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The Record-Review

A WISCONSIN HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER


AT H ENS

E DGAR

MARATHON

ST R AT FOR D

ONE DOLLAR
JANUARY 13, 2016
VOLUME 54, NO. 2
TWENTY PAGES

Fenwood challenge

Edgar will
try for
County seeks community support in watershed clean-up
$500,000
state grant
The Edgar Village Board
on Monday voted to contract
with MSA Professional Services, Marshfield, for $8,500 to
submit a $500,000 Community
Development Block Grant request to the state.
If awarded, the grant would
pay half of the cost of an estimated $1 million project to reconstruct Thomas Hill Rd.
MSA senior planner Dave
Rasmussen told trustees that
a survey of Thomas Hill residents, while not
yet complete,
has preliminarily documented
a
sufficient
number of low
and moderate
income people
to justify pursuing the state
grant.
After
Dave
Rasmussen surveying 24
families, MSA
found 51.5 percent have low to
moderate incomes.
Rasmussen said the state
will require additional surveying. Once completed, he said, a
public hearing will be held on
the grant request. The village
board must approve a citizen
participation action plan. It
also must have on file a fair
housing ordinance and a police department policy on use
of excessive force.
The grant application is due
by May. If awarded, the project
would go to bid in March 2017.
Project completion must be by
June 2018.
In related street business,
board members agreed to get
quotes to regrind and blacktop Second Ave. between Lutz
Street and Chesak Road.

The Wisconsin Department


of Natural Resources has
awarded the Marathon County
Conservation, Planning and
Zoning Department a threeyear, $805,135 grant to improve
water quality in Fenwood
Creek, but Paul Daigle, the
departments land and water
director, says he wont spend a
nickel of it unless it is to help
farmers
make
permanent, environmentallyfriendly changes in how they
farm.
We are not
going to spend
the
taxpayers
money
on a waPaul
tershed
only
Daigle
to get poor results, he said.
Daigle is a veteran of his
departments priority watershed projects for the upper and
lower Big Eau Pleine during
the 1990s. After spending millions of dollars in cost sharing
for manure pits, conservation
buffer strips and barnyard enclosures, he said, water quality improved briefly, but gains
were reversed when cost sharing dollars dried up and farmers returned to old, polluting
practices. By 2009, the Big Eau
Pleine watershed suffered a
70-80 percent fish kill when
rotting, phosphorus-fed algae
blooms used up nearly all of
the 17-mile reservoirs oxygen
prior to ice-out in the spring.
Daigle said the Fenwood watershed grant will give his department a second chance to do
conservation right.
This is a pilot program
where we will do things differently, he said. If we are
successful, we will have a blue-

FROSTY FENWOOD -A small part of Fenwood creek north of the CTH P bridge peaks through a layer of snow and ice. Department of Natural Resources water testing has documented 147 milligrams
per liter of phosphorus in the creek. A future water quality goal as part of a Wisconsin River Basin Total
Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) project may call for cuttting the phosphorus level in half.
print we can use in other
watersheds that feed both
the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir and the Big Rib River.
Daigle said the old conservation approach is for his
department staff, as experts,
to recommend best management practices to farmers
and dangle cost-sharing dollars in front of them as incentives.
The county director said
a new community engagement model will be tried.
The idea is to encourage
the entire Fenwood area
community to try and
improve water quality as a
goal with neighbors helping

neighbors figure out how


to change cropping and manure spreading practices.
The county will be there
with cost share dollars to
persuade farmers to try new
things.
Daigle, however, is upfront
about the challenge of what
the county is undertaking.
We dont know how it is
going to work, he said.
Fenwood Creek is currently polluted with 147 milligrams per liter of phosphorus. A Wisconsin DNR water
quality goal is to reduce this
pollution level by approximately half to 75 milligrams
per liter.

See STREETS/ page 13

Daigle said the Fenwood


project seeks to lower phosphorus
loadings,
which
eventually wind up in the
Big Eau Pleine Reservoir, by
1,000 pounds a year.
The director said no till
cropping,
winter
cover
crops, manure storage and
managed grazing
Bestare all
techniques that
would,ofover
Selection
time, reduce phosphorus
Boots in
loadings.
But, he said,Central
the key is not
just to pay Wisconsin
farmers to engage in these best management practices.
What we have to change
are farming habits and land
use habits, he said. We

See FENWOOD CLEAN-UP/ page 5

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Page 2

January 13, 2016

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Opinion/Editorial
Let the work begin

enwood Creek is no different than any number of small


tributaries that flow across western Marathon County into
the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir.
Surrounded by dairy farms and cropland, the creek runs chocolate brown in the spring after a big snowmelt or following any
major rain event and, frothing and churning, it carries nutrients,
notably phosphorus, into the reservoir.
State and county government has, for years, tried to clean-up the
creek, to nurse it back to health. These efforts have failed. Back
in the mid-1990s, the county spent millions of dollars on manure
pits, nutrient management plans, barnyard enclosures and grassy
buffer strips to keep soil, silt and manure out of not just Fenwood
Creek, but all of the Big Eau Pleine waterways. Any gains that
were achieved were eventually reversed. Today, depending on rainfall, 10,000 pounds of phosphorus flows through Fenwood Creek
each year. The reservoir, receiving all of this nutrient, is subject
to periodic, major fish kills. In 2009, decaying algae, generated by
phosphorus, took up so much oxygen across the 17 mile length of
the Big Eau Pleine that, under ice, not even carp could survive. An
estimated 80 percent of all fish died.
But fish are not the only victims of this ongoing pollution. People are, too.
The state, responsible for enforcing the federal Water Act, has
mandated $7 billion worth of municipal and industrial sewage
plant upgrades statewide to help phosphorus-impaired water
resources, such as the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir. The mandate will
remove but a scant amount of phosphorus from state waterways,
but no matter. The cost of these new regulations will prove enormous. Household and business sewer bills could double or triple.
A village of Edgar planning survey, still being tabulated, reports a
large number of residents say they would leave the village if they
have to pay significantly higher sewer bills. Some residents said
they would not be able to afford their normal groceries. This hardship will play out all over Wisconsin.
All of this underscores a truth. A river or creek is home to a
community. When the water body is unhealthy, the community,
both human and animal, suffers.
But maybe there is hope.
Last week, the Marathon County Conservation, Planning and
Zoning Department announced receipt of an $805,000 grant from
the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to reduce phosphorus in Fenwood Creek by a modest amount, 1,000 pounds, over
three years.
The county, having learned from the past, is taking a different
approach to this project. The county will not woo farmers in the
Fenwood Creek watershed with grant dollars in exchange for
temporary, reversible gains in water quality. The county will write
checks only to farmers who will pledge to do no less than change
the way they farm. Forever. Second, the county will not pretend it
knows, as a practical matter, how to reduce phosphorus pollution.
It will rely on farmers themselves to figure this out. They will be
the experts.
We hope the Fenwood Creek watershed community can rise to
the challenge set before it.
Failure would be a double disaster. In the first place, a failed
watershed project would continue the current pollution. But, second, an unsuccessful project would convince those in government
that regulation is the only way to deal with the states phosphorus
dilemma. So convinced, government would dictate farm practices
and punish with fines those who disobey. The countryside, instead
of being a refuge for those who want to be free, will become a place
to follow government rules. It will increasingly become a tyranny.
So, what is needed? We, as people living here, need an environmental ethic. We need to appreciate water as a vital source of
community. This needs to be taught in the public schools and from
the ministers pulpit. And we need farmers for their expertise,
wisdom and practical knowledge. They need to show us the way to
feed a hungry world while protecting our precious water resources.
The Fenwood Creek watershed effort is a pilot project, one that,
if successful, can be replicated across the county or even the state.
Let the work begin. If the Fenwood Creek community can come
together to protect its water resource, it can happen everywhere.

Beware new legislation


about property rights
My neighbor likes to expand his creates a loophole so big that the aplot, Kelly told me. First he put up proval of a culvert permit in Kenoa stone fence on our property and sha could affect a development in
then he built a jungle gym for his Eau Claire.
kids on his other neighbors properIn addition, if the developer first
ty. The fence stayed but the jungle sought permission from the stategym came down.
for a minor permit, locals might not
Laws and fences help
even know the granting of
make good neighbors.
that state permit would
Often these laws are
mean the entire project
ordinances passed by local
had become a vested
communities. We decide
right of the developer.
collectively what works
Vested Rights is a comfor our neighborhood, and
mon law idea that means
what works insome areas
some version of because
will not work in other arI have the property, I have
eas. You cant have roostan absolute, unconditional
ers in most cities. But in
complete right to do what I
some cities, you can keep
want on the property. Obvia few hens.
ously, I cant build on your
Moving at warp speed in
property, as in my first exthe Capitol is legislation
ample. But what if what I
that would change what
do affects you? What if I
your neighbor could do
create an industrial site
on his/her property and
that pollutes your water
would limit your local
and air? What if I create
BY
community from taking
a new activity (like sand
STATE SEN.
a position to protect you
mining sixyears ago) that
and your other neighbors.
effects your enjoyment of
KATHLEEN
When does your neighyour land?
VINEHOUT
bors property right limit
The bill is written so
(D-ALMA)
your own rights? What if
broadly that an action in
your neighbor built a fireone part of the state could
works factory next door? How about affect land owned by the same coma large hog operation? Or an indus- pany in another part of the state.
trial sand mine?
The bill also gives vesting rights
In a bill, introduced just before retroactively. Meaning, if the bill is
Christmas and due to have a pub- passed into law, the new law would
lic hearing before you read this, apply to any project that has not yet
the simple action of applying for a been finally approved by the time
driveway permit or a state culvert the bill passes. The bill could also
permit could freeze in place any affect any pending court cases.
local ordinance or state law.
Land use ordinances, zoning, subFor example, on the date a person division and shoreland zoning rules
applies for a driveway permit and- all came about to protect our comdiscloses a proposed project, the or- munities. We, collectively through
dinances and rules of all levels of local elected leaders want nice
local and state government could be places to live and raise our families.
frozen in place on that date providThis bill is just one of several
ed the driveway is constructed with- bills that take away the collective
in a stated deadline even though rights of a community and the insome aspects of the project may not dividual rights of neighbors to probe completed for many years.
tect themselves. Lawmakers should
Expanding a little known part of reject this bill and others like it.
the law related to housing developments, the bill (Senate Bill 464 and
its companion Assembly Bill 582)

BE OUR
GUEST

A HE LLE R CARTO ON

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Local athletes
commit to
college sports
Local high school football athletes
have begun giving colleges verbal
commitments to play football next
fall.
Youve probably already seen my
story on Jared Belisle giving his verbal commitment to play football at
Division 2 MinIEW FROM nesota State University Moorhead,
THE HEAP so he can join his
brother
Nathan
SEATS
who was a redshirt freshman on
the team this past
season.
But now a few
other area high
school
football
star players have
made their decision on which college to attend and
play football.
BY
Stratford
seniors Dylan PeCASEY
and TayKRAUTKRAMER terson
lor
Krall
gave
REPORTER
Division 3 UniverTHE RECORD-REVIEW sity of WisconsinStout verbal commitments to play football there next
fall, during a recruitment visit the
pair made to the college in Menomonie last weekend. Now they plan
to sign their written letters of intent
once they received them from UWStout in the mail.
Peterson will play defensive end for
the Blue Devils, and he is majoring
in engineering technology. Krall will
play running back and is majoring in
mechanical engineering.
The pair will join fellow Stratford graduate Travis Urlaub on UWStouts football next fall. Urlaub was
a junior running back on the team
this season.
UW-Stout football coach Clayt Birmingham traveled to Stratford High
School in December to meet with Peterson, Jesse Dickmann and Krall.
Dickmann has not yet scheduled a recruitment visit at UW-Stout and still
pondering what college he will play
football at next fall.
Peterson and Krall were two of nine
recruits from Wisconsin and Minnesota that attended the UW-Stout
recruitment visit last weekend. The
Blue Devils coaches and players apparently that Peterson and Krall met
last weekend apparently spoke highly
of recruiting players from a strong
football program like Stratford.
More local football stars, like Matt
Urmanski from Edgar and Sam Buchberger from Marathon, will soon also
decide on what colleges they are playing for next fall. They have a couple
of weeks yet to decide.
I loved the crowd energy inside
the Athens gymnasium Jan. 7 for the
Marawood Conference wrestling dual
between Athens and Stratford. Athens band director Patty Riske did an
outstanding job of directing the Bluejays pep band to pump up the wrestlers. It had been a while since Id last
witnessed the bleachers packed full
of fans on both sides of the gym. I
cant wait to bask in more of this tremendous crowd energy come tournament time.

Page 3

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Everywhere I go
I find a pal
Peter Weinschenk, Editor, The Record-Review
Can a dog be too smart? Well, perhaps.
Let me tell you about Lischka. She is my
daughter Maisies dog. They both live in a
high-rise apartment down in Chicago.
One day, my daughter gets a phone call at
work. It is a tenant in her apartment building who called to report that Lischka was
found in in the first floor lobby area.
My daughter was shocked. She left Lischka that morning behind a locked apartment door. But now the dog was down in
the apartment building lobby greeting
passersby.
This is what happened. The dog somehow managed to unlock the apartment
door, walk into the hallway, find a path to
the apartment elevator, and, either by summoning the elevator herself or waiting for
somebody else to use the elevator, entered
the elevator and took a ride down to the
apartment lobby.
My daughter was shocked. She was worried, naturally, about Lischkas safety.
After the episode, Maisie went to Home
Depot and invested in a door latch covering
and a gate to block the door.
These devices, she thought, was to keep
the dog inside her apartment.
She was wrong. Lischka defeated the
latch covering and, in a small, one-foot area
between the gate and the apartment door,
the dog, once again, opened the door. She
spent the afternoon exploring the apartment hallway. This great canine escape
was captured on a trail camera set up in
Maisies apartment.

It is fun to have a smart dog, but no fun


when a dog is too smart.
This past week, Maisie bragged to me
that Lischka had passed a tough test at her
obedience school with flying colors. She
earned a doggie diploma.
Now, my daughter has to invent some
kind of door security system she can operate but the dog cant. Its not so easy.
Academics and writers spend a lot of
time and energy worrying about the day
computers will become thinking, mechanical monsters and, following the plot of a
thousand pulpy science fiction novels, enslave mankind. They wonder if computers
have consciousness.
Perhaps more time ought to be spent worrying about dogs.
Stanley Coren, an international canine
expert at the university of British Columbia, says an average dog has the mental
abilities of a two-year-old child.
But I dont know about that. Is there a
two-year-old who could unlock an apartment door and take an elevator down to the
building lobby?
Maybe dogs are more like Mr. Peabody
than wed think.
Given what weve seen so far, I wouldnt
be all that surprised if my daughter returns from work one day to find Lischka on
the couch with a piping hot pizza tuned to
reruns of the Puppy Bowl on Animal Planet.
Thats one smart pooch.

