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Lesson 1

Name: Kalonikae Drenckhahn______

TPA-Referenced Lesson Template*

Date:_1-25-16 Grade:_2__Time:_9:20
am____

Lesson Title
MN/CC State Standard(s)
Central Focus
Learning Target

Academic Language (AL)


a. Domain-specific vocabulary
b. Any needed sentence structures
c. Language demands: Planned
points where students will use AL

Needed modifications/supports
Planned points for specific students

Lesson Part
Part 1 Initiating Instruction
-Preview
-Review of pre-requisite
knowledge/skills

6.1 Addition of Three or More Numbers


2.1.2.4 Use mental strategies to add numbers to two-digits.
To familiarize students with whole number operations and number stories.
The student will be able to use and explain strategies for adding three
or more numbers.
The student will be able to write number models with three or more
numbers.
The student will be able to describe and apply the associative
property of addition.
Academic Language: addend, strategy, estimate
Sentence structures:
I can use the ________ strategy to solve the problem.
It was easier for me to add the numbers in this order because _______.
Language demands:
The student will participate in discourse while giving suggestions for solving
math problems.
The student will explain why they think rearranging some numbers to add
them made it easier.
One student may need assistance with the reading portion of the
math journal. A teacher or paraprofessional will be available to
assist.
It may be useful for some students to use ten-frames to add multiples
often.
Stronger students may add with four or more addends.

Activity description/teacher does


Instruct students to meet on
carpet with math journals, a
pencil, and iPads.

Students do
Students will gather materials
and meet on carpet.

Once students are seated, have a


student read the math
message.

One or all students will read


the math message.

Lia has 13 pencils. Thomas has


6 pencils. Nate has 7. How many
pencils do they have in all?
Draw a unit box and ask students
what I should write in it. What is
the message about? Write in
pencils.
Direct students to solve the
problem using their iPads.

Students will offer answer to


unit box.

Next, ask students about ideas or

Students will offer their own

Students will solve math


message using their iPads.

strategies they used to solve the


problem. Write their ideas on the
board.
Counters, fingers, number
grid, pictures or tally
marks, a parts and total
diagram, mental math,
partial sums diagram,
open number line
Assess 1.1
Ask students to hold up
Check for Understanding their iPads to show
possible answers and strategies.
Part 2 Teacher Input/Inquiry
Next, walk through the process
-Intro of learning target
of writing the math message
-explanation procedures
horizontally. Ask:
-teacher demonstration
Does it make any difference
-teacher think aloud
what order I put the numbers
in?
Rearrange the order to show
order doesnt matter.

strategies for solving the math


message.

Students will flip up iPads to show


answers and strategies.
Students will participate in
discussion about number
order.

Out of the three orders, ask:


Is there one model that you
think makes it easier to add?
Why?
Discuss why it may be easier
for some sets of numbers to
be rearranged to be added
more easily. Ex: Multiples of
ten. 13+7=20 then 20+6=26
Ask students to offer up other
examples of numbers that
can be arranged in a similar
way.
Summarize by saying that it
doesnt matter what order we
add in, and that in some cases,
addition may be easier with
the rearrangement of numbers.
Assess 1.2
When students are offering
Check for Understanding examples of number models,
have students make at least
one of their own on their
iPads. Have them hold
up their whiteboards and make

Students will offer examples


of other sets of numbers to
show understanding of concept.
Students will write at least one
example of their own on
their iPad.

Students will hold up iPads to


show a number model they think
shows the concept.

Part 3 Guided support/practice


-Pair/collaborative work
-indiv work & partner check
-teacher(s) roam and assist

a point to check in later with


those that dont appear to
understand.
Explain to students that they
will be working with a partner
to play Three Addends. Briefly
give instructions.

Students will listen while


instructions are given about
math journals.

Next, using a students math


journal, explain pg 132-133.
Finally, direct students to put
away their iPads and get their
Everything Math cards,
find a partner and complete
their assigned tasks.
Assess 1.3
While roaming, review
Check for Understanding students work in math journals.
Part 4 Closure
Before directing students to
-Restate learning target
put away work, summarize our
targets for the day.
Second graders, this morning
we learned that when were
adding three numbers it doesnt
matter what order they are
in. However, sometimes it may
be easier to add certain
numbers more easily if we
rearrange them.

Students will put away and


gather necessary materials,
find their partner and play
Three Addends, followed by
work in journals.
Students will explain their
reasoning for work.
Students will begin to finish up
work and prepare for next
lesson.

