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College of the North Atlantic

CAS: Transfer
Burin Campus

CM1135

Winter 2016

Instructor: Kayla Walters


Office: 2132
Hours: Monday 9:30am, Tuesday 8:30am, Thursday 11:30am, Friday 10:30am
Email: kayla.walters@cna.nl.ca
Tel: 891-5660
Course Goals:
This course is an introduction to the study of long fiction, particularly the novel. Its goals
include an emphasis on writing in order to continue to help you develop critical reading
and writing skills. Formal academic research is a required component of this course.
This course transfers to MUNs English 1101.
Required Texts:
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby.
McEwan, Ian. Atonement.
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four.
James, P.D. The Children of Men.
Reading Schedule (Book Start Dates):
The Great Gatsby
Atonement
Nineteen Eight-Four
The Children of Men

January 11th
February 1st
March 1st
March 21st

Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on the work described briefly below. Please note that all
dates are approximate and that more information will be provided on these assignments
and methods of evaluation throughout the semester. Marks will be awarded for content,
organization, style, mechanics, and research methods (if appropriate).

In-Class Assignment #1
Students will write an essay in response to a question on The Great
Gatsby
Value:
10%
Date Due:
January 29th, 2016

In-Class Assignment #2
Students will write an essay in response to a question that compares The
Great Gatsby to Atonement.
Value:
10%
Date Due:
February 22nd, 2016

Out-of-Class Assignment #1:


Students will submit preliminary work related to their upcoming research
essay, including a tentative title, outline, bibliography, and practice
quotations.
Value:
10%
Date Due:
March 14th, 2016

Out-of-Class Assignment #2:


Students will write a research essay comparing one text studied this
semester to a film version. DVDs will be available to borrow.
Value:
20%
Date Due:
April 4th, 2016

Learning Journal (Blog):


The best way to improve literacy skills is to develop a regular habit of
writing. In this light, students will keep a weekly learning journal
throughout the course. Rather than writing entries in a physical book, you
are asked to start a blog. The ability to work effectively with language in
online environments is an increasingly important skill, sometimes called
digital literacy. The most popular platform for free internet blogging is
Weebly and the signup page offers stepbystep instructions that allow
you to customize your site and begin posting within a few minutes. I will
post your weekly question at the beginning of each school week on the
course blog (http://englishlitcna.weebly.com). These writing activities and
prompts will engage with courserelated material from that particular
week. Each week you will have until Friday at 5 p.m. to complete the
assigned activity. Once you have set up your blog, please email me the
URL (web address) for your page along with your name and student
number.

Learning journals will be assessed based on timely completion of weekly


writing activities and on your active participation. You are encouraged to
take responsibility for your own development as a writer and to spend
adequate time and effort on your entries. Please remember to pay close
attention to detail when writing. Always be sure to write grammatically
correct sentences (no short form ttyl; lol; aatsot) and to use respectful,
appropriate language (nothing foul or offensive).

***Privacy and anonymity*** Please keep in mind that a blog is a publicly


accessible space. Many bloggers write under an alias, and you may wish
to do so as well. If you choose to write under an assumed name, let me
know in the initial email which blog is yours (so I can track your work). I

will not reveal at any time who owns which blog. If one of your peers is
writing under an alias, please refer to them by their assumed name when
online (even if you know who they are) to protect their privacy and
anonymity.
Value:
Due Date:

10%
Weekly, Friday by 5pm

Full Evaluation List


Term Work (Essays, Learning Journal)
Final Exam

60%
40%

TENTATIVE READING SCHEDULE

JAN

FEB

4
5
7
8

Registration
Intro to English 1135
No Class Reading Time, Blog Post submissions
The Great Gatsby

11
12
14
15

The Great Gatsby


The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby
Film Viewing - The Great Gatsby: Pt. I (2013)

18
19
21
22

The Great Gatsby


The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby
Film Viewing - The Great Gatsby: Pt. II (2013)

25
26
28
29

The Great Gatsby


Library Orientation Presentation
Information Literacy & Anti-Plagiarism Presentation
In-Class Test: The Great Gatsby

