have difficulty with this task I will give them fewer facts and opinions to sort.

Day #6
Opinion Writing Word Choice
(Direct)
Topic: Opinion Writing Word Choice
Duration: This lesson will take approximately 30 minutes.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to work on word choice that will help them
express their opinion without repeating the same words over and over again.
Materials: The materials needed for this lesson are a poster board.
Michigan Benchmarks:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g.,
for instance, in order to, in addition).
Objectives: Students will be able to support their opinion with using words and phrases like for
instance, for example, and etc.
Assessment of Objective: Students will be assessed through observations throughout the lesson.
Anticipatory Set: To hook the students I will tell them my favorite season. I will give reasons to
support my opinion, but I will use the same words and phrases over and over again.

In my opinion my favorite season is summer. I like summer because I like to be outside. I


also like summer because you can go swimming. I like summer because it is warm all the
time. That is why summer is my favorite season.

After I read them this I will ask them how I can improve my writing.
Input= What and How
Teacher Behavior:

Deliver instruction
Ask questions
o What can I change about my writing?
o What words can I change?
o Why should I change these words?
o How will this make my writing stronger?
o Did I follow the OREO writing structure?

Student Behavior:

Answer questions
Listen

Modeling: After students answer the questions the class will goes through and discuss what
other words might help support my opinion. We will also discuss why it is important to use
different words and not the same ones over and over again. After the discussion we will create a
poster with words they can use to support their opinion. This poster will be displayed for the rest
of the unit for students to refer to for help on word choice.
Checking for Understanding: After we have made the poster with words to help support
opinions, I will reread my summer writing aloud to the students. We will go sentence by
sentence. After I read a sentence I will ask for volunteers to recreate the sentence using examples
of words we put on the poster.

Day #7
Opinion Writing Word Choice (Continued)
Cooperative

Topic: Opinion Writing Word Choice


Duration: This lesson will take approximately 30-40 minutes.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to work on word choice that will help them
express their opinion without repeating the same words over and over again.
Materials: The materials needed for this lesson are a worksheet, pencil, and role lanyard.
Michigan Benchmarks:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g.,
for instance, in order to, in addition).
Objectives: Students will be able to support their opinion with using words and phrases like for
instance, for example, and etc.
Assessment of Objective: Students will be assessed through observations and there presentation
at the end of the lesson.
Anticipatory Set: To hook the students I will reread my bad example of opinion writing to them
again. I will tell them that our goals is to not write like that so none of their worksheets should
use the same words over and over again.
Input= What and How
Teacher Behavior:

Give Directions
Assign Jobs
o All students will receive a lanyard with their job tile on it explaining what they
are responsible for during this project.
Ask question
o Where in the room is a good place to work?
o What does the Supply Manager/Scribe do?
o What does the Facilitator do?
o What does the Presenter do?

Student Behavior:

Respond to questions
Ask Questions

Jobs:

Supply Manager/Scribe- This student is responsible for getting all supplies needed for
this activity and writing down any answers the group comes up with.
Facilitator-This student is responsible for reading the story to the rest of the group.
Presenter- This student will share the groups final product will the whole class.

Adaptations: For students who need extra help with words to help support opinions, a word
bank will be provided.

Names:_________________________________

Math is the Best Subject


In my __________, Math is my
favorite subject in school. I __________ Math
__________ I like to work with numbers. My
___________ part about Math is multiplication.
For _______, I like to multiply by 5s because I
know the answer will always end in a 0, or 5. I
___________ Math should be taught all day.
That is why I __________ Math is the
___________ subject.

Day #8
(Direct)
Supporting Opinions Using Text
Topic: Supporting Opinions using text.
Duration: This lesson will last 30-40 minutes.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to give an opinion after reading a passage and
support their opinion by using details from the text.
Materials: For this lesson students will need a copy of the article Are Roller Coasters Safe?
Michigan Benchmarks: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1Write opinion pieces on topics or
texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
Objectives: Students will be able to support their opinion using details from the text.
Assessment of Objective: This is a whole group lesson therefore all students will be assessed
through observations.
Anticipatory Set: Before reading the article I will ask students if they think roller coasters are
safe. Once the students have stated whether or not they are safe we will read the article together.
Input= What and How
Teacher Behavior:

Deliver instruction
o Create class writing on whether or not students think roller coasters are safe.
Provide Materials
o All students will receive a copy of the article Are Roller Coasters Safe?
Ask Questions
o Do you think roller coasters are safe?
o What in this article can help us support our opinion?
o Why is it important to pick one side and stick to it?

