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Unit Design Rationale

o Students are engaged in learning in this unit plan through


the use of research and investigation of various topics
centered on Michigans geography. The activities in this
unit plan will engage and motivate students because a lot of
the lessons incorporate the use of technology and smart
devices. Children of this generation can relate to learning
using these technological devices because most students
use devices on the everyday basis. Ideas in this unit are
linked to students lives outside of the classroom by
incorporating lessons that revolve around current things
that are going on close to them. For example, in lesson
number one the landscape and natural resources of Adrian,
Michigan are discussed since m student lives in Adrian
Michigan.
o Inquiry is used in this lesson plan my proposing my student
with questions that lead to investigation before the start of a
lesson plan. For example in lesson #5 I proposed the
question What human resource is made to get from the
Lower Peninsula to the Upper Peninsula? I used the
scaffold technique to get my student to come up with the
answer the Mackinaw Bridge. I used the Great Lakes game
as my technology tool to help my student comprehend the
H.O.M.E.S acronym to remember the Great Lakes. I did an
informal formative assessment with my student and
reviewed the information and facts we learned about the
Great Lakes by playing the game on the computer. I chose
this form of assessment because I did not want to stress out
my student with a formal test. I simply wanted to receive

direct feedback and get an idea of the knowledge that my


student retained using the technology tool.
o Knowing that my student was a third grader was very
important for me when constructing my unit plan. I simply
had to look up the second grade Social Studies and
Language Arts GLCEs to get an idea of the knowledge and
content that he should have learned in each of the content
areas. I then looked at the third grade Social Studies and
Language Arts GLCEs to base my unit on the content that
he should be learning in third grade. I tried to purposely
sequence my lessons so that each lesson covered a different
region or multiple regions of the state.
o I think the activities implemented in my unit plan will help
students learn because a lot of the activities are hands on,
and require research and investigation to get the required
answers. This approach will help students develop a deep
understanding of the material because students are not
simply given the answer by the instructor. I feel that you
better comprehend information if you have to go out and
retrieve the correct information on your own, instead of the
correct information being simply handed to you. Since this
unit plan was made for one student, I was able to get direct
feedback through formative assessments to get an idea if
my student was truly comprehending the information that
was presented.

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Your name: Mr.


Brown

School:
Lincoln

Cooperating Teacher:

Grade: 3rd

Date/Time:
2/23/15

Subject:
Lang.
Arts/Soc.
Studies

Unit Plan Driving


question/Theme/Title:
How does Michigans
geography affect the
way that people live?

Lesson
title/Topic:
Relative
Location
Lesson number:
1

STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson:


3 G1.0.1
Use cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to describe the
relative location of significant
places in the immediate environment.
3 G1.0.2
Use thematic maps to identify and describe the physical and human
characteristics of Michigan.

3 G2.0.1
Use a variety of visual materials and data sources to describe ways
in which Michigan can be
divided into regions.
3 G2.0.2
Describe different regions to which Michigan belongs (e.g., Great
Lakes Region, Midwest).
STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES
Through these learning activities, the learner will
demonstrate the ability to:
Use cardinal directions to describe Adrians and
Michigans location.
Describe Adrians relative location compared to
other landmarks, cities, counties, and states
around it.
Describe Michigans location compared to other
landmarks, states, regions, and countries around
it.
Describe the occupations that citizens of both
Adrian and Michigan might have based on their
location.
INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:
Time:

Introduction

Engagement: Show student(s) a map of the United


States (physical or electronic). Ask student to point
to where Michigan is one the map. Ask student
what characteristics on the map helped them find
the state of Michigan. Ask students to point to
general location that Adrian will be located in
Michigan. If correct, ask student what
characteristics of Michigan helped them find
where Adrian is located. If incorrect, show student
where Adrian is located with an explanation for
why you know it is located there.
Anticipatory set
Exploration: Begin by asking student(s) to review
the geography of his/her local community with a
chart based on the 3rd grade geography
expectations (including physical/human
characteristics, land use, changes in land, etc.)
Student will be introduced to the concept of region
by exploring other regions to which their
community belongs (e.g., counties, metropolitan
areas). Finally the student will explore the
questions: What is a city? What is a state?
Instructional activities (including checking for
understanding activities, modeling, guided practice,
independent practice)
Today we will be describing the city of Adrian, and
the state of Michigan based on their relative

