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Fun with Pesach Complete Teaching

First: Pesach in a Nutshell!

1) 14th of Abib (morning-afternoon, day of preparation for the seder). On the 14th you get the
matzah, bitter herbs and the rest of the meal items ready. You sit down for seder just before
sunset on the 14th, do the meal into the early hours of the 15th.

2) 15th (High Shabbat), from your seder to the next sunset is High Shabbat where no work or
commerce of any kind is allowed.

3) 16th is first fruits or Bikurrim, when the sheaf would have been waved to the priests. There is
no modern equivalent for observing this now, just be aware of
it.

4) 17-20, regular days of Pesach, no ban on commerce or work but still must eat unleavened
bread.

5) Any Friday sunset to Saturday sunset time in these 8 days is the Shabbat in the middle of the
feast and is considered special.

6) 21--High Shabbat for the last day of Pesach, no work or commerce of any kind is allowed.

Introduction

I know weve spent a lot of time in recent weeks dealing with a lot of calendar stuff and
controversy, so this week I thought I would take a different path and approach. Regardless as to

what any of you here decide to do with regards to Pesach (celebrating either around March 23rd
or April 22nd), the fact remains that I have to begin my Pesach preparations now, in order to stay
on schedule with the calendar I use.

That new approach also means I have to do what I can to more simply and efficiently answer at
least the major issues regarding not just Pesach but when Mashiyach Yshua died.

But dont worry, because theres a reason I called this teaching Fun with Pesach. I decided to
make this teaching more like a TV quiz show, asking certain questions and delivering some little
known facts for the answers along the way. (Please no looking at the Notes before I deliver the
answer.) As I ask these questions, I would like for all of you to please write your answers down
and then compare them with the answers I will give later on.

After I have asked these questions, I will use Part 2 to answer them from Scripture and then
show the relevancy of those answers to dealing with a lot of the confusion that is rampant at this
time of year.
And now the quiz
We begin then, with question #1, and I will fairly warn you in advance that this is, in a sense,
also a trick question. Ready? Here we go
1) How many lambs are slain at Pesach? Is it
A)
B)
C)
D)

1
7
8
50

2) The Pesach feast begins the moment the sun sets ending the 13th. TRUE or FALSE?
3) The terms Pesach and Feast of Unleavened Bread are always interchangeable and
refer to the same exact thing. TRUE or FALSE?
4) The day of preparation for Pesach is the 13th of Abib, since the feast starts on the 14th.
TRUE or FALSE?
5) The entire Pesach (and/or Feast of Unleavened Bread) event lasts
A) 6 days, the first and last days are separate.

B) 7 days, as the 14th when we slay the lamb doesnt technically count.
C) 8 full days, from the 14th to the 21st inclusive.
D) None of the above.
6) Not all the events that the church usually teaches happened at the Last Supper did
actually happen there. TRUE or FALSE?
7) There is no question that the Last Supper is a Seder Meal. TRUE or FALSE?
8) Many NT scholars believe that the account in John is running a day behind the versions
in Matthew, Mark and Luke with regards to the Last Supper, Crucifixion and
Resurrection. The truth of the matter is
A) We cant figure out who is right or wrong because our understanding of first century
Torah observance is limited or contradictory.
B) John only appears to be running a day behind and the reason has to do with
mistranslation of the earliest NT texts.
C) The different accounts are all correct because there were rival traditions on when
different groups kept Pesach.
D) The issue is not with when Pesach starts at all but rather when different parts of the
feast were done by different groups.
9) The timing of First-fruits has nothing to do with the day Yshua rose from the dead.
TRUE or FALSE?
10) Fill in the blank for the correct days of the week from the choices below: Yshua was
crucified on a ____ and rose on a ____.
A)
B)
C)
D)

Tuesday, Saturday.
Wednesday, Saturday.
Thursday, Sunday.
Friday, Sunday.

11) The day that Yshua died was also


A)
B)
C)
D)
E)
F)
G)

The 14th, the Preparation Day for the Annual Shabbat.


A Friday afternoon, the preparation time for the Weekly Shabbat.
Both a regular Shabbat and an Annual Shabbat.
An Annual Shabbat that was ending.
An Annual Shabbat that was beginning.
In between an Annual and a Weekly Shabbat.
Cloudy with a chance of supernatural darkness and earthquakes.

12) Fill in the blanks. The day that Yshua died also must correspond to the ___ day of Abib
because___

A) 14th, because he is our Pesach lamb that must be sacrificed on that day to align with
the evening sacrifice and 1 Corinthians 5:7.
B) 15th, because Matthew 26:17 and Luke 22:7-9 have Yshua alive all day on the 14th,
including the late afternoon when he was otherwise supposed to have been dead.
C) 14th, because Mashiyach cannot be crucified nor the Sanhedrin meet to condemn him
on an Annual Shabbat.
D) 14th, because the Pesach started just after sunset on the 13th, and he was arrested and
condemned that night, dying the following afternoon.
E) 15th, because in the year Yshua died there had to be back to back Shabbats, where
the Annual was followed immediately by the Weekly.
F) 15th, because Amos 9 predicts that he must die in the daylight part of a feast that is
turned into mourning.
The answers to these and other questions will be given in Part 2!

Bonus Teaching: Fun with Pesach, Part 2

Okay lets get back to our quiz and see how you all did! We begin with #1 which, as I
mentioned earlier is kind of a trick question.

1) How many lambs are slain at Pesach? Is it


A)
B)
C)
D)

1
7
8
50

The answer isD, 50 lambs are slain over the entire 8 day feast of Pesach and Feast of
Unleavened Bread, with one slain on the 14th and seven slain on each of the remaining seven
days, or 49. All these lambs are males a year old (Exodus 12:5, comp. to Numbers 28:1-19) and
are therefore identical. As a result ANY of the year old male lambs slain between the 14th and
21st of Abib is in actual fact a Passover lamb. I should also point out this was in a way a trick
question the way I phrased it, since some might take the phrase at Pesach to meant just the 14th
while others would apply it to all 8 days, which is a matter we will deal with in answering
another question.