1
2
4
5

Atonement
Atonement
Atonement
Film Viewing - Atonement (2007)

8
9
11
12

Atonement
Atonement
Atonement
Film Viewing - Atonement (2007)

15
16

Atonement
Atonement

MAR

APR

18
19

Atonement
Film Viewing - Atonement (2007)

22
23
25
26

In-Class Test: The Great Gatsby & Atonement


FILM ADAPTATION LECTURE
Introduction to Dystopian Fiction
NO CLASS

29
1
3
4

NO CLASS
Nineteen Eighty Four
Nineteen Eighty Four
Nineteen Eighty Four

7
8
10
11

Nineteen Eighty Four


Nineteen Eighty Four
RESEARCH PAPER ROUGH DRAFT WORKSHOP
Nineteen Eighty Four

14
15
17
18

Nineteen Eighty Four Out-of-Class Assignment #1 due


Nineteen Eighty Four
The Children of Men
The Children of Men

21
22
24
25

The Children of Men


The Children of Men
The Children of Men
The Children of Men

28
29
31
1

NO CLASS. MARCH BREAK


NO CLASS. MARCH BREAK
NO CLASS. MARCH BREAK
NO CLASS. MARCH BREAK

4
5
7
8

The Children of Men


The Children of Men
Film Viewing The Children of Men (2006)
Film Viewing The Children of Men (2006)

11
12

Exam prep
Exam prep - LAST DAY OF CLASS

Essay Format
Your essays must comply with MLA style and guidelines, must be double-spaced, and
use standard one inch margins. Make sure to number your pages in the top right hand
corner. Do not use plastic or other covers. It is not necessary to attach a cover page, but
be sure to follow standard MLA formatting for the first page of essays. For quotation,
citations, and documentation guidelines, consult the MLA section of Purdue University's
online style guide, or Memorial Universitys online guide (available at
www.library.mun.ca/internet/termpapers.php).

Penalties
For all assignments a late penalty will be assessed for work not handed in in person at
the beginning of class on the due date. Work will lose .5 of a mark for each day late,
including weekends. A paper due Friday, but handed in on Monday will be reduced by
.5+.5+.5=1.5 (a grade of 8.0 will be reduced to 6.5). Documented medical illnesses and
a death in the family are the only acceptable reasons for handing in late work. While I
am human and do understand various other life events that prevent work from being
accomplished, you must request an extension before 4pm on the day before the
paper is due. Malfunctioning printers, broken computers, or even hungry dogs are not
acceptable excuses for late papers. It is your responsibility to finish papers before the
deadline and to ensure they are printed before class starts on the due date.
While I will accept papers at any point on the due date, the only guarantee that I will
receive your paper is by handing it to me in person at the start of class. I will not accept
papers that are placed under or tacked to my office door once Ive left campus, nor will I
be accepting electronic copies of your papers.
Remember: ALWAYS back up your work when typing up your paper.

Email policy
All email should be sent using your cna.nl.ca email address. When using email, make
sure to identify yourself by full name, student number, and by reference to this particular
course. As this course is geared towards effective writing, you are encouraged to
compose email with the same attention to detail as you would give to any other kind of
formal writing.

Privacy Policy
To ensure privacy, the student may obtain assignment papers personally when papers
are returned in class or picked up during the instructors office hours. Papers will not be
available otherwise, and grades will not be posted in any public places on campus or
online.

Plagiarism
Plagiarism, the theft of anothers words or ideas, is a serious academic offence, which
can result in a mark of zero for an assignment and, in some cases, expulsion from the
university. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated and will result in disciplinary
measures. The College of the North Atlantic values academic integrity. Cases of
plagiarism may be referred to the Campus Administrator. Students should consult the
Student Handbook for more information on academic offenses. I would highly
recommend that students make themselves aware of the proper procedures for using
the Internet for research purposes. Please make time to sit down with me if you have
any specific questions about avoiding plagiarism in your academic writing.