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Marry Nurcahya
Ivan Pattiasina
Physics
3 December 2015
Design Experiment
Research Question:
How to prevent an egg from breaking when dropped from a certain height with the
changes of volume of gas in the balloon?
Introduction:
Gravity is a powerful force that has an impact in our lives. Gravity gives downward
force on our bodies that creates the friction between our feet and the ground that
allows us to walk.
Momentum and collisions:
An object that is moving has momentum. The amount of momentum (p) is possessed
by the moving object is the product of mass (m) and velocity (v). The equation is:
p=m v
Knowing the numerical values of all but one of the quantities in the equation allows
us to be able to calculate the final quantity in the equation. The equation also can be
treated as a statement, which describes qualitatively how one variable depends upon
another. Momentum is directly proportional to both mass and velocity. Thinking and
reasoning proportionally about quantities allows us to be able to predict how an
alteration in one variable would affect another variable.
In a collision, a force acts upon an object for a given amount of time to change the
objects velocity. The product of force and time is known as impulse. The product of
mass and velocity change is known as momentum change.

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impulse=momentum change
f t=mass v
In collision between two objects, each object is interacting with the other object. The
interaction involves force acting between the objects for some amount of time. This
force and time constitutes an impulse and the impulse changes the momentum of each
object. The Newtons laws of motion give the rule for such a collision. The laws of
motion can be applied to the analysis of the collision situation.
In a collision between object 1 and object 2, the force exerted on object 1 (F1) is
equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted on object 2 (F2).
F 1=F 2
The statement is an application of Newtons third law of motion to the collision
between objects 1 and 2.
Depends on what the egg weighs, the lift of helium in air is equal to the (density of
air-density of helium) x displaced volume of temperature x gravitational constant.
Weigh the egg first then find the lift by multiplying the weight in grams before using
the formula.
Hypothesis:
With more amount of helium, it would be able to keep the egg falling slowly, so the
egg would not drop quickly and not break.
Variables:
Dependent Variables
The mass of the egg

Independent Variables
The volume of gas in the
balloon

Materials:
Plastic cups (to carry the egg)
Egg

Controlled Variables
The mass of the plastic
cups

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Balloon
Helium Gas
String (to tie the balloon to the plastic cups)
Stopwatch
Notepads, pens (to write notes)
Experiment:
1. Fill the balloons with different volume of helium for this experiment.
2. Prepare the eggs and place them in the plastic cups, make sure the eggs are
equal in their mass.
3. Tie the balloons filled with helium to the plastic cups.
4. From a high place (at least three floors), drop the eggs that were tied with the
balloons.
5. Calculate the volume or helium in the balloon, and using the stopwatch,
collect the time of the egg reaching to the ground, safely.
6. Using the formula p=m v to calculate the momentum.
7. Record the numbers calculated in the data collected to prove the hypothesis.
Data:
Data collected for experiment 1
Volume of helium in the balloon
Mass of the egg
Time taken for the egg to fall
Momentum:
p=m v
Data collected for experiment 2
Volume of helium in the balloon
Mass of the egg
Time taken for the egg to fall
Momentum:
p=m v
Data collected for experiment 3
Volume of helium in the balloon
Mass of the egg
Time taken for the egg to fall

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Momentum:
p=m v
Data collected for experiment 4
Volume of helium in the balloon
Mass of the egg
Time taken for the egg to fall
Momentum:
p=m v
References:
"Friction, Force and Motion." Skwirk Online Education. N.p., n.d.
Web. 2 Dec. 2015.
"The Great Egg Drop Project." Egg Drop Project. N.p., n.d. Web. 3
Dec. 2015.