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owned newspaper published
every Wednesday serving
the communities of Athens, Edgar,
Marathon and Stratford.
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Page 4

January 13, 2016

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Referendum plan not legal


Proposal to link Stratford referendum questions nixed by law firm
A proposal made by the Stratford
Board of Education during Mondays
meeting to word the April 5 school referendum election ballot to say that the
passing of question No. 2 for $7.9 million would be contingent on residents
passing question No. 1 of $15.9 million
has been found not legal.
Quarles & Brady, the school districts
law firm, informed Stratford schools
superintendent Scott Winch Tuesday
the referendum election ballot cant legally be worded this way.
Winch said he will recommend to
the school board at Mondays meeting, where a final referendum vote is
expected, that it give
electors two independent questions to vote
on, but agree to tell
voters in marketing
materials that it will
not go forward with
a $7.9 million auditorium and gymnasium
if a $15.9 million remodeling package is
defeated.
The $15.9 millionquestion
includes
Scott
remodeling the high
Winch
school locker rooms,
agriculture
laboratory, home economics area and the
special education classrooms in the
elementary and high schools. It calls
for building two science classrooms
and three general classrooms on the
high schools northwest corner parking lot, along with additional office and
commons space and a bathroom in the
middle school.
The project also includes upgrading
the audio and lighting on the current
stage, upgrading the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems
along with the electrical and plumbing
in the elementary and high schools.
At Mondays meeting, school board
president Dan Thompson and the rest
of board thought it was a good idea to
word the April 5 election ballot to say
the passing of question No. 2 was contingent on question No. 1 passing.
We wouldnt want to put a new addition of an auditorium and gymnasium
onto an old school that is falling apart
and in desperate need of renovations,
Thompson said.

STRATFORD REFERENDUM PROPOSED QUESTIONS


Question 1 ($15,999,900):
Renovations
Light Remodeling from Asbestos Abatement
Heavy Remodeling (Locker Rooms, FACE, Ag, Special
Ed - MS/HS) (Kitchen - Elem.)
HVAC Upgrade
Electrical and Plumbing Modifications
Restroom
Stage and Audio Lighting
Additions:
2 Science Classrooms
3 General Classrooms
Office & Additional
Commons
Space

ment on the loan. He said money left


over from the 2009 middle school building project was used for bathroom repairs and new doors.

Question 2
($7,999,900):
New Construction
Auditorium with 550
seats
Lobby/Restrooms
2 station gym

school building and renovation needs.


They have no clue these are the
original science classrooms in the 1962
building, and that our HVAC system is
out of whack and, because of it, some
of our classrooms are 90 degrees and
Vote expected
some are 60, he said.
The school board will have a special
Residents John Southworth, Elmer
board meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan.
Hayes and Kitty Guyer voiced their
18, in the high school band room to put
opinions on the school districts need
a referendum on the April 5 election
for an auditorium. Hayes read off sevballot. The school board will decide How many questions?
Resident Nikki Skroch asked the eral musical events planned for the
on the building idea and total cost of
the project for taxpayers, and whether school board during the Jan. 6 listening Edgar Public School auditorium, and
session if the two referendum he said the Stratford community could
to approve having two separate
questions could be lumped into provide the same musical entertainreferendum questions or simjust one question. School board ment with an auditorium.
ply lump everything into one
Thompson said it was important for
president Dan Thompson and
question on the ballot.
the
school board to place the building
clerk Pam Warosh, however,
The school districts financial
addition
of a gymnasium and an audiwere against putting all the
adviser, Robert W. Baird & Co.,
Details sought
torium together on the same referenbuilding
additions
and
renovahas
provided
a
summary
of
fi
Resident Travis Skroch argued durdum question.
tions together in a one
ing public participation Monday that nancing scenarios for school
Thats why we wanted to put
$24
million
referendum
the building referendum design team district taxpayers. If only the
them together as one question
question.
fi
rst
question
of
$16
million
is
didnt provide details of how much
because if we pitted one group
The vast majority of
every item cost in the project like he passed, taxpayers of a $100,000
against each other then all we
people
automatically
house
would
pay
$8.25
requested during the Dec. 16
would be doing is cutting each
assume the numbers
per month or $99 a year
listening session. A few of
Dan
others legs off, he said.
are reversed, that the
more in school taxes. If
the examples he noted were
Thompson $16 million is actually
Stratford middle and high
both
referendum
quesasbestos removal for $225,000
school
band director John
for building the gym
tions pass for a total of
and heavy remodeling in speRickinger
said its important
and
auditorium,
Warosh
said.
$24 million, then taxpayers with
cial education for $191,895.
to add an A and call it the
I
think
we
stand
a
lot
more
the
same
$100,000
house
would
Miron building project
performing arts and athletics
pay $15.50 per month or $186 per chance of success if we show
manager Lee Spindler excomplex.
them
that
actually
two
thirds
year
on
top
of
the
current
school
plained to Skroch the design
If I would cut out every
of the $16 million is for renovataxes they pay each year.
Elmer
team needed to estimate high
student
that I have involved in
Winch has proposed a borrow- tions and the addition of classHayes
on the line item costs, so the
athletics that is in band, then I
rooms.
If
you
just
give
people
ing
plan
should
voters
approve
school district has enough
would cut out most of my band
both referendum questions. He the $24 million cost, then they
money to pay for everything
members,
he said. Likewise, if a
are
going
to
think
the
vast
majority
of
would borrow the first $14 milTravis
needed in the referendum.
sports coach would cut out their band
that
money
is
for
the
addition
of
a
gym
lion
for
the
building
project
this
Winch said the school disSkroch
and choir students, then most of the
year at 3.75 percent interest on and an auditorium.
trict would use any remainplayers would be gone from the team.
School
board
member
Jamie
Wenzel
a
20-year
loan,
and
then
borrow
ing money left over from the
proposed building referendum to pay the remaining $10 million next year at said he has received phone calls from
for other needs or make an extra pay- a projected 4 percent interest rate. He residents who say they dont know
said most of the construction work enough about the school districts
would occur in the summer of 2017.
The building design team of Miron
and Somerville Architects unveiled
cost estimates of the two referendum
questions at the Dec. 16 listening session. They proposed the first question
would cost between $14-18 million and
the second question would be between
$7-8.2 million.

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Page 5

Fenwood clean-up
Continued from page 1

Stetsonville

Athens
Dorchester

STH 97

need to change behavior to achieve


any long-term gains.
The Fenwood Creek Watershed,
which extends from STH 29 all the
way south of STH 153 to the Big Eau
Pleine reservoir, has 64 livestock operations, including 43 dairies. There
are nine heifer operations and another nine beef farms. There are plenty
of acres that are
cash cropped.
Within the 37square mile watershed, only 34
farming operations
have Nutrient Management Plans on
file with Marathon
County. These plans
cover 5,100 acres of
Kelly King
cropland.
Daigle said he
hopes to encourage a culture of conservation in the Fenwood Creek watershed.
We will need education, he said.
People will need to know what a conservation field looks like. We need to
develop an eye for that sort of thing.
Town of Wien dairy farmer Kelly
King, whose farm is located in the
Fenwood Creek watershed, said he
fully supports improved conservation practices to clean up county surface waters.
The Fenwood Creek was rated
among the dirtiest in the state, he
said. The level of phosphorus is astronomical. I sure hope we can clean
it up a little bit. That would be nice.
But King, who sits as a farmer representative on the countys Land,
Conservation and Zoning Committee, said he has no illusions about
how difficult it will be to get farmers
in his rural neighborhood to change
how they farm.
We have some very good farmers, but to get them to change practices will be very, very hard, he said.
There are farms that are doing the
same things for 80 years. It is real
hard to change people after 80 years.
King said, however, it is possible

Abbotsford

STH 29

Marathon City

Colby

Edgar

Fenwood
Unity

Stratford

The Fenwood Creek subwatershed within the Big Eau Pleine watershed
to be more conservation-minded as a
farmer. He has changed his farming
practices, bit by bit, over the years
and thinks it has made a difference.
Its just the little things, he said.

They add up.


King said he is, nevertheless, hopeful that the state grant can accomplish good things in Fenwood Creek.
It will be a challenge, he said.

But lets see if we can clean things


up.

Shared municipal court idea advances


Village of Marathon City adminis- Streets to enhance traffic safety.
trator Andy Kurtz on Thursday anTrustee Lauren Knoeck strongly
nounced that sharing a municipal supported the proposal, arguing that
court with the village of Rothschild the angled parking forced traffic, notapromised to be very economical and, bly trucks, over the Third Street center
if negotiations continue to move for- line and compromised safety.
ward, the village could have a
Trustee Mark Ahrens, howjoint municipal court as early
ever, said taking parking away
as May or June.
from three businesses, includKurtz said he has discussed
ing
Schumacher
Ginseng,
using the Rothschild municiGlenns Ginseng and Sun Counpal court with mayor George
try Tees, would hurt Marathons
Peterson. The administrator
downtown at a time when the
said Rothschild would only
village was trying to help the
charge Marathon City for
downtown.
actual court costs, not space
Trustee Connie Ruplinger said
rental.
traffic safety was a priority and
The preliminary numbers
that she would trust the recomare very attractive, Kurtz
mendation of Chief Gertschen.
Andy
said. It could be cheaper
Im for safety, she said.
Kurtz
than if we were to run the
Ahrens said that, at minimunicipal court ourselves.
mum, the affected business ownCurrently, Marathon City uses Mara- ers should be contacted and invited to
thon County Circuit Court to handle a village board meeting to give their
contested municipal ordinance cita- perspective.
tions, including traffic fines.
Board members agreed with Ahrens.
In other village board business:
The board directed Gertschen and ad Police Chief Kory Gertschen pro- ministrator Kurtz to contact the busiposed ending the angled parking on ness owners and see if they wish to adThird Street between Main and Walnut dress the board.

Administrator Kurtz informed the


board that flooding in December after
a major rain washed out 170 feet of the
road that services Lions Park. He said
the village is considering options to
better direct water in the area in order
to preserve the road. Flood prevention
could help the village meet a phosphorus reduction mandate from the DNR,
Kurtz said.
Board members agreed to have
Sulzer Machine and Manufacturing,
Mosinee, replace a drive shaft in a
snowblower unit for $500. The snowblower has a shaft that breaks every 50
hours of operation, Kurtz said.
Administrator Kurtz announced
the police departments Charger was
sold at a Wisconsin surplus auction for
$4,178.
Kurtz said an engineering class at
Marathon High School has been making progress in designing and manufacturing Main Street flag brackets.
A design phase should wrap up this
month, he said, and fabrication will
begin. This has been a useful exercise
for the students, he said.
Administrator Kurtz said Mara-

thon Plumbing completed drainage


work in the Veterans Park dugouts.
The business supplied labor and materials. Village expense for the work are
excavator time and some concrete flatwork.
Kurtz told board members that residents at the Marathon Mobile Home
Park continue to bring complaints to
the village office that ordinances are
not being followed. The administrator said hes followed up on the complaints, only to be accused by owners
of the business that they are being harassed. The property owners are not
happy, Kurtz said.
The administrator announced
25 UW-Stevens Point urban forestry
students will work with the village
to come up with a Marathon forestry
plan. The plan may enable Marathon
to become a Tree City USA.
Following a closed session, board
members
directed
administrator
Kurtz to advance a Marathon Center
Project. The project envisions razing
three businesses on the east side of
Main Street between Third and Fourth
Streets to make room for a new grocery
store and other retail business.

Page 6

January 13, 2016

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Athens
COMMUNITY LIVING

Send Athens news to:


RR@tpprinting.com
phone: 715-223-2342
fax: 715-223-3505
P.O. Box 677
103 West Spruce Street
Abbotsford, WI 54405

SCHOOL LUNCH
Athens Public School
Monday, Jan. 18: Chicken
soup, crackers, Bosco Sticks
Tuesday, Jan. 19: California
burger on a bun, sweet potato
fries
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Breaded
pork cutlet, mashed potatoes,
bread, glazed carrots, cranberries, applesauce
Thursday, Jan. 21: Taco with
soft shell or chips, refried beans,
shredded cheese
Friday, Jan. 22: Chicken patty
with bun, green beans, mandarin
oranges

Pay it forward
The Athens Class of 1975
is encouraging Athens High
School students to pursue a
career after high school.
The class will provide over
$1,000 of financial assistance
for educational courses including, but not limited to,
music, computers, engineering or agriculture.
Partial reimbursement of
20 percent, but not greater
than $200, will be provided
upon verification of completion of an approved course.
The class of 1975 challenges
all other classes to pay it forward.

Lunches served with milk, fruit


and salad bar.

St. Anthonys School

Book Club
The Marathon County Public Library Athens Branch will
present a Book Club: The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 14, at 221 Caroline Street.

Speakeasy Party
Athens High School social studies teacher Rhonda Stange held three hours of a living history day for her
junior students on the morning of Dec. 18. The students portrayed real life people from the 1920s and
attended a speakeasy party. Pictured in the front row, from left to right, are Taylor Myszka Pola Negri, Mikala Verpoorten Blance Sweet, Kailey Schug Vivan Chase, Haley Kralcik Zelda Sayre, Tiffany Gaebel
Marion Davis, Marissa Nowacki Aileen Riggin and Alyssa Schueller Coco Channel. Back row, Kaitlyn
Gumz Texas Guinan, Shay Boesl Jean Harlow and Hannah Zettler Norma Shearer.

Continuing education
Yoga 4 Everybody will be
held from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays from March 1 until May 3
in the Trinity Lutheran Gym.
There is a fee. People interested in attending the class
should sign up at www.my
signup.com/winterspring2016
-athn-grnvly-haldr-rozell-spen
cr-strat.

Story Time
Family Story Time is held at

10 a.m. Tuesdays at the Athens


Branch Library.
It consists of stories and activities for children newborn
to five years old and their families.

Schwans Cares
Trinity
PTL
Schwans
Cares Fundraiser continues.
Order at www.schwanscares.
com or call 1-888-schwans
and enter Trinitys campaign

number, 19117, and place an


order.
Any purchases placed over
the next period of time, Trinity will receive five percent of
sales. The fundraiser goes until March 2016.
This fundraising effort
helps offset funds for activities and other items that PTL
helps pay for. If you have any
questions, call Vicki Halopka
at 715-607-0716, or email her at

halopkaav@gmail.com. She
can also assist you in placing
an order.

Senior Citizens
The Senior Citizens card
group met Jan. 7 for weekly
card playing at the Athens
Area Fire and Ambulance Hall.
Three games of Sheepshead
were played.
Jake Rogaczewski won the
first game and Pat Frank was

Monday, Jan. 18: BBQ pork


riblet on bun, French fries, baked
beans
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Hot dog on
a bun, Doritos or plain chips,
carrots
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Cheese
or pepperoni pizza, Go-Gurts
Thursday, Jan. 21: Hot ham
and cheese sandwich, potato
wedges, broccoli
Friday, Jan. 22: Spaghetti with
meat sauce, noodles, peas,
garlic bread
Lunches served with milk, fruit,
vegetables and salad.

Trinity Lutheran School


Monday, Jan. 18: Teriyaki
chicken with stir fry vegetables
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Tacos or
fajitas, carrot sticks and dip
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Pancakes with syrup, sausage links
Thursday, Jan. 21: Chili with
crackers, cheese, salad/corn,
grapes
Friday, Jan. 22: Pizza sticks,
salad/veggies and dip, mixed
fruit

See ATHENS/ page 7

SOMEONE IN ATHENS YOU SHOULD KNOW...

Jordan Zinkowich
TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF?
I am a junior at Athens High School,
and I play football and wrestle. I am
an offensive and defensive lineman
on the football team, and I am currently wrestling at 195 pounds.
WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?
I like to hang out with my buddies,
and I do a lot of fishing and hunting.
I like to do a lot of trapping with my
buddy too.
HOW DID YOU FARE HUNTING
THIS YEAR?
I shot a nice little three pointer this
year with my rifle, but I didnt shoot
anything with my bow.

DO YOU ENJOY LIVING IN THE


VILLAGE OF ATHENS?
I would rather live in the country.
IS IT EXCITING TO SEE YOUR
ATHENS WRESTLING TEAM
HAVING SUCCESS?
It is a lot more fun when you win
matches. If you dont win any
matches then the season gets boring. Athens wrestling is coming back
around and we are starting to win a
lot more matches, and therefore we
are seeing a lot more people come
out to watch our matches.

Do you know someone from Athens we should know? Call us at 715-223-2342.

