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The UK's best jewellery magazine

making

50

BUSINESS
LEARN ALL ABOUT
BRANDING

GARDEN
PARTY
PROJECTS

In this issue...
Beaded chain technique
Beaded bezel set cabochons
Polymer clay ower bud necklace

BEADING 12 STEPS

MJ92 Cover 02 SH.indd 1

POLYMER 6 STEPS

LAMPWORK 9 STEPS

WIREWORK 6 STEPS

24/03/2016 15:32

Bigger and better than ever.


Your new Cooksongold Catalogue is here,
with over 8 0 0 pages packed with more than 17,0 0 0 produc ts and more big brands. M aking Jeweller y
readers can get an exclusive copy free* by quoting M J2016 online, on the phone or at the Counters.

* O n e f re e c a t alo g u e p e r cus to m e r. Po s t a g e ch arg e s ap p l y.

IFC_MAJ_092.indd 1

3/3/16 12:03 PM

Making Jewellery is published


13 times a year by
GMC Publications Ltd,
86 High Street, Lewes,
East Sussex BN7 1XN
www.makingjewellery.com
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EDITOR Sian Hamilton
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30
Saraguro stitch

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Views and comments expressed


by individuals in Making Jewellery
magazine (ISSN 1756-4069) do
not necessarily represent those
of the publishers and no legal
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Editors letter

ts May! And the summer is coming, yes it really


is. So Im excited as I cant wait for warmer
weather and to abandon the jumpers for my
summery T-shirts and lighter colours in general
(not sure who says I have to wear dark colours in the
winter, but it appears to be a must in my wardrobe!).
Anyway, back to summer. As early as May is in the
year I like to think its the beginning of a new season
so I decided it was time for an outdoor theme!
I chose garden parties and I am glad I did.

This issue is full of lovely f loral designs, lace


effect pieces and generally really elegant and
beautiful designs you would be proud to make and
wear. We also have a couple of beading techniques
from Clair Wolfe (p30, p62) and a project (p70) for
you to feast on. Beading is as popular as ever and
I know Clair has the belief that those tiny little size
15 beads are addictive; once you start beading you
just cant stop!

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P01 Ed's letter SH.indd 1

Sian
1

04/03/2016 10:14

3D BRACELET JIG

CONETASTIC

PATENT PENDING

This ingenious tool makes beautiful


wire cones and bead caps

Create trendy bangle bracelets,


cu bracelets, and curved components

FLAT COPPER WIRE


Design wire jewelry with
new dimension

BRAID

Give your designs a


compelling textured look

The Largest Selection of Craft Wire


and Wire Working Tools

ALUMINUM WIRE
Wire is soft tempered and is ideal
for creating wire wrapped designs

WIRE KNITTER TOOL

FINDINGS FORMS

Try dierent stitches to create


various patterns

PATENT PENDING

Use these clever xed peg jigs


to make your own wire clasps,
ear wires, and connectors

COILING GIZMOS

SAW FRAME WITH 36 BLADES

PATENTED

Everything you need to start cutting metal


sheet, large gauge wire, wood, and plastics

Crank wire to make


coiled springs & beads

WIRE STRAIGHTENER TOOL


Make it easy to straighten wire
that has been worked

To nd an Artistic Wire/Beadalon retailer near you, please visit


www.beadalon.com/store_locator.asp

002_MAJ_092.indd 2

To nd an Artistic Wire/Beadalon retailer near you, please visit


www.beadalon.com/store_locator.asp

3/1/16 3:28 PM

Contents

Regular

ISSUE 92 MAY 2016


Easy
6

Lacy blossoms
A textured pendant with
lace and air dry clay

20 Celebrity Style
Buttery necklace inspired
by Vanessa Hutchins

24 Folk-art birds
Polymer clay earrings with
a folk-art bird theme

46 Buds and shoots


A necklace made with polymer
clay bud shape beads

60 Daisy delight
Polymer clay earrings with
bright daisies

66 Beautiful bead
clusters
A cluster eect black agate
bead necklace

86 Initial it!

72 Mix and match


Lots of component pieces that
can be made into a necklace
or range of bracelets

78 Flower bead garland

Flower bead garland

Stamped letter discs

92 Mermaid necklace
Sea inspired necklace and
wrap bracelet

Intermediate
8

Wrapped with love


An intricate wirework bracelet
with decorative swirls

34 Lace cu
A delicate lace inspired rose
gold coloured wire cu

36 Centrepiece silver
pendant

8
Wrapped with love

An embellished donut bead


with a silver clay centre

56 Crystal garden
A sparkly oral necklace with
bead bezelled cabochons

70 Beaded lace collar


A delicate seed beaded
lace collar

76

Advanced
14 Pretty posy
A charming and elegant stone
set oral silver clay pendant

