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Note: Numbers correspond with the scoring system on the BIP Quality Evaluation Guide

CO NF ID E NT I AL D O NO T DI S P L A Y

BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PLAN


For Behavior Interfering with Students Learning or the Learning of His/Her Peers
This BIP attaches to:

IEP date: 02/2/16

Student Name Mark Villalobos

504 plan date:

Todays Date 02/2/16

Team meeting date:

Next Review Date 01/31/17

1. The behavior impeding learning is (describe what it looks like) The student frequently demonstrates antisocial
behavior such as murmuring under his breathe, talking louder than his peers, speaking out of turn, and
sharing inappropriate jokes/comments. These outbursts impede learning because they are disruptive and
distracting to the teacher and the class.
2. It impedes learning because the student's comments affect his ability to pay attention in class, listen to
directions, and complete assignments in a timely manner. His behavior is extremely distracting to himself
and everyone around him.
3. The need for a Behavior Intervention Plan
early stage intervention
moderate
serious
extreme
4. Frequency or intensity or duration of behavior The student displays antisocial behavior several times
throughout each day of the week. The range of incidents occur most frequently during Mr. McGreevy's
reading class, lunch, and homeroom. From 9:30-10:30, the student demonstrates this behavior 90% of the
week. From 11:30-12:30, the student misbehaves 75%. It has become apparent that the behavior of interest
disrupts and distracts the teacher, the student, and the peers from academic learning.
reported by Mr. Jackson and/or
observed by Mr. McGreevy
PREVENTION

PART I: ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND NECESSARY CHANGES

Observation & Analysis

What are the predictors for the behavior? (Situations in which the behavior is likely to occur: people, time, place, subject, etc.)

5. From the collected data, it is evident that the student's current behavior stems from a desire for attention. Mark's
behavior is expressed when Mr. McGreevy turns his back to the students and allows Mark the time to talk to his
peers. Boredom at school, escape from completing difficult academic work, and inattention from no ADHD
medication could be factors. Outside of school, however, Mark shows obvious signs of needing attention.
What supports the student using the problem behavior? (What is missing in the environment/curriculum or what is in the
environment curriculum that needs changing?)

6. Mr. McGreevy's classroom must eliminate the class response after the student cracks a joke or makes an
inappropriate comment because the student receives attention from his peers and the laughter encourages the
current problem behavior. The classroom could also be set up in a way for Mr. McGreevy to never have his back to
the students. Implementation of a token economy system or individual positive reinforcement could promote
appropriate behavior.

Intervention

Remove students need to use the problem behavior----What environmental changes, structure and supports are needed to remove the students need to use this behavior?
(Changes in Time/Space/Materials/Interactions to remove likelihood of behavior)

7. Since most of Mark's behavior is triggered when Mr. McGreevy turns his back to the students, the classroom should
be rearranged in a way that Mr. McGreevy's back never has to be turned to the students. Mark should sit toward the
front of the classroom by Mr. McGreevy's desk. In addition, Mr. McGreevy should interact with Mark in a positive
way. Mark desires attention and simply wants to please. Being in close proximity to Mr. McGreevy will provide Mark
with a lot of attention he desires. Mark's desk should also be placed away from other peers that will be a distraction.
Who will establish? Mr. McGreevy

Who will monitor? Mr. Jackson

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


1
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

Frequency? Every 3 Minutes

Observation & Analysis

ALTERNATIVES

PART II: FUNCTIONAL FACTORS AND NEW BEHAVIORS TO TEACH AND SUPPORT

Team believes the behavior occurs because: (Function of behavior in terms of getting, protest, or avoiding something)

8. Mark's function of behavior occurs because of his desire for attention.


Accept a replacement behavior that meets same need----What team believes the student should do INSTEAD of the problem behavior? (How should the student escape/protest/
avoid or get his/her need met in an acceptable way?)

9. Mark should stay in his seat and work diligently on his assignments until Mr. McGreevy comes to his desk to
assist him. He should raise his hand if he has a question, answer, or concern instead of blurting inappropriate
comments. If Mark needs to to be in closer proximity to Mr. McGreevy and will remain on task, he can sit by Mr.
McGreevy's desk while he works.
What teaching Strategies/Necessary Curriculum/Materials are needed? (List successive teaching steps for student to learn
replacement behavior/s)

10. It is recommended that the student receive a lot of positive reinforcement for on-task behaviors. The following
strategies should be implemented into Mark's classrooms:

Intervention

1. Praise: This strategy would be wonderful for giving Mark attention whenever he exhibits pro-social behaviors. Verbal
praise could be the teacher saying, "I love how Mark is being such a great example for the class!" Or "Wow Mark,
you are working so quietly on your reading. Keep up the awesome job." Or "Thank you for waiting patiently and
raising your hand, Mark." These verbal compliments will boost Mark's self-esteem and satisfy his craving for
attention. Even high-fives, fist bumps, hugs, and smiles praise the student for his on-task behavior. This is a
fantastic way to provide instant reinforcement.
2. Token Economy: Ms. Johnson uses a classwide token economy system in her English class that seems to work
wonders for Mark. Mr. McGreevy should implement this strategy in his reading class to encourage/reinforce prosocial behaviors from Mark. Throughout this process, Mr. McGreevy would be giving Mark needed attention. Mr.
McGreevy could give Mark a sticker every time he performed a desired behavior in reading class. After receiving a
certain number of stickers, Mark would be able to exchange his tokens (stickers) for a prize/other reinforcer. For
example, Mark loves soccer and could possibly trade his tokens in for a soccer ball or a soccer game against the
teachers at recess.
3. Punch Card: A punch card is kind of like a specific token economy system. This strategy would allow Mr. McGreevy to
make an appearance at Mark's desk to punch his card every time he behaved appropriately. Mark would work extra
hard to be on-task so Mr. McGreevy would notice, punch his card, and fill his desire for attention. Eventually,
Mark's pro-social behavior would become automatic and Mr. McGreevy would slowly reduce the amount of times
he would punch Mark's card.
4. Check-in/check-out: This system would also satisfy Mark's need for attention because he would have to approach Mr.
McGreevy several times throughout the school day. Every time Mark would check-in with Mr. McGreevy, he would
receive a sticker. Mark's desire for attention would be filled every time he met and talked with Mr. McGreevy. Mr.
McGreevy could even have an incentive for Mark to earn more stickers if he behaved appropriately throughout the
day (one sticker for checking-in and two stickers for on-task behavior).
5. Role Playing: This practice could be implemented in the classroom for Mark to have an idea of what counts for ontask behavior and inappropriate behavior. Mr. McGreevy would act out certain scenarios for Mark to watch. He
would then have to share what Mr. McGreevy did right and wrong. While they role played, Mark would receive 100%
of Mr. McGreevy's time and energy. His desire for attention would be met. Also, Mark would be able to practice
appropriate and expected behavior. If Mark had a question, but the teacher was busy, he would learn how to raise
his hand or quietly walk to the teacher's desk. The teacher should make sure to response by saying, "Thank you
for being patient, Mark. What can I help you with?" Scenarios like these encourage pro-social behavior.
Who will establish? Mr. McGreevy

Who will monitor? Mr. Jackson and Ms. Freyling

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


2
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

Frequency? Every day

What are reinforcement procedures to use for establishing, maintaining, and generalizing the replacement behavior(s)?

11. If Mark were to be successful in raising his hand, waiting patiently, or quietly walking up to the teacher's desk

Intervention

when he needed help, he would receive a lot of praise from the teacher (hug, high-five, verbal praise). This on-task
behavior always needs to be instantly reinforced. Mark seems to respond well to attention from adults, so simple
praise would encourage him greatly. Currently, Ms. Johnson uses a classwide token economy system in her
English Language Arts class as well as individualized positive reinforcement for Mark. His inappropriate behavior
never occurs in English class, so these strategies should be implemented in Mark's other classes. He responds
well to being rewarded, so receiving stickers, tokens, or punches on a punch card would really push Mark to
behave appropriately. After gaining so many tokens (attention), Mark would be rewarded with an even bigger prize
dealing with soccer or video games.

1. If Mark raises his hand or quietly approaches Mr. McGreevy, he will be rewarded with verbal praise, a high-five, a fist
bump, or a hug from his teacher.
2. Mark will be given a punch on his punch card for every pro-social behavior.
3. If Mark fills half of his punch card, he will be allowed to play his favorite soccer game on the computer for 10 minutes
where he won't be disturbing the rest of the class.
4. Once Mark fills his entire punch card (approximately 20 punches), he will get to play an intense soccer game against
the teachers at recess.
5. The teachers will gradually reduce the number of reinforcements, extend the time between reinforcements, and
hopefully remove all types of positive reinforcement. Eventually, Mark's pro-social behavior will become automatic
and social praise (hugs, high-fives, fist bumps) will be enough attention.
Selection of reinforcer based on: The Observation Form (Interview) filled out by Mr. McGreevy
reinforcer for using replacement behavior
reinforcer for general increase in positive behaviors
By whom? Mr. McGreevy Frequency? Every 3 Minutes

EFFECTIVE REACTION

PART III: REACTIVE STRATEGIES

What strategies will be employed if the problem behavior occurs again?

12.
1.