Part 5 Class Overview of Assessment Results: Include a template for a class overview of data
assessment for each lesson. This can be as simple as a class roster with a place to mark 3 levels of
proficiency such as strong, moderate, and developing.
Student #

Independent: The
student is able to solve
number models and stories
with three or more addends
very little to no assistance.

With Assistance: The


student is able to solve
number models and stories
with three or more addends
with some assistance.

Needs Improvement: The


student is unable to solve
number models and stories
and needs remedial work.

Name: _Kalonikae Drenckhahn_____

Lesson Two
TPA-Referenced Lesson Template*
Lesson Title
MN/CC State Standard(s)
Central Focus
Learning Target

Academic Language (AL)


a. Domain-specific vocabulary
b. Any needed sentence structures
c. Language demands: Planned
points where students will use AL

Needed modifications/supports
Planned points for specific students

Lesson Part
Part 1 Initiating Instruction
-Preview
-Review of pre-requisite
knowledge/skills

Date:1/26/16 Grade:_2_Time:9:20 am

6.2 Comparison Number Stories


2.1.2.5 Solve real-world and subtraction problems involving whole numbers up to
to two digits.
To familiarize students with whole number operations and number stories
The student will be able to share number story solution strategies.
The student will be able to describe and solve comparison number
stories.
The student will be able to write number models to summarize
addition and subtraction number stories.
.Vocabulary: comparison number story, difference, comparison diagram,
quantity
Sentence structures:
I can use a comparison diagram.
I have ___ more than you.
You have ___ less than me.
Language demands:
The student will participate in discourse in strategies to solve number story
problems.
The student will compose number sentences and explain how they solved the
problem.
Student #1 may need assistance with the reading portion of the
math journal. A paraprofessional removes him to work with him
one-one one. One student may need some extra encouragement to
finish work. Having him work with a partner may encourage focus.

Activity description/teacher does


Direct students to meet at
Smartboard with their math
journal and an iPad.

Students do
Students gather materials and
meet at Smartboard.

Beneath Math Message, write


equations such as 3+9+7=?,
14+8+6=?, or ?=21+5+9. Use
these equations to review adding
multiple addends like we did on
the previous day. Remind
students that order doesnt matter
when using addends and that
sometimes rearranging order may
make it easier. Direct students to
use iPads to solve problems.
Check for understanding with iPads.
Briefly explain that we will be
working with number stories to
solve real-world subtraction

Students will use iPads


to solve equations on Smartboard.

problems.
Assess 1.1
Direct students to show
Check for Understanding possible answers on
iPads.
Part 2 Teacher Input/Inquiry
Have students flip iPads over in
-Intro of learning target
their laps. Direct students
-explanation procedures
attention to Smartboard. Either
-teacher demonstration
read the objective or have a
-teacher think aloud
student read it to the class.
Briefly explain what a
comparison diagram is.

The student will hold up iPads


with possible answers.
Students will flip over iPads.
One student will read the
objective.

Next, read the math message.


Silva has 17 CDs. Mark has 8
CDs. How many more CDs does
Silva have than Mark?
Ask students if there is a word
in the sentence that they
should look for. Allow time for
responses. Underline more.
Emphasize that more usually
means difference. Discuss the
meaning of the words
quantity and difference.

Students offer answers.

Pull down appropriate number


of CDs for Silva and Mark.
Show students how we would
use the picture to determine
the difference by counting the
9 CDs above the empty space
left by the 8 Mark has.

Students count along as CDs


are pulled down.

Next, draw a comparison


diagram to show how we use it
to determine difference. Write
a number model.
Ask students to offer some
other examples of number
models to represent the CD
problem.
17-8=?

Students can write or offer


variations of the number
model.

17-?=8
?+8=17
8+?=17
Next, rewrite the number
models, but place the answer
in the place of the question
mark.
Finally, do the additional story
problems. Discuss these with
the class.
Assess 1.2
Have students give the thumbs
Check for Understanding up/thumbs down for each
answer to the problems. Take
note of those that may be
having difficulty.
Part 3 Guided support/practice Using a students math journal,
-Pair/collaborative work
explain pg 134-136. Allow
-indiv work & partner check
students to work with a partner to
-teacher(s) roam and assist
solve comparison number
stories. After pg 134 is done
with a partner, have students
work on pg 135 and 136 on
their own. Give a brief
explanation of those two pages.
Last, advise students to play
Addition Top-It if they finish
early. Students will need an
explanation of rules of the
game.
Assess 1.3
Roam the classroom and while
Check for Understanding assisting, look over students
work. Take special care to
observe students ability to
solve comparison number
stories.
Part 4 Closure
Approximately one minute
-Restate learning target
before directing students to
put math journals away and
get ready for the next lesson,
summarize the days math
learning targets.
Today we learned strategies on
how to solve number story

Students will participate in


discussion.