38 Floral lace eect


A oral lace eect bib style
necklace made in silver wire

Lampwork ower beads

14
Pretty posy

56
Crystal garden

34
Lace cu

MJ92_P03-04_Contents SH.indd 3

04/03/2016 10:15

69

Designer inspirations

Regulars

Features

11 News

22 10 questions

The latest jewellery trends,


news and must-haves

13 Whats on
Classes, workshops and shows
not to miss this May

18 Colour & Style


Fashion trends for your
summer wardrobe

27 Readers page
Your letters, news and views,
plus pictures of your work

43 Book reviews
Imogen Cooper reviews the
latest inspiring jewellery books

45 Web reviews
Lauren Johnson surfs the web
for the latest jewellery sites

49 Business matters
The latest tips on running your
jewellery business

80 Ask the expert


Joan looks at jewellery for a
garden party

82 Coming next month


Find out whats inside our
June 2016 issue

83 Top ve
Garden party jewellery
components

94 Its a jewellers life


ife
The latest instalment of Eleanor
Swinhoes column

55 Trends
4

MJ92_P03-04_Contents SH.indd 4

Interview with talented


contemporary jeweller

29 Designer prole
Contributor Zoe Lynham
answers our questions

69 Designer
inspirations

18 Colour & Style

Find out what inspires


Justine Nettleton

Shopping
55 Trends
Perfect accessories for
your wardrobe

84 Product review
Books galore! to help you
brush up on your skills

Techniques
30 Technique
Learn to do Saraguro beading
stitch, which is a type of
netting stitch

62 Technique

50 Technique
Learn to use transparent
polymer clay

62 Technique
Learn to make beaded hoops
for use as a chain

78 Product test
Clair checks out a bead bag by
the Celtic Bead Shop

96 B
Basic techniques

22 10 questions

29 Designer prole

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 10:15

091_MAJ_092.indd 91

3/1/16 3:31 PM

Project Easy

STEP 1
Cut a section of lace in a rectangular
shape. Seal with several coats of
acrylic sealer allowing each to dry
before applying the next. Cut a
piece of reusable poster putty to
the same shape and press lace into
it rmly, right side out. This is to
stabilise the lace to ensure that the
silicone moulding materials does
not adhere in every single hole of
the fabric pattern.

LACY BLOSSOMS
Create a textured pendant adorned with
bunches of fl owers. By Linzi Alford Buckmaster

his simple-to-make
air-dried clay pendant is
given a delicate pattern
and embellished with bouquets of
pretty acrylic owers in soft tones
of lavender, mauve and lilac. The
pendant combines the textural
mesh patterns of lace together with
an array of ower clusters. Using
the same technique you could
replicate any pattern or ligree and
use any colour or type of owers.

MATERIALS
Silicone moulding putty
Apoxie Sculpt air-dry clay in
colours: pink, red, orange, blue,
white, super white
Lace or textiles to mould

MJ92_P06-07_Lacy Blossoms Necklace SHSD.indd 6

Chain, ball chain or ribbon to


hang pendant from
Spray acrylic sealer or PVA type
medium
Non-stick mat
40cm x 0.8mm (20 gauge)
silver wire
120cm x 0.5mm (24 gauge)
lavender wire
Acrylic owers and leaves in your
chosen shade(s) approx. x 21
depending on size
Seed beads, same quantity as
owers
Rotary tool drill
Selection of pliers
Metal le
Sanding block or ne sandpaper
Wire cutters
Nitrile disposable gloves

Designer tips
Add as many wire loops
for attachment points as
you wish, frame the whole
pendant or just around
two corners; it is up to
you to decide. If it helps,
then drill multiple holes to
wrap wire through.
Use one type and size of
oral beads or mix it up. Be
colour coordinated or make
a cottage garden of shades.
For a dierent take, overlay
a contrasting colour (of
acrylic paint, mica powder,
marker pen or ink) to
highlight the lace pattern,
i.e black over pink, or
sparkly over black with
crystals and silver. It really is
a versatile method.

STEP 6
Cut a 40cm length of 0.5mm
lavender wire. You can use longer
or shorter lengths, but this seems
the most convenient length. Attach
to the silver wire by coiling it several
times. Trim the wire ends. Attach
the rst ower by threading the
lavender wire up through the ower
hole, through a seed bead and then
back down into the ower hole on
the outside of the seed bead.

RESOURCES
Acrylic owers:
www.bargainbeads.co.uk
Apoxie Sculpt:
www.avesstudio.com.
Check for stockist local to you.
The colour mixing chart is also
available here to download.
Non-stick mat:
www.axitcraft.co.uk

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:13

Easy Project

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Mix the air-dry clay to the desired


shade (or of course you can use an
existing colour with no blending).
Wear disposable gloves, as some
colours will stain your ngers. Mix
a pale lilac colour, with red + blue
bended (plus an equal amount of
blue) + white (and an equal part of
blue). Use the colour chart on the
supplier website for assistance, if
needed, in mixing the colours. Once
mixed, form a rectangular shaped
piece and press into the lace mould.

Leave overnight and once the clay


has dried, remove from the mould.
Using a rotary tool, drill a hole in the
top centre. Using a metal le and
then a bung block, remove all the
uneven edges and any surplus clay
to neaten the shape.

Cut a 40cm length of 0.8mm silver


wire. Make a wrapped loop at one
end and pass it through the hole
on the pendant front to back. Wrap
wire tail again to secure.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, LINZI ALFORD BUCKMASTER

STEP 2
Thoroughly mix the silicone
moulding putty. It normally consists
of two colours to be mixed in equal
parts (1:1). Once mixed it will cure
in about 10 minutes so do not spend
too long blending the two parts.
Roughly shape the silicone putty
into a rectangle shape. Press the
lace rmly face down into it. Ensure
there are no air bubbles trapped, as
these will cause blank areas. Wait for
10 minutes for the mould to cure.