And in the first month, on the fourteenth day, is the Passover of and on the fifteenth
day of this month is a festival. For seven days unleavened bread is eaten. On the first
day is a set-apart gathering, you do no servile work. And you shall bring near an
offering made by fire as a burnt offering to : two young bulls and one ram, and
seven lambs a year old, perfect ones they are for you. (Numbers 28:16-19, The Scriptures
1998)

Incidentally, the 50 lambs may be a reflection of the 50 day omer count ending at Shavuot, and
the reason why you only kill one lamb on the 14th but seven on all the other days is because only
the last hours of the 14th are elevated in sanctity with the Pesach offering, whereas for the 15th
onwards, the entire days are considered sacred. Its almost as if there is a kind of pro-rating
going on.
2) The Pesach feast begins the moment the sun sets ending the 13th. TRUE or FALSE?

The answer is FALSE. As I just observed in the previous answer, about 21 hours on the 14th is
considered normal. The Israelites were still in bondage on the morning and through the late
afternoon of the 14th. It is only when they slayed the lambs and put the blood on the doorstep and
then roasted the lamb as the day was ending that the occasion we call Pesach actually began. As
a good friend and teacher once observed, Pesach is a time of offering, NOT a day.

Pesach is in fact one of two Set-apart times when the occasion does not begin immediately after
the sunset of the previous day, in this case, the 13th of Abib. When the darkness of the 14th
begins, it is NOT Pesach. Nor is it Pesach at dawn or noon or even hours after that. It is only
when the lamb is slain at the end of the day that Pesach really begins. Incidentally, Yom Kippur
is the other occasion, except in that case the fast begins BEFORE the 10th of Tishri.

You are not allowed to slaughter the Passover within any of your gates which your
Elohim gives you, but at the place where your Elohim chooses to make His Name dwell,
there you slaughter the Passover in the evening, at the going down of the sun, at the
appointed time you came out of Mitsrayim. (Deuteronomy 16:5-6, The Scriptures 1998)

On the tenth day of this seventh month is the Day of Atonement. It shall be a set-apart
gathering for you. And you shall afflict your beings, and shall bring an offering made by fire
to . And you do no work on that same day, for it is the Day of Atonement, to make
atonement for you before your Elohim. For any being who is not afflicted on that same
day, he shall be cut off from his people. And any being who does any work on that same
day, that being I shall destroy from the midst of his people. You do no work a law forever
throughout your generations in all your dwellings. It is a Sabbath of rest to you, and you
shall afflict your beings. On the ninth day of the month at evening, from evening to evening,
you observe your Sabbath. (Leviticus 23:27-32, The Scriptures 1998)

3) The terms Pesach and Feast of Unleavened Bread are always interchangeable and
refer to the same exact thing. TRUE or FALSE?
The answer is FALSE. In the Tanakh, there is a clear distinction made between the Pesach
OFFERING done at the end of the 14th and the seven days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread
from the 15th-21st.

However, when we get to the NT, sometimes the distinction is made and sometimes it is not.
Here are three examples of the former:
Now on the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the disciples drew near to Y'shua and
said to him, "Where do you want us to prepare for you to eat the Paskha?" (Matthew 26:17
AENT)
And in the first day of the unleavened bread in which the Yehudeans slay the Paskha, his
disciples were saying to him, "Where do you desire us to go for you to prepare the Paskha to
eat?" (Mark 14:12 AENT)
And the day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread arrived during which there was the custom
that the Paskha be slaughtered And Y'shua sent Keefa and Yochanan and said to them, "Go.
Prepare the Paskha for us that we may eat." And they said to him, "Where do you want us to
prepare it?" (Luke 22:7-9 AENT)

These three references above will become important later on for answering other questions,
so please bear them in mind. In the meantime, please observe that between the three
references there is enough collective data to establish the timing as late in the afternoon on
the 14th. The first day of unleavened bread cannot be any earlier than the 14th and the late
afternoon of the 15th would be too late to prepare the FIRST lamb.

On the other hand, I admit I exploited the ambiguity of the term Pesach in question 1 (to
make this very point) and applied it to all 8 days, which I know many others also do. If I had
asked the first question as How many lambs are slain for the first Pesach offering? then the
answer would have to be 1.

Finally, it was the use of the word all that made this answer false, as sometimes the
separation of the 14th from the rest was made clear and other times it was not.
4) The day of preparation for Pesach is the 13th of Abib, since the feast starts on the 14th.
TRUE or FALSE?
The answer is FALSE, because the preparation day is actually the 21 hours of the 14th, from
the moment sunset ends the 13th to the following day up to late afternoon. Realistically
speaking, real preparation for Pesach does not begin before noon and the lamb is not killed
(which is only the start of preparing it) until 3 PM or even a bit later.
5) The entire Pesach (and/or Feast of Unleavened Bread) event lasts

A)
B)
C)
D)

6 days, the first and last days are separate.


7 days, as the 14th when we slay the lamb doesnt technically count.
8 full days, from the 14th to the 21st inclusive.
None of the above.

I have been mentioning 8 days frequently in previous answers, which eliminates answers A and
B. Nevertheless I think I may have thrown a bit of a curveball here because the right answer is
not C, but rather D, none of the above. The reason why C is wrong is because I said 8 full
days, and as we have seen Pesach is only starting on the last part of the 14th, far from a full
day. The more accurate statement is that Pesach-Feast of Unleavened Bread happens over part
or all of 8 Hebrew days.
6) Not all the events that the church usually teaches happened at the Last Supper did actually
happen there. TRUE or FALSE?
The answer is TRUE. In fact one of the most iconic events of the Last Supper was actually at
The Second to Last Supper: The washing of the apostles feet! Heres how I know that:

Y'shua answered and said, "The one for whom I dip and he I give the bread to." And Y'shua
dipped the bread and gave it to Yehuda, the son of Shimon Skaryota (the Zealot). And after
the bread, then Satan entered in him. And Y'shua said to him, "The thing that you do, you do
it quickly!" But no man of those who reclined understood of this concerning what he said to
him. For some thought that because of the bag Yehuda was carrying that he had
expressly commanded him to buy what was needed for the feast, or that he might give
something to the poor. Now Yehuda took the bread and went at once, and he departed
when it was night outside. (John. 13:26-30 AENT)

So how could the Pesach Feast have started if they thought Yehuda was going to buy
supplies for that same feast? Also how could the Pesach Feast had started when Yochanan
13:1 clearly states it had not? And if it was sunset after the 14th, Yehuda cant buy supplies.
Its a High Shabbat!