Prompt student to switch to the replacement behavior The student will be reminded of his goal to raise his hand and quietly
approach the teacher instead of blurting inappropriate comments/jokes. He will be reminded that he will not receive
attention, praise, or any rewards if he chooses to behave poorly. The teacher could remind Mark by simply saying, "Mark,
remember that you should raise your hand if you need help. Mr. McGreevy will come to your desk as soon as he can. If it
is taking awhile for the teacher to come help you, you may quietly walk to the front of the room and ask for help as long
as the teacher is not talking to anyone else." The teacher should be sure to keep the prompts and reminders very short.

2.

Describe how staff should handle the problem behavior if it occurs again If the problem behavior continues to occur, Mark will
be sent into the hall where he can take a quick break, pull himself together, and come back into the classroom when he is
ready to make better choices.

3.

Positive discussion with student after behavior ends The teachers can have a positive discussion with Mark after the problem
behavior ends, but it should circle back around to reminding him of his goals. The conversation should be short and
sweet so the student doesn't receive too much attention.

Optional:
4.

Any necessary further classroom or school consequences It is important for the student to know why they receive further
consequences if the behavior continues.
Personnel? Mr. McGreevy or Ms. Freyling

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


3
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

OUTCOME

PART IV: BEHAVIORAL GOALS

Behavioral Goal(s)

13.
Required: Functionally Equivalent Replacement Behavior (FERB) Goal
By
when

Who

5/10/16

Mark

Will do X
behavior
(line 9)
Will
demonstrate
on-task
behavior
(raising his
hand, and
patiently and
quietly
approaching
the teacher, if
appropriate)
during
independent
seat work.

For the
purpose of
y
(line 8)
Gaining
knowledge
and
increasing
reading
skills.

Instead of Z
behavior
(line 1)
Interupting,
making rude
and
inappropriate
comments,
distracting
other students,
and disrupting
learning (offtask behavior).

For the
purpose
of y
(line 8)
Receiving
attention
from his
teachers.

Under what
contingent
conditions

At what
level of
proficiency

In Mr.
McGreevy's
reading
class.

With
100%
accuracy
on 3 out
of 5 days
in a 2week
period.

As
measured
by whom
and how
Mr. Jackson
or Ms.
Freyling
(determined
by the
teacher
through
observation
and data
collection).

Option 1: Increase General Positive or Decrease Problem Behavior


By when

Who

Will do what, or
will NOT do what

At what level of
proficiency

Under what
conditions

Measured by
whom and how

Under what
conditions

Measured by
whom and how

Option 2: Increase General Positive or Decrease Problem Behavior


By when

Who

Will do what, or
will NOT do what

At what level of
proficiency

The above behavioral goal(s) are to:


Increase use of replacement behavior and may also include:
Reduce frequency of problem behavior
Develop new general skills that remove students need to use the problem behavior

Observation and Analysis Conclusion:


Are curriculum accommodations or modifications also necessary? Where described: Reading and math
may be a struggle for Mark due to his Learning Disability. He has an IEP; therefore, he can receive
special education services. Perhaps Mark needs extra attention from a paraprofessional or special
education teacher on reading skills. Since Mark does well listening to directions instead of reading
them, the special education teacher or paraprofessional could read to him. If Mark's behavior stems
mostly from attention, modifications could be made so Mark has someone's undivided attention for
10 minutes of reading class...............................................................................................................................
Are environmental supports/changes necessary? ................................................................................................
Is reinforcement of replacement behavior alone enough (no new teaching is necessary)?..................................
Are both teaching of new replacement behavior AND reinforcement needed? ....................................................
This BIP to be coordinated with other agencys service plans? ............................................................................
Person responsible for contact between agencies
...................................................................................

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


4
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.

yes

no

yes
yes

no
no

yes
yes

no
no

yes

no

COMMUNICATION

PART V: COMMUNICATION PROVISIONS

Manner and content of communication

14.
1. Who?

2. Under what
condition(s)
(Contingent?
Continuous?)

3.
Delivery
Manner

4. Expected
Frequency?

5. Content?

6. How will this be


two-way
communication

1. Who?

2. Under what
condition(s)
(Contingent?
Continuous?)

3.
Delivery
Manner

4. Expected
Frequency?

5. Content?

6. How will this be


two-way
communication

1. Who?

2. Under what
condition(s)
(Contingent?
Continuous?)

3.
Delivery
Manner

4. Expected
Frequency?

5. Content?

6. How will this be


two-way
communication

PARTICIPATION
Student

PART VI: PARTICIPANTS IN PLAN DEVELOPMENT

Mark Villalobos

Parent/Guardian

Jose Villalobos

Parent/Guardian

Tatiana Villalobos

Educator and Title

Mr. McGreevy (Reading Teacher)

Educator and Title

Ms. Johnson (English Teacher)

Educator and Title

Ms. Freyling (Special Education Teacher)

Administrator
Other

Mr. Jackson

Other

Diana Browning Wright, Behavior/Discipline Trainings


5
For the electronic expandable version, see www.pent.ca.gov/forms.htm.