HISTORY
CORNER
THE RECORD-REVIEW
Wednesday Jan. 10, 1990
Athens matmen defeat Edgar
Bluejay wrestlers got back
to winning ways in the Marawood Conference when they
defeated the Edgar Wildcats,
45-19 last Thursday.
Seven pins were involved in
the score, six for the Bluejays
and one for the Wildcats.
Bluejay wrestlers who won
by pins were Mitch Marohl at
112 pounds, Mitch Schreiber
at 125, Troy Szydel at 130,
Chuck Fortier at 135, Jamie
Dehlinger at 145 and Chad
Marcon at 171.

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Page 7

Athens

Continued from page 6


second. Norbert Lake won the second
game and Betty Rogaczewski was second. Ceil Frank won the third game
and John Totzke was second.
The Senior Citizens card group will
meet again Thursday, Jan. 14, at 1 p.m.

Udder Plunge
The Udder Plunge and Snowshoe
Race will be held Saturday, Jan. 30, at
Erbach Park in Athens.
The event consists of a three-mile
snowshoe race and hike through the
wooded Erbach Park, and it will be held
regardless if there is snow or not.
Registration is at 8 a.m. the day of
the race, which begins at 10:30 a.m. The
awards ceremony is at noon.
Medals will be given to the top four
finalists in each age group, all children
12 years and younger will receive an
award and top three male and female
finishers overall will receive trophies.
There will be a warming shelter with
free hot soup, beverages available for
purchase, changing rooms and door
prizes. After the awards ceremony,
there will be a childrens treasure hunt.
The polar plunge will begin at 12:30 p.m.
There is a registration fee. Contact
Chris Kepner at 715-257-9178 for more
information.

Hall of Fame ceremony


The Athens wrestling alumni/parents night and Hall of Fame ceremony
will be held Thursday, Jan. 14.
There will be an alumni and parents
social from 5-6 p.m. in the Athens High
School commons area.
The Hall of Fame presentation will
be at 6 p.m. The late Pat Switlick, the
first Athens wrestling state champion
in 1977, will be inducted into the Hall of
Fame.
Athens then wrestles at 7 p.m. against
Auburndale.

Students of the Month


The following students were named
the Athens Middle School students
of the month for December: Reanna
Stowe, social studies; Maleah Redmann, science; Brock Thompson, English
and language arts; and Lila Thompson,
math.
The following students were named
Athens High School students of the
month for December: Joey Lontcoski,
social studies; Carley Lipinski, science; Marcianna Olson, Kayla Hein and
Kenadi Diedrich, English and language
arts; and Megan Nowak, math.

LEGO club night


The Marathon County Public Library Athens Branch will hold its Family LEGO Club from 3:30-5 p.m. every
Thursday from Jan. 14-May 26.
Families and children of all ages can
design and build creative structures using LEGOs at the library. The club is
free and no registration is required.

Living History Lesson

Winter family event


The second annual candlelight trail,
snowshoe, walk and ski event will be
held at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, at Erbach Park in Athens.
There will be a bon fire, camarderie,
hot dogs and hot chocolate served after
the walk.
The event is sponsored by the Athens
Area Trail Association. The Associations goal is to promote and preserve
the unique system of trails at Erbach
Park. Donations will be accepted at the
end of the event to be used toward the
cost of maintaining the trails.

Athens Trails meeting


The Athens Area Trail Association
will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21, in
the Athens High School library.

500 Club
The 500 Club met at the home of

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deans list.
Those students are Madelyn Kulas,
majoring in English with a rhetoric
and writing emphasis; Luke Mroczenski, majoring in mathematics education;
and Heather Schreiner with an exercise
and sport science major: exercise science-fitness track.
Collin Ellenbecker of Athens has
been named to the deans list for the fall
semester.

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Lynne Harder at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday,


Jan. 6.
Black forest dream dessert and coffee
were served before playing. Winners
were Gayle Maurer in first place, Linda
Adams in second and Bitsy Ewan received low score.
The club will next meet at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, a the home of Agnes Gianoli.

2-177364

Rural Mutual

These junior boys were in Stanges first hour of her living history lesson Dec. 18. They
were in 1920s costume, talked the slang of the time period, brought food and beverages
and listened to music of the time period during a speakeasy party. Pictured, from left to
right, are Paul Mroczenski Gene Tunney, Nate Morse Charlie Chaplin, Zach Annala
John Dillinger, Joe Bennett Fred Killer Burke, Ty Halopka Red Grange, Josh Lanteau Al Capone and Jameson Brooks Babe Ruth.

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Page 8

January 13, 2016

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Edgar
Valentines Day. The top five
entries will be shared in library displays and social media. Drop off paper entries at
any Marathon County public
library location or email entries to love@mcpl.us. The
limit is three entries per person. Vulgar or excessively
graphic entries will not be
considered. Call 715-261-7230
for more information.
The Edgar Public Library
Book Club will meet to discuss A Week in the Winter
by Maeve Binchy on Thursday, Jan. 14, at 12:30 p.m.
The Edgar Branch Public
Library will hold a Family
Fun Night Gingerbread and
More! on Monday, Jan. 18, 6-7
p.m.
Children and their families are invited to learn about
the history of gingerbread
from medieval festivals to
the gingerbread husbands
maidens would eat to improve
their chances of marrying a
knight.

Send Edgar news to:


RR@tpprinting.com
phone: 715-223-2342
fax: 715-223-3505
P.O. Box 677
103 West Spruce Street
Abbotsford, WI 54405
Football alumni
The Edgar Football Alumni
will meet Friday, Jan. 15, at
Louies Pub, Edgar, at 8:30 p.m.
All Edgar football alumni are
invited to attend this annual
winter meeting. Raffle tickets
will be distributed. Alumni
hats and shirts will be available for purchase.

Medical equipment
The American Legion Sawyer-Drumm Post in Edgar has
medical equipment available
for public use. The equipment
includes crutches, canes, portable toilets, shower chairs,
wheelchairs and several styles
of walkers. The equipment
may be used by Edgar area residents without charge or time
restriction. Donations of medical equipment are welcome.
For more information, contact Billy or Sylvia Fergot at
7125-352-2221.

Citizen survey

Edgar fine arts


The Edgar Fine Arts Association has announced a schedule of concerts in 2016.
John Greiners Little Big
Band will play at the Edgar
High School jazz band spaghetti dinner at 5 p.m. on Saturday,
Feb. 13. The music begins at
6:30 p.m.
Country music band The
Blend will perform Saturday,
April 2, 6 p.m.
Thursday concerts in Oak
Street Park, Edgar, will run
from July 28 through Aug. 18.
Performers will be announced.

Public library
The Marathon County Pub-

Country music performer


Central Wisconsin country music performer Brad Emanuel entertained an audience at the Edgar Public School auditorium as part of
the Edgar Area Fine Arts winter concert series on Sunday afternoon.
He won the 2013 county band contest championship at the Hodag
Country Festival, Rhinelander.
lic Library will hold a second
annual Love in Six words contest. The contest involves encapsulating what love means

to you in only six words. Entries will be accepted between


Jan. 13 and Feb. 10. The winners will be announced on

The Edgar Planning Commission is conducting a citizen survey to gather information for a 2016 comprehensive
plan.
The survey was mailed to
residents with their property
tax bills.
If you did not get a survey
form, you can pick one up at
the Edgar village hall. An online version of the survey is
also available at the village
website.
Surveys are to be completed
by Friday, Jan. 15.

On campus
Five Edgar students attending UW-La Crosse have been
named to the deans list for
the fall semester of the 2015-16
academic year.
The students and their majors are Caleb Cline, radiation
therapy; Derek Edwards, his-

SCHOOL LUNCH
Edgar Public Schools
Monday, Jan.18: Chicken patty/bun, baked beans, peaches
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Salisbury
steak, buttered noodles, green
beans, pears
Wednesday, Jan. 20: 4K-4
-chicken drummie, 5-HS -baked
chicken, mashed potatoes and
gravy, steamed peas and carrots, pineapple
Thursday, Jan. 21: Lasagna,
garlic toast, baked beans, mandarin oranges
Friday, Jan. 22: No school
Lunches served with romaine
with spinach, baby carrots and
milk.

St. Johns School


Monday, Jan. 18: Hot dog/bun,
baked beans, salad, peaches
Tuesday, Jan. 19: French toast
sticks, potato wedges, baby carrots, applesauce
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Nachos
w/taco meat, salad, buttered
corn, pineapple
Thursday, Jan. 21: Chicken
noodle soup, jelly or PB sandwich, mixed veggie, mixed fruit,
dessert
Friday, Jan. 22: No school
Lunches served with milk.

tory with a religious studies


emphasis; Alyson Kornack,
undeclared; Jessi Krause, biology; and Cedric Lechleitner,
recreation management.

Sewers needed
Kristine Federwitz, a teacher at Edgar High School, is
looking for sewers to help
make 20 shark and mermaid
costumes for children receiving cancer treatments. The
project will take place in the
high school family and consumer education room. Basic
sewing skills (ability to make
a straight stitch) are required.

See EDGAR/ page 9

SOMEONE IN EDGAR YOU SHOULD KNOW...

Jane Ross
WHERE WERE YOU BORN
AND RAISED?
I was born in Marathon. I went
to the Lutheran Church in Marathon. Then I started going to St.
Stephens Church in Edgar. That
was 67 years ago.
WHAT KINDS OF THINGS
DO YOU DO FOR THE
CHURCH?
I used to be president, but I dont
do that anymore. Play the handbells, do Bible study, read Scrip-

ture as a lector and coordinate


funeral luncheons. I also help
make quilts.
HOW MANY PEOPLE MAKE
QUILTS?
About a dozen people helped
make 92 quilts last year. This
year, we are aiming for 100 quilts.
WHERE DO THE QUILTS
GO?
All over the globe. We deliver
them to Lutheran World Relief

and the American Red Cross.


We also give quilts to church
members who are graduating
high school students.
IS MAKING QUILTS FUN?
Well, people have been making
quilts at St. Stephens Church for
50 years. Its not the idea of making quilts actually. Thats not why
we do it. Its the fellowship.

Do you know someone in Edgar people should know? Call us at 715-223-2342.

HISTORY
CORNER
THE RECORD-REVIEW
Wednesday Jan. 10, 1990
Willowberry Gleanings
The black dirt on the snow
the other day did not look like
our usual local brown dust
coming off the roads and the
bare patches in the fields.
The wind was from the
west and very strong and
fast. What the dirt turned
out to be is nothing less than
ash from a volcano currently
erupting in Alaska. Now you
can go out and touch the soil
of another state.

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Page 9

Edgar
Continued from page 8
If interested, get more information by
contacting Edgar High School at 715352-2352. Federwitzs e-mail is kfeder
witz@gapps.edgar.k12.wi.us.

a.m. to 6 p.m. at Illusions Bar and Grill,


Fenwood. The club will collect aluminum tabs for the Ronald McDonald
House, Marshfield.

Chili feed

Bingo

The Midwest ATV Trailblazers will


sponsor a chili feed Saturday, Feb. 6, 11

The Edgar Jaycees Club will sponsor bingo games in the Edgar Public

School cafeteria on Sunday, Jan. 17,


starting at 6 p.m.

Movie night
Edgar Elementary School will sponsor a family movie night on Thursday,
Jan. 21, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Popcorn and
snacks will be provided.

Matthew Ryan Lacke


M
Death leaves a heartache
no one can heal,
but love leaves memories
b
no one can steal.
Matt lived strong.
His life impacted so many of
inspire us today.
2-177543

FOREVER IN OUR HEARTS,


THE FAMILY OF MATTHEW RYAN LACKE

To all the individuals, organizations


and businesses who donated to the
food pantry this past year
we extend a great big thank you.
Your generosity is outstanding
and much appreciated!

Thanks!

Edgar Marathon Area Circle of Joy

2-177429

Dads, grandfathers and other significant males are invited to read to Edgar
Elementary School students in grades
4K on Thursday, Jan. 14, and to 5k students on Friday, Jan. 15. Reading on
both days is from 8:15 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

OBITUARIES

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
May 5, 1986- January 11, 2006

Dads and donuts

S
P
A
C
E
F
O
R
R
E
N
T

Beverly Strasser
Beverly Ann (Punke) Strasser, 67, Wausau, enjoyed
every minute of life, not even the cancer would
discourage her. When she passed on Saturday, Dec. 5,
2015, in Las Vegas, her last prayers were for her family
and friends to also enjoy every minute of life.
She was born July 1, 1948, daughter of the late
Arnold and Mabel (Pilgrim) Punke. She grew up on
a farm, one of six children, and graduated from the
Edgar High School. On April 26, 1969, she married
Norman Witucki and together had three sons. On Aug.
19, 2001, given a beautiful sunny day, Bev and Doug
joyously wed at home in their backyard with family and friends.
Bev worked at many different places throughout the years, including
Edgar schools, Menards, Elks Club, Hoffman House and at their business,
Norde Memorials. She loved talking to people at these jobs, along with
several others.
Among some of her favorite pastimes, she enjoyed gardening and tending
to her wild flowers, playing canasta and sheepshead, setting puzzles, reading
and watching romantic comedies with Doug. Bev looked forward to the
Energy Fair in Amherst each year to learn new ways of living which gave
her the ability to think outside of the box and a curiosity to try new things.
Her outlook on life was one of simplicity, wastelessness and taking time
to notice the beauty around her. Most of all, Bev loved spending time with
family, cherished talking to her boys and baking homemade gingerbread
cut-out cookies and making yummy grilled cheese sandwiches for her
grandchildren.
Survivors include her husband, Douglas Strasser, Wausau; three sons,
Brian Witucki, Wausau, Jeffrey Witucki, Las Vegas and Daniel (Meli)
Witucki, Houston, Texas; five grandchildren, Joshua, Alexandra, Isabella,
Liam and Olivia; four sisters, Joan Christianson, Edgar, Judy Zarndt,
Middleton, Nancy (Alan) Witucki, Athens and Connie (Paul) Astrachan,
Austin, Texas; one brother, Dennis Punke, Edgar; sister and brother-in-law,
Denise (Mike) Watts; father and mother-in-law, Kenneth (Joyce) Strasser;
numerous nieces and nephews; and cousins.
A memorial service will be at held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, at
St. Stephen Lutheran Church, Edgar. Rev. Gail Sowell will preside. Friends
may call on Friday from 4-8 p.m. at Peterson/Kraemer Funeral Home, 3400
Stewart Avenue, Wausau, and again on Saturday from 1:30 p.m. until the
time of the service at the church. Online condolences may be expressed at
www.petersonkraemer.com.
Paid obituary 2-177531

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Page 10

January 13, 2016

The Record-Review

Sports
BLUEJAYS

WILDCATS

RED RAIDERS

TIGERS

Red Raiders stymie Tigers


Blume paced the team with 14 points
and Rachu chipped in 12. Despite Marathon continuing to win games, the Red
Raiders fell from No. 1 to No. 2 behind
undefeated Cuba City in this weeks
Division 4 WisSports.net coaches poll.
The Cubans have won two straight
Division 4 state championships.
Marathon has a huge matchup
Thursday at home against Wisconsin Rapids Assumption, who remains
ranked No. 2 in Division 5. The Red
Raiders handed the Royals their lone
Marawood south defeat with a 59-44
win Dec. 1 in Wisconsin Rapids.

