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STAGE 2 AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE STUDIES

Assessment type 2: Skills and Applications Tasks


Name of assessment: Animal Health and Disease Management
Name: ___________________

SACE number: ________________________

Purpose
This task allows you to:
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and practices in animal
health
Apply concepts and evidence to solve problems
Use correct scientific terms.
Description of Assessment
Animal health on farms is of major importance to agriculture and animal welfare in
Australia. Traceability of animals along with the protection of them and the farming
community from common diseases are some of the issues. Animal farmers must be able to
use strategies to maximise productivity while ensuring animal welfare is at the highest
standards.
Part 1: Vaccinations

2016 Stage 2 Animal Nutrition

GLANVAC 6 VACCINE

Description

Glanvac 6 provides sheep and goats with


protection against Cheesy Gland (CLA) and
the five main clostridial diseases; black
disease, black leg, malignant oedema, pulpy
kidney, and tetanus.
Glanvac 6 utilises Zoetis' ultra-filtration
technology, which selectively removes
unwanted particles during the production
process. This allows the vaccine to produce a
more targeted immune response in sheep,
while providing producers with the
convenience of a 1mL dose rate.

Approved Uses

Control of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and


prevention of enterotoxaemia (pulpy kidney
disease), tetanus, black disease, malignant
oedema and blackleg in sheep, lambs, goats,
and kids; swelled head in rams.

Key Features

Maintain a high level of disease protection in


the breeding flock for the months after
vaccination.
Improve lamb marking percentages by
preventing clostridial deaths such as pulpy
kidney.
Improve wool quality and quantity by protecting
against cheesy gland.
Improve meat quality through cheesy gland
protection, ensuring export and domestic
customers receive a quality product.

Additional Information

Localised swelling may develop at the injection


site and a firm nodular lump may persist for
some weeks or even months.
Storage:
Store at 2C to 8C (refrigerate. Do not freeze.)
Protect from light.
Withholding Period
Nil
Schedule:
Nil

Caution: Avoid Carcass Damage

Packaging
Injection (plastic pack): 100mL, 250mL, 500mL

Dosage and Administration

Inject 1mL subcutaneously on the side of the


neck just behind and below the base of the ear.
In previously unvaccinated animals of all ages,
give a 1mL dose and repeat 4 weeks later.
Give a booster dose of 1mL 12 months after
the two initial doses to confer lifelong immunity
against tetanus.
Give all animals annual booster doses to
control caseous lymphadenitis (CLA).
Where possible give the annual booster prior
to the time of maximum risk, e.g. transfer to
lush pasture or grain feeding in the case of
enterotoxaemia.
Pregnant ewes: Give previously unvaccinated
animals 1mL at the time of joining; repeat at up
to 4 weeks before the expected date of birth.
Omit the dose at joining in previously
vaccinated animals.

Vaccinated pregnant ewes will pass immunity


onto their lambs in the colostrum; lambs should
be protected for the first 6 to 8 weeks of life.
This product can be stored and used for up to
30 days after first opening. On each
subsequent reuse, swab the opening with a
suitable disinfectant (for example, methylated
spirits) both before and after using. A sterile
needle must be used each time product is
removed. Store unused material upright, at 2C
to 8C (refrigerated) and in the original
cardboard packaging to protect from light.

Sterilise all injection equipment by boiling in


water for 10 minutes before use. Avoid use of
strong disinfectants.
Maintain cleanliness at all times during
vaccination. Great care must be taken to avoid
contamination of the vaccine, needle and
internal parts of the syringe by contact with
unsterile surfaces or unwashed hands.
Keep needles sharp and clean. Replace
frequently.
Use the shortest possible needle, not
exceeding 15mm in length.
As far as possible avoid injection ofthe animals
during wet weather or under dusty conditions.
This product must be injected only under the
skin, (subcutaneously).
Inject high on the neck behind the ear, i.e.
under the skin on the side ofthe neck (ust
behind and below the base of the ear). Do not
inject at any other site.