Extra Projects
Make earrings
and a bracelet
EARRINGS

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

Wrap the silver wire in a series


of wiggles and loops that
encompass both the back and
edge of the pendant. These loops
will form attachment points for the
owers. Secure the wire on the
reverse by looping and twisting
together, but leave it reasonably
loose. It will tighten it once all the
owers are added.

Continue to thread owers and


leaves around the perimeter of the
pendant adding as many as you
please. Work your way around,
making a couple of coils around
the 0.8mm wire in between each
ower to secure. If the 0.5mm wire
becomes brittle as you near the end
then clip o the kinked section and
start with a new length; try using 3 x
40cm lengths on this pendant. You
can continue to add more owers or
leaves onto the design until you are
happy with the overall look.

Finish o the pendant once all the


owers are attached by taking the
chain nose pliers and making a
sharp half turn in the slack wires
on the reverse of the pendant.
This will tighten the wire, although
be careful not to overdo this as it
can pull the wire away from the
pendants edges onto the back!
Add a chain, a ball chain or a
ribbon through the wrapped loop
bail and a clasp, if required.

CONTACT

Shape two small


pieces of clay into
teardrop shapes and
nd
place into the mould.
ld.
Allow to dry, then
sand and drill as
before. Add beadss
by making eye
pins with short sections
tions
of 0.8mm wire. Thread
read
through an acrylic
ower and attach
with a jumpring to
earring wires.

BRACELET
Using the same technique
as the main project, make a
mould of a short section of
lace binding. Form a bracelet
bar shape in clay and press
into the mould. Allow to dry,
but remove before it is totally
set and drape over a pencil to
get the slightly curved shape.
Once dry, sand and drill a
hole at each end. Attach a
chain and a clasp, connecting
using large jumprings.

www.magpieinthesky.co.uk
www.facebook.com/magpieinthesky
linzi@magpieinthesky.co.uk

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P06-07_Lacy Blossoms Necklace SHSD.indd 7

14/03/2016 14:51

Project Intermediate

STEP 1
Cut your frame wires using the
formula described above. Then
measure and mark a point 10cm from
the left on the middle and outside
wires and 4cm from the left on the
inside wire. Starting at the 10cm
mark you just made, and leaving
a 12cm tail that youll use later,
coil the weaving wire three times
around the outside wire (OW) in an
anticlockwise direction. Leave the
weaving wire sticking up at the back.

STEP 6

WRAPPED WITH LOVE


Make an intricate
wirework bracelet
with decorative
loops and swirls.
By Karen Caine

MJ92_P08-09_Wirework Bracelet SHSD.indd 8

efore you start the bracelet,


you will need to be aware of
how to cut the frame wires.
First you need to measure your
wrist in centimetres to discover
your bracelet length (BL). Then
cut three frame wires using the
following calculation:
Inside wire = (BL x 2) + 8cm for
hook and spiral
Middle wire = (BL x 3) + 20cm for
the decorative swirls at either end
Outside wire = (BL x 3) + 23cm for
the decorative swirls and to make
the eye for the hook

MATERIALS
1mm frame wire
0.4mm weaving wire
(14 x bracelet length)
4 x 6mm beads
Liver of Sulphur (optional)
0.7mm and 0.3mm weaving wire
(for extra projects)
2mm beads (for extra projects)

Using the two 10cm lengths of


frame wire you left bare in Step 1,
create some decorative elements
at the end of your bracelet. Swirls,
spirals, zigzags the design is up
to you. You can also choose how to
nish the ends. You can ball them
up with a torch, or simply cut them
with ush cutters. Once complete,
use short lengths of weaving wire
to sew the ends to the bracelet to
prevent them moving.

RESOURCES
www.cooksongold.com

CONTACT
www.thecraft ydwarf.com
www.craft ydwarftutorials.com
www.facebook.com/thecraftydwarf

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:15

Intermediate Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Add the middle wire (MW) just


above, making sure that the two
10cm marks are aligned. Continuing
in an anticlockwise direction, coil
the weaving wire three times around
both wires. Now add the inside wire
(IW) above. Bring the weaving wire
up the back of all three, then coil it
three times around the top two frame
wires. On the third loop, poke the
weaving wire forward between the
two wires (IW and MW).

Continue the weave by looping


three times around the lower two
frame wires (MW and OW), then
take the weaving up the back of all
three frame wires, so that youre in
a position to coil once more around
the top two frame wires, then push
the weaving wire through between
IW and MW once more. Repeat
this pattern until a ribbon of weave
covers the bracelet length (BL) you
measured earlier.

To make the eye, loop the weaving


wire three times around IW and
MW, then coil it three times around
MW. Repeat twice more so that the
weave continues on IW and MW,
but leaves OW bare. Make sure the
frame wires still line up then bend
the woven ribbon back on itself.
Follow with the bare wire, but leave
a gap for the hook to go through
(approx. 5mm). Resume the same
weaving pattern as before.