Clearly the feast had NOT started yet, and since we know this was after the two days before
Pesach reference in Matthew 26:1-2, the only possible timing is that this was the supper that
began on the 13th of Abib. But, by the time Yehuda left, the sun had set and it was night, so
now the very start of the 14th. It is this very issue that has confused many into trying to put

Pesach earlier than it is supposed to be. This proves we do NOT begin the Pesach the
moment the 13th is over.
7) There is no question that the Last Supper is a Seder Meal. TRUE or FALSE?
I know of a lot of scholars who want to really attempt to bring reasonable doubt into this
issue and state the Gospels contradict themselves on this point. Some of these scholars even
get specials on the History Channel and the like. Nevertheless, the real answer is TRUE,
there is no doubt as far as the Gospels are concerned, that the Last Supper is most indeed a
Seder running from the end of the 14th to the opening hours of the 15th.
The chief reason why some dont believe this I perceive is due to what we talked about for
the question just answered above (#6). Because the washing of the feet cannot be on the 14th
and because Christian tradition insists this is the Last Supper, then the Last Supper by
definition cannot be a Seder meal. This then gives rise to all manner of theories trying to
explain why John is on a different schedule, but thats a topic for the next question.
Suffice to say for now that once John 13:1-30 is de-coupled from the Last Supper block,
there is no impediment whatsoever from seeing the rest of Johns account as
contemporaneous with the Seder meal as described in Matthew, Mark and Luke.
8) Many NT scholars believe that the account in John is running a day behind the versions in
Matthew, Mark and Luke with regards to the Last Supper, Crucifixion and Resurrection. The
truth of the matter is
A) We cant figure out who is right or wrong because our understanding of first century
Torah observance is limited or contradictory.
B) John only appears to be running a day behind and the reason has to do with mistranslation
of the earliest NT texts.
C) The different accounts are all correct because there were rival traditions on when
different groups kept Pesach.
D) The issue is not with when Pesach starts at all but rather when different parts of the feast
were done by different groups.
Many teachers in Hebrew Roots will insist that C is the right answer, saying that the
Galileans kept Pesach a day earlier than the Jerusalem Jews did or that Yshua and his
disciples were a day earlier than the priests and Pharisees were.

The reality though is that C is false and the correct answer is, D, the issue is not with when
Pesach starts but rather when different parts of the feast were done by different groups.

One reason why answer C could be popular among some of our teachers is that the Talmud
in Pesachim 6:4 states: A festal offering derives from the flock of sheep or from the herd of
oxen, from lambs or from goats, from males or from females, and it is eaten for two days and
the intervening night, to the night of the 15th of Nisan. (The Mishnah by Jacob Neusner, p.
240)

Interestingly enough, we have proof from the Gospels this was actually practiced in the first
century:

And they brought Y'shua from the presence of Qayapa into the Praetorium, and it was
morning and they did not enter into the Praetorium, that they not be defiled before they
had eaten the Paskha. (John 18:28 AENT)

But, by direct reference, sometime after Yochanan 13:30 but before Yshuas arrest in
Yochanan 18:1-12 was the fourth Gospel writers version of the Last Supper and the other
three Gospels directly state Yshua performed the Seder with the prepared lamb (Matthew
26, Mark 14 and Luke 22).

Therefore, the reason the Pharisees has not yet eaten their Pesach lamb was because they
were following the Talmud, not the Torah. The former said the 14th of Abib lamb had to be
eaten or destroyed no later than daybreak on the 15th, but the latter gave the Pharisees another
12 hours to do this instead. The reason may be because of what Josephus said in the Jewish
War, book 6:

So these high priests, upon the coming of that feast which is called the Passover, when
they slay their sacrifices, from the ninth hour till the eleventh, but so that a company not
less than ten belong to every sacrifice, (for it is not lawful for them to feast singly by
themselves,) and many of us are twenty in a company, found the number of sacrifices was
256,500; which, upon the allowance of no more than ten that feast together, amounts to
2,700,200 persons that were pure and holy. (The Jewish War, 6:423-425)

If you only have two hours to slay more than a quarter million lambs, that leaves only the last
hour of the day to slay the lambs for their own households. While the Talmud does not

precisely give a reason for the extension then, I believe it probably had something to do with
them running out of time slaying lambs for the rest of Israel.

Then, as the 14th turns into the 15th, these priests and Pharisees are given until the end of the
15th to offer their first lamb, called the chagigah (from chag, feast, hence festal offering) at
the same time the rest of Israel are doing the second chagigah.

However, if they miss that deadline for the evening sacrifice on the 15th, now the priests and
Pharisees are in violation and are barred from doing Pesach entirely! They must wait another
month to just do the regular seder on 15 Iyar, per Numbers 9.

But because they ran late on the afternoon of the 14th, that is why they still had not eaten their
Pesach lamb when they visited Pilate in the early morning of the next day, the 15th, and if
they got defiled by coming into Pilates housewhich Oral Law also said would happen
that defilement would keep them outside the camp until after sunset, in which case they
would have missed that late afternoon sacrifice and had to wait another month.

As a result, for the priests and Pharisees who were watching Yshua die, his lingering into the
9th hourthe beginning of the time to do the sacrificewas kind of cramping their style. If
they did not leave soon, again they would miss that very deadline.

Therefore, John is not running a day behind. He is simply relating special details related to
advanced halacha that when misunderstood by modern readers make him appear to be so.
9) The timing of First-fruits has nothing to do with the day Yshua rose from the dead. TRUE or
FALSE?
SPECIAL NOTE: On the video I actually mis-spoke and said FALSE when I meant TRUE.
Sorry for any confusion there!
The answer is TRUE, which may seem surprising given that some Scripture verses would appear
to contradict that judgment, such as these:
But now the Mashiyach has risen from the dead, and become the first-fruits of them that
slept. And as by a man came death, so also by a man came the resurrection of the dead. For as it

was by Adam that all men die, so also by the Mashiyach they all live: Everyone in his order; the
Mashiyach was the first-fruits; afterwards, they that are the Mashiyach's, at his coming. (1
Corinthians 15:20-23 AENT)

So whats going on? I mean, if Paul says essentially that Yshua is the first-fruits of the
resurrection how can I possibly say otherwise? The answer isI DIDNT say otherwise!

The key to seeing this is in the way I phrased the question. Please notice that I didnt say firstfruits had nothing to do with Yshuas resurrection, but that the TIMING of first-fruits had
nothing to do with the DAY of the resurrection. The resurrection itself is relevant to first-fruits,
but not in the way most think, but the TIMING is not. Heres why:

Speak to the children of Israel, and say to them, When you come into the land which I give to
you, and you shall reap of its harvest, then you shall bring a sheaf of the first-fruits of your
harvest to the priest: And he shall wave the sheaf before Yahweh, to be accepted for you: on the
following morning after the Shabbat-convocation1 the priest shall wave it.