2016 Stage 2 Animal Health and Disease Management

1. Using the graphs and Glanvac 6 information, answer the following:


2. Explain why lambs need to be vaccinatedat6 weeks, 14 weeks and then 12
monthly.
3. Why are pregnant ewes vaccinated 4 weeks before expected birth?
4. Farmer Sue has a mob of 300 breeding ewes. Suggest a vaccination program for
her.
5. What is the dose rate for the animals?
6. How many animals will a 100 ml box treat?
7. If the box cost $34.00 what is the cost per sheep?
8. How can you avoid carcass damage?
9. List the diseases that the vaccine prevents
10. Explain the difference between vaccine and antiserum
11. Injections are given subcutaneous, intravenous and intra-muscular. Explain these
terms and show on an animal where they are most likely to be given

11.

The following information is about common sheep diseases.

Ryegrass staggers caused by grazing rye-grass colonized by fungus. The sheep when
affected move with a stiff action and if forced to move too far will collapse with their head
held back and legs stiffly extended. If left alone it will recover but often death occurs by
crows or drowning.
Black leg this sometimes as sudden death in weaners with no obvious predisposing
cause. It also occurs as a wound infection following mulesing, lamb marking, shearing.
Cheesy gland cheesy lumps form in lymph glands. Overseas countries do not like this.
Use a vaccine to control.
2016 Stage 2 Animal Nutrition

Cobalt deficiency loss of appetite, unthritfiness, anemia. Affects young sheep 1-18
months. Drench or inject with vitamin B12.
a)
b)
c)
d)

What are the symptoms of two of these diseases?


What does symptom mean?
In black leg what does no obvious predisposing cause mean?
What are the animals natural barriers to disease?

Part 2: Zoonoses
1. What is a zoonotic disease?
2. Give an example and briefly describe the symptoms and how it is spread.
Part 3: Quarantine issues Biosecurity
In 2007 a major outbreak of equine influenza occurred in Australia. Read the information
and answer the questions.
Animal and Plant Biosecurity Branch
26 August 2007
]it is critical that horses be left on the place they are currently located to minimise
contact with potentially infected horses. Owners/managers must also take
measures to ensure they do not transfer the infection to horses.
Equine influenza is a disease easily spread from horse to horse. Most horses get the virus
by being close to another horse. You can reduce the risks of this occurring by leaving
the horse(s) where they are currently located. This is why movement of horses has
been stopped.
If you have contact with horses other than your own, there are simple things you should do
to prevent infecting your horses.
If possible, allow 72 hours between contact with other horses and your own horses. If this
is not possible, make sure you change all clothing and shower and wash you hair. Equine
influenza is readily killed by detergents/soaps. Clothes should be washed with warm/hot
water and washing powder.
Do not transfer any equipment between horses apart from your own horses. This includes
halters, bridles, twitches, saddles, horse floats, horse trucks, etc. As the virus is fragile,
time (allow at least a week, preferably in the sun) plus disinfection will make them safe.
Disinfection requires that objects are scrupulously clean and then apply disinfectants as
per the instructions.
1. Describe the process you would use if you visited horses on a friends property to
ride and took your own saddle and then returned home to your horses.
2. Outline a procedure you should take if you are bringing in new stock (sheep or
cattle) to your property.
3. Discuss why Australia has such strict quarantine measures in place compared with
the rest of the world.
Assessment conditions
This task is to be completed individually in class time and own time. The report format is
negotiable.
2016 Stage 2 Animal Health and Disease Management

Learning Requirements

Assessment Design Criteria

Capabilities

1. Demonstrate knowledge
and understanding of
agricultural and
horticultural concepts,
practices, and principles
including ecological
sustainability

Investigation
The specific features are as follows:
I1 Design of agriculture and horticulture investigations.