Continue weaving until you have


equal lengths on either side of the
curve. Finally, coil the weaving
wire three times around OW before
cutting and tucking it in. Use the tail
you left in Step 1 to tie the two sides
of the bracelet together. Maintain an
anticlockwise direction and loop the
tail around each of the six frame wires
in turn. Repeat twice more, then coil,
cut and tuck in the tails end to nish.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, KAREN CAINE

Designer tips

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

Now take the remaining outer pair


of frame wires and curve them back
on themselves and then swirl them
around the body of the bracelet,
adding a bead to each wire as it
sweeps across the front. Make
sure that the decorative wires are
pinched closely enough to the body
of the bracelet that the beads cannot
slide around to the inside of the
bracelet. If you want your bracelet
to have a sense of symmetry, place
the beads one-third and two-thirds
of the way along the bracelet.

At the end of the bracelet, add


some more decorative elements
using the same techniques as in
Step 6. Create the bracelets hook
with the two remaining inner frame
wires. Make a simple decorative
loop with the rst, then bring the
second wire parallel to it before
sweeping it around into a hook
with a loop at the end. Make sure
that this loop is small enough to
pass through the eye you created
in Step 4.

Cut o the hooks excess wire and


hammer the shank to make it solid.
Now wrap your bracelet around a
bracelet mandrel (or similar object)
to make it round. Use your hands to
shape the woven parts and a mallet
to shape the bare wires where they
overhang the woven parts just
make sure you dont hit the beads!
Add a patina if you like, then settle
back and admire your handiwork.

Be careful not to
accidentally reverse the
weave during this project,
especially if you put it down
for a moment. From the
front the weave should
have a regular 3-3 pattern,
while at the back you can
see the weaving wire
periodically crossing all
three frame wires.
If you have problems
poking your weaving wire
through when sewing your
decorative elements in
place, push a pin into the
weave and wiggle it in a
circle to enlarge the gaps
in the weave.

Extra Projects Make a pendant and earrings


PENDANT
Start 2cm from the left and create a ribbon in the
same way you created the bracelet, substituting
the eye part for the pendants two bails. Bring the
two ends of the ribbon together at the hearts point
and fold the 2cm lengths over the longer frame
wires to anchor them in place. Sew all the layers

together, then use the leftover frame wires to form


the decorative arcs.

EARRINGS
Make straight ribbons and use the centre frame wires
for the ear wires. Curl the other frame wires into
decorative swirls.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P08-09_Wirework Bracelet SHSD.indd 9

26/02/2016 15:15

010_MAJ_092.indd 10

3/4/16 11:55 AM

Regular

NEWS
The latest jewellery making
trends, news and must-haves.
By Ellen Evans
Glitter and Twisted classes
Throughout May and beyond, Lydia Foster will
be running Silver Workshop days from her
studio in Emsworth, Hants. Go along to learn
how to make your own piece of silver jewellery
to take home. The workshops take place from
10am-4pm, and cost 65, including all
materials and lunch. For dates and other
information, visit the website.
www.glitterandtwisted.co.uk
07786005955

Artistic Wire Large Wire Crimp


Connectors
Beadalon have launched new Artistic Wire
Large Wire Crimp Connectors. They are the
perfect cold connection to join large gauges of
Artistic Wire together. Calibrated for 12, 14,
and 16 gauge Artistic Wires, you can also use
them for Artistic Wire Braid, 12 gauge
Aluminum Craft Wires, and to join multiple
strands of smaller gauge wires. To use, place
one end of the wire that you are joining half
way into the Crimp Connector. Place the other
wire in the opposite end so that the wires meet
in the middle. Use the back notch of the Mighty
Crimping Pliers for the 12 and 14 gauge wires
and the Standard Crimping Pliers for the 16
gauge wires to gently squeeze one side of the
crimp then the other for a secure connection.
www.beadalon.com

Daniella Sigurd A45 Bejewelled Bugs

Pulse
From 15-17 May, artists and makers will ood
to Pulse at Olympia London. The large-scale
event promises a wealth of beautiful things to
see, including jewellery from the very best
makers. Its a chance to pick up gifts and
inspiration, with lots of one-o pieces on
display. The team at Pulse have identied key
trends and motifs for the upcoming Autumn/
Winter 2016 season, such as oriental-style
snake charms/serpent bangles, enamel and
crystal bugs and minimal circles and stars.
Earrings and rings are the key pieces to look out
for at the show.
www.pulse-london.com

Amanda Coleman D83 Bejewelled Bugs

EuroSynergy2 Polymer Clay


Conference
Do you love working with polymer clay? The
International Polymer Clay Association will
hold EuroSynergy2 in Bordeaux from 10-13
July. The conference is an opportunity to meet
other artists from around the world, listen to
inspirational presentations and buy and sell
polymer work. Three days of workshops follow,
held by highly regarded international tutors. All
of the presentations at the conference and the
workshops are brand new to Europe and the
presenters are from USA, Europe and the
Middle East. The cost of the conference is 350
Euros and each workshop is priced separately.
Full details of the programme and location can
be found on the website or Facebook group.
www.eurosynergyconference.net