Students will give a thumbs up/


or thumbs down in response to
an answer.
Students will put their iPads
away and dismiss to desks to
work.

Students will play Addition Top-It


with a partner.

Students will work in math


journals.

Students will finish work, put


away materials, and prepare
for next lesson.

problems. Then we showed how


we are able to draw a number
model to represent them.

Part 5 Class Overview of Assessment Results: Include a template for a class overview of data
assessment for each lesson. This can be as simple as a class roster with a place to mark 3 levels of
proficiency such as strong, moderate, and developing.
Student #

Independent: The student


can solve comparison
number stories and write
number models with little
to no assistance. The
student is able to assist
others.

With Assistance: The


student can solve
comparison number stories
and write number models
with some assistance.

Needs Improvement: The


student cannot solve
comparison number stories
or write number models
without assistance. The
student cannot determine
the correct operation. The
student needs remedial
work.

Name: _Kalonikae Drenckhahn_____

Lesson Three
TPA-Referenced Lesson Template*
Lesson Title
MN/CC State Standard(s)
Central Focus
Learning Target

Academic Language (AL)


a. Domain-specific vocabulary
b. Any needed sentence structures
c. Language demands: Planned
points where students will use AL

Needed modifications/supports
Planned points for specific students

Lesson Part
Part 1 Initiating Instruction
-Preview
-Review of pre-requisite
knowledge/skills

Date:_1/27/16_Grade:2 Time:9:20 am_

6.3 Data Day: The Four Food Groups Day 1


2.1.2.6 Solve addition and subtraction questions based on tables, bar graphs
and tally charts.
To familiarize students with whole number operations and number stories.
The student will be able to generate whole numbers from sets of tally
marks.
The student will be able to collect data and tabulate it in a tally chart.
The student will be able to use data in a tally chart to draw and
interpret a bar graph.
The student will be able to draw conclusions and answer questions
from tally-chart and bar-graph data.
.Academic Language: basic food groups, data table, bar graph
Sentence structures:
I can sort, tally, and graph data.
There are _____ more/less than
Language demands:
The student will be able to describe and explain the four basic food groups.
The student will be able to justify and explain why they graphed a bar graph
the way they did.
Student #1 will need assistance with the reading portion of the lesson.
A paraprofessional has been assigned to assist him. Some students
may need guidance in understanding the graph or drawing their own.
A straightedge may help them see where the end line of the bar falls
on the graph.

Activity description/teacher does


Direct students to bring their
math journals and iPads to the
carpet.

Students do
Students will gather math
journals and iPads and meet at
the carpet.

After opening the 6.3 Smartboard


lesson, direct students attention
to the mental math and reflexes
(MMR) on the slide.
Boys and girls, this should look
familiar. We did several of these
yesterday. These are story
problems that we can draw
pictures for and use a comparison
diagram to solve. Lets read the
first one together.
Choose a student to read the first
problem. Ask for suggestions on
our next step.

A student will read the first


problem.

Should we draw a picture?


Should we make a comparison
diagram? Should we do both if
necessary?
Using suggestions from the class,
draw a picture and make a
comparison diagram. Work with
students to solve the problems.
Have students use iPads to draw
a picture and/or
make a comparison diagram.

Students will offer suggestions


about strategies to solve the
problems.

Repeat for other two problems.


Introduce todays lesson by going
over the objective.
I can collect sort, tally, and graph
data.
Assess 1.1
Direct students to flip up iPads
Check for Understanding to show their thinking. Take
note of students that may need
additional assistance.
Part 2 Teacher Input/Inquiry
Have a student read the math
-Intro of learning target
message.
-explanation procedures
-teacher demonstration
What is your favorite food?
-teacher think aloud
Direct students to tell their
partner their favorite food.

A student will read the objective.


I can collect sort, tally, and graph
data.
Students will show iPads.

Student will read the math


message.
What is your favorite food?
Students will tell their partner
their favorite food.

Have a brief discussion about


good nutrition. Ask questions
to stimulate higher order
thinking.

Students will participate in


discussion.

Next, begin collecting data


about students favorite foods.
Make tally marks for each food
group.