And you shall offer that day when you wave the sheaf a male lamb without blemish of the first
year for a burnt offering to Yahweh. And the meat offering for two tenths of an ephah of fine
flour mingled with oil, an offering made by fire to Yahweh for a sweet aroma: and the drink
offering for it shall be of wine, a fourth of a hin.

And you shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn, nor green ears, until the exact same day that
you have brought an offering to your Elohim2: it shall be a statute forever throughout your
generations in all your dwellings.

And you shall count to yourselves from the morning following after the Shabbat-convocation,
from the day that you brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven complete weeks3: Even to
1

As defined earlier, in Leviticus 23:6-7, referring to the 15th of Abib.


This refers to the 16th of Abib, the day after the 15th Shabbat-convocation. See Joshua 5:10-13.
3
If the start of the omer count was fixed to Sunday, the first day of the week, there would be no need to command
that the weeks be complete or tamim in Hebrew, because they would automatically be complete, starting each
week on Sunday and ending each week on Saturday. The only reason one would need a separate command to force
2

the morning4 following after the seventh (complete) week shall you number fifty days; and you
shall offer a new meat offering to Yahweh. (Leviticus 23:10-16-Matara)
What all of this means for our question is simple: The First-fruits are offered on the 16th, not the
Sunday dawn on which Yshua rose. And the First-Fruits do NOT rise either but instead they are
gathered from the earth and presented to the priests.
In fact, the first-fruits are presented to the priests, not because they are alive but because they
have just been harvested and are therefore DEAD. Therefore, First-Fruits cannot relate to
resurrection DAY since THEY are not resurrected. However, they DO relate to a part of the
drama surrounding the resurrection:
And on the next day, which was after the sunset, the chief priests and the Pharisees were
gathered with Peelatos. And they were saying to him, "Our master, we have remembered that
the deceiver would say while he was alive that, "After three days, I will arise." Command,
therefore, that they guard the grave until the third day, or else his disciples come steal him in the
night and say to the people that he has risen from the dead. And the last deception should
become worse than the first. Peelatos said to them, "You have the guards. Go and take
precautions as you know." And they departed and took precautions by the grave and set a seal
upon that stone together with the guards. (Matthew 27:62-66 AENT)
Now notice this detailits the priest and the Pharisees that ask this of Pilate, and he tells them
to make preparations. Heres a possible surprise though: By going to the tomb, the priests and
Pharisees have declared that the First-Fruits of what WILL be the resurrection is really DEAD at
this point. The First-Fruit Yshua had been GATHERED FROM LIFE, PLUCKED (crucified)
on the 15th and then buried, so that on the 16th he could be before the priests and Pharisees and
certified as the dead First-Fruits, again, that will later come alive again. So while Yshua doesnt
go to them, they come to him and do the same thing the priests do for the First-Fruits. Then once
he is risen, he becomes the first fruits to those who have gone asleep, as Paul taught.
10) Fill in the blank for the correct days of the week from the choices below: Yshua was
crucified on a ____ and rose on a ____.
the weeks to be complete is because the 16th of Abib can hit any day of the week, and if it hits on a Tuesday, your
weeks must count completely from Tuesday to Monday, and so on.
4
The work here is not boker or yom but rather machar, which has a special meaning the others dont. While the first
two terms can generically refer to either a sunrise or the start of a day, machar specifically refers to the morning
after the current Hebrew day concludes. This becomes important when we consider that any Hebrew day starts in
darkness and has its last half end by sunset, which means the yom or boker part of the Hebrew day is in only 12
hours from its start the previous evening. Depending on the time reference, these different words can yield different
results. If for example the timing begins late in the afternoon, then all three Hebrew terms refer to the next morning.
The current Hebrew day ends that sunset and the next morning on the new day is intended. On the other hand, if the
timing reference starts at night, then boker and yom will be pointing to the next sunrise about 12 hours later but
machar will be pointing to the morning after that, because the next boker-yom is still part of the same Hebrew day
and machar referring to the morning on the following Hebrew day.

A)
B)
C)
D)

Tuesday, Saturday.
Wednesday, Saturday.
Thursday, Sunday.
Friday, Sunday.

The answer isC, Yshua dies on a Thursday and rises on a Sunday morning. Lets see
why. Answer A is eliminated since all four Gospels tell us he rose on the first day of the week,
not the seventh day of the week, so any resurrection before the end of Shabbat is incorrect.
Answer D, that Yshua died on a Friday and rose on a Sunday, the traditional Christian belief, is
also wrong because Matthew 12:40 said that just as Jonah the prophet spent three days and three
nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man spend three days and three nights in
the belly of the earth. No matter how hard the church tries there is no way to make 1 days into
three days and three nights.

Now to counter this, some have suggested that Yshua meant ON the third day rather than three
days and three nights which is actually at the END of the third day. It is true that there are
several places where the vague phrase is on the third day he will rise to life, however this is
clarified by the fact this is the Sign of Jonah:
And Yahweh appointed a great fish to swallow Jonah, and Jonah was in the stomach of the
fish three days and three nights. (Jonah 1:17 Matara)
There is no other way to translate shlosha yamim ushlosha laylot other than three days and
three nights, which Friday to Sunday can never be. If Yshua had meant on the third day
as some Christian scholars believe, I cannot see any reason for him to use the Sign of
JONAH. Instead, it would be more likely for him to call it the Sign of JOSEPH, since
Joseph freed his brothers AFTER TWO DAYS, or on the third day by that definition
(Genesis 42:17-18).
You can only get three days and three nights by counting the last part of Thursday afternoon
as a day which is Scriptural (Joshua 8:29, Matthew 20:1-16). The third night will then end
Sunday dawn, after which he rises (Mark 16:3,9).
That leaves choice B, Wednesday to Saturday, and yes I know a lot of Hebrew Roots folks
favor this one, but it is still incorrect. Wednesday is wrong because the astronomy is
unequivocal that in the year Yshua died Wednesday was the 14th of Abib, and he did that
Seder at that time, which means he cannot be dead by 3 PM that same day.