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P11 news SHSD.indd 11

11

26/02/2016 15:16

012_MAJ_092.indd 12

3/1/16 3:28 PM

Regular

Wendy Ramshaws Room of Dreams

BIRMINGHAM MUSEUMS TRUST

Dont miss your chance to see work by designer Wendy Ramshaw, a British jewellery icon.
Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery is exhibiting her Room of Dreams until 22nd May.
Ramshaw draws inspiration from stories such as Alice in Wonderland to make up an installation of
many parts, from small jewels in frames to large freestanding furniture. In the artists own words:
The dream is the room and every one of its individual contents is in some sense a part of a dream.
A white wall is covered with frames, each of which contains a piece of jewellery, each inspired by a
dream or dream-like situationa series of stories and images waiting to be considered and
discovered. Room of Dreams has brought into existence so many imagined objects, gathering
together so many thoughts in one place, the room. It has fullled and completed a dream for me.
In this exhibition, jewellery is imagination.
www.birminghammuseums.org.uk

WHATS ON
Want to get out and about this spring? Here are
some creative shows and classes not to miss.
Digital Paper
Jewellery

In the Studio
In the Studio Jewellery School runs a wide variety of courses
taught by worldwide experts. Upcoming classes include Chasing
and Repouss, in which you can learn how to hammer metal
into beautiful sculptural designs of your choosing using this
traditional Italian technique. There is also a course on fusing,
fabricating and granulating Argentium silver, which does not
leave re scale, is tarnish resistant and can be fused to itself
without the need for solder. Demonstrations are followed by
hands-on experience to create earrings, rings, and a bead.
www.inthestudio.co.uk

On the 21-22 May 2016,


Francine Oeyen is presenting
a two day course on paper
jewellery at the Victoria &
Albert Museum in London.
The course combines analogue
and digital processes, using
paper and cardboard. Suitable
for beginners, the workshop is
a chance to try something
dierent. Using a variety of
techniques, you can create a
unique and creative piece of
contemporary jewellery.
Visit the website for prices
and to book.
www.vam.ac.uk/whatson

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P13 What's On SHSD.indd 13

Amulet Master Class


Tracey Spurgin will be teaching her renowned
Freyas Tears Amulet master class at her
Craftworx Studio in East Yorkshire on Fri 6 to
Sun 8 May. This is your chance to experience
the project originally designed for the 2nd
Midsummers Dream Metal Clay Retreat that
took place in June last year and has since been
taught around the country as well as in
Belgium. Tracey has decided to extend the
workshop from two to three days to give
students plenty of time to completely nish
their creations. The cost of the class is 295.
www.craftworx.co.uk, 07961 883115

13

26/02/2016 15:17

Project Advanced

PRETTY
POSY
Create a charming and elegant, stone set,
fl oral silver clay pendant.
By Nicola Beer

icola is a silver clay and wire artist,


and is a level two accredited ACWUK
instructor. She is inspired by fairytales,
legends and nature to produce enchanting and
whimsical jewellery designs.
Nicolas pendant was inspired by thoughts
of fragrant English country gardens and pretty
owering meadows. Silver clay is the perfect
medium in which to recreate the delicate
beauty of early summer blooms and the design
can be adapted to feature any natural element
to represent dierent seasons of the year.

MATERIALS
30g Silver Clay
Silver Clay paste
Silver Clay syringe
Fine silver bezel wire
Oval cabochon, 20mm in length
Selection of reable 1-2mm cubic
zirconia stones
Teon sheet
Badger Balm
Roller
Paintbrush
Playing cards or spacer bars
Small ower cutters
Clay pick or sharp craft knife
Tissue blade
Ballend tool
Rubber tipped clay shaper
Thick and thin drinking straw
Sanding pads or polishing papers
Kiln, blowtorch or gas hob
Bezel pusher tool
Liver of Sulphur gel
Brass brush
Polishing cloths
Rotary tool and sanding/polishing
attachments or tumble polishing machine

RESOURCES
www.metalclay.co.uk
www.j7j.biz
www.design-a-cake.co.uk

CONTACT
www.facebook.com/RubycurlsJewelleryDesigns
www.etsy.com/shop/Rubycurls

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MJ92_P14-16_Pretty Posy Pendant SHSD.indd 14

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04/03/2016 12:44

Advanced Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

To create the pendant backplate, lightly balm the


work surface, your hands and the roller. Roll out a
sheet of silver clay 1mm (or 4 cards) thick and cut
out a large oval. The cabochon should t into the
centre of the oval, leaving a 1.5cm space around
the circumference of the stone. Roll out another
1mm sheet of clay and cut out a second oval that
is just a few mm larger than the cabochon.

Wet the surface of the large oval with a


paintbrush and water and layer the small oval on
top. The wet surface will give you a minute or so
to position the smaller oval so that it sits centrally.
Gently push the bezel wire into the smaller oval.
The wire should be suciently embedded to
hold it in place but not cut through the back.
Using a pick or craft knife to cut out an oval inside
the bezel, leaving a gap of at least 4mm around.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, NICOLA BEER

STEP 1
Shape a length of ne silver bezel wire around
the cabochon. Ensure that you start and end the
wire along a straight edge of the cabochon. Trim
the bezel wire down to the exact size to form a
close t. File the edges of the bezel wire so that
they are parallel and sit ush next to one another.
Apply silver clay paste to the join and allow to
dry. Place the bezel onto a rebrick and re the
join with a blowtorch until fused.

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

Set aside the back plate to dry. Take a sheet of


clinglm and loosely fold it a couple of times but
do not completely atten it out. Roll a small lump
of clay to a depth of 0.75mm (3 cards) thick and
cut out several owers in two dierent sizes. Place
each ower onto the folded clinglm and use a
large ball tool to gently depress the centres. This
will shape the petals. Allow the owers to dry.