Marathon jumps
out to early lead
to rout Stratford
What most people expected to be a
competitive game between the Marathon and Stratford varsity girls basketball teams last Friday turned into an
easy 20-point win for the Red Raiders.
Marathon was ranked No. 1 in Division 4 when it played Stratford, but the
Tigers were a hot team, having won
three straight games entering the contest with the Red Raiders. But Marathons full-court press forced Stratford
players into hurrying up and making
several turnovers early in the game,
as the Red Raiders jumped out to a 12-0
lead en route to a 61-41 victory in Stratford.
Stratford coach Tammie Christopherson said her team needed to play
solid basketball for 36 minutes to beat
Marathon, which didnt happen Friday.
We dug ourselves into a hole early
and we were down by 12 points before
we scored, she said. They are an
amazing team but we lost our minds
at times tonight. We did not play like
weve played all year; we just checked
out and they made us pay for it every
time.
Tigers sophomore Chelsey Gliniecki
tried to get her team back into the
game with some big baskets toward
her team-high 10 points, but the Red
Raiders still built a 39-16 halftime lead.
Marathon senior forward Olivia
Meurette led three Red Raiders in double figure scoring with 18 points. Julia Anderson added 13 points and five
steals, while Morgan Rachu had nine
10 points and nine rebounds.
Meurette and the teammates were
well prepared for Stratford.
We knew they were playing really
well and that they had good outside
shooters, so we really focused on play-

Edgar bests Athens

BATTLE FOR THE REBOUND-Marathon senior guard Alison Stieber (15) jockeys
for rebounding position with Stratford sophomore guard Kaylee Hollatz (23), while
Tigers junior guard Sammy Griesbach (11) looks on in the background.
ing hard defense and really jumping to the ball well, she said. Our
guards like Julia, Jayci (Blume) and
Morgan played great defense on their
guards, and their players were getting
flustered. Morgan and Amanda were
amazing with their rebounding on the
inside, so it was a really good team effort and a fun game to play.
Marathon coach Jeff Schneider said
his team worked hard in practice leading up to last Fridays game on improving its halfcourt defense.
I thought our ball pressure, espe-

cially in the first eight to nine minutes,


was really good, he said. When our
players get after it like that they are really fun to watch.
With the loss, Stratford fell to fourth
place in the Marawood South with a 3-3
record but is 9-3 overall. Marathon improved to 6-0 in the conference.

Marathon beats Colby


The Red Raiders improved to 12-1
overall this season with a 52-30 nonconference win against Colby Tuesday
in Marathon.

The Wildcats jumped out to a big lead


to cruise to an 82-28 home win against
Athens last Friday.
Edgar remains in first place in the
Marawood North Conference at 6-0 and
is 9-3 overall this season. The Bluejays
fell to 0-6 in the conference and 1-11
overall.
Senior Tianna Borchardt led the
Wildcats with a game-high 25 points,
while Dana Heidmann added 16. Macey Wirkus scored 14 points along with
nine assists and seven steals.
Edgar coach Betty Urmanski was
proud of her teams play against Athens.
We jumped out to a 16-0 lead and
had a 53-16 advantage at halftime, she
said. All our girls contributed with
positive stats and we shot 76 percent
from the free-throw line.
Freshman Kenadi Diedrich led the
Bluejays with 17 points.

Edgar bests Athens


Athens dropped a 72-51 non-conference home game Monday against
Marshfield Columbus.
Hanna Ellenbecker led Athens with
10 points. Kaylyn Schreiner, Gabrielle
Janke and Diedrich all scored nine
points apiece. Berenice Lira pulled
down 10 rebounds.

Edgar extends its win streak

PRESSURE D-Edgars Matt


Urmanski (10) and Tyler Engel
prevent an Abby player from
making a pass.
STAFF PHOTO/CHRISTIAN PARKER

The Edgar varsity boys


basketball team just keeps
on winning, as the Wildcats
secured their eighth straight
victory with a dominating 7727 home win against Athens
Tuesday night.
Senior Matt Urmanski led
three Edgar players in doublefigure scoring with 14 points.
Sophomore Josh Burish added 12 points and junior Tyler
Engel chipped in 11 for the
Wildcats, who remain in first
place in the Marawood North
Conference at 4-0 and are now
9-2 overall this season.
Justin Kelly paced the Blue-

jays, who fell to 0-5 in the


Marawood North and 1-8 overall, with 12 points.

Edgar bests Abby


Senior Austin Borchardt
and junior Alec Hafferman
scored 10 points apiece to lead
the Wildcats to a 55-23 road
win against Abbotsford Jan.
7.
Edgar scored 23 points off
Abbys turnovers, and also
scored 24 points in the paint.
The Wildcats held a 32-23 rebounding edge against the
Falcons.

Bluejays fall to Bucs


Athens suffered a 64-43
home defeat to Marawood
North foe Prentice last Friday.
Senior Lane Nicholds led
Athens with 18 points while
Kelly added 17.

Raiders ranked No. 7


The Red Raiders have won
nine games in a row since
their season-opening loss at
Mosinee, and they are ranked
seventh in this weeks WisSports.net Division 4 coaches
poll.
Marathon improved to 5-0

in the Marawood South Conference with a 57-38 win at


Stratford Tuesday night.
Ethan Nagel led Stratford,
which fell to 2-3 in the Marawood South and 6-6 overall,
with 15 points.
Stratford dropped a 56-30
game at Pittsville last Friday,

Marathon wins by 10
The Red Raiders beat the
Auburndale Apaches, 57-47,
in Marathon Jan. 7.
Senior
Preston
Wirkus
scored a team-high 15 points
for Marathon, while sophomore Nathan Stoffel added 10.

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Page 11

Tigers stave off upset bid


Bi-State Classic and he placed higher
than Tyson Kauffman, so his win was
huge for us to seal the match victory,
he said. Hats off to Tyson Kauffman
for beating a very good opponent.
Another competitive battle during
Stratfords top-ranked wrestling
the dual pitted juniors Mason Kauffteam survived a scare from Athens
man of Stratford against Austin Engel
during a Marawood Conference dual
of Athens in the 152-pound match. MaJan. 6 in front of a large rowdy crowd
son Kauffman was recently ranked No.
at Athens High School gymnasium.
2 and Engel No. 6 in the weight class,
The Tigers, ranked No. 1 in Division
and Mason Kauffman managed to stave
3, outlasted the honorable mention
off a fierce effort from Engel with a 4-3
Bluejays, 41-31, who gave Stratford its
decision win to stay undefeated in his
closest match of the season.
high school career.
Athens made things interMason Kauffman analyzed
esting with two straight pins
his close match with Engel.
by Jordan Zinkowich and DaHe came out with a good
kota Venzke to get within a
game plan and he wrestled
point of Stratford, 32-31, with
tough, and I executed a few
two matches left in the dual.
takedowns to get the win, he
Zinkowich, a junior, pinned
said. It was a close bout and a
Stratford senior Kyle Giebel
good match. Being undefeated
in their 195-pound match in
in my high school career puts
one minute and 53 seconds,
a target on my back so I just
and then Bluejays sophomore
need to stay calm and keep doMason
Dakota Venzke pinned Jon
ing what I am doing.
Kauffman
Aguirre at 220 in 2:42.
Engel knew from the moBluejays coach Dale Westment he stepped out onto the mat it
fall was as surprised as everyone else
would be a close battle between Mason
that Zinkowich pinned Giebel.
Kauffman and him.
We didnt expect that from him
Hes a lot quicker than me so I just
(Zinkowich) so he went out there and
knew I needed to stay low and be physioutperformed how we thought he
cal with him, he said. I just didnt do
would do because his opponent placed
the moves that I should of at the right
pretty high at the Bi-State Classic and
times when I had the openings and he
Jordan didnt place, he said. Jordan
stalled out the win. That was probably
told me, I am tired of losing, coach,
my best match so far this season, but I
and Im going out there to win this
will see him later on again in the seathing.
son and maybe the result will be differZinkowichs pin set up a pivotal
ent.
match between the teams heavyweight
Westfall provided some perspective
wrestlers, Tyson Kauffman of
on Engels match against MaStratford and Tyson Sommer
son Kauffman.
of Athens. Kauffman was reThis gym was full of
cently ranked No. 1 and Somwrestling fans who didnt
mer No. 2 at 285 pounds in Diwant to see our wrestlers getvision 3.
ting pinned; they wanted to
Tyson Kauffman won a
see good matches, he said.
hard-fought
7-5
decision
They are going to meet sevagainst Sommer to give Strateral more times this season,
ford some breathing room
and you need to beat a state
with a 35-31 lead. Then Manny
champ to be a state champ.
Drexler made quick work of
Another
key
matchup
Austin
Gabe Weiks at 106 pounds by
between juniors was Nate
Engel
pinning him in 53 seconds.
Morse of Athens, ranked No.
Stratford coach Joe Schwabe
9 at 160 pounds in Division 3,
said Tyson Kauffmans match win was
against David Marquardt of Stratford,
crucial in the Tigers pulling out the
who was ranked No. 10 at 160. Morse
match win.
pulled out a 6-3 decision win for his
Tyson Sommer looked really good
proud coach Westfall.
in head-to-head matchups at the recent
Nate Morse has wrestled him many

Athens gives
Stratford a fight

TIGHT MATCH-Nate Morse of Athens and David Marquardt of Stratford wrestle a


competive match. The two juniors have competed against each several times in their
high school careers, but this time Morse beat Marquardt with a 6-3 decision.
times; that match is just recurring
over the years because they are always
wrestling each other, Westfall said.
Nate got beat by him the first time
they wrestled last year, and then Nate
got beat by him. Then Nate beat him
in the conference championships and
regionals, and then they didnt meet in
sectionals.
The dual began with Stratford sophomore Jake Drexler receiving a forfeit
at 113 pounds and Tigers sophomore
A.J. Schoenfuss getting a forfeit at 120.
The varsity wrestling action then
began with Stratford sophomore Jeremy Schoenherr pinning Jonathan
Albrecht of Athens in 2:35 to remain
undefeated this season.
In the next match, Stratford freshman Derek Marten was disqualified
for injuring Athens sophomore Kevin
Albrecht. Marten slammed Kevin Albrecht down onto the mat, where Kevin Albrecht laid motionless with an

apparent neck injury while paramedics attended to him. He was eventually


transported to the hospital.
Schwabe felt bad for Kevin Albrecht.
There was an unfortunate situation
early in the match where one of their
kids got hurt, so God bless him and
hopefully he is alright, Schwabe said.
We came out a little flat after kind of
feeling bad for the kid, but there are no
excuses, Athens came out and wrestled
us tough and it turned out to be a great
dual.
Kevin Albrecht suffered a stinger,
which is a painful nerve injury, but he
will be fine. Westfall was unsure how
well his team would wrestle after one
of their teammates got injured.
With the way Kevin got hurt, I
didnt know if that would be a good or
bad thing because the kids sat around
for a long time, but they really rose to
the occasion and wrestled well, he
said. Even the kids who got pinned

See WRESTLING SHOWDOWN/ page 12

SPORTS CALENDAR
Thursday, January 14
Athens - Girls basketball at Rib
Lake, 7:30 p.m.; wrestling vs. Auburndale, 7 p.m.
Edgar - Wrestling vs. Marathon, 7
p.m.
Marathon - Girls basketball vs.
Assumption, 7:15 p.m.; wrestling at
Edgar, 7 p.m.
Stratford - Wrestling vs. Pittsville,
7 p.m.

Friday, January 15
Athens - Boys basketball at Rib
Lake, 7:30 p.m.

Edgar - Girls basketball vs. Prentice, 6 p.m.; boys basketball vs.


Prentice, 7:15 p.m.
Marathon - Boys basketball at
Assumption, 7:15 p.m.
Stratford - Boys basketball vs.
Northland Lutheran, 6 p.m.; girls
basketball vs. Northland Lutheran,
7:30 p.m.

Saturday, January 16
Athens - Wrestling at Ladysmith
tourney, 9:30 a.m.
Edgar - Wrestling at Chippewa
Falls tourney, 9:30 a.m.

Monday, January 18
Athens - Boys basketball vs.
Chequamegon, 7:30 p.m.
Edgar - Girls basketball at OwenWithee, 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, January 19
Athens - Girls basketball vs.
Chequamegon, 7:30 p.m.
Edgar - Boys basketball vs. Marathon, 7:15 p.m.
Marathon - Girls basketball vs.
Pitttsville, 7:15 p.m.; boys basketball
at Edgar, 7:15 p.m.
Stratford - Girls basketball vs.
Newman Catholic, 7:15 p.m.

Page 12

January 13, 2016

The Record-Review

SPORTS
BOWLING SCORES

Marathon City
Sports Center

PRIDE
JANUARY 4, 2016
Mens high game: Mark Henrichs, 277; mens high series:
Jim Moore, 726. Womens high
game and series: Christele Hall,
150, 392.
TEAM STANDINGS
Werner Insurance
19
1
Edgar Lanes
16
4
Edgar Lanes PS
13.5 6.5
Pro-Plow
13
7
Chads Auto Repair
7 13
Edgar Lanes II
6.5 13.5
BSs Bar & Grill
4 16
Edgar Lanes III
1 19

SATURDAY NIGHT COUPLES


JANUARY 9, 2016
Mens high game and series:
Larry Stuhr, 255, 709; womens
high game and series: Julie Volhard, 276, 682.
TEAM STANDINGS
The Four STs
13
7
4 Muskateers
12
8
Town & Country
11
9
L&L
10 10
Biscuits & Gravy
8 12
Cougar Camp
6 14

MONDAY NIGHT LADIES


JANUARY 4, 2016
High game and series: Jody
Davis, 195, 531.
TEAM STANDINGS
Edgar Lanes
38 26
Boehm Insurance
35 29
The Foxy Four
33 31
Werner Insurance
32 32
Pro-Plow
32 32
Advantage Community 22 42

WEDNESDAY NIGHT LADIES


JANUARY 6, 2016
High game: Cheryl Bettin, 219;
high series: Vicky Witberler, 537.
TEAM STANDINGS
Brickner Motors
42 30
Marathon Cheese
40 32
Myszka Oil Co.
37.5 34.5
Marathon City SP
37 35
Village Inn
37 35
Peoples State Bank
36 36
Red Woof Pet Resort 31.5 40.5
Bowling Chicks
27 45

Jans 11th Frame

MONDAY NIGHT LADIES


JANUARY 4, 2016
High game and series: Lindsey
Heier, 165, 449.
TEAM STANDINGS
Weiler Electric
33.5 22.5
KBV
28.5 23.5
Ladies With Balls
26 30
Just Us
25 31
Pro-Plow
23 29
TUESDAY TWO-HOUSE
JANUARY 5, 2016
High game and series: Brian Ellenbecker, 279, 672.
TEAM STANDINGS
11th Frame
7 1
Nubbys Service
7 1
Memory Lanes 2
6 2
S.D. Ellenbecker
5 3
Memory Lanes 1
4 4
Switlick & Sons
4 4
Rothenberger Custom
3 5
Schreiner Trucking
2 6
Agri-Service Center
1 7
M&M Bakery
1 7
THURSDAY 3-MAN
JANUARY 10, 2016
High game: Doug Brodziski,
242, high series: Keith Weiler,
651.
TEAM STANDINGS
Fischer Transp.
33 7
Here 4 Beer
28.5 11.5
SD Ellenbecker
22 18
Jans 11th Frame
21 19
WWE
20 20
Bunkelmans Sugar
13 27
Peter Trucking
13 27
Ds Liquor Box
9.5 30.5

Memory Lanes

WEDNESDAY NIGHT LADIES


JANUARY 6, 2016
High game and series: Jane
Schaefer, 244, 626.
TEAM STANDINGS
Athens IGA
45.5 22.5
Burger Construction 38 30
Haines Trucking
27.5 40.5
Memory Lanes
25 43