Student Behavior:

Listen
Respond to questions
Ask questions

Modeling:

This writing prompt will be done in whole group. The teacher will determine if the
majority of students think roller coasters are safe, or if they are not safe. Once the teacher

know what the majority of the class chose we will then write a paragraph as a whole
group. We will use details from the text to support out opinion.
Day #9
Supporting Opinion Using Text
Topic: Supporting opinions by using text
Duration: This lesson will take approximately 1 hour.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to express their opinion and provide evidence
from a passage that they read.
Materials: In this lesson students will need a copy of the article A Grad Old Canyon, and their
writing note books.
Michigan Benchmarks: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1Write opinion pieces on topics or
texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
Objectives: Students will be able to express their opinion and give reasons to support their
opinion using evidence from the passage.
Assessment of Objective: Assessments will be done through observations while students are
writing independently, and when they are presenting their writing to the class.
Anticipatory Set: To hook the students I will ask them if anyone has ever visited the Grand
Canyon. I will ask them what they saw, and if they liked it.
Input= What and How
Teacher Behavior

Deliver instructions
o Today we will read an article about the Grand Canyon. After we read if you will
write whether or not you would like to visit the Grand Canyon. You will use text
from the article to help support you opinion.
Ask Questions
o Why would you like to visit the Grand Canyon?
o What might we see if we visit the Grand Canyon?
o Is the Grand Canyon big or small? How do you know?

Student Behavior

Listen
Popcorn Read
o Students will read the article aloud. Students will switch off after every paragraph.
Ask questions
Respond to questions

Modeling:
Teacher Behavior

Give examples
o I would like to visit the Grand Canyon because I would like to see the deep
valleys.
o I would not like to see the Grand Canyon because I do not want to see brown,
yellow, and red rocks.
Ask questions
o How can we start our writing?
o What can I do to keep the reader interested in my writing?
o How do I end my writing?

Student Behavior

Listen
Provide examples
Respond to questions

Checking for Understanding:


Teacher Behavior

Walk around while students are working to make sure they are pulling evidence from the
article.
Ask individuals questions to help them better understand.

Student Behavior

Write
Ask questions

Independent Practice: After reading the article as a group, students will go back to their seats
and write a paragraph stating if they would or would not like to visit the Grand Canyon,
Closure: To conclude this writing activity, students will be given the opportunity to share their
writing with the class. After each student has shared the audience will be given the opportunity to
provide stars and wishes. What did they do well, and what do you wish they did in their writing
Adaptations/Differentiation:
Some students will not be able to complete three reasons. For these students I would require one
or two reasons to support their opinion. There are also students who can write a paragraph with
ease. For these students I will require them to write two paragraphs going into more detail on
why they would or would not like to visit the Grand Canyon.

Day #10
Review/Post Assessment
Topic: Review and post assessment
Duration: This lesson should take approximately 35-45 minutes.
Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to review opinion writing so students can show their best
work on the post assessment.
Materials: For this lesson the students will need their writing journals.
Michigan Benchmarks:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a


point of view with reasons.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.A Introduce the topic or text they are writing about,
state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.B Provide reasons that support the opinion.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.C Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because,
therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.D Provide a concluding statement or section.

Objectives: Students will be able to express their opinion and give three reasons to support their
opinion.
Assessment of Objectives: Students will be assessed through the opinion writing rubric, as well
as observations.
Anticipatory Set: To hook the students I will read them some of their classmates pre
assessment writing. After reading them I will ask if they followed the OREO writing structure
and the prompt. I will also as how they can improve the writing that I read to them.
Input= What and How
Teacher Behavior

Give Directions
Ask Questions
o What is an opinion?
o How do you know the difference between and fact and opinion?
o Does everyone have the same opinion?
o What comes first when you are writing about your opinion?
o What are some examples of words we can use to help support our opinion?

o How many reasons should we give when we are writing about our opinion?
o How do we end opinion writing?
o What animal would make the best pet?
Student Behavior

Respond to questions
Ask questions
Give examples

Modeling: Teacher will give good examples of student work so all students know what is
expected of them. Teacher will ask for students to give examples of what animla would make the
best pet.
Checking for Understanding:
Teacher Behavior

Walk around and observe.


Make sure students are using good word choice
Make sure students are using the OREO format.

Student Behavior

Write
Ask questions

Independent Practice: Students will write a paragraph stating which animal they think would
make the best pet and why.
Closure: To conclude this writing activity, students will be given the opportunity to share their
writing with the class. After each student has shared the audience will be given the opportunity to
provide stars and wishes. What did they do well, and what do you wish they did in their writing
Adaptations/Differentiation:
Some students will not be able to complete three reasons. For these students I would require one
or two reasons to support their opinion. There are also students who can write a paragraph with
ease. For these students I will require them to write two paragraphs going into more detail on
what animal they think would make the best pet and why.