Whilst the owers are drying, work on rening the


back plate of the pendant. Use round needle les
to shape the interior oval and sanding pads or
papers around the edges. Rene the at surfaces
of the backplate, ensuring that there are no divots
or scratches. Baby wipes are particularly useful
for this job and produce a lovely ne nish. If
using baby wipes dont allow the clay to get too
wet, you may need to dry it at intervals.

Place the backplate to one side and start


preparing the bale. Lubricate a piece of teon
sheet and roll out a small lump of clay to 1mm
thick. Cut out a diamond shape with a tissue
blade that is approximately half the length of
your backplate. You can make it smaller or larger,
according to your taste. If you cant do this by
eye, use a paper template or a cutter to help.

Designer tips
Any small ower shaped cutter can be used. Cake decorating
suppliers are an excellent source of tools for metal clay work and
some sugar craft cutters come in really small sizes which is perfect
for silver clay.
Use damp, ock tipped disposable lipgloss applicators to rene
tiny components.
When positioning the owers, ensure that you leave enough space
around the bezel wire to be able to use a bezel-pushing tool to
secure the stone.

15

MJ92_P14-16_Pretty Posy Pendant SHSD.indd 15

26/02/2016 15:18

Project Advanced

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

This is an articulated swinging bale so the ends


need to be joined to form a loop. Lubricate the
plastic, rounded handle of a tool or a thick straw
and drape the wet diamond over it. Rest the ends
of the tool on a prop and apply a small amount of
paste to one end of the bale and a little water to
the other end. Gently press the ends together and
use a rubber clay shaper to blend. Set aside to dry.

To create ower centres, gather a selection of


12mm stones and a syringe of clay. Pipe tiny balls
of clay twice as large the stones. Pick up a stone
and place it, point down, dead centre onto the
wet ball of clay. Press the stone down with a clay
shaper until the girdle of the stone is encased.
Allow these to dry and then adhere them to the
centres of the dry owers. Arrange the owers
around the bezel of the pendant and glue each
one in place with water and silver clay paste.

The bale of the pendant is xed in place with


a loop of silver clay. Create the loop by rolling
a thin snake of silver clay. The snake should be
approximately 2mm thick. Thoroughly wet the
snake with a paint brush and water to prevent
cracking, pick it up with the paint brush and coil
it around the smooth plastic handle of a tool or a
thin drinking straw. Allow the coil to dry.

STEP 10

STEP 11

STEP 12

Spend some time rening the dried bale


and pendant. When the coil is dry, cut it into
semicircles. Apply a thin layer of water to the back
of the pendant. Feed the loop through the bale
and apply a little silver clay paste to the underside
of the loop. Position the loop on the back of the
pendant and give it a wiggle until you feel the
clay start to drag, indicating a bond. Hold it for a
minute or so and then leave it to completely dry.

The pendant should be red without the stone in


place so remove it if you have it in the setting. Fire
your pendant according to the manufacturers
instructions either in a kiln, with a blowtorch or
on a hob. Place the pendant onto a rubber block
and pop the cabochon into the bezel setting.
Use a bezel pusher tool and press the bezel wire
around the cabochon with gentle pressure and
small movements. Work on alternate sides to
push the wire over the edges. Burnish the wire all
around the cabochon for a neat nish.

Most reable stones will survive a kiln, hob or


torch ring but the stones will be susceptible
to thermal shock. For this reason, allow the hot
silver to cool naturally and do not quench to
avoid discolouring or cracking the stones. When
cool, brush the piece vigorously with a brass
brush to bring the silver to a satin nish. Or, for a
mirror nish, use decreasing grades of polishing
papers, rotary tool polishing attachments or
burnish in a polishing tumbler.

Extra Projects
Make earrings and a ring
EARRINGS
Cut out additional owers and layer them
up with water and silver clay paste. Fire and
add earwires.

RING
Loop and twist thin clay snakes around a
ring mandrel, prepared with a ring paper,
to make a ring band. Add a stone, small
owers and tiny leaves as embellishments.

16

MJ92_P14-16_Pretty Posy Pendant SHSD.indd 16

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:18

Premier Metal Clay Jewellery School

Metal Clay Workshops


t Beginners
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t Advanced

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Follow Tracey Spurgin
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www.craftworx.co.uk

FluxnFlame
Jewellery School

At Flux n Flame we offer jewellery


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with sterling silver, gold and precious
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friendly, informal atmosphere with
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Humour, patience and creativity
Jess and Al have in abundance.
Nothing is too much trouble, and
everyone is treated like family.
One of the nicest places you could
wish for to learn and express yourself,
comforted in the knowledge that
each piece will be made to their
exacting standards.
I cant praise them highly enough.
Susan, student

For a brochure contact us at


FluxnFlame
Milton Abbas, Dorset DT11 OBD
Tel: 01258 881690
Mobile 07785 550771
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ZZZX[QDPHFRXN

017_MAJ_092.indd 17

3/1/16 3:29 PM

Regular Colour & Style

FLORAL FESTIVITIES

As the weather warms up and the fl owers are blooming, its the perfect time to host a garden
party with plenty of outdoor style! By Rachelle Bell
Wonderland