Edgar Lanes

MONDAY NIGHT 3-PERSON

WEDNESDAY WILDCAT
LEAGUE
JANUARY 6, 2016
High game: Jim Moore, 258;
high series: Tracy Schreiber,
735.
TEAM STANDINGS
Brandons Farm
37
23
Edgar Lanes PS
35.5 24.5
Edgar Lanes
35.5 24.5
Edgar Lanes II
31
29
Edgar Lanes III
30
30
Boehm Insurance
28
32
Amity Screening
23.5 36.5
Round of Mulligans 19.5 40.5
WEDNESDAY NIGHT LATE
LEAGUE
JANUARY 6, 2016
High game: Larry VanArk, 256;
high series: Mike Czech, 629.
TEAM STANDINGS
Werner Insurance
39
9
Boehm Insurance 33.5 14.5
Werner Insurance 2 27
21
Werner Insurance 1 21
27
Edgar IGA
14.5 33.5
Brandons Farm Serv 9
39
THURSDAY NIGHT
LADIES
JANUARY 10, 2016
High game and series: Aleena
Lepak, 235, 651.
TEAM STANDINGS
Tac-Force
35 25
Denfeld Construction 34 26
Werner Insurance
31 29
Edgar Lanes
31 29
EdgarLanes.com
28 32
Ontogeny Ad & Design 21 39
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
JANUARY 10, 2016
Mens high game and series:
Keith Niemann, 264, 662; womens high game: Erin Niewolny,
195; womens high series: Kim
Halama, 468.
TEAM STANDINGS
Hoo Care!
22
6
Soooo Close
21
7
Da Farmers
15 13
Chads Auto Repair 14.5 13.5
Split For Brains
12 16
Team America
11.5 16.5
No Excuses
11 17
One More Time
4 24

Edwin Memorial
Lanes

BUDWEISER AMERICAN
JANUARY 7, 2016
Mens high game: Dane
Stroetz, 300; mens high series:
Pat Breu, 719.
TEAM STANDINGS
The Shack
23
7
Legend Seeds
23
7
Stroetz Tax & Acct.
18 12
Westside Autobody
16 14
Beinings Garage
14 16
EML
12 18
Shack II
7 23
Buck-a-neer
7 23
BUDWEISER NATIONAL
JANUARY 11, 2016
High game and series: Ryan
Kurtz, 279, 793.
TEAM STANDINGS
Bangart Racing
321.5 188.5
Central Culvert
308 202
Beinings Garage
288 222
Strobel Harvesting 264.5 245.5
Teska Trucking
251.5 258.5
Jive Turkeys
243 267
Chips Restaurant
202 308
Cross-Eyed Crick. 161.5 348.5
EML STRIKERS
JANUARY 12, 2016
Mens high game and series:
Mike Berdan, 279, 713; womens high game: Connie Treankler-Pretsch, 209; womens
high series: Joann Bangart, 566.
TEAM STANDINGS
Nasonville Dairy
324 208
Weinfurtner Const. 296.5 234.5
Westside Service 2 296.5235.5
Westside Service 1 261.5 270.5
Sceeter & Otis
260 272
Bowler Bares
240.5 291.5
Rembs
235 297
UltraCom
213 319
MIDWEEK MIXED
JANUARY 6, 2015
Mens high games: Al Landwehr
and Jeff Spindler, 255; mens
high series: Jeff Spindler, 642.
Womens high game and series:
Sherry Kraus, 192, 479.
TEAM STANDINGS
Pioneer Bank
44 24
Financial Strategies
39 29
B & I Lumber
39 29
Weiler Dairy
37 31
Mar By
36 32
Watering Trough
35 33
Ultra Com
20.5 47.5
YOUTH LEAGUE
JANUARY 9, 2016
Boys high game and series:
Eli Drexler, 212, 598; girls high
game and series: Taylor Purgett,
208, 502.
TEAM STANDINGS
The High Rollers
34 22
The X-Factors
33 23
The Tigers
27 29
The King Pins
26 30
The Spare Shooters 20 36
The Super Strikers
20 36
JUNIOR LEAGUE
JANUARY 9, 2016
Boys high game and series:
Thomas Bangart, 104, 301; girls
high game and series: Riley
Mueller, 114, 306.
TEAM STANDINGS
The High Rollers
35 21
The Spare Shooters 21 35

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KAM IN CHARGE-Stratford junior Kamren Bornbach wrestles Athens senior Tannor


Frahm Jan. 7. Bornbach won with an 18-3 technical fall, to help the Tigers to a 41-31
match win against the Bluejays in Athens.

Wrestling showdown
Continued from page 11
did really well in their matches.
Other wins for Athens were sophomore Klay Ellenbecker winning a 15-7
decision against Stratford sophomore
Jordan Becker at 138 pounds, and
sophomore Marshall Westfall pinning
Dylan Schoenherr in 1:49 at 170.
Stratfords other wins were senior
Sam Wenzel pinning sophomore Andy
Nowacki in 3:02 at 145 pounds, and
junior Kamren Bornbach winning
an 18-3 technical fall against Tannor
Frahm.

Tigers win Evergreen Invite


Stratford easily won the Fred Lehrke
Evergreen Invitational team title Saturday by scoring 487 points, which was
172 points higher than second-place
Denmark.
Champions for Stratford included
Manny Drexler (10-0) at 106 pounds,
Jake Drexler (22-2) at 113, Jeremy
Schoenherr (25-0) at 126, Marten (21-5)
at 132, Jordan Becker (18-1) at 138, Wenzel (20-3) at 145, Mason Kauffman (25-0)
at 152 and Bornbach (24-1) at 182.
Second-place finishers were A.J.
Schoenfuss (23-2) at 120 pounds, Dilan
Dehlinger (3-1) at 126 and Tyson Kauffman (22-3) at 285.
Third-place finishers were Marquardt (17-6) at 160 pounds, Giebel (158) at 195 and Aguirre (4-6) at 220.

Bluejays finish 3-2


Athens competed in five matches

during Saturdays Neillsville/Greenwood/Loyal tournament.


The Bluejays won three matches, 5428, against Wausau East, 51-30 against
Manawa, and 40-39 against Nekoosa/
Assumption/Port Edwards.
Athens wrestlers that finished with
5-0 tournament records to win their
weight classes were Klay Ellenbecker
at 138, Morse at 160, Westfall at 170 and
Sommer at 285.

Wildcats beat Apaches


Edgar picked up a big 45-22 Marawood Conference road match win Jan.
6 at Auburndale.
Wildcats scoring pins were Jake Lepinski over Matt Leich in four minutes and 53 seconds at 113 pounds and
Bryce Imhoff over Samuel Hasenohrl
in 1:33 at 182. Edgars other win was Ty
Guden with a 3-2 decision against Isaiah Hasenohrl.
Both teams forfeited at 106 and 132
pounds. Edgars Dawson Lemmer,
Colton Heil, Will Raatz, Alex Lemanski and Kade Schraufnagel received forfeits. Auburndales Kaleb Bolder also
received a forfeit.
Auburndales wins came from
Trayton Weister pinning Martin Sanattchieu at 120 pounds in 5:46, Dylan
Altmann with a 10-0 major decision
win against Brock Handrick and
Keller Wolfe pinning Cade Littleton in
five minutes.

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Page 13

Streets
Continued from page 1
In other business:
 Board members approved a request from Keith Baumgartner to allow the Edgar Baseball Association to
install plaques or signs on two baseball
fields under construction to recognize
a major donor.
He told the board his association has
raised $88,000 in monetary and in-kind
donations so far to pay for the two extra little league baseball fields. The association needs an extra $50,000 to complete the project, he said. Baumgartner
said area businesses will be contacted
to generate the needed funds.
I expect that we will get that
$50,000, he said.
Board
members
congratulated

Baumgartner for bringing his project


to reality.
Sounds like it is going good, said
trustee Paul Skimp Schilling.
 Four candidates were nominated
for three open trustee seats in the April
5 election at a village caucus. The candidates are incumbents Paul Schilling
and Cathy Schueller, along with Ken
Goodwin and Randy Koehler. Koehler
was not present at the caucus and
needs to file nomination paperwork to
become a candidate.
 Board members voted to use a $500
Community Planting Program grant
for planting trees in the village.

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Athens Village Hall


221 Caroline Street
Athens, Wisconsin
January 27, 2016 6:00 p.m.
The village board of the village of Athens will conduct a public
hearing regarding its proposed application for Community Development Block GrantPublic Facilities (CDBG-PF) and the CD
BG-Public Facilities for Economic Development (CDBG-PFED)
funds on January 27, 2016, at 6:00 p.m. The public is invited
to attend to learn about the CDBG program, to help identify additional community development needs, and to comment on the
activities proposed to be included in the CDBG applications.
The agenda for the public hearing is as follows:
1. Identification of total potential funds
2. Eligible CDBG activities
3. Presentation of identified community development needs
4. Identification of any community development needs by
public
5. Presentation of activities proposed for CDBG application,
including potential residential displacement
6. Citizen input regarding proposed and other CDBG activities
Residents of the village of Athens are encouraged to attend,
especially residents with low to moderate incomes.
The meeting room is handicapped accessible. Persons needing additional accommodations should contact the village clerks
office at (715) 257-9170.
Publication Date: January 13, 2016
Lisa Czech, Clerk
WNAXLP 2-177511

Receipt Books
Posters
Rafe Tickets
Pens, Stampers, etc.?

Well get the


job done!

TP Printing
715-223-2342
www.centralwinews.com

2-177495

103 W. Spruce St.,


Abbotsford

The Marathon Legion Post 469 recently donated to the Marathon/Edgar Circle of
Joy. Pictured are, left to right, seated: Darlene Berg, Darlene Hurtis, Lynn Schlagel and Jeanne Heidmann; back row: Legion member Don Southworth, Sandy
Sekorski, Kelly Stoffel, Jane Thompson, Kathleen Hack, Legion members Duane
Handrick and Roger Grell.

PUBLIC NOTICES

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF ATHENS


ANNUAL NOTICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION REFERRAL
AND EVALUATION PROCEDURES CHILD FIND NOTICE
Upon request, the School District of Athens is required to evaluate a child for eligibility for special education services. A request for
evaluation is known as a referral. When the district receives a referral, the district will appoint an Individualized Education Program
(IEP) team to determine if the child has a disability, and if the child
needs special education services. The district locates, identifies and
evaluates all children with disabilities who are enrolled by their parents in private (including religious) schools, elementary schools and
secondary schools located in the school district.
A physician, nurse, psychologist, social worker or administrator of
a social agency who reasonably believes a child brought to him or
her for services is a child with a disability, has a legal duty to refer
the child, including a homeless child, to the school district in which
the child resides. Before referring the child, the person making the
referral must inform the childs parent that the referral will be made.
Others, including parents, who reasonably believe a child is a
child with a disability may also refer the child, including a homeless
child, to the school district in which the child resides.
Referrals must be in writing and include the reason why the person believes the child is a child with a disability. A referral may be
made by contacting Jason Haluska, School Psychologist, School
District of Athens, at 715-257-7571, ext. 229 or ext. 107, or by writing
to him at P.O. Box 190, Athens, WI 54411.
2-177504
WNAXLP

Happy Birthday,
Happy Anniversary,
Happy Whatever!

Helping the Circle of Joy

PUBLIC NOTICES
VOTING BY ABSENTEE BALLOT

Any qualified elector who is unable or unwilling to appear at the polling place on Election Day may
request to vote an absentee ballot. A qualified elector is any U.S. citizen, who will be 18 years of age
or older on Election Day, who has resided in the ward or municipality where he or she wishes to vote
for at least 28 consecutive days before the election. The elector must also be registered in order to
receive an absentee ballot. Proof of identification must be provided before an absentee ballot may
be issued.
You must make a request for absentee ballot in writing.
Contact your municipal clerk and request that an application (GAB-121 form) for an absentee ballot be sent to you for the primary or election or both. An application can also be obtained from the
Government Accountability Board website: http://gab.wi.gov/forms/gab-121. You may also submit a
written request in the form of a letter. Your written request must list your voting address within the
municipality where you wish to vote, the address where the absentee ballot should be sent, if different, and your signature. You may make application for an absentee ballot by mail or in person.
Making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail
The deadline for making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail is:
5 p.m. on the fifth day before the election, Thursday, February 11, 2016.
Note: Special absentee voting application provisions apply to electors who are indefinitely confined to home or a care facility, in the military, hospitalized, or serving as a sequestered juror. If this
applies to you, contact the municipal clerk regarding deadlines for requesting and submitting an
absentee ballot.
Voting an absentee ballot in person
You may also request and vote an absentee ballot in the clerks office or other specified location
during the days and hours specified for casting an absentee ballot in person.
Towns
Bern: Debora Auner, clerk, 6159 Cty Rd. M, Athens, WI 54411. 715-560-0864, by appointment
only: Monday-Friday, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. February 1-5, 2016; Tuesday-Friday, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. February
9-11, 2016; Friday, February 12, 2016, 3 p.m.-5 p.m.
Cassel: Mary Kay Hagenbucher, clerk, 3398 Eagle Lane, Marathon, WI 54448. (715) 352-3113,
call for appointment Monday-Friday 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. February 1-5; Monday-Thursday, February
8-11, 2016; Friday, February 12, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Cleveland: Phyllis Schnelle, clerk, C2070 Rock Road, Stratford, WI 54484. (715) 687-3561, call
for an appointment Monday, Wednesday & Friday, February 1, 3, 5, 8, 10 & 12, 2016, from 1 p.m.-5
p.m.; Tuesday & Thursday, February 2, 4, 9 & 11, 2016, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Emmet: Gerry Fitzgerald, clerk, 402 County Road S, Mosinee, WI 54455. (715) 693-2847, call
for appointment Monday, February 1, Tuesday, February 2, Thursday, February 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Monday, February 8, Tuesday, February 9, Thursday, February 11, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Friday, February
12, Noon-5 p.m.
Frankfort: Kelly Wussow, clerk, F1824 County Road N, Edgar, WI 54426. (715) 302-5217, contact
clerk for appointment between hours of 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, February 1-11,
2016; Friday, February 12, 2016, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Halsey: Annette Kremsreiter, clerk, 446 E. County Road F, Athens, WI 54411. (715) 257-9363,
contact clerk for appointment Monday through Thursday, between the hours of 8 a.m.-7 p.m., February 1-11; Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., February 12, 2016.
Hamburg: Dawn Czech, clerk, 16155 5th Lane, Athens, WI 54411. (715) 536-3638, Monday Friday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., February 1-5; Monday-Thursday, February 8-11, 2016; Friday, February 12,
2016, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Johnson: Marilyn K. Bhend, clerk, 1961 County Road A, Athens, WI 54411. (715) 257-7005,
contact clerk for appointment between the hours of 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday-Friday, February 1-5
& February 8-12, 2016.
Marathon: Kelley Blume, clerk, 3684 Marathon Road, Marathon, WI 54448. (715) 443-3082, contact clerk for an appointment during specified hours. Tuesday-Friday, 3 p.m.-5 p.m., February 2-5;
Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.- Noon, February 8-11; Friday, 3 p.m.- 5 p.m., February 12, 2016.
Rib Falls: Cindy Beaty, clerk, 359 E. 18th Street, Marathon, WI 54448. (715) 680-0694, contact
clerk for an appointment between 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Monday-Friday, February 1-5, 8-11, 2016; Friday,
February 12, 2016, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Rietbrock: Laurie J. Miller, clerk. R5010 Pioneer Road, Athens, WI 54411. (715) 257-9980, contact clerk for appointment between 8 a.m-7 p.m., Monday-Friday, February 1-5 & February 8-12,
2016.
Wien: Diane Drinsinger, clerk, W4302 County Road M, Edgar, WI 54426. (715) 352-2252, contact
clerk for an appointment between the hours of 9 a.m.-7 p.m., Monday through Friday, February 1-11;
Friday, February 12, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Villages
Athens: Lisa Czech, clerk, 221 Caroline St., P.O. Box 220, Athens, WI 54411. 715-257-9170,
Monday thru Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., February 1-5 & 8-12, 2016; Friday, February 12, 2016 by appointment only between the hour of 4 p.m.-5 p.m.
Edgar: Louella Luedtke, clerk secretary, 224 S. 3rd Avenue, P.O. Box 67, Edgar, WI 54426. 715352-2891, Monday thru Thursday, February 1-11, 2016, 8:15 a.m.-4:45 p.m., Friday, 8:15 a.m.-5
p.m., February 12, 2016.
Marathon: Andrew R. Kurtz, administrator/clerk. 311 Walnut St., Marathon, WI 54448. 715-4432221, absentee voting will be allowed during normal business hours, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.,
February 1-5 & 8-12, 2016.
Stratford: June Krueger, clerk, 265 N. 3rd Ave., P.O. Box 12, Stratford, WI 54484. 715-687-4166,
Monday thru Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., February 1-5 & 8-11, 2016; Friday, February 12, 2016, 8 a.m.5 p.m.
The first day to vote an absentee ballot in the municipal clerks office is:
Monday, February 1, 2016
The last day to vote an absentee ballot in the municipal clerks office is:
Friday, February 12, 2016
No in-person absentee voting may occur on a weekend or legal holiday.
The municipal clerk will deliver voted ballots returned on or before Election Day to the proper
polling place or counting location before the polls close on Tuesday, February 16, 2016. Any ballots
received after the polls close will be counted by the board of canvassers if postmarked by election
day and received no later than 4:00 p.m. on the Friday following the election.
2-177510 WNAXLP