Similarly, Saturday is also wrong because yes, while it is true Saturday NIGHT is the first
day of the week, there is only one DAWN on the first day of the week and thats Sunday
morning. Sorry, there is no way around the fact that he rose at DAWN.
John 20:1 tells us it was still dark when the women set off for the tomb, but this dark time
could not be early in the night because women would not travel alone without male escort at
that time. But if the night was ending and sunrise was near, that makes perfect sense. It was
safe to travel then.
Also, since there was an earthquake the moment Yshua died (Matthew 27:54) it makes sense
that the earthquake the women experienced on the way, as the sun rose (Mark 16:2) marked
the moment of his resurrection, which concords with statements in all four Gospels that
Yshua rose at the end of the night, not at its beginning:
...as the first of the week was dawning, came Maryam of Magdala and the other Maryam
that they might see the grave. And behold a great earthquake occurred for a Messenger of
Master YHWH descended from heaven and came and rolled away the boulder from the
entrance, and he was sitting upon it. (Matthew 28:1-2 AENT)
And when the Shabbat had passed, Maryam of Magdala and Maryam the mother of
Ya'akov and Shalom bought spices that they might come to anoint him. And at early morning
on the first of the week, they came to the cemetery as the sun was rising... Then, at early
morning on the first of the week, he had risen and appeared first to Maryam of
Magdala, she from whom he had cast out seven demons. (Mark 16:1-2,9 AENT)
Now on the first day of the week, at dawn while still dark, they came to the tomb and
brought the spices, those, which they had prepared. And there were other women with them.
(Luke 24:1 AENT)
On the first of the week, in the morning while it was dark, Maryam of Magdala came to
the tomb and saw that the stone was removed from the grave. (John 20:1 AENT)
Granted the language in Matthew and Mark is much stronger than it is in Luke and John in that
the first two affirm that the approach of the women and the resurrection happened at dawn on the
first day, whereas the last two simply put the women there at that time and dont directly confirm
the latter. However, Luke and John also dont contradict Matthew and Mark either, and I would
find it hard to harmonize the accounts with the idea that two of the Gospels are lying and two
others are telling the truth, when the reality is the general statements of some are easily
harmonized into the specific statements of the others.
11) The day that Yshua died was also
A) The 14th, the Preparation Day for the Annual Shabbat.
B) A Friday afternoon, the preparation time for the Weekly Shabbat.

C)
D)
E)
F)
G)

Both a regular Shabbat and an Annual Shabbat.


An Annual Shabbat that was ending.
An Annual Shabbat that was beginning.
In between an Annual and a Weekly Shabbat.
Cloudy with a chance of supernatural darkness and earthquakes.

The answer is: D, an Annual Shabbat was ending. While A is correct that the 14th of Abib
is the Preparation Day, Yshua is not arrested until the start of the 15th. He is totally free and
therefore also alive ALL day on the 14th, again as these references we saw before prove:
Now on the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the disciples drew near to Y'shua and
said to him, "Where do you want us to prepare for you to eat the Paskha?" (Matthew 26:17
AENT)
And in the first day of the unleavened bread in which the Yehudeans slay the Paskha, his
disciples were saying to him, "Where do you desire us to go for you to prepare the Paskha to
eat?" (Mark 14:12 AENT)
And the day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread arrived during which there was the custom
that the Paskha be slaughtered And Y'shua sent Keefa and Yochanan and said to them, "Go.
Prepare the Paskha for us that we may eat." And they said to him, "Where do you want us to
prepare it?" (Luke 22:7-9 AENT)
Once it is established that Yshua could not have died on the 14th, the 15th of Abib is the only
other viable alternative, and late afternoon on the 15th is as the Annual Shabbat (the First Day
of the Feast of Unleavened Bread) is as that Annual Shabbat is ENDING.
Please see the attached Powerpoint When Did Yshua Die? for more information on this
complicated issue. But for now the main point is, that several Aramaic words were mangled
into Greek and left a false impression.
For example, erubata is sometimes thought to mean either Friday (which we know is
wrong) or day of preparation, which is either the afternoon of the 14th for the Annual
Shabbat (too early) or the afternoon of the 16th for the weekly Shabbat (way too late).
It was then translated into Greek three times in John (19:14, 31 and 42) as paraskue, which
means day of preparation for a Shabbat or a feast. If that rendering is correct, then
Yshuas death day indeed could only be a Wednesday or Friday afternoon, and yet I have
chosen Thursday!
In consulting other Aramaic versions, they all seem to be following in line with the Greek
understanding. But, in reality, erubata means evening in 19:14 describing the evening of
the 14th as having turned over to the 15th now that night has passed and it is dawn, or the
sixth hour from midnight by Roman time.

As a result, John 19:14s reading of werubata hawat dpetzkha is closer to and the evening
of the Paskha (i.e. from the sunset ending the 14th to the next morning of the 15th, or 6th hour)
had turned over into the dawn.
The second place we see erubata/paraskue are several references in 19:31. Lets take these
one at a time. In the opening line we have din metil derubata, which is literally rendered
since because it was the setting of the day or since because it was evening. Either way, it
describes the afternoon ending.
Next in 19:31 is the phrase metil dshabta nagha, or because the Shabbat was closing
down/spending the night. What is neat about this one is that nagha can also mean shining,
dawning and this meaning I believe was what the Greek redactor thought, so he rendered it
and the Sabbath was dawning, meaning the weekly Sabbath was metaphorically about to
begin.
Additionally, the issue as to whether nagha is spending the night/closing down or
dawning/beginning rests on whether or not it IS a Shabbat of ANY kind at that MOMENT.
This is where the third and final reading of 19:31 helps: yoma hwa gyr raba yoma dshabta
or, because the day was a Great Shabbat day. This is about the day that is ending, not
about the day that is about to start, and that current day IS a HIGH SHABBAT, which can
only mean the 15th, but in a few hours the 15th will be over and go to bed, as the expression
goes.
Then 19:42 says, metil dshabta aila howat or because that Shabbat that was brought was
turning over, i.e. ending.
Therefore, the Aramaic never uses the phrase preparation day even though it was put into
Greek which does use that term. In fact preparation day in Aramaic is a completely
different term, more akin to yoma dnetivata which never appears in the Aramaic NT.
And one more thing, another possible answer in addition to this one is G: Cloudy with a
chance of supernatural darkness and earthquakes!
12) Fill in the blanks. The day that Yshua died also must correspond to the ___ day of Abib
because___
A) 14th, because he is our Pesach lamb that must be sacrificed on that day to align with the
evening sacrifice and 1 Corinthians 5:7.
B) 15th, because Matthew 26:17 and Luke 22:7-9 have Yshua alive all day on the 14th,
including the late afternoon when he was otherwise supposed to have been dead.
C) 14th, because Mashiyach cannot be crucified nor the Sanhedrin meet to condemn him on
an Annual Shabbat.
D) 14th, because the Pesach started just after sunset on the 13th, and he was arrested and
condemned that night, dying the following afternoon.
E) 15th, because in the year Yshua died there had to be back to back Shabbats, where the
Annual was followed immediately by the Weekly.