Flower power

f you want to host a kooky, eclectic event, take inspiration from


the Mad Hatters tea party. Were thinking an updated version of
the Victorian classic novel. Sleek cuts with a fun twist. Abstract
patterns teamed with the traditional Alice blue-and-white colour
palette. We love the head-to-toe white look with a patterned blazer
for detail. Keeping with the blue theme, these trousers with their
peg-leg style would also work well with basic, neutral pieces. For a
bit of pizzazz, add an embellished clutch bag. This sequined, oral
piece certainly adds a sparkle to a minimal outt. We cant mention
wonderland without including a white rabbit. This jumper is cute yet
fun with the illustration-style print, team with a sparkly skirt for an
eccentric look, or keep it pared back with skinny jeans and loafers.
Bunny jumper, 21.99,
www.newlook.com
Blazer 65, White trousers,
45, all www.longtallsally.com
Sequin clutch bag, 28,
www.wallis.co.uk
Patterned trousers, 18,
www.bonmarche.co.uk

ts almost festival season; if you


didnt manage to get tickets for
Glastonbury fear not! Hosting
your own festival in the garden is so
much fun! Plus you dont have to worry
about portaloos or not showering for
days, as all your home comforts are just
inside the door. This festival season has
a 70s Woodstock inuence, which has
been revived for the summer. Wellies
are the festival essential; we love the
pattern on these jolly boots and they
will certainly lift spirits on a rainy day.
You could even set up a tent in the back
garden for extra festival atmosphere,
while this tee ticks all the retro buttons.
A saddlebag is ideal for carrying around
your must-haves. This bag has beautiful
embroidery detail. Zhandra Rhodes
is renowned for her festival prints,
this lipstick dresss comp
the
ccompletes
ompletes
p
tth
he laidla id
laid
dback Im with thee b
band
and
an
d vibe.

Zhandra Rhodes
lipstick dress, 119,
9,
www.peopletree.co.uk
.co.
o.uk
o.uk
uk
Luxe Willow saddlebag,
lebag,,
lebag
75, www.joythestore.com
sto
tore
re..cco
om
m
FFloral wellies, 35,
5,, w
www.seasalt.co.uk
ww
w.sseasa
easa
ea
saltlt.cco.
o.uk
uk
Happy cam
campers T-shirt
T-shirt, 6,
6,
6
www.primark.com
w
ww
w w.
w.pr
p im
pr
mar
a k.
k.co
com

18

MJ92_P18-19_Colour & Style SHSD.indd 18

26/02/2016 15:19

Colour & Style Regular


Croquet on the lawn

f you fancy something a little


more sophisticated, hosting
your own afternoon tea
party complete with croquet on
the lawn is a great way to enjoy
summer. Of course, you have to
look prim and proper whilst you
sip your Pimms. Dainty, retro
silhouettes are perfect for this
trend. A oral shift dress is a very
attering cut for many shapes and
sizes. This high-necked applique
top would look wonderful teamed
with a pastel pencil skirt. Who
says heels are impractical for
garden games? These court shoes
have an almost tropical oral
print and add a little daytime
glamour. To add a bit of sparkle,
why not add an embellished
beaded collar to complete your
outt? Even on a casual day, a
beaded collar worn with a plain
white t-shirt looks good.

Quintessentially British
sh

ritish summertime has lots of


traditions, picnicking beingg one
of them! We love rallying up
p
the troops and heading out for the day,
knowing we have lots of amazing food
for an impromptu lunch in a sunnyy
spot. A oral tea dress, teamed with
h
a cardi is a cute yet casual outt. We
have lots of beautiful British wildlife
ife
in the summer and we think the
humble bumblebee is something to
o be
celebrated. This adorable bee pursee
is so kitsch! Peg-leg trousers are the
he
silhouette to be sporting this summer.
mer.
We also love these white trousers with
their gorgeous, delicate wildower
pattern. Whilst you sit in the meadows
you can admire the dainty orals on
your legs too!

Floral shift dress 39, bracelet 6,,


earrings 3, all from
www.mandco.co.uk
Diva oral cluster collar, 16.50,
6.50
50,
www.missselfridge.co.uk
F&F pink oral top (matching
ching skirt
available), 16, www.tesco.com/
tesco
esco.ccom/
clothing
Floral court shoes,, 18
18,
8,
8,
www.very.co.ukk

Floral prairie dress, 60, www.yumi.co.uk


Floral trousers, 40, www.riverisland.com
Bee purse, 4.99, www.newlook.com
Floral and tartan tea dress, 57,
www.lookagain.co.uk

19
19

MJ92_P18-19_Colour & Style SHSD.indd 19

26/02/2016 15:20

Project Easy
MATERIALS
0.8mm (20 gauge) silver
coloured wire to make your
own eye pins
31 x green agate beads
7 x silver frosted beads
6 x 40mm silver bullet beads
62 x flower bead cups
Decorative flower toggle clasp

RESOURCES
All beads and findings apart from
the silver bullet beads are from:
www.hcbeads.com
Silver bullet beads were
from US company: www.
hilltribesilveronline.com
Similar brushed silver available
from: www.beadstampede.co.uk
Looking under category metal
accent and focal beads

CONTACT
tansywilson@hotmail.com

Designer tip

CELEBRITY
STYLE
Make a butterfl y necklace with green agates
inspired byVanessa Hudgens.
By Tansy Wilson

have taken inspiration from her name


Vanessa, which actually means Buttery
in Latin and is one of the reasons Vanessa
recently had a buttery tattoo done on her
neck. Her style is the perfect mix of edgy and
feminine, which I captured with these pretty
agate beads in contrast to the hard-edge
brushed silver.