locations to landmarks, cities, states, etc. around


them. We will be doing some research in the
computer lab to look for various landmarks in,
near, or around both of the locations. We will also
read Goodnight Michigan to look more into the
landmarks and special places that Michigan has.
Explanation: After researching and gathering
information we will brainstorm and write down
ideas on how both Adrian and Michigans relative
location affects the people that might live in those
areas.
Interdisciplinary approaches:
Elaboration
Accommodations for differentiated instruction
for:
Resource students: Try to incorporate more use of
maps and Goodnight Michigan with resource
students.
ESL students: Check to see of Goodnight
Michigan is available in alternative languages. If
not make sure to use a lot of visuals too describe
each activity instead of saying everything verbally.

Gifted students: Gifted students can go on to


describe the relative locations of other cities in
Michigan or describe the relative location of
certain parts of Canada to Michigan.
Assessment
Evaluation: I will informally evaluate my students
and ask them to list 3 ways to describe both the
relative location of Adrian and Michigan to make
sure that the information presented was
comprehended.
Conclusion/closure
Review the terms of relative location and cardinal
directions.

Assignment/follow up
Extension Students will describe the relative
location of Lansing compared to a landmark, city,
and region of Michigan it is located.

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:

Laptop/computer
Goodnight Michigan
United States map
Michigan map
Pencil/pen
Paper

SAFETY/CAUTIONS:
Make sure that students are using the internet safely and
effectively.
LIST of RESOURCES:
http://www.eup.k12.mi.us/page/1352

REFLECTION: What have you learned about teaching and


student learning? What went well in your lesson? What did not
go well in your lesson? Why? What will you do differently next
time?

I learned that I will have to review the cardinal directions


throughout the entirety of my unit plan so that my student gets a
good grasp of how to use them. My student really enjoyed
reading the Goodnight Michigan. We did some extra research in
the computer lab to find out more about some of the landmarks.
Next time I will try to use more time management skills,
because we did not get through entire lesson that I had prepared.

LESSON PLAN FORMAT


Your name: Mr. Brown
Cooperating Teacher:

School:
Lincoln
Grade: 3rd
Subject:

Date/Time:
3/16/15

Lang.
Arts/Soc.
Studies

Unit Plan Driving


question/Theme/Title:
How does Michigans
geography affect the
way that people live?

Lesson
title/Topic:
Michigan
Regions
Lesson number:
2

STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson:


3 G1.0.1
Use cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to describe the
relative location of significant
places in the immediate environment.
3 G1.0.2
Use thematic maps to identify and describe the physical and human
characteristics of Michigan.
3 G2.0.1
Use a variety of visual materials and data sources to describe ways
in which Michigan can be
divided into regions.
3 G2.0.2
Describe different regions to which Michigan belongs (e.g., Great
Lakes Region, Midwest).

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES


Through these learning activities, the learner will
demonstrate the ability to:
Use cardinal directions to describe Adrians and
Michigans location.
Describe Michigans location compared to other
landmarks, states, regions, and countries around
it.
Describe the way that geographers look at
Michigan. (Movement, Regions, Places, Human
Environment/Interaction, Location) *This lesson
will focus specifically on regions
INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:
Time:

Introduction
Engagement: Ask students the two regions that we
learned how to identify Michigan in the previous
lesson. (The upper and lower peninsula). Explain to
students that as geographers we will learn how to
identify 4 other separate regions of Michigan.
Anticipatory set
Exploration: Explain to students that as
geographers that we will use five separate criteria
to classify regions of a particular area. Those five
things being movement, regions, places, human