Page 14

January 13, 2016

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Marathon
COMMUNITY LIVING

Send Marathon news to:


RR@tpprinting.com
phone: 715-223-2342
fax: 715-223-3505
P.O. Box 677
103 West Spruce Street
Abbotsford, WI 54405

SCHOOL LUNCH
Marathon Public
Schools
Monday, Jan. 18: Corn dog,
fish square/bun, steamed peas
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Salisbury
steak, mashed potatoes/gravy,
green beans
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Orange
chicken, rice pilaf, Oriental
vegetables
Thursday, Jan. 21: Brat/bun,
baked beans, coleslaw
Friday, Jan. 22: Chicken
noodle soup, ham/bun, turkey/
bun

Public library
The Marathon County
Public Library will host a
Family LEGO Club from
3:30-4:30 p.m. beginning on
Jan. 19 at the MCPL Marathon City Branch Library,
515 Washington St., Marathon City. The club is free
and open to the public, with
no registration required
and all LEGOs provided.
The club will also meet Feb.
16, March 15, April 19 and
May 17, at the same time.
For more information, call
715-443-2775.

Lunches served with fruit,


salad bar and milk.

St. Marys School


Monday, Jan. 18: Chicken
patty/bun, potato wedges,
applesauce, Fruit by the Foot
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Salisbury
steak w/gravy, mashed potatoes,
peas, roll, fruit cocktail
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Taco
w/fixings, Fritos, refried beans,
mandarin oranges
Thursday, Jan. 21: Grilled
ham and cheese, French fries,
veggie tray, banana
Friday, Jan. 22: Pizza sticks
with marinara sauce, pineapple

Coloring book
The Marathon County Historical Society is planning
to create a Marathon County
Times and Scenes coloring
book. The public is invited to
participate.
The coloring book will reflect scenes from Marathon
Countys history through todays local culture. Illustrations will include the areas
natural scenic beauty, local
architectural landmarks both
past and present, close-ups
and sweeping vistas, downtown and rural scenes.
Anyone age 12 and older may
submit black and white line
drawings by late February for
consideration to be included.
For more information, contact Sandy Block, Outreach
and Program coordinator at
the Marathon County Historical Society, by email at
sblock@marathoncountyhis

Eagle Scout ceremony


An Eagle Scout ceremony was held for Silas Beranek, Marathon, on Saturday attended by family
and friends. Pictured are, left to right, Satchel Beranek, brother of Silas and an Eagle Scout, Scott
Beranek, uncle of Silas and an Eagle Scout, Saul Beranek, brother of Silas and Webelo Scout, Dave
Beranek, father of Silas and an Eagle Scout, Silas Beranek, Eagle Scout, Lara Beranek, mother,
Mira Beranek, sister, and Mike Beranek, uncle of Silas and an Eagle Scout. The Beranek family now
has six Eagle Scouts. A cousin to Silas, Josh Beranek and son of Mike Beranek, is not pictured.
tory.org or by phone at 715-8425750 (generally available Tuesdays through Thursdays).

St. Marys School


St. Marys School, Marathon, will participate in upcoming competitions.
Students will participate

in the NERR academic competition to be held Tuesday,


Jan. 19, 1 p.m. at St. Josephs
School, Stratford.
The school will compete in
the Brains and Brawn contest
in La Crosse on Saturday, Jan.
30.

Blood drive
The Blood Center of Northcentral Wisconsin will have a
blood drive from 4-7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 18, at the Marathon
village hall.

On campus

Lunches served with fruit,


salad bar and milk.
Five Marathon students
have been named to the deans
list at UW-La Crosse for the
fall semester of the 2015-16
academic year.
The students and their majors are Emily Kind, biology;
Chelsey Sloan, undeclared;
Nadine Switlick, therapeutic
recreation; Keely Vetter, public administration; Shanna
Weber, chemistry.
Dayton Hamann, Marathon,
was named to the UW-Milwau-

See MARATHON/ page 15

SOMEONE IN MARATHON YOU SHOULD KNOW...

Brandon Skrzypchak
WHERE WERE YOU BORN
AND RAISED?
I grew up in Rib Mountain on
CTH NN right by St. Andrews
Church.
HOW LONG HAVE YOU
BEEN IN MARATHON?
Thirteen years.
WHAT DO YOU DO IN MARATHON?
I have been a member of the
American Legion Post for nine

years. In September, I was


named post commander.
THE LEGION DOES A LOT
FOR MARATHON.
We have 130 members and a
very strong presence in the community. Last year, we gave back
$28,000 to the Marathon area.
We support the schools, softball
and baseball teams, the Boy
Scouts, Fun Days and people
who are in need.

ARE YOU STILL IN THE MILITARY?


Yes, I am a member of the 86th
Training Division at Fort McCoy. I
have served 17 years in the National Guard and Army Reserve.
TELL US ABOUT YOUR
FAMILY?
I am married, and we have two
daughters, ages 7 and 10.

Do you know someone in Marathon people should know? Call us at 715-223-2342.

HISTORY
CORNER
THE RECORD-REVIEW
Wednesday Jan. 17, 1990
St. Marys sixth-graders win
The St. Marys, Marathon,
fifth grade boys played the
St. Marys, Marathon, sixth
grade boys on Monday, Jan. 8.
The fame counted in the
Wausau Catholic Basketball
Conference standings.
After clinging to a 16-14
lead going into the final quarter, the St. Marys sixth grade
boys battled to post a 26-19
victory against the fifth graders. Andy Wilichowski led the
sixth grade with 10 points.

THE RECORD-REVIEW

January 13, 2016

Page 15

Marathon
Continued from page 14

kee deans list with a 4.0 grade point


average for the first semester of the
2015-16 school year.

St. Matthews
St. Matthews Church, Marathon,
has announced upcoming events.
There will be a worship service with
holy communion 7 p.m. on Saturday,
Jan. 16.
On Sunday, Jan. 17, there will be 9
a.m. Sunday school and Bible class
followed by a 10 a.m. worship service
with holy communion.
There will be a 3:30-5:30 p.m. catechism class and 6:30 p.m. Bible instruction class on Wednesday, Jan. 20.

Zion/St. Johns
Zion Lutheran Church and St. Johns
Lutheran Church, town of Rib Falls,
have announced
upcoming activities.
The
Zion
Church
Council meets on
Thursday, Jan.
14, in the church
basement at 7
p.m. There will
be worship on
Sunday, Jan. 17,
9 a.m. at Zion.
Sunday School
Tim and Mary
is at 9:30 a.m.
Gurlea
The Zion annual
meeting will be
at 10 a.m. Adult Bible Class continues
its study of Worship on Tuesday, Jan.
19, at 7 p.m. in the St. Johns church
basement.
Catechism class meets
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 4:30 p.m. at St.
Johns. The St. Johns Church Council
will meet Thursday, Jan. 21, at 7 p.m.

New pastor
Rib Falls Methodist Church welcomed a new spiritual leader on Sunday, Jan. 3. Tim Gurlea, a licensed lay
speaker, has accepted an appointment
to serve this rural church. He succeeds
Steve Booher, who retired at the end of
2015 after 39 years and three months of
service. Tim Gurlea and his wife, Mary,
come from Stevens Point. Both have

Free throw contest

The Knights of Columbus held a basketball free throw contest on Sunday at St. Marys School, Marathon. The winners are,
left to right, front row: Madisyn Lang, 9G; Kali Prihoda, 10G; Delany Lang, 11G; Allison Wokatsch, 12G; Kaitlyn Rusch, 13G;
Kyli Blume, 14G; back row: Deputy Grand Knight Andy Krautkramer, Payton Lawrence, 9B; Mason Seehafer, 10B; John Stoffel, 11 B; Dalton Lang, 12B; Dawson Lang, 13B; and Grand Knight Joe Chesak.
been active in the Walk to Emmaus
program and in United Methodist outreach programs, packing aid supplies
for countries like Haiti and Thailand.
The Sunday, Jan. 3, service included
communion, with Methodist district
superintendent Forrest Wells presiding, and a sermon by Tim Gurlea. A
brunch and fellowship hour followed
the service.

Genealogy
The Marathon County Historical
Society will present German Geneal-

ogy as its next History Speaks topic


at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 23, at the Woodson History Center, 410 McIndoe St.,
Wausau. Gary Gisselman will be the
presenter.
A German population has been part
of Marathon County since the county
formed. Immigrants came from all
parts of Germany to make their home
here in the Northwoods. This program
will present some hints, Internet sites,
and research tools to enable participants to trace their German family
tree.

Little Rose Riders

Ask The Doctor


BY

1 & 2 BR Apt. Homes AVAILABLE

Noelle O. Marks D.D.S.

Gibson Estates - S. Gibson Street, Medford

Presented as a service to the community by

Dr. Noelle O. Marks D.D.S.


Dr. Jeremy M. Hoffman D.D.S.

Appliances, spacious rooms, walk-in closet, in-unit


W/D, secured entrance, garage, deck/patio & utilities
(heat, sewer, water & trash removal) included.

715-443-2200

A PRIMER ON X-RAYS
Q. Why does my dentist take x-rays?
A. The x-ray is a vital tool for the dentist. X-rays, of course, let the dentist see
whats not visible to the naked eye. For example, your dentist uses x-rays to view
the root, that part of the tooth that is submerged in the gum. In the case of a new
patient, the dentist will want to take a set of x-rays to establish a baseline of a
persons mouth to be used in future evaluations. And the dentist may periodically
use x-rays during a regular visit to screen for decay.
Both the American Dental Association and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have set guidelines for the use of x-rays. The main ADA rule is that dentists
should use them only when necessary. The frequency of x-rays will depend on
the details of an individual patients case. You and your dentist can work out
an x-ray schedule thats appropriate for your planned treatment. That schedule
will vary according to your age, your risk of disease and the symptoms of your
condition.
As with all aspects of dentistry - and other healthcare fields - technology and
techniques have improved considerably over the years. Talk with your dentist for
more information about x-rays and how they play into his plans for your treatment.

595- 715/mo.

Call Carla TODAY!!

TF-500242

981 Blue Stone Lane, Marathon

New Patients Welcome!

Discovering information about German ancestors can provide a person


with a sense of their own history. This
is another in a continuing series of
programs on searching your family
tree presented by the Marathon County Historical Society.
There is no admission fee; however,
donations are appreciated. Registration is not required. For more information, call the Marathon County Historical Society at 715-842-5750.

715-340-2331
S.C. SWIDERSKI, LLC
www.scswiderski.com

Chili Feed
Saturday, January 16

EEau Pl
Pleine
i Town Hall

Serving 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

EP410 Equity St., Stratford


1.5 miles north of Hwy. 153 on Cty. E
$5.00 in Advance Door s
ze
$7.00 at the Door Pri Cash
Prizes
8 & Under Free

For information, call


715-506-0123 715-897-0503

2-177434

Visit
us
on
the
web!
www.centralwinews.com
or www.facebook.com/centralwinews

2-177215

The Record-Review - Your Community News Source

Page 16

January 13, 2016

The Record-Review

Stratford
COMMUNITY LIVING

Send Stratford news to:


RR@tpprinting.com
phone: 715-223-2342
fax: 715-223-3505
P.O. Box 677
103 West Spruce Street
Abbotsford, WI 54405

SCHOOL LUNCH
Stratford Public
School
Monday, Jan. 18: Chili soup,
PBJs, tropical fruit
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Quesadilla,
Romaine salad, apple slices
Wednesday, Jan. 20: French
toast, sausage, cauliflower, juice
cups
Thursday, Jan. 21: Chicken
nuggets, baked beans, mixed
fruit
Friday, Jan. 22: No school

Daddy Date Night


The second-annual Daddy
Date Night Snowflake Ball
will be held from 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 23, at the Country
Aire Banquet Hall at F1312
Hwy. P in rural Stratford.
The event is a magical evening filled with dessert and
dancing for father figures and
their special girls. There is a
fee and girls of all ages are
welcomed.
Music will be provided by
Rock the Flock Mobile DJ Services. Dress attire is encouraged.
Those interested in attending this event should pre-register for the event by Saturday, Jan. 16. To register, they
can visit themill.church/
events or contact Stephany at
715-391-1010 or at stephany@
themill.church.

Steak feed
The Stratford VFW will
continue to have steak feeds
on the first Tuesday of each
month throughout 2016.
The next steak feed will be
held from 4:30-8 p.m. Feb. 2 at
the Stratford VFW clubhouse.
People who want takeout
food should call 715-687-3114.

Chili Feed
The Little Rose Riders
Snowmobile Club will have a
chili feed from 11 a.m. until
5 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 16 at

Lunches served with milk.

St. Josephs School

Voice of Democracy
A Voice of Democracy contest was sponsored by the Stratford VFW and Auxiliary 6352, open to students
in ninth through 12th grades who gave a three to five minute speech. Pictured, from left to right, are Betty
Southworth, third-place winner Alexis Lappe, second-place winner Kylah Wenzel and John A. Southworth.
First-place winner Heather Greenberg is not present in the picture.
the Eau Pleine town hall located at EP410 Equity Street
in rural Stratford.

Pancake breakfast
The Stratford VFW will
have a Honor Flight pancake breakfast from 8 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 24,
to support the Never Forgotten Honor Flight, at the VFW
clubhouse.
Breakfast includes potato
and regular pancakes, scrambled eggs, cheese curds, sausage, coffee and milk. There
is a fee. There is a fee.
Matching funds of the proceeds will be provided up to
$500 by Catholic Financial

Life Chapter #309 of Marshfield.


There will be a basket raffle for a special autographed
Green Bay Packers football
from the first world championship in 1965.