Students should follow along


by making tally marks and
completing their own graph in
their journal.

Once data is gathered, discuss


the features of the graph. Ask
questions to guide drawing in
the bars of the graph.

Students will participate in


discussion and offer answers
to questions to help complete
the graph.

Take the opportunity to use


data to make comparison
diagrams and number models.
Once students have completed
their graph, have students
complete an exit slip.
Assess 1.2
Have students complete an exit
Check for Understanding slip.
Part 3 Guided support/practice Direct students to finish
-Pair/collaborative work
incomplete math journal
-indiv work & partner check
pages.
-teacher(s) roam and assist
Once pages are checked and
shown to be complete, have
students work on math journal
pg 140.

Students will fill out exit slip.

Assess 1.3
Roam and monitor students
Check for Understanding work and look over math
journals.
Part 4 Closure
Second graders, today we
-Restate learning target
learned about nutrition. Using
our favorite foods, we
learned how to collect, sort,
tally and graph data. Graphs
are an important tool to study
data and can be used in a
variety of ways for a variety of
reasons.

Students will ask and answer


questions about todays lesson.

Students will complete an


exit slip.
Students will complete
incomplete math journal pages.
Students will work on math
journal pg 140.

Part 5 Class Overview of Assessment Results: Include a template for a class overview of data
assessment for each lesson. This can be as simple as a class roster with a place to mark 3 levels of
proficiency such as strong, moderate, and developing.
Student #

Independent: The student


can tally and graph
collected data. They can
solve number stories and
write number models to
represent their stories with
little to no assistance. The
student is able to assist
others.

With Assistance: The


student can tally and graph
collected data. They can
solve number stories and
write number models to
represent their stories with
some assistance.

Needs Improvement: The


student cannot tally and
graph collected data
and/or solve number
stories and write number
models to represent their
stories. The student needs
further explanation and/or
remedial work.

Name: _Kalonikae Drenckhahn_____

Lesson Four
TPA-Referenced Lesson Template*
Lesson Title
MN/CC State Standard(s)

Central Focus
Learning Target

Academic Language (AL)


a. Domain-specific vocabulary
b. Any needed sentence structures
c. Language demands: Planned
points where students will use AL

Needed modifications/supports
Planned points for specific students

Lesson Part
Part 1 Initiating Instruction
-Preview
-Review of pre-requisite
knowledge/skills

Date:_1/30/16_Grade:_2_Time:_9:20_

6.4 Addition and Subtraction Stories


2.1.2.5 Solve real-world mathematical addition and
subtraction problems involving numbers with digits up to 2 digits.
2.1.2.3 Estimate sums and differences up to 100.
For example: Know that 23+48 is about 70.
To familiarize students with whole number operations and number stories.
The student will be able to explain solution strategies.
The student will be able to solve multidigit addition and subtraction problems
within number stories.
The student will be able to identify change, parts-and-total, and
comparison number stories.
.Academic language: difference, subtraction, addition, compare, comparison
story, comparison diagram, parts-and-total diagram, change diagram, and
estimate
Sentence structures:
I can use a__________diagram to solve the problem.
I can estimate addition and subtraction problems.
The number story is asking ___________.
Language demands:
The student will be able to explain their solution strategy to solve a
problem.
The student will be able to explain what a number story is asking.
Student #1 will need assistance with the reading portion of the math
journal. A teacher or paraprofessional will be available to read as
needed.
For those students have difficulty with number stories, they may work
with a partner to create their own stories. They may use counters and
laminated diagrams to help them solve the problem.

Activity description/teacher does


Have students gather at the
carpet with their math journals,
iPads, and pencils.

Students do
Students gather materials.

Begin lesson by reviewing the


addition of three or more addends
using the Mental Math and
Reflexes problems on the 6.4
Smartboard lesson. Ask a student
to explain a strategy to make the
addition of these numbers easier.
For example, the numbers
43+5+7 can be rearranged to
43+7+5. Review that 43+7 makes
a multiple of ten, which makes
addition easier.

Students use iPads to solve


addition problems with more
than three addends.
Student(s) explains their
strategies(s).

Have a student read todays


objective.

A student reads the days


objective.

I can complete a diagram for an


addition or subtraction problem.

I can complete a diagram for an


addition or subtraction problem.