F) 15th, because Amos 9 predicts that he must die in the daylight part of a feast that is turned
into mourning.
G) The answer is B, the 15th, because Matthew 26:17 and Luke 22:7-9 have Yshua alive
all day on the 14th, including the late afternoon when he was otherwise supposed to
have been dead.

Special Follow-up Teaching:


Fun with Pesach Part 3: The Quiz About the Quiz!
Please Note: For more information on the timelines, please see the two timeline charts at
the end of this teaching!

Shalom all. When I did the Fun with Pesach quiz last week I had absolutely no idea a sequel
was in the works, but many of you made sure it was with your excellent questions. The good
news is: I received an overwhelming response with folks having enthusiastic questions and
comments!
And the not so good news is: I received an overwhelming response with folks having
enthusiastic questions and comments! But please dont get me wrongI was and am very
grateful for the level of interest this quiz generated, as I hoped it would, in contrast to a typical
lecture.
The only thing was, it was the will of the people that kind of forced me to change my plans for
this week, and very soon, I will be writing the 2016 Pesach Special on top of it! So the question
I imagine some of you may have is, why answer these questions now? Why not just incorporate
the answers into the special teaching?
The answer is, because if I do that it will be too late for many of the people who wrote these
questions to me. You see, a majority of these questioners run fellowships for other believers to
attend. So, if I dont answer their questions now, they have no time to plan, so I have to get the
proverbial house in order before the chag! And, as it also turned out, the one getting quizzed
now was me.
All that said, there still remained my firm belief in the Member Q&A process i.e. that if one
person has a question others also likely do, so how much more is that idea true when I get many
of these questions? In fact, some of these questions I did not even have time to answer back
individually, so I am doing them here, in no particular arrangement, theme or order. Here we go!

Shalom Brother Andrew,


Planning for Pesach, a couple of questions:
1. Am I correct in saying Y'shua's execution was on Wednesday 3/23 and resurrection on
Shabbat 3/26?

2. If resurrection is on Shabbat what is a good and proper way to add celebration of resurrection
to the Shabbat service? Thank you! Blessings to you!
My response back:
Shalom Brother...sorry but I have another opinion about that. Y'shua is alive all day on the 14th
of Abib (Matt. 26:17, Mark 14:12-15, Luke 22:7-9) as the earliest time they could slaughter and
prepare the lamb and the earliest possible time to have "the first day of the feast of unleavened
bread" are the same date--the 14th of Abib--which in Y'shua's death year of 30 CE was a
Wednesday. I know folks have a hard time accepting this and it takes a while to explain, but yes,
Y'shua died on the 15th, a High Shabbat (John 19:31), because the Romans did not give a rip
about whether the Jews were having a feast or not and they ran the whole show.
Resurrection Day in all 4 Gospels is not just "first day of the week", but John 20:1 makes it clear
the women set out while it was still dark, but near dawn (the dead of night was dangerous for
women to go out without a male escort) and the sun rose on the way, at the moment of
resurrection and the earthquake marked it (Mark 16:2-9). That is why Messiah could not rise on
a Saturday night and I know Wed-Sat is a popular HR alternative to Fri-Sun in the church but I
have to disagree with it due to Scripture, a small amount of Talmud and astronomy that yields
the right dates.
And for this year the calendar days just happen to be matching the days of the week that the
washing of the feet, the "Last Supper", crucifixion and resurrection occurred in 30 CE. Relating
to our secular calendar, the concordances are...
Abib 13 late afternoon to start of the 14th, when the apostles feet are washedTuesday, March
22nd (evening)
Abib 14 [Last Supper/Seder just before and into the 15th, the start of FULB]Date this year,
2016: Wednesday, March 23rd
Abib 15 (early hours overnight, date this year, 2016: Thursday, March 24tharrest and various
sham trials.
Abib 15 (dawn to 6 PM, date this year, 2016: Thursday, March 24th)condemned by Pilate,
crucified and buried before sunset.
Abib 16/Bikurrim or First-Fruits (Date this year, 2016: daylight period of Friday, March
25th)priests and Pharisees place seal on tomb.
Abib 17 (Friday sunset to Saturday sunset. Date this year, 2016:March 26th-27th)the women
rest "according to the commandment", i.e. the 4th, the weekly Shabbat.
Abib 18 (dawn on Sunday, March 28th)Qyemteh d'Maran (the resurrection of our
Master/Resurrection Day)

Please note that the only difference in 30 CE was simply that our Gregorian calendar dates were
different, not the Hebrew dates or the days of the week they happened on. For your reference, the
Gregorian dates for these events in 30 CE are April 2nd-7th. Can you imagine my surprise when
I learned the solar day of his resurrection was my birthday and the 2000th anniversary of that
event will hit on the day I turn 66 years old, Father Yah willing if I am still here?
As to how that translates into Pesach liturgy, I would need to think on that. I did deal with it
extemporaneously in the seder I did last year and would also need to see my notes for the times I
referred to this timeline. Again sorry that I am in a position here that is not popular and is
somewhat controversial, but I have to where the evidence and the Ruach leads, popular or not.
Hope this helps! Andrew
Hello Andrew. In your Bonus Teaching Fun With Pesach, Part 2 you say that only 1 lamb is
slain on the 14th of Aviv. Exodus 12:3 reads as follows: Speak to the whole community of Israel
and say that on the tenth of this month each of them shall take a lamb to a family, a lamb to a
household (JPS). (Emphasis ours)
Josephus says So these high priests, upon the coming of their feast which is called the
Passover, when they slay their sacrifices, from the ninth hour till the eleventh, but so that a
company not less than ten belong to every sacrifice (for it is not lawful for them to feast singly by
themselves), and many of us are twenty in a company, found the number of sacrifices was two
hundred and fifty-six thousand five hundred; ... (Jewish Wars 6.9.3). (Emphasis ours)
From the above citations, it is apparent that more than one lamb was killed on the 14th of
Aviv. Josephus states that some 256,500 lambs were killed in the Temple during Passover at the
time of his writing. We would appreciate your thoughts and comments on this.
So I wrote back and said this:
Shalom...yes but that's what exactly what I am saying. There is one lamb slain per group on the
14th of Abib. Technically 12:3 talks about SELECTING a lamb on the 10th, but not KILLING
it. The selection of the lamb on the 10th was only at Exodus; all other references in Scripture
have the 1 lamb per group slain on the 14th. I am pretty sure I did NOT say in the notes or on the
vid that it was one lamb PER PERSON, Hope this helps! Andrew
Then they wrote back again and said:
Hello Andrew,
Your response undoubtedly raises the question: From 15th to 21st Aviv does EACH group offer
7 lambs per day OR are 7 lambs offered by the WHOLE congregation of Israel each day?