Continuing Education
Stratford Continuing Education is offering classes.
Yoga 4 Everybody will be
held from 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays from Jan. 27-March 13 at
a to be determined site.
Paint
Away
Workshop
will take place from 7-9 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 11, at Zion Lutheran Church in Stratford.
A 20/20/20 class will be held

from 5:15-6:15 p.m. Sundays


from Feb. 21-March 24 in the
Stratford High School commons.
Yoga Body Bootcamp will
take place from 7:15-8 p.m.
Thursdays from March 3-May
5 at the town of Day hall in
Rozellville.
Zumba will be held from
6:15-7:15 p.m. Mondays from
March 25-June 27 in the Stratford High School commons.
People can sign up for
these classes by going to
www.mysignup.com/winter
spring2016-athn-gr nvly-hal
dr-rozell-spencr-strat. There
is a fee.
Anyone with questions
about the classes can e-mail

Monday, Jan. 18: Build a


burger, potato wedges, applesauce
Tuesday, Jan. 19: Mozz sticks,
corn, peaches
Wednesday, Jan. 20: Turkey
wrap, green beans, pears
Thursday, Jan. 21: Chicken
nuggets, pasta salad, broccoli,
mixed fruit
Friday, Jan. 22: No school
Lunches served with milk
and salad bar.

Linda at stratfordclasses@
gmail.com. People can also
visit the Stratford Continuing
Education website at http://
www.stratfordclasses.com,
or find them on Facebook at
http://www.facebook.com/
StratfordContinuingEducation.

Square dancing
The Marshfield HoeDowners Square Dance Club will
hold an open house from 7:309:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.
20, at the Lincoln Municipal

See STRATFORD/ page 17

SOMEONE IN STRATFORD YOU SHOULD KNOW...

Viola Untiedt
WHEN WERE YOU BORN?
I was born on Nov. 30, 1912. I recently turned 103 years old.

I was a clerk and the buyer of merchandise. We sold everything imaginable in the store.

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP?


My family moved to the United
States from Germany. I grew up in
the southern Minnesota town of Le
Sueur, where the Mayo brothers
who founded Mayo Clinic are also
from. I spoke German as a child and
then learned English when I attended school.

WHAT ABOUT YOUR FAMILY?


I had two brothers growing up. I
moved to the Stratford area and
married Norman Untiedt in 1948.
We operated an 80-acre dairy farm
in the town of Cleveland. We have
one child, Paul, who I currently live
with in the village of Stratford.

WHERE DID YOU WORK


AFTER HIGH SCHOOL?
I worked in a variety store in Le
Sueur, from 1930 until 1948, where

WHAT INTERESTING THINGS


HAPPENED DURING WWI?
We brought fruit pits to school, so
the nitrates from the pits could be
extracted to use for ammunition.

Do you know someone from Stratford we should know? Call us at 715-223-2342.

HISTORY
CORNER
THE STRATFORD JOURNAL
Thursday, Jan. 14, 1971
Senior Citizens meet
The Senior Citizens met in
St. Josephs Hall Wednesday,
Jan. 6, with President Ezra
Brown presiding.
The pledge to the flag was
given and the birthday song
was sung for Mrs. Katie Meyer, Mrs. Martha Burkart, Ernest Pache and George Kohel.
Routine business was taken
care of.
A note of thanks for the
plant presented at the time of
the death of her husband and
for sympathy cards received
by Mrs. Harry Schoppenhorst
was read.

The Record-Review

January 13, 2016

Page 17

Stratford
Continued from page 16

LEGO Club night


The Marathon County Public Library Branch will host its Family
LEGO Club beginning Jan. 19.
The club will be held from 3:30-4:30
p.m. on the third Tuesday of each
month until June.

Card playing
Stratford residents can play cards
from 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays at the Stratford Community Hall.

An Outdoorsmans
Journal

Family Snow Shoe event


The Cold Feet! Warm Hearts! Snow
Shoe event will be held from Noon until 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 14 at Stratfords
Heritage Trail.
The event will take place at the
trailhead shelter located on Parkview
Drive in the Stratford Business/Industrial Park.
Attendees can bring their own snow
shoes, boots and sleds to enjoy the
trail, or reserve a pair of snow shoes
and let the experts from The Sports
Den in Marshfield provide a lesson on
how to snow shoe.
There will also be a bonfire. Brats
and hot dogs, and hot cocoa and cider
will be served.

By: Mark Walters

First
F
irs Ice? Fishing trip!

Hello friends,
Generally in Wisconsin, ice fishermen hit
our frozen lakes between mid-November
and early December. For most Wisconsin
hard water enthusiasts, first ice was not
until after Christmas.
My first ice fishing getaway was just completed and, by all accounts, it was extremely
successful. Please read further for details on
how to have a really good time in Wisconsin
when there is ice.
Friday, January 1
High 27, low 16
Chetac Lake, Sawyer County, covers
1,920 acres and has an abundant supply of
8-10 inch crappie as well as northern pike,
walleye, perch and bluegill.
Paul Bucher is my good buddy from Cum- Left to Right: Joey Dushek, Preston Johnson and
berland, who I try to have one or two fun out- Paul Bucher enjoying a January evening on Lake
Chetac.
ings a year with. Preston Johnson lives in Rice
Lake and is a lot of fun and a hardcore fisherman. Chris Schiefelbein lives on Lake Chetac and is
into catching fish and socializing with his pals. Chris
was our informant and found the fish for us the first
day there was somewhat safe ice on Chetac. Joey Dushek is my 22-year-old stepson, who is the young guy
in the group and, like the other guys, is very good at
catching crappie in 26 feet of water with electronics.
My official position is head Fun Master. I come up
with a date each year that everyone works around
for this trip, and I kind of suck at catching crappie in
deep water. So we are staying at a really nice home
on the water, whose very kind owners are snowbirds
(thank you). We are using four-wheelers to travel and
there is 4-5 inches of ice. We are fishing in my Eskimo
Fatfish which is about 13 feet by 8 feet, and literally is a cabin on the ice. For this trip we are breaking in a brand new Fatfish that is insulated and
everyone is impressed. After a three hour drive and
settling in, we hit the ice about 1:00 p.m. with a plan
of fishing until somewhere around midnight.
Today it is Paul, Joey, Chris and myself in the shack
with plenty of friends in nearby shacks. The crappie
action is steady but it is not a slaughter. Most of the
action is about 6 feet off the bottom in 26 feet of
water. We also have tip-ups out, that at first are set
Joey Dushek living the good life on
for gators and as day became night we switched over
Lake Chetac.
for walleye. Over the course of the weekend we caught
five snakes and no walleye.
Our comfortable abode is lit with propane lights that run off 20 pound cylinders and later in
the night Paul Bucher heated up scalloped potatoes and ham. At dark we had about 35 crappie
between the four of us that were all in the nine inch range. Mr. Schiefelbein likes to call them
lobsters of the lake. When we pulled tip-ups and headed to camp we had about seventy extremely tasty crappie between the four of us. If you were outside of our shack and listening, you
would pretty much hear nonstop laughter.
Saturday, January 2
High 32, low 19
Today, Preston joined our ranks. I probably should have charged the battery on my Vexilar, it showed the pretty colors but not my jig. We caught a lot of fish and we laughed a
lot. At one time I had a flag
and missed a small fish right
at the hole. Chris Bein was
watching the experience and,
as usual, verbally abused me.
Low and behold I had a line
hooked onto my tip-up and
though I had to pull really
A village of Eskimo ice shacks on Lake Chetac.
hard, I broke it off from the
tree that it must have been
snagged on.
Chris starts pulling in the other end and there is about a 24 inch snake on it and all the line
from someones tip-up. No ones flag went up so we figured it was a fish that had been hooked
a day or two earlier. When we showed the guys the set-up, Joey claimed it was his rig and I may
have put the entire spool into a very large mess. Joeys flag never went up and there was some
debate as to why that may have happened.
Well after dark I burned a precooked hot dish that had kind-of froze and even my dog would
not eat.
This trip is so much fun that we must return next year! Sunset

Deans list
Stacie Hartl of Stratford has been
named to the Deans list at St. Norbert
College for the fall semester.

Happy
Birthday,
Happy
Anniversary,
Happy
Whatever!
happy

For all the


things
you want to express
to someone,
well help you design an ad.

2-177542

Tribune-Phonograph
The Record-Review
Tribune-Record-Gleaner
Central Wisconsin Shopper

715-223-2342

ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS

36

centralwinews.com/online-subscriptions
Online subscription can only be purchased through our website

TP Printing Co.

103 W. Spruce St., Abbotsford | 715.223.2342

Stratford Building
Supply, Inc., Stratford

715-687-4125 1-800-261-4125
TF-500158

We are your source for letterhead, envelopes, invoice, notepads, brochures,


business cards, banners, address labels, pens, stampers and more!

Klemme Sales Inc.

125-129 Second Ave., Stratford, WI 54484


ph: 715-687-4511 fax: 715-687-4507

715-687-3128 Fax: 715-687-2230


www.billsservicecenter.com

TP

THE RECORD-REVIEW
TRIBUNE-PHONOGRAPH
TRIBUNE RECORD GLEANER
THE CENTRAL WISCONSIN SHOPPER

Printing
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FOR ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS!


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(715) 223-2342

2-177494

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W
AdventuhreereBthe
egins!

TF-500161

Custom Designs & Printing

AWARD WINNER

CHEVROLET
TF-500204

TFEV-502040

Gets you an online


subscription to the
Tribune-Phonograph,
The Record-Review
or the TRG!

TF-500205

Building located at 10905 Falcon Road,


southwest of Marshfield, for anyone
who is interested in learning how to
square dance.
Free square dancing instructions
will be given Jan. 21 and then again
from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 27.
No dance partners are required and
families are welcom.

Page 18

HELP WANTED

We are currently accepting applications for experienced shop & field installation
personnel. Preferred candidates need to have experience in
stainless steel welding, fabricating and pipe fitting.
We offer:

Apply at:

Subsistence Pay
Full Wage Travel Time
Doubletime on Sundays
Health Insurance
Paid Hotels

CUSTOM
FABRICATING
& REPAIR, INC.

1-175623

Process Systems Engineering Installation &


Custom Fabrication Specialist for the Food,
Dairy and Pharmaceutical Industry.
1932 E. 26th, P.O. Box 296,
Marshfield, WI 54449
Or call for an appointment (715) 387-6598
or (800) 236-8773.

51/31 &1$2SHQLQJV
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5HVSHFW&DULQJ 7HDPZRUNLVZKDW$VSLUXV&DUH 5HKDELVDOODERXW
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2-157364

City/Zip _____________________________________ Ph # _____________________

Per Pub - Per Week

Write one word per box. Use sheet of paper if additional room is needed.

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

Deadlines subject to change during holiday weeks

Check only one.

Automotive
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Child Care
Feeds/Seeds/Plants
For Sale
Garage Sales
Horses
Lost and Found
Mobile/Manuf. Homes
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Wanted to Rent














Agriculture (Misc.)
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For Rent
Free/Give Away
Help Wanted
Livestock
Miscellaneous
Notices
Real Estate
Wanted to Buy
Work Wanted/Services

AUTOMOTIVE

Marten Transport. NOW HIRING


DRIVERS FOR DEDICATED &
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METAL BUILDING MANUFACTURER seeking sales representative. Previous building sales
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AVAILABLE NOW. One bedroom


apartments at Withee Housing,
Withee. Eligible applicants must
be 62 or disabled. Appliances
and some utilities included.
Building features community
room, car plug-ins, and laundry facilities. Tenant pay 30% of
adjusted monthly income. For
an application please contact
Impact Seven, Inc. at 855-3168967 or 715-357-0011. EHO.
impact@impactseven.org.
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom house
on Center Road. References
required. Positively no dogs or
cats. $500/month plus security.
Available now. 715-654-0060.

Need to place a memorial ad to remember your


loved one by? Many designs and poems to
choose from or make it your own.
Stop by our ofce to see samples.

HORSES
TEAM OF Percheron draft horses, 3 and 4 years old, fully broke
and selling with harnesses. 715506-0072.

FEED-SEED-PLANTS
HAY FOR Sale, small squares.
1st, 2nd, 3rd crop, your choice.
$2.75 each. Call evenings, leave
message. Stratford, WI. 715-6874274.

WANTED TO BUY
WANTED: GUNS - new and
used. Turn them into ca$h or
trade for a new one! Shay Creek
in Medford, 715-748-2855.

WORK WANTED
STONE SETTER. All types masonry, brick, block and stone,
stone walls, basement, barns.
715-897-4177.

715-223-2342
HELP WANTED

Online Subscriptions
Available!

2013 HYUNDAI Accent, black, 4


door, 4 cylinder, 45,000 miles, extended warranty. $10,700 OBO.
715-229-4136.

HELP WANTED

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PO Box 677, 103 W. Spruce St.,
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classsub@tpprinting.com
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and number of times you would like it to run:
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715.223.2200 www.pineridgeliving.com

EOE

Full-time motivated, responsible


laborers/equipment operators
& CDL truck drivers.
Mechanical
aptitude is a plus.

1-177199














ANTIQUE SPORTING AND ADVERTISING SHOW February


5&6, Sunnyview Expo Center,
OSHKOSH WI Friday 10--6, Saturday 9-5. BUY/SELL/TRADE
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AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY At
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paid heat, water, sewer & trash
removal. Certain restrictions apply. For more information please
contact Impact Seven, Inc. at
855-316-8967 or 715-357-0011.
EHO.

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Please Call 715-223-2342 for Credit Card Payments. All classifieds must be prepaid.

Our Hunters will Pay Top $$$ To


hunt your land. Call for a Free
Base Camp Leasing info packet & Quote. 1-866-309-1507
www.BaseCampLeasing.com
(CNOW)

2-177460

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AVAILABLE AT Green Acres


Terrace in Colby. 2 bedroom,
1 bath for $550 for 11/1/15. Includes lot rent. Utilities not included. Cats considered, sorry
no dogs. Vacant lots for $225.
Colby, WI. 715-340-2116.

103 W. Spruce St., Abbotsford

)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQUHJDUGLQJWKHVHMRERSSRUWXQLWLHV
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$SSOLFDWLRQVDUHDYDLODEOHRQOLQH

Offer Excludes WCWS & TC

NOTICES

TP PRINTING CO.

&RPHIHHOWKHGLIIHUHQFHDQGOHDUQZKDWPDNHVRXU
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Bold My Classified Ad

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Competitive Wages
Vacation
Overtime
Personal Days
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THE RECORD-REVIEW

1-177250

HELP WANTED

January 13, 2016

***50 per word

Dorchester

January 13, 2016

Page 19

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

COUNTRY HOME for Sale Ranch style, 3 bedroom, 3 bath


on 24 mostly wooded acres.
Less than 10 years old. Finished
basement with walk out on blacktop road. 7 miles east of Medford. Black River runs through
property. Call 715-748-3012 for
details.

FOR SALE - Hardwood firewood,


cut and split. Levi Nolt, 715-2232930.

FOR SALE: Kernel Burner furnace, biomass systems, 100,000


BTU, only 6 years old. $4,500.
Call 715-654-0060.

FULL-TIME Field and shop person, experience with general repair work and operator desired.
Reference required. Stratford
area. Phone 715-305-4735.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FOR SALE: 2 stainless steel


syrup pans. One is 3x7x12 for
$600. Second is 2x6x12 for
$500. Both have draw-off valves.
715-212-8071.

FRESHLY CUT, Nice red and


white oak firewood, 100 inch
lengths, 4 to 20 inch diameter.
715-316-2276.
WOOD FOR Sale, split and unsplit, $45 per cord. 715-6874274.

HELP WANTED
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS For
waitress and cook. Apply in person, Abby Cafe, Abbotsford.
TRUCK DRIVER Wanted for grain
hopper division, home weekends. Saturday morning mechanic. Looking for drivers, also
home daily route. 715-571-9623.