Explain to students that our


goal is to be able to identify
whether addition or subtraction
is necessary to solve the
number story. Tell them that
there may even be times
where we use both. Those are
two-step problems. Have
students flip iPads upside down
and place them on their laps.
Assess 1.1
Observe students strategies
Check for Understanding for solving addition with more
than three addends.
Part 2 Teacher Input/Inquiry
Using slide 5 of Smartboard
-Intro of learning target
lesson, ask students to make
-explanation procedures
up their own unit for our story
-teacher demonstration
problems. Ex: marbles, stickers,
-teacher think aloud
pencils, etc.

Students place iPads on their


laps.

After reading the story problem,


ask students what the problem
is asking for. Emphasize that
the words in all implies
addition.

Students provide an
explanation of why they think
we should use addition.

After reading the next problem,


ask the same question. What
is the problem asking? Note
the word give implies
subtraction.

Students provide an
explanation of why they think
we should use subtraction.

After each problem, use the


diagrams provided at the
bottom of the slide. Note that
all the diagrams may be used
for each problem.

Students provide answers and


explanations as to why they
would fill out the diagram they
way they are.

Repeat the steps with the last


two problems.
Have students provide a

Students volunteer to fill in the


answers.
The students give a thumbs up/

Assess 1.2

Using their iPads, students


solve addition problems with
more than three addends.
Students make up unit for
story problems.

Check for Understanding thumbs up/thumbs down to


show understanding.
Part 3 Guided support/practice Briefly explain the students
-Pair/collaborative work
math journal pages 142-143.
-indiv work & partner check
Demonstrate how to do ball-teacher(s) roam and assist
park estimates with the first
two problems on page 142.

thumbs down to show


understanding.
Students assist in providing
answers to problems.

Dismiss students to work with


their math partners to
complete math journal pages
142-143.

Students will find their math


partners and set to work on
their math journal pages.

Roam and assist as needed.

Ask for assistance as needed.

Assess 1.3
While roaming the classroom,
Check for Understanding check on work being done in
math journals and discussion
between partners. Pay special
note to academic vocabulary.
Part 4 Closure
Use an attention getter to get
-Restate learning target
the classs attention. Have a
student reread our learning
target that is on the Smartboard.
Direct students to put away
their materials and prepare for
the next activity.

Students will work on math


journals and discuss solutions
with their math partners.
Student reads learning target
on Smartboard.

Students put away materials


and prepare for the next
activity.

Part 5 Class Overview of Assessment Results:


Student #

Above-Level:
1. Can identify whether
addition or subtraction is
necessary.
2. Can identify the most
appropriate diagram to
use.
3. Few to no errors in
computation.

Moderate:
1. Has some difficulty
determining whether to use
addition or subtraction.
2. Sometimes uses the
most appropriate diagram.
3. Computational errors
occur occasionally.

Below Level:
1. Has great difficulty
determining whether to use
addition or subtraction.
2. Use the wrong diagram
often.
3. Has frequent errors in
computation.

Name: _Kalonikae Drenckhahn_____

Lesson Five
TPA-Referenced Lesson Template*
Lesson Title
MN/CC State Standard(s)
Central Focus
Learning Target

Academic Language (AL)


a. Domain-specific vocabulary
b. Any needed sentence structures
c. Language demands: Planned
points where students will use AL

Needed modifications/supports
Planned points for specific students

Lesson Part
Part 1 Initiating Instruction
-Preview
-Review of pre-requisite
knowledge/skills

Date:_2/3/16Grade:_2_Time:_9:20 am

6.5 Subtraction Strategies


2.1.2.4 Use mental strategies to subtract two-digit numbers: partial
sums and differences.
To familiarize students with whole number operations and number stories.
The student will be able to count up and back by 1s and 10s.
The student will be able to model multi-digit numbers using base-10
blocks.
The student will be able to develop counting up and back strategies
for subtraction.
The student will be able to explain strategies for solving multi-digit
subtraction problems.
a. Domain specific vocabulary: trade, strategy
b. Sentence structures:
I can use the ________ strategy to solve subtraction strategies.
I need to trade ______ longs for ______ cubes.
c. Language demands: The student will need to explain strategies for solving
multi-digit subtraction problems.
Student #1 will need reading support from a paraprofessional or
teacher. Said student may also need guidance with focus and
suggestions for possible strategies.
Some students may need to be taken to the side and worked with
one-on-one. They will need to use hands on manipulatives to process
the concept of trading with the 10s place to be able to subtract the
ones. Toothpicks will be used for this process.

Activity description/teacher does


Direct students to meet on the
carpet with their math journals,
pencils, and iPads.

