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LESSON PLAN OUTLINE

JMU Elementary Education Program

Kelsey Mercadante
Mrs. Lowery, Paul Munro Elementary School, 1st Grade
Date: September 14th, 2015. Time: 1:40-2:05

A. TITLE OF LESSON: Introduction: Meet the Sun


B. CONTEXT OF LESSON
During this lesson, students will be introduced to the Sun, Earths nearest star. Students will
go outside and observe the sun. We will record observations as a class. They will then
experience a read-aloud that introduces the Sun. If it isnt sunny outside, students will view a
video clip that talks about the Sun and shows vivid images of the real Sun.
C. UNWRAPPING THE VIRGINIA STANDARDS OF LEARNING
1. Grade Level and Content Area:
First Grade: Science
2. Standard and Indicators:
SOL 1.6 The student will investigate and understand the basic relationships
between the sun and Earth. Key concepts include
a) the sun is the source of energy and light that warms the land, air, and
water; and
b) the suns relative position in the morning is east and in the late
afternoon is west.

Blooms Taxonomy
Levels:
Apply
D. LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Understand

Know

Do

U1: The sun provides energy,


which warms the land, air, and
water on Earth.

E. ASSESSING LEARNING

K1: The sun is a star.


K2: The sun provides heat and
light.

D1: Explain that the sun is a


star, which gives off heat and
light.

I will assess students by observation. Students will participate when they generate
observations about the sun. Students will also participate in discussion about the observations and
how they compare with the information presented in the book.
F. MATERIALS NEEDED
1.
2.
3.
4.

Book The Sun: Our Nearest Star


Yellow bulletin board paper (Cut in a circle to resemble a sun)
Marker to write on bulletin board paper
United Streaming Video- Our Sun (if it isnt sunny outside).

G. PROCEDURE
Prep:
Get yellow bulletin board paper and cut in a circle to resemble a sun
Get The Sun: Our Nearest Star book
Engage:
Tell the class that today we are going to learn about the sun.
Ask students what they already know about the sun.
Tell students that we are going to go outside to observe the sun
Implementation:
*When students are outside, remind students to NOT look directly as the sun. Explain
that observations are not only things we see but what we feel/touch, hear, and taste
(encourage students to use 5 senses).
Have students tightly close their eyes and face the sun.
o Have them describe what the sun feels like.
o Explain that they have made an observation.
Observe objects in direct sunlight and objects in the shade. What observations can
students make?
Return to classroom and discuss student observations.
Record their observations on the large sun/bulletin board paper.
If they have difficulty coming up with a list of observations consider the following
questions:
o What color is the sun?
o What size? What shape?
o What is the sun?
o Is the sun near or far?
o What does the sun do?
Read the book The Sun: Our Nearest Star. Share pictures as I read
Closure:
After book, have students go through the list of observations generated to the sun cutout
and identify what information from the book supports their observations. Circle them as
you discuss them.
Display the sun in the class for the duration of the sunny days unit if find a space.

H. WHAT COULD GO WRONG WITH THIS LESSON AND WHAT WILL YOU DO
ABOUT IT?
It may not be a sunny day (it may be too cloud/rainy to see sun) and the students may not be
able to observe the sun outside.
o I will have to be flexible. I will show students a video of the sun instead, that way the
students still get to see a real life sun and make observations. (Students can make
observations outside or observations on the video). I would still ask students how the
sun feels (they should know it is warm, not cold).
After telling students to not look directly in the sun, a student may still look directly in the
sun, and may complain about how it hurt his/her eyes.
o Explain to the class, that is why I told them not to look directly at it. Explain how the
sun is very powerful and bright.
During the read-aloud, some students may be unengaged.
o Engage them by asking them a question about the story.
Students may be bothering one another on the rug.
o Separate the students or move a student to another spot on the rug if they are creating
a problem.
When I question students at the end of the lesson and have them make connections between
the book and the observations, students may not be able to think of anything.
o Guide them by reminding students of what we learned about in the story and see if
they see anything that is similar on the cutout sun.