environment/interaction, location. Briefly state


and write down the each category and a definition
and picture to show visual evidence of the
meaning of each category. Tell students that in our
lesson today that we will be focusing on the
category of regions, and how we can use that to
divide Michigan separate parts.
Instructional activities (including checking for
understanding activities, modeling, guided practice,
independent practice)
Hand out a map of the Lower Peninsula divided
into 4 geographical regions. Ask students to
explain using the cardinal directions learned in the
previous lesson where these geographical regions
are located in relation to Adrian, MI. Ask students
to use the map to identify the major cities located
in each of the geographical regions on the map.
Hand out map of Michigan divided into
agricultural regions. Have students identify the
pictures in these regions. Have students come up
with ideas of what each region is known for based
of the picture that is associated with it. Using the
map have students identify what agricultural
region Adrian, MI falls under, and what
agricultural input Adrian provides to the state of
Michigan. Give students a blank map of Michigan
and have them draw and identify their own
regions of Michigan (Lower Peninsula). Tell
students to imagine the Lower Peninsula as a

glove with 5 separate regions (4 fingers and a


thumb). Have students identify those regions
based off of a physical map of Michigan. Students
will be given various labels to use on their map to
categorize specific regions.
Explanation: Emphasize to students that as
geographers you have to have the ability to
categorize specific regions using one or more of
the 5 categories.
Interdisciplinary approaches:
Elaboration
Accommodations for differentiated instruction
for:
Resource students: I will walk around
continuously to make sure that the students
understand what is expected of them. I will help
those children who need assistance researching the
regions of Michigan.
ESL students: Make sure that you be sure to
visually demonstrate the directions of each
assignment so that ESL students can fully
comprehend what is expected of them in the
lesson in case they do not comprehend everything
that is stated verbally.

Gifted students: Gifted students can be given a


map of their school and have them identify
different regions of the school.
Assessment
Evaluation: I will informally evaluate my
student(s) based on their participation during our
research as well as their creation of their own
geographical maps.
Conclusion/closure
Review the five ways that geographers look at
Michigan. Emphasize the way that they divide
Michigan into regions. Have student(s) explain the
way that they divided their map of Michigan into
5 separate regions.

Assignment/follow up
Extension Students will describe the relative
location of Lansing compared to a landmark, city,
and region of Michigan it is located.

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:

Laptop/computer
Michigan maps (physical, agricultural, regional, blank map)
Pencil/pen
Paper
Markers

SAFETY/CAUTIONS:
Make sure that students are using the internet safely and
effectively.

LIST of RESOURCES:
http://www.eup.k12.mi.us/page/1352
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/4311.html
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/archive/2/2f/2011020707
0438!Lower_Michigan_Region_Map.png
http://geo.msu.edu/extra/geogmich/images/commap.gif
http://www.clipartbest.com/cliparts/Kcn/eqz/KcneqzE9i.jpeg

REFLECTION: What have you learned about teaching and


student learning? What went well in your lesson? What did not
go well in your lesson? Why? What will you do differently next
time?
In this lesson I learned about the importance of having visual
definitions of words that are unfamiliar to students so that they
can quickly and easily refer back to them. In this lesson the
student really enjoyed making his own regions of Michigan
using his hand to do so. I think he enjoyed this because he really
felt like a geographer wen doing making his own regions. Next
time I will be sure to include more activities in the lesson
because we finished a little before our time was up. It is always
better to be over prepared, than to be underprepared.

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Your name: Mr.


Brown

School:
Lincoln

Cooperating Teacher:

Grade: 3rd

Date/Time:
3/23/15

Subject: Lang.
Arts/Soc.
Studies

Unit Plan Driving


question/Theme/Title:
How does Michigans
geography affect the
way that people live?

Lesson
title/Topic:
Michigan
Physical
Characteristics
Lesson number:
3

STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson:

3 G1.0.1
Use cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to describe the
relative location of significant
places in the immediate environment.
3 G1.0.2
Use thematic maps to identify and describe the physical and human
characteristics of Michigan.
R.WS.03.03
Know the meanings of words encountered frequently in grade-level
reading and oral language contexts.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES Through


these learning activities, the learner will demonstrate the ability to:

Know physical characteristics of Michigan.