Students do
Students meet on carpet with
their materials.

Using mental math and reflexes


from the 6.5 Smartboard lesson,
have students use their iPads to
solve subtraction problems with
multiples of ten to review
subtraction. Have students flip
iPads to show their answers.

Students use their iPads to


solve subtraction problems
with multiples of ten.
Students flip up iPads to show
their answers.

Discuss answers with students.


Students provide answers and
Ask, Does it matter where the
strategies
question mark is in this equation?
Next, have a student read the
learning objective.

A student reads the learning


target.

I can

I can complete a diagram for an

subtract two-digit numbers.

addition or subtraction problem.

Then, have another student read


Another student reads
the vocabulary. Trade.
the vocabulary. Trade.
Assess 1.1
Students should flip up their
Students flip up their iPads to
Check for Understanding iPads to show their answers to
show their answers.
the mental math and reflexes.
Part 2 Teacher Input/Inquiry
Using the math message on
Students solve problems then
-Intro of learning target
slide 5 of the Smartboard
offer their solutions and
-explanation procedures
lesson, have students solve the
strategies.
-teacher demonstration
problem two ways on their
-teacher think aloud
iPads. 56-24=? Remind students that they
may use their number
grids. Have students provide
their answers.
Using their strategies, show
all correct strategies on the
Smartboard. Emphasize the
variety of ways to solve the
problem.

Students help list their


strategies.

Next, using Smartboard slides


six and seven, demonstrate
how to use base-10 blocks to
solve subtraction problems.

Students direct teacher movement is to be done with the


base-10 blocks. They may want
them crossed out, moved, or
want more cubes drawn.
Students use their iPads on
activity on the Smartboard to
demonstrate their knowledge
of trading.
Students go to assigned area
and wait to receive their
base-10 kits. Once they receive
their kits, they will use the kits
to solve the two equations we
did on the Smartboard.

Assess 1.2
Observe students offer ways to
Check for Understanding solve subtraction problems
using their own strategies
and the base-10 blocks.
Part 3 Guided support/practice Assign the partnerships to an
-Pair/collaborative work
area and provide them with
-indiv work & partner check
a Base-10 blocks kit. Direct
-teacher(s) roam and assist
them to solve the same two
problems we just did on the
board. 36-14=? and 53-38=?
Remind the students that
they may have to break a
long down into ten cubes in
order to do the subtraction.
Explain to students they will be
using the Base-10 Trading
Game.

Students listen for instructions.

Tell them the rules of the game.


Each student will start out with
one flat, or 100. The first
student rolls the dice and
subtracts that from their total.
Obviously, they will have to
trade their flat in for ten longs
and possibly some cubes. The
players take turns subtracting
the numbers on their dice
until the first player runs out
cubes. The student will have
to make regular trades with the
bank throughout the game.
It is essential to roam and
assist all groups with trading at
this point. Be mindful of those
students not grasping the
concept of trading.
Once students have played the
game once (or twice if they
finish early), have them
complete the Base-10
Subtraction worksheet and the
Math Boxes on math journal
page 145.
Assess 1.3
Float through the class and
Check for Understanding observe students play the
Base-10 Trading Game. Make
sure to note those that need
extra one-on-one attention.
Part 4 Closure
At the end of the lesson, have
-Restate learning target
a student volunteer to read the
learning objective from the
Smartboard again. Provide an
exit slip to gauge how strong
each student feels about
learning the target.

Students to will begin with one


flat and working with their
partners, they will play the
game.

Students will show the teacher


that they have completed
the game and turn in their
base-10 kits. They will get the
Base-10 Subtraction
worksheet and their math
journal and begin work.
Students will play the Base-10
Trading Game and ask for
assistance as needed.
One student will read the
learning target. All students
will complete an exit slip to
show how confident they are
about the learning target.

Part 5 Class Overview of Assessment Results: Include a template for a class overview of data
assessment for each lesson. This can be as simple as a class roster with a place to mark 3 levels of
proficiency such as strong, moderate, and developing.
Student #

Above-Level:
1. Can identify whether
addition or subtraction is
necessary.
2. Can identify the most
appropriate diagram to
use.
3. Few to no errors in
computation.

Moderate:
1. Has some difficulty
determining whether to use
addition or subtraction.
2. Sometimes uses the
most appropriate diagram.
3. Computational errors
occur occasionally.

Below Level:
1. Has great difficulty
determining whether to use
addition or subtraction.
2. Use the wrong diagram
often.
3. Has frequent errors in
computation.