Incidentally, if you read our former email carefully, in NO WAY were we asserting that ONE
LAMB PER PERSON was slain, NOR were we saying that you said so either. Also, we are fully
aware about the Israelites SELECTING the lamb on the 10th of Aviv and KILLING it on the
14th of Aviv as per Exodus 12. Our citation of Exodus 12:3 was to establish that it was 1 lamb
per household or group and NOT 1 lamb for the whole congregation of Israel. Evidently, 1 lamb
per household or group was the practice during the 1st Century CE since Josephus estimates that
256,500 lambs in total were slain by the households or groups on 14th Aviv (Jewish Wars 6.9.3).
Shalom.
My answer:
Thanks again for following up! Actually, I think we are kind of saying the exact same thing but
in different terms. I was actually agreeing with what you were asking and saying about the lambs
on the 14th being slain per household.
The numbers Josephus gives are important. In addition to the 256,500 he mentions and which
you quote above as the total number of lambs, he also says in that same line that the total amount
of people who constituted a household eating those lambs was 2,700,200 persons that were pure
and Set-apart. Simple division yields an average household of 10.53 people, which also
matches what Josephus said a little earlier as well.
Sorry that your citation of Exodus 12:3 and its intended focus or purpose was not clear to me.
Understand please that I get a lot of these emails and often this verse is used to prove that the
14th allegedly was not the time to KILL the lamb, when of course it is, so that was what I
responded to. There have been many that thought Exodus 12:3 proves a Last Supper on the 13th,
or at least not having to be on the 14th, so when the intent was not clear, thats what I kind of
went with.
I apologize once more for being premature there. It is also due to the vagueness of some
translations that talk of taking that lamb, which equates in the minds of some killing the
lamb even though a line or two later that latter idea is proven incorrect.
As for your other question, the same procedureexcept for 7 year old lambs without blemish
applies for the remaining 7 days. It is again per household and not per the entire congregation of
Israel that a total of 49 more lambs are killed per group averaging about 10 people each. Such is
clear I believe from these passages of Scripture, first, with respect to the households as described
with Josiahs Pesach:
And Yoshiyahu gave the lay people lambs and young goats from the flock, all for
Passover offerings for everyone present, to the number of thirty thousand, and three
thousand cattle these were from the sovereigns possessions. And his leaders
contributed a voluntary offering to the people, to the priests, and to the Lwites. Hilqiyah,
and Zekaryahu, and Yehil, leaders of the House of Elohim, gave to the priests for the

Passover offerings two thousand six hundred, and three hundred cattle; and
Konanyahu, his brothers Shemayahu and Nethanl, and Hashabyahu and Yeil
and Yozabad, chiefs of the Lwites, gave to the Lwites for Passover offerings five
thousand, and five hundred cattle.
And the service was prepared, and the priests stood in their places, and the Lwites in
their divisions, according to the command of the sovereign, and they slaughtered the
Passover.
And the priests sprinkled out of their hands, while the Lwites were skinning. And they
removed the burnt offerings, to give them to the divisions of the fathers houses of the lay
people, to bring to , as it is written in the Book of Mosheh, and the same with the
cattle. So they roasted the Passover offerings with fire according to the right-ruling, and
they boiled the set-apart offerings in pots, and in cauldrons, and in bowls, and brought
them speedily to all the lay people. And afterward they prepared for themselves and
for the priests, because the priests, the sons of Aharon, were offering burnt offerings
and fat until night. So the Lwites prepared for themselves and for the priests, the sons
of Aharon.
And the singers, the sons of Asaph, were in their places, according to the command of
Dawid, and Asaph, and Hman, and Yeduthun the seer of the sovereign. And the
gatekeepers at each gate did not have to leave their position, because their brothers the
Lwites prepared for them.
And all the service of was prepared that day, to perform the Passover and to
offer burnt offerings on the altar of , according to the command of Sovereign
Yoshiyahu. And the children of Yisral who were present performed the Passover
at that time, and the Festival of Unleavened Bread for seven days. (2 Chronicles 35:717, The Scriptures 1998; see also Luke 2:41-50)
And then the Scripture confirms this idea in a more general fashion, about the number and timing
of the lambs slain:
And in the first month, on the fourteenth day, is the Passover of , and on the fifteenth
day of this month is a festival. For seven days unleavened bread is eaten. On the first day
is a set-apart gathering, you do no servile work. And you shall bring near an offering
made by fire as a burnt offering to : two young bulls and one ram, and seven
lambs a year old, perfect ones they are for you, and their grain offering, fine flour
mixed with oil. Prepare three-tenths of an phah for a bull, and two-tenths for a ram.
(Numbers 28:16-20, The Scriptures 1998)
And Josephus concurs, putting it this way:

249

The feast of unleavened bread succeeds that of the passover, and falls on the fifteenth
day of the month, and continues seven days, wherein they feed on unleavened bread; on
every one of which days two bulls are killed, and one ram, and seven lambs. Now
these lambs are entirely burnt, besides the kid of the goats which is added to all the rest,
for sins; for it is intended as a feast for the priest on every one of those days. (Antiquities,
3:249)
Okay, moving on to the next series:
Dear Jaye & Andrew,
I met with my two friends today for Shabbot and we watch your Torah portion when we get
together and study and midrash after wards. We are all fairly new in the "Hebraic Roots"
coming out of various "Christian denominations". There were a couple of things we are still
confused on and hope you can clarify please. On question #3 the answer is false that Pesach
and Feast of Unleavened Bread are interchangeable.
However scripture you gave such as in Mk. 14:12 Lk. 22:7- 9 it states Now on the first day of the
Feast of Unleavened Bread the disciples drew near to Y'shua and said to him, "where do you
want us to prepare for you to eat the Paskha? You stated on video that Paskha is the Passover
lamb & the Sedar which is the 14th.
Now if those days are NOT interchangeable and your calendar does say the Feast of Unleavened
Bread is the next day the 15th of Abib then how can the meet the day after Paskha to ask Y'shua
where to prepare for the meal that should take place the night before?
My answer:
Shalomthank you for writing. You may recall I also asked for folks to keep the notes available
while I taught because the questions were worded very precisely. For the first question, what the
notes said and what I said was:
The terms Pesach and Feast of Unleavened Bread are always interchangeable and
refer to the same exact thing. TRUE or FALSE?
As I indicated in the answer section (page 16), what made the answer FALSE was the word
"always interchangeable", and I mentioned on the video that sometimes in the NT Pesach was
interchangeable with Feast of Unleavened Bread and sometimes Pesach only referred to the
14th. So because it wasn't ALWAYS the case, the statement was false.
The same person then asks the next question:
The second question is we all have the understanding based on scripture when the Israelites left
Egypt and they slaughter the lamb on the 14th of Abib putting the blood on the door post and

heading out on the 15th in the night. We have all been taught Y'shua was and should be the 1st
lamb slain and should be on Pesach/Passover and not killed on the 15th which is also a High
Shabbot which is against what Torah teaches. Thank you for any clarification.
And heres my answer:
As for the second issue, there were many lines of evidence that proved Y'shua was alive all day
on the 14th--and multiple scriptures were used throughout the notes (Matthew 26:17, Mark
14:12, Luke 22:7-9) that told us the disciples asked "where can we prepare the Pesach lamb" on
the "first day of unleavened bread" which in context must be the 14th. They would not have had
the lamb sacrificed (which they had to do before "preparing" it) earlier than the 14th and the
15th, which is a High Shabbat, is called "a high day" in John 19:31.
That phrase in John 19:31 is about the day that currently is ending and NOT about the day that
is coming. And it can't be Friday because it violated the 3 day/3 night requirement in Matthew
12:40 (comp. to Jonah 1:17). I realize this is not what is usually taught...but I do feel the
Scripture supports what I am saying, along with other historical sources that help the Scripture
and Biblical astronomy.
Finally we talked about in the notes and on the video why there were 50 passover lambs, and
they were all identical. They were all male lambs without blemish a year old. There is absolutely
no evidence that Y'shua had to be ONLY that first passover lamb because as I said that timing is
not in the Scripture. John 18:28 though tells us the Pharisees had not eaten their lamb even 12
hours after the Galileans had the previous evening.. This was because of the Talmud, not the
Torah, as we also explained. Hope this helps! Andrew
This answer though usually brings up the following question from the same person:
Hi Andrew,
Yes that all helps. Yes we all had our notes in front of us, but I think because so much is new to
us and we are still sorting through, we get lost easily. When your answer was FALSE to the
ALWAYS we then went to the NEVER interchangeable which gave us the problem.
My comment here: Its okaythese types of questions used to trip me up all the time when I was
younger. It took a while for me to realize that while the OPPOSITE of always is NEVER, the
FALSITY of always is simply NOT always, which can include never. Moving on
So that is cleared up along with Y'shua not having to be the first slain lamb on the 14 Pesach, but
when I was questioning you about Y'shua being slain late the 15th that being a High Shabbot my
question was wouldn't that be against Torah law because of doing something like that on a high
Shabbot, knowing He had to be taken down before sunset and prepared for burial all that is work
on a Set Apart Day. I wasn't disputing the 3 days or 3 nights. Just trying to understand Torah in
regards to what is right on a Set Apart day.

I certainly appreciate all your study and time and most of all your challenges for us to study
also. Sometimes though as in this case, I have had a difficult time making heads or tails of what
I'm studying if it's right or wrong.
Also, its interesting- we came up with the idea that Torah was broken and it didn't matter
because the Romans were in charge, however we weren't sure about that because scripture said
the Romans were afraid to seize Y'shua on the 14th Pesach because it was the feast and they
were concerned about an uproar with the Jews. So this has been a great study. Again thank you
so much for your time. Yah Bless.
And I said this:
Shalom. You are welcome. You might want to look at though Matthew 26:3-5 and Mark 14:1-2.
In both places it was NOT the Romans who were worried about a riot, but the Jewish leadership,
and well they should have been, because as Caiaphas accurately predicted, "If we let him go on
like this the Romans will come and take away our place and our nation". So at no time were the
ROMANS scared of riots in the streets. In fact, they probably would have enjoyed it, thinking it
little more than target practice. Andrew
And heres how I answered the exact same question from another person:
The Sanhedrin did an ILLEGAL trial of Y'shua. Not only were they not supposed to meet on
Shabbat, they were not supposed to convene a capital case at night when many members would
be sleeping or unavailable. In fact, the violations of the Sanhedrin were so egregious that while
we were in Israel my publisher and I heard from people who know folks on the Sanhedrin and
they said to us that the new Sanhedrin is considering condemning the old one for the
mishandling of the Y'shua case, that they violated both Torah and Oral Law also.
It may be hard to come to grips with this, but the reality is that Oral Law superseded Torah
observance in 1st century Israel. Torah commanded, to give just one example, that the Pesach14th lamb must be eaten or consumed by daybreak on the 15th. Pesachim 6:4--with details
backed up in John 18:28--proved that the Pharisees disregarded Torah and extended the
deadline to the 15th at sunset. Technically speaking, they allowed the lamb roasted as the 14th
was ending to be eaten as the 15th was ending when Torah required a SEPARATE lamb be
sacrificed then.
The Sanhedrin was NOT Torah observant and Y'shua said so on many occasions (Matthew 15:23, Mark 7:7-8, John 5:45-47, 7:19). As Y'shua said, "Moshe gave you the Torah yet not one man
among you keeps it."

The other issue remains that Matthew 26:17 clearly states in all translations that the Feast of
Unleavened Bread had already started or, to be more precise, that the day on which the
Passover offering was given had already begun, the 14th. Take care! Andrew
And BTW, trust me when I tell all of you, this was just a sampling of the questions I got, not just
for Fun with Pesach per se but with calendar questions in general, for such is the case always
at this time of year, but I am happy to help where I can!
Again, please consult the timeline charts, starting on the next page.

Yeshua washes disciples


feet (late 13th to early
14th)