Be able to describe the difference between physical and human
characteristics of a region.
Use a map to find cities, towns, roads, bridges, etc. and
different landforms of Michigan.
INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:
Time:

Introduction
Engagement: Read students the book Legend of

the Sleeping Bear by Kathy-Jo Wargin. Discuss


how this Ojibwe legend explains the creation of
the sleeping bear dunes and the two islands near
the dunes.
Anticipatory set
Exploration: Remind students that geographers
study a place by asking questions and trying to find
the answers to the questions. Remind them that one
of the questions is: What is the place like? Explain
that to answer this question geographers study the
natural (physical) characteristics of the place.
Instructional activities (including checking for
understanding activities, modeling, guided practice,
independent practice)
Explain to student(s) that sand dunes are one of
Michigans most special natural (physical)
characteristics. Share the following information
about sand dunes Michigans has the largest
amount of fresh water dunes in the world. The
dunes support a wide variety of habitats from cool
forests of maple trees to the windy environment of
open dunes. Michigan sand dunes have many uses.
People use them for tourism, photography, nature
study and recreation. Michigan sand dunes
support many threatened and endangered species.
The state of Michigan and the United States

government work to manage and protect


Michigans sand dunes. Show student photographs
of Michigans sand dunes. Explain that bodies of
water are another set of very important natural
(physical) characteristics of Michigan. As a class,
list bodies of water which students learned about.
Ask student(s) what natural (physical)
characteristic(s) on a map makes it so easy to
identify (Great Lakes). Guide students in
identifying the Great Lakes on the map. An easy
way for students to remember the names of the
Great Lakes is to use the acronym HOMES.
(Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, Superior).
Explanation: Provide students with a blank map
of Michigan and have them create their own
natural (physical) map of Michigan. Allow student
access to a computer/laptop so that they can obtain
specific ideas of various physical characteristics
they could include in their map.
Interdisciplinary approaches:
Elaboration: Explain to student(s) how
Michigans physical features makes it one of the
most distinguishable states when looking at a map
of the U.S.

Accommodations for differentiated instruction for:


Resource students: I will walk around continuously to
make sure that the students understand what is expected
of them. I will help those children who need assistance
researching the regions of Michigan.
ESL students: Make sure to visually demonstrate the
directions of each assignment so that ESL students can
fully comprehend what is expected of them in the lesson
in case they do not comprehend everything that is stated
verbally.
Gifted students: Gifted students can be given a map of
the Midwest region of the U.S. and asked to identify
various physical characteristics of other Midwest states
including Michigan.
Assessment
Evaluation: I will informally evaluate my
student(s) based on their participation during our
research as well as their creation of their own
geographical maps.
Students will also be evaluated on their ability to
correctly name the 5 Great Lakes

Conclusion/closure
Have student(s) show the natural (physical)
characteristics that they chose to incorporate on
their map to describe Michigan.
Assignment/follow up
Extension Student will have to research on their
own one interesting fact about a Great Lake of
their choice.

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:


Legend of the Sleeping Bear by Kathy-Jo a Wargin
Laptop/computer
Michigan maps (physical, blank map)
Pencil/pen
Paper
Markers

SAFETY/CAUTIONS:
Make sure that students are using the internet safely and
effectively.
LIST of RESOURCES:
http://www.eup.k12.mi.us/page/1352
http://media.maps.com/magellan/Images/michiganusrah.gif

REFLECTION: What have you learned about teaching and


student learning? What went well in your lesson? What did not
go well in your lesson? Why? What will you do differently next
time?
I learned from this lesson to be better prepared for possible
student questions. Since I have never actually seen the Sleeping
Bear Dunes I could not accurately describe how they looked like

to my student. With that being case we had to go into the


computer lab to look up pictures of them. This was my first
lesson so far that I seemed to have the perfect amount of
material to complete my lesson in the allotted amount of time. I
simply just estimated how long each portion of lesson would
take to get done so I could have an idea of much information to
incorporate in the lesson. Next time I will be sure to talk more
about the Great Lakes throughout the lesson instead of such a
large chunk of information being discussed about them at the
end of the lesson.

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Your name: Mr.