Communication
Citizenship
Personal
Development
Work
Learning

2. Demonstrate planning
and the application of
practical skills using
safe, cooperative work
practices and
appropriate technologies

3. Design and undertake


practical and other
investigations in
agriculture and
horticulture, analyse
results, form
conclusions, and make
recommendations
4. Obtain and evaluate
social, cultural,
environmental, and
economic information
and data about issues
facing agricultural and
horticultural enterprises
and their impacts on
local, national, and
global markets and
communities
5. Communicate
information and
reasoning using
appropriate agricultural
and horticultural
terminology and
conventions.

I2 Selection and acknowledgment of information and data


about agriculture and horticulture and relevant issues in
agriculture and horticulture from different sources.
I3 Manipulation of apparatus, equipment, and technological
tools to implement safe and ethical investigation
procedures.
I4 The obtaining, recording, and display of findings of
investigations using appropriate conventions and formats.

Analysis and Evaluation


The specific features are as follows:
AE1 Analysis of data and concepts and their connections, to
formulate conclusions and make relevant predictions.
AE2 Evaluation of procedures, with suggestions for
improvement.
Application
The specific features are as follows:
A1 Application of agricultural and horticultural concepts and
evidence from investigations to solve problems or make
recommendations in new or familiar contexts.
A2 Use of appropriate agricultural and horticultural terms,
conventions, formulae, and equations.
A3 Demonstration of skills in individual and collaborative
work.
Knowledge and Understanding
The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Demonstration of knowledge and understanding of
agricultural and horticultural concepts.
KU2 Use of knowledge of agriculture and horticulture to
understand and explain social, economic, or environmental
issues.
KU3 Communication of knowledge and understanding of
agriculture and horticulture in different formats.

Students may refer to the rubric provided over the page to identify the performance standards that they need
to demonstrate to reach their highest possible level of achievement.

2016 Stage 2 Animal Nutrition

Performance Standards for Stage 2 Agriculture and Horticulture


Animal Health and Disease Management

Investigation

Analysis and
Evaluation

Application

Knowledge and
Understanding

Designs logical, coherent, and detailed


agriculture and horticulture investigations.

Critically and systematically


analyses data and their
connections with concepts to
formulate logical and
perceptive conclusions and
make relevant predictions.

Applies agricultural and


horticultural concepts and
evidence from investigations to
suggest solutions to, or make
effective recommendations to
address, complex problems in
new and familiar contexts.

Consistently demonstrates a deep


and broad knowledge and
understanding of a range of
agricultural and horticultural
concepts and practices.

Critically and logically selects and


consistently and appropriately acknowledges
information about agriculture and horticulture and
issues in agriculture and horticulture from a
range of sources.
Manipulates apparatus, equipment, and
technological tools carefully and highly
effectively to implement well-organised safe
and ethical investigation procedures.

Critically and logically


evaluates procedures and
suggests a range of
appropriate improvements.

Demonstrates initiative in
applying constructive and
focused individual and
collaborative work skills.

Obtains, records, and displays findings of


investigations using appropriate conventions
and formats accurately and highly effectively.

Designs well-considered and clear agriculture


and horticulture investigations.
Logically selects and appropriately
acknowledges information about agriculture and
horticulture and issues in agriculture and
horticulture from different sources.
Manipulates apparatus, equipment, and
technological tools carefully and mostly
effectively to implement organised safe and
ethical investigation procedures.

Clearly and logically


analyses data and their
connections with concepts to
formulate consistent
conclusions and make mostly
relevant predictions.
Logically evaluates
procedures and suggests
some appropriate
improvements.

Designs considered and generally clear


agriculture and horticulture investigations.
Selects with some focus, and mostly
appropriately acknowledges, information about
agriculture and horticulture and issues in
agriculture and horticulture from different
sources.
Manipulates apparatus, equipment, and
technological tools generally carefully and
effectively to implement safe and ethical
investigation procedures.

Analyses data and their


connections with concepts to
formulate generally
appropriate conclusions and
make simple predictions with
some relevance.
Evaluates some procedures in
agriculture and horticulture and
suggests some improvements
that are generally
appropriate.

Obtains, records, and displays findings of


investigations using generally appropriate
conventions and formats with some errors but
generally accurately and effectively.