Witmer Furniture is now hiring for 3rd Shift,


Monday-Thursday, 4-9 hour shifts.
Work 36 hours, get paid for 40 hours.
1-177203

Apply in person at
200 S. 11th St., Abbotsford, WI 54405

WANTED: FULL-Time or parttime milker or chaser. Reference


required. Stratford area. Phone
715-305-0959.

drive4marten.com

DUTIES: Test e-bid CenterPoint product options, set-up and maintain


shop oor and paperless workstation details, create mfg. shop oor
paperwork reports using various SSRS software and update and test
the e-bid parts program.
REQUIRES: Procient w/ Windows 7/8 & M/S Word, Excel & Outlook,
product and/or mfg. knowledge in the Windows & Door industry and
WTS Paradigms Center Point will be given additional consideration.
Must have the ability to organize time and prioritize tasks, understand
and communicate engineering details and have an aptitude for
problem solving and work with new product ideas. Excellent benet
package. Send resume to:

Questions may be directed to City of Wausau HR Dept.


Phone 715-261-6802 or email HR@ci.wausau.wi.us.

Help Wanted
Duties include (but are not limited to) street
maintenance, snow plowing, building maintenance,
operation and maintenance of equipment,
purchasing, budgeting. Must be computer literate,
willing to learn, and able to interact professionally
& effectively with governing body, professional
consultants, and the public. CDL preferred, water/
VHZHUH[SHULHQFHDQGFHUWLFDWLRQVDSOXV

Salary range from $16.50-$19.00/hour, depending on


TXDOLFDWLRQVDQGH[SHULHQFHSOXVEHQHWVKROLGD\
pay, PTO, vacation, retirement, short-term disability,
health insurance reimbursement, HSA; vision/
dental/long-term disability available.

EOE. The Village has the right to accept or reject any or all applications.

Staab Construction Corporation, an employee owned


company, is a premier builder of municipal and industrial
water and waste water treatment systems in the Midwest.
We are seeking an Earthwork/Heavy Equipment Manager.
Managing a highly skilled team of equipment operators,
this position will be responsible for all job site earthwork
operations including site preparation, excavating and
backfilling for structural and pipe installation, dewatering
system installation and operation, etc.. The position will
also be responsible for management of heavy equipment
purchases and leases, maintenance and service,
transportation, fleet management, and allocation of
equipment to projects.
Qualified candidates should have significant construction
related earthmoving experience, experience managing
equipment ownership and maintenance programs, and
project management and analytical skills. This is an
excellent career opportunity which offers room for
growth!
We are an employee owned company (ESOP) offering
above market wages and benefits including health and
dental insurance, long and short term disability insurance,
life insurance, 401k, profit sharing, and an Employee Stock
Ownership Plan.
To apply and obtain more information, please go to
www.staabco.com/employment and complete our
simple online application.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

2-177467

We are a drug free workplace. A veriable social security number


is required. EOE, including disabled and veterans.

The Village of Stratford is seeking a


qualified person for full time employment as
POLICE CHIEF. The selected individual will
provide leadership and management of the
day-to-day operations of law enforcement
within the Village (population 1,600).
Successful candidates must possess:
Law enforcement certification in the State of
Wisconsin
Associate Degree minimum; Bachelor Degree
preferred
Supervisory/management experience
Good verbal and written communications skills
Valid Wisconsin driver license and good driving
record
A condition of employment includes village residency
within six months of hire date. Salary is dependent on
qualifications.
Submit resume, DJ-LE-330 and Villages Employment
Application by February 1, 2016, to:
Village of Stratford
Attn: Village President Harvey Suckow
265 N 3rd Avenue
PO Box 12
Stratford WI 54484-0012
or email: stratfordclerk@stratfordwi.com
Detailed information is available at wilenet.org
Application materials are available at
www.stratfordwi.com. For more information, call
715-687-4430 or 715-687-4166

2-177534

Deadline: January 22, 2016

2-157367

Sierra Pacic Ind.


ATTN: Cher Murphy
575 S Whelen Ave., Medford, WI 54451

Clark County is an ADA/CRC/EEO Employer.

POLICE CHIEF

Sierra Pacic Windows, a Division of Sierra Pacic Ind., is looking for a


full-time, hourly PRODUCT DATA SPECIALIST with good computer
experience and professional attitude to join our group of developers
supporting order processing with our IT Group in Medford.

On-line applications only:


https://agency.governmentjobs.com/wausauwi/

EARTHWORK/HEAVY
EQUIPMENT MANAGER

W4266 CTH X, Owen, WI 54460-8932


Village of Stratford

Product Data
Specialist

Deadline to apply January 31, 2016

Applications will be accepted until Friday, January 15.


1-177234

866.370.4476

Department of Public Works


Street Maintainer

Submit resume or application (available in the Clerk's


RIFHRURQRXUZHEVLWHwww.dorchesterwi.com,
under the 'Forms & Permits' tab), references, and
VDODU\UHTXLUHPHQWVWRWKH'RUFKHVWHU&OHUN
VRIFH
228 W. Washington Ave., Dorchester, WI 54425.

2-177508

Text MARTEN to
95577 to receive our
latest job alerts.

Holiday
BONUS

The CITY OF WAUSAU


is now hiring for the
following position:

52-177172

Are you interested in becoming a Certified Nursing


Assistant and having the cost of the course paid for? Clark
County Rehabilitation and Living Center will be offering the
C.N.A. course through NTC at CCRLC starting in February. The
facility will sponsor individuals and pay for tuition/books
and other fees associated with taking the course. Candidates
must qualify and successfully complete the course and
state certification test with a two year commitment of
employment to CCRLC.
If interested in taking the course, contact Joan Jalling,
HR Manager, at 715-229-2172, extension 204, for further
information.

Based out of Tomah, WI.

HELP WANTED

The Village of Dorchester is accepting applications for a


full-time position in the Public Works department.

NOW IS YOUR CHANCE TO START A


CAREER IN THE HEALTH CARE FIELD!

NEW assigned equipment Top Pay and Benefits


Monthly Bonuses for Safety and Performance

INCLEMENT WEATHER
Pay

MEYER MANUFACTURING Corporation is accepting applications for laser and press brake
area leader, prior leadership
experience or machine operation and technology experience
desired, pay based on qualifications. Also accepting applications for a qualified laser operator, press brake operator, CNC
machinist and welders - start at
up to $16.75/hr. and general labor and assemblers - $14/hr. All
positions include excellent benefits - paid vacation, 6% match
401K, (4) 10 hr./day work week,
tuition reimbursement, health
insurance and profit sharing. Apply online at meyermfg.com or in
person at Meyer Mfg. Corp, 574
West Center Ave., Dorchester,
WI.

Certified Nursing Assistant Classes

NOW HIRING TRUCK DRIVERS


FOR SCHEDULED DEDICATED RUNS

AUTOMATIC DETENTION DOWN-TIME


Pay
Pay

HELP WANTED

2-177549

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Page 20

January 13, 2016

THE RECORD-REVIEW

Input sought on road issue


Infrastructure Committee will invite farmers to next meeting
The Marathon County Infrastructure Committee on Thursday agreed it
didnt yet have enough information to
decide whether to let dairy producers
who use drag line technology run overweight equipment on posted county
roads in the spring.
The committee said it wants to hear
from farmers themselves before making a decision.
Committee chairman Kurt Kluck
said the committee has considered lifting weight limits for farmers who, in
giving the county an infrastructure
protection plan, can show that they
are preserving county blacktop by running overweight drag line equipment a
few times on posted county highways,
rather than hauling loaded tankers full
of liquid manure hundreds or even
thousands of times on the same highways after weight limits come off.
Kluck said, too, the committee has
considered sectioning Marathon County--the states largest--into quadrants

and lifting spring weight limits when


soil conditions in those areas permit,
rather than doing so all at once countywide.
A third option, he said, is to do nothing to change policy, only to invest in
soil moisture meters and frost tubes to
have more of a scientific basis for lifting spring weight limits.
Typically, the county imposes a 48,000
pound maximum weight limit on county roads from mid-March through May.
The county issues routine exemptions
for milk trucks and sanitation tankers.
The weight limits regularly interfere
with farmers eager to till, fertilize and
plant cropland as early in spring as
possible in order to assure a mature
crop by fall.
Most committee members did not
state where they stand on the spring
weight limits debate.
Supervisor Arnie Schlei, town of
Easton, however, once again argued for
granting the drag line exemption to

farmers. He said preserving the county


highways was more important than being fair.
Schlei said the dairy farmer who has
invested in a manure pumping system
will keep millions of gallons of liquid
manure off of the county highways.
That is saving our roads tremendously, he said.
Schlei said allowing this farmer a
half dozen overweight equipment trips
each year was warranted.
Is this preferential treatment? he
asked. No, not if you can guarantee
you are saving my road.
Schlei did acknowledge that others
would not like granting an exemption
for agriculture, but not other industries.
Are there going to be people who are
not going to like it? he asked. Like
the loggers? Yes, I suppose.
Schlei said agriculture was one of
our biggest industries and needed
support from the county.

Edgar students have share


of dangerous behaviors
High school guidance counselor
Brooke Davis told the Edgar Board of
Education on Monday that Edgar students engage in comparatively less
dangerous behaviors than their local,
state and national peers, but that there
are serious issues that face students.
Davis referenced a 2015 Marathon
County Health Department survey of
students in schools county-wide.
The survey of students in grades 9-12
found the following:
Traffic safety. 18.7 percent of Edgar
students have rode in a car with someone who has been drinking in the past
30 days. That compares with 19.7 percent of county students and 20.6 percent of students statewide. 29.8 percent
of Edgar students said they texted or
e-mailed while driving a car within the
last 30 days. That compares with 22.4
percent of county students and 47.9
percent statewide.
Physical fighting. 14.8 percent of
Edgar students said they were in a
physical fight within the past year. This
compares with 20.8 percent of county
students and 22.4 percent statewide.
7.1 percent of Edgar students said they
were in a physical fight on school property within the last 12 months. This
compares with 8.6 percent of county
students and 6.8 percent of students
statewide. 18.2 percent of students
said they were physically threatened
on school property within the past 12
months. 19.1 percent of county students said the same.
Partner abuse. 4.7 percent of Edgar
students said they were forced to take
part in a sexual activity. This compares
to 6.2 percent of county students during the past 12 months.
Bullying. 23.7 percent of Edgar students reported being bullied on school
property during the past 12 months.
This compares with 30.4 percent of
county students and 22.7 percent of
Wisconsin students. 11.8 percent of Edgar students said they were electronically bullied. This compares with 16.9
percent of county students and 17.6

percent of Wisconsin students.


Depression and suicide. 17.8 percent of Edgar students said they felt
either sad or hopeless for two weeks in
a row within the past 12 months. This
compares with 21.3 percent of county
students and 13.2 percent statewide.
1.2 percent of Edgar students said they
attempted suicide during the past 12
months. This compares with 4.2 percent countywide and 6.0 percent statewide.
Tobacco use. 5.9 percent of Edgar
students said they smoked tobacco at
least one day during the past month.
8.2 percent of county students and 11.8
percent of students statewide reported
the same.
Alcohol use. 50.3 percent of Edgar
students said they had at least one
drink of alcohol during their life. This
compares with 54 percent of county
students and 65.9 percent of students
statewide. 13.6 percent of Edgar students said they had five or more drinks
within a couple hours within 30 days
of the survey. 13.6 percent of county
students and 18.4 percent of Wisconsin
students reported the same thing.
Marijuana use. 9.5 percent of Edgar students said they used marijuana
once in their life. This compares with
12.7 percent of county students and
32.1 percent of students statewide.
Other drugs. No Edgar students said
they have used cocaine. This compares
to 1.6 percent of county students and
4.3 percent of Wisconsin students. 5.3
percent of students said they sniffed
glue or inhaled paint to get high. This
compares with 4.9 percent of county
students and 5.9 percent of Wisconsin
students.
Sexual behavior. 33.7 percent of Edgar students report having sexual intercourse. This compares with 22 percent of students countywide and 35.3
percent of all Wisconsin students. 14.2
percent of Edgar students reported being either gay, lesbian bisexual or unsure. That compares with 8.5 percent
of students countywide.

Davis said Edgar staff has looked


at the risk behavior survey data and
tried to deal with issues as they present themselves. Most recently, she said
a speaker at a student assembly talked
about safe driving habits. Davis said a
Students Against Drunk Driving chapter will form at Edgar High School.
In response, school board members
said that Edgars at-risk behavior was
largely no different than any other
county school.
We are the same as everybody else
in Marathon County, board member
Bill Dittman said. We all have the
same issues.
In other school board business:
Board members approved using
up to $13,000 of Act 32 contingency
money to purchase new polycarbonate
sheeting and an electronic heating and
ventilation control for the courtyard
greenhouse operated by the agriculture department.
Ag instructor Matt Reinders said the
schools 100 by 23 foot greenhouse was
in generally good shape, but needed
these improvements.
He said he hopes to develop the
schools central courtyard in the future
for a pumpkin patch, outdoor learning
laboratory and reading area.
Board members agreed to hire Angela Totzke as an assistant varsity softball coach.
Board members agreed to modify
its open enrollment policy to drop a
$100 transportation fee. The policy requires students to get to the nearest
regular route transportation stop.
Board members approved an annual contract with CESA 10 for $12,720,
an increase of $350 over the past year.
Edgar school district receives distance
learning services from the agency.
District administrator Dr. Cari
Guden announced the Edgar High
School jazz band will perform Wednesday, Jan. 20, before 1,500 delegates to
the Wisconsin Association of School
Boards convention in Milwaukee.

The supervisor added he did not


support eliminating all spring weight
restrictions on drag line farmers. He
said, too, that he wouldnt mind sitting
on this policy discussion for another
year, rather than rushing to a decision
to be ready for this spring.
County highway engineer Kevin
Lang said the county committee did not
need to decide on posted road weight
limits this spring, but it did need to
respond to Van Der Geest Farms, town
of Maine, which requested several
months ago an overweight permit to
run its 53,000 pound articulated tractor
with a manure spool on posted roads
this year.
Chairman Kluck said the highway
department, no matter what policy
emerges, should buy some moisture
meters to have more information about
when to lift road weight limits in the
spring.
That should happen ASAP, he said.

STRATFORD CAPSULES
The Stratford Board of Education
took action on the following items at
Mondays regular meting.
The school board took administrator Scott Winchs recommendation not
to limit the amount of students who
open enroll into the school district. If
the likely April referendum fails, then
the board may change their mind during its January meeting next year.
Following a closed session on
Monday, the board decided not to purchase another piece of land next to
the Becher property north of the high
school, which last month the district
offered to buy for $100,000 if a list of
contingencies were met. One of the
contingencies was the soil on the
Becker property be tested, and Winch
confirmed Tuesday the soil test was
good.
Winch could not provide any further
details on the school district purchasing the other property while negotiations are ongoing. The school district
will possibly buy property using part
of the $250,000 it received from the village of Stratford when it closed out
Tax Incremental Finance District No.
1 for the Stratford Business/Industrial
Park.
The school board approved to purchase a 2010 Chevy Silverado pickup
truck for $10,000 from Damons Auto
in Stratford, to replace the old truck
that is falling apart. The school board
approved to donate the old truck to the
Rawhide Boys Ranch.
The school board approved vicepresident Chris Dickinson as the Wisconsin Association of School Boards
convention delegate.
The board approved the hiring
of spring coaches: Mark Guderski as
head track coach, and Amanda Krautkramer, Bert Wenzel and Tammy Folz
as assistants. Missy Schmidt and April
Sparbel will co-coach middle school
track, and Adam Knoll will be their assistant coach. Brad Grube is the head
baseball coach. His assistants are Ryan
Bloom and Marshall Lehman. Curt
Schmidt is the middle school baseball
coach. Amanda Pankratz is the head
softball coach. Her assistants are Kellen Kafka and Scott Krum. Dani Austin is the middle school softball coach.