Brown

School:
Lincoln

Date/Time:
4/13/15

Cooperating Teacher:

Grade: 3rd
Subject: Lang.
Arts/Soc.
Studies

Unit Plan Driving


question/Theme/Title:
How does Michigans
geography affect the
way that people live?

Lesson
title/Topic:
Natural
Resources
Lesson number:
4

STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson:


3-G5.0.1
Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the
consequences of their use.
R.WS.03.08 In context, determine the meaning of words and
phrases including
synonyms, homonyms, multiple meaning words, content
vocabulary, and literary
terms using strategies and resources including context clues,
concept mapping, and the dictionary

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES Through


these learning activities, the learner will demonstrate the ability to:
locate natural resources on a map of Michigan
label natural resources found in Michigan on a map.
explain the consequences of the use of natural resources
explain what happens to the environment when natural
resources are used.
INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:
Time:

Introduction
Engagement: Have pictures for student(s) to
compare natural resources to mechanical/man
made resources. Using the picture of
gas/petroleum, explain to students how it is a
natural resource that when used can make
everyday tasks a lot easier for human beings.
Anticipatory set: Make a KWL chart to get an idea of
what the student(s) know about Michigans natural
resources. Fill out the columns of what students prior
knowledge is about Michigans natural resources, and
what they want to know about Michigans natural

resources.
Exploration: Instructional activities (including
checking for understanding activities,
modeling, guided practice, independent
practice)
Discuss the various Michigan Orchards that are
located map located in Michigan. Display a
Michigan map displaying natural resources and the
cities/counties that they are located in. Ask
students what might we conclude about the
location of orchards and the Great Lakes? Discuss
student responses and guide them to the idea that
orchards are often found along the shores of the
Great Lakes. Explain that every state has State
Symbols which reflect the natural (physical)
characteristics of the state.
Explanation: Emphasize to students that the Great
Lakes is Michigans most important natural
resource. Tell them that they are some of the
largest fresh water lakes in the world.
Interdisciplinary approaches:
Elaboration: Read student(s) The Giving Tree by
Shel Silverstein. After reading, discuss the tree
being the natural resource, and what the tree
provided for the boy.
Accommodations for differentiated instruction for:

Resource students: I will walk around continuously to


make sure that the students understand what is expected
of them. I will help those children who need assistance
researching the regions of Michigan.
ESL students: Make sure to visually demonstrate the
directions of each assignment so that ESL students can
fully comprehend what is expected of them in the lesson
in case they do not comprehend everything that is stated
verbally.
Gifted students: Gifted students can be given the task
of doing research for extra credit on the natural resource
exchange through Michigan and Florida. Meaning how
Michigan ships some of our cherries down to Florida,
while Florida ships some of its oranges to Michigan.
Assessment
Evaluation: I will informally evaluate my
student(s) based on their participation and input
into the lesson.
Conclusion/closure
Fill out the L portion of the KWL chart to assess
what the new information they have learned about

Michigans natural resources.


Assignment/follow up
Extension Student will be given the task of
researching more of Michigans natural resources
for HW, and how each natural resource might
affect our citizens.

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:


Desktop maps of Michigan for students or a Michigan map
from a textbook or a paper copy of a Michigan map
Highlighters
Student journal or notebook
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
SAFETY/CAUTIONS:
Make sure that student(s) are using materials appropriately and
effectively.

LIST of RESOURCES:

http://www.eup.k12.mi.us/page/1352
http://media.maps.com/magellan/Images/michiganusrah.gif

REFLECTION: What have you learned about teaching and


student learning? What went well in your lesson? What did not
go well in your lesson? Why? What will you do differently next
time?
I learned from this lesson the importance of not assuming the
knowledge that you perceive a student might have about the use
of maps. You have to come to the lesson assuming that the
student has very little to know background knowledge of the
topic so that you are guide them through each step of the correct
way to use maps. Reading the The Giving Tree gave the student
a text-to-world connection of relating the book to the natural
resource that the Great Lakes provide Michigan citizens with.
We talked about the importance of finding alternative resources
so that we do not use up all of the natural resources that we have

available. Next time I will figure out a different way to assess


my student besides using the KWL chart. I would consider doing
an exit slip to complete lesson.