Prepares the outline of one of more agriculture


and horticulture investigations.
Selects and may partly acknowledge one or
more sources of information about agriculture
and horticulture or an issue in agriculture and
horticulture.
Uses apparatus, equipment, and technological
tools with inconsistent care and effectiveness
and attempts to implement safe and ethical
investigation procedures.

Identifies a simple procedure for an agriculture


and horticulture investigation.
Identifies a source of information about
agriculture and horticulture or an issue in
agriculture and horticulture.
Attempts to use apparatus, equipment, and
technological tools with limited effectiveness or
attention to safe or ethical investigation
procedures.
Attempts to record and display some
descriptive information about an investigation,
with limited accuracy or effectiveness.

Uses appropriate agricultural


and horticultural terms,
conventions, formulae, and
equations effectively.

Applies agricultural and


horticultural concepts and
evidence from investigations to
suggest some solutions to, or
make recommendations to
address, basic problems in new
or familiar contexts.
Uses generally appropriate
agricultural and horticultural
terms, conventions, formulae,
and equations with some
general effectiveness.
Applies generally constructive
approaches to individual and
collaborative work.

Describes basic connections


between some data and
concepts and attempts to
formulate a conclusion and
make a simple prediction that
may be relevant.

Applies some evidence to


describe some basic problems
and identify one or more
simple solutions or
recommendations in familiar
contexts.

For some procedures,


identifies improvements that
may be made.

Attempts to use some


agricultural and horticultural
terms, conventions, formulae,
and equations that may be
appropriate.

Obtains, records, and displays findings of


investigations using conventions and formats
inconsistently, with occasional accuracy and
effectiveness.

Applies agricultural and


horticultural concepts and
evidence from investigations to
suggest solutions to, or make
recommendations to address,
problems in new and familiar
contexts.

Applies mostly constructive


and focused individual and
collaborative work skills.

Obtains, records, and displays findings of


investigations using appropriate conventions
and formats mostly accurately and effectively.

Uses appropriate agricultural


and horticultural terms,
conventions, formulae, and
equations highly effectively.

Attempts individual work


inconsistently, and contributes
superficially to aspects of
collaborative work.

Uses knowledge of agriculture and


horticulture perceptively and
logically to understand and explain
social, economic, or environmental
issues.
Uses a variety of formats to
communicate knowledge and
understanding of agriculture and
horticulture coherently and highly
effectively.
Demonstrates some depth and
breadth of knowledge and
understanding of a range of
agricultural and horticultural
concepts and practices.
Uses knowledge of agriculture and
horticulture logically to understand
and explain social, economic, or
environmental issues.
Uses a variety of formats to
communicate knowledge and
understanding of agriculture and
horticulture coherently and
effectively.
Demonstrates knowledge and
understanding of a general range
of agricultural and horticultural
concepts and practices.
Uses knowledge of agriculture and
horticulture with some logic to
understand and explain one or
more social, economic, or
environmental issues.
Uses different formats to
communicate knowledge and
understanding of agriculture and
horticulture with some general
effectiveness.

Demonstrates some basic


knowledge and partial
understanding of agricultural and
horticultural concepts and/or
practices.
Identifies and explains some
agricultural and horticultural
information that is relevant to one
or more social, economic, or
environmental issues.
Communicates basic information
to others using one or more
formats.

Attempts to connect data with


concepts, formulate a
conclusion and make a
prediction.

Identifies a basic problem and


attempts to identify a solution
or recommendation in a familiar
context.

Demonstrates some limited


recognition and awareness of
agricultural and horticultural
concepts or practices.

Acknowledges the need for


improvements in one or more
procedures.

Uses some agricultural and


horticultural terms or formulae.

Shows an emerging understanding


that some agricultural and
horticultural information is relevant
to social, economic, or
environmental issues.

Shows emerging skills in


individual and collaborative
work.

Attempts to communicate
information about agriculture and
horticulture.

2016 Stage 2 Animal Health and Disease Management