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Your name: Mr.


Brown

School:
Lincoln

Cooperating Teacher:

Grade: 3rd

Date/Time:
4/20/2015

Subject: Lang.
Arts/Soc.
Studies

Unit Plan Driving


question/Theme/Title:
How does Michigans
geography affect the
way that people live?

Lesson
title/Topic:
Michigan
Physical
Characteristics
Lesson number:

5
STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson:
3-G5.0.1
Locate human resources in Michigan and explain the consequences
of their use.
R.WS.03.03
Know the meanings of words encountered frequently in grade-level
reading and oral language contexts.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES Through


these learning activities, the learner will demonstrate the ability to:

know the human resources found within Michigan


the consequences of using human resources
label human resources found in Michigan on a map
explain what happens to the environment when human
resources are used.

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:
Time:

Introduction
Engagement:
Using a map of Michigan point out the two
peninsulas and pose this question: What human

characteristic do you think people had to build


because Michigan had two separate peninsulas?
Anticipatory set
Exploration:
Scaffold student to the idea that the Mackinac Bridge
had to be constructed. Pose the following question
and ask student to write an answer down on a piece
of paper. How do you think people got from the
Lower Peninsula to the Upper Peninsula before the
bridge was built?
Instructional activities (including checking for
understanding activities, modeling, guided practice,
independent practice)
Introduce the book Mackinac Bridge: The Story of the
Five Mile Poem. Show the cover of the book and
explain that this book describes the building of the
Mackinac Bridge from the viewpoint of three different
characters, a father and his two sons. Read the book
aloud to student, stopping at appropriate times to
discuss the characters and their points of view regarding
the construction of the bridge as well as the impact of
the bridge itself. Have student make a list of the
characteristics that each of the 3 characters uses to
describe the Mackinac Bridge.
Explanation: Explain to student that different
point of view of each characters gives a different
perspective on the story.
Interdisciplinary approaches:

Elaboration:
Explain to student that there are many other
important bridges in Michigan including three that
connect Michigan with the country of Canada.
Using a Michigan map point out the Ambassador
Bridge at Detroit, the Bluewater Bridge at Port
Huron and the International Bridge at Sault Ste.
Marie.
Accommodations for differentiated instruction for:
Resource students: I will walk around continuously to
make sure that the students understand what is expected
of them. I will help those children who need assistance
with identifying the 3 bridges that connect Michigan
with Canada.
ESL students: Make sure to visually demonstrate the
directions of each assignment so that ESL students can
fully comprehend what is expected of them in the lesson
in case they do not comprehend everything that is stated
verbally.
Gifted students: Gifted students will have the
opportunity to research and present other important
landmark bridges in the United States and the
characteristics of each one.
Assessment
Evaluation:

Student will be informally tested on the names and


purpose of each of the 4 bridges discussed.
Conclusion/closure
Have student(s) make a map identifying where the
4 bridges discussed in this lesson are located.
Assignment/follow up
Extension Student will have to research on their
own one interesting fact about one of the 4 bridges
discussed in this lesson.

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:


Mackinac Bridge: The Story of the Five Mile Poem.
Laptop/computer
Michigan maps (physical, blank map)
Pencil/pen
Paper

Markers
SAFETY/CAUTIONS:
Make sure that students are using the internet safely and
effectively.
LIST of RESOURCES:
http://www.eup.k12.mi.us/page/1352
http://media.maps.com/magellan/Images/michiganusrah.gif

REFLECTION: What have you learned about teaching and


student learning? What went well in your lesson? What did not
go well in your lesson? Why? What will you do differently next
time?

I learned in this lesson the importance of guiding and


scaffolding students to the correct answer instead of simply
telling them. When scaffolding students to the correct answer
they are more prone to comprehend the information so that they
will have it in their long term memory. The YouTube video on
the construction of the Mackinaw Bridge really sparked my
student to engage in learning in this lesson. I think this is
because my student had a natural interest in the conduction of
certain human resources. Next time I will try to save time to use
for the culmination of the entire unit.