20

MJ92_P20-21_Celebrity Inspiration SHSD.indd 20

Using a bead board


really helps with not only
planning the correct
length of your necklace
but also to stop beads
rolling around. However
if you dont have one, you
can always measure the
desired length and mark
lines onto an old tea towel.

Extra project
ect
Make earrings
ings
The green
agate beads
come on
a string of
approx. 48
beads so you
should easily
have enough
to make
matching
earrings.
Remember
to keep
two beads
that are the
same colour
to make a
matching pair.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:25

Easy Project

STYLE PROFILE VANESSA

STEP 2
Make another eye loop using round
nose pliers as close to the top of the
last added flower cup as possible.
Cut away any excess wire. See page
96 for how to make simple loops.

PHOTOGRAPH: HELGA ESTEB/SUTTERSTOCK.COM

STEP 1
It is easier to make your own eye
pins for this project, using 0.8mm
wire. Cut approx. 30mm of wire
and make an eye loop at the very
tip of the wire using round nose
pliers. Thread your eye pin through
a flower bead cup, followed by
a green agate bead then finally
through another flower cup.

STEP 6
The butterfly connectors will be
linked by the jumprings added in
Step 4. Keep working your way
around the bead board ending
up by joining a clasp using one
jumpring either end.

MJ92_P20-21_Celebrity Inspiration SHSD.indd 21

PHOTOGRAPH: FLAT DESIGN/SUTTERSTOCK.COM

STEP 5
STE
Arran all your beads on a bead
Arrange
board playing around with ideas
boar
symmetry or perhaps you would
of sy
prefer a random pattern. Either
prefe
way, when you are happy with your
design, simply open one eye loop
desig
on a bead and link it to the next
bead along.

Vanessa Hudgens is an American actress and singer rising to fame as


Gabriella Montez in the High School Musical series. Songs from the
series and films charted worldwide. She has also appeared in various films
and television series for the Disney Channel but is now focusing on her
acting career, currently playing the title role in the Broadway musical
Gigi and also the role of Rizzo in Grease: Live.

PHOTOGRAPH: FEATUREFLASH/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

STEP 4
Open an oval jumpring and link
through the top hole of a butterfly
connector and close. Repeat, to
add another oval jumpring to the
bottom of the connector. Repeat
this step to add jumprings to the
other butterfly connector.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

STEP 3
If you are making your own eye pins,
you can make them the size you
require
to accommodate all your
q
different sized beads. Repeat Steps 1
differ
and 2 so you have all of your assorted
beads ready to link together.
bead

21

04/03/2016 11:53

Feature
1

PHOTOGRAPH: SCOTT RANKIN

Who am I?

I am Stacey Bentley

Stacey frequently uses enamelling as a focal point to create unique jewellery


designs, often with an industrial or architectural feel.
How did your interest in jewellery start?
I enjoyed wearing jewellery as a little girl,
but it never crossed my mind I would end up
becoming a jeweller. I had always enjoyed
art and design as a subject and in particular
I loved to paint. My art teacher would teach
me how to use oil paints and the dierent
brush techniques after school so the natural
progression for me was to apply to study
ne art as part of a Foundation course at
Leeds College of Art. Here I was opened
up to a new world of disciplines such as
illustration, printmaking, textiles, fashion
and photography. I loved 3D design
in particular, and this is where I was
introduced to the world of jewellery.
Where did you train?
After passing my BTEC diploma
in Foundation Studies at Leeds
College of Art, I went on to study
Jewellery Design and Silversmithing
at Edinburgh College of Art. I had
enrolled straight into the 2nd year at
the college with very little technical
ability, so I had to work hard to catch
up with the rest of the students. I soon
became immersed in the world of
enamelling and once I had graduated
with a 1st class degree I went on the
study my MA in Jewellery also at ECA.
Where is your studio?
I set up my own studio in 2010, a year
after I had nished college. My studio is in a
fantastic old warehouse in Edinburgh next to
Haymarket Railway Station. The environment
I work in is very industrial so it provides me
with a wealth of inspiration and complements
my work perfectly. I share my studio with three
other talented jewellers as well as a painter,
violin-maker and glassworker.
What is the main inspiration for your design?
I have always been inspired by architecture. I
grew up in a small industrial town called Batley

22

MJ92_P22-23 10Qs Stacey Bentley SHSD.indd 22

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26/02/2016 15:27

Feature

in West Yorkshire and I remember sitting with


my dad painting the old cotton and textile
mills. After I moved to Edinburgh I loved the
grandeur of the architecture there and this
began to fuel my jewellery designs. More
recently I have begun to look into the geometric
patterns of Islamic architecture after a recent
trip to Egypt, and a new collection is currently
being developed from this research.
What is your preferred medium?
I like to use precious materials in my work
such as silver and gold. I usually oxidise the
silver to give it a more industrial, architectural
feel. 18ct gold is used to highlight a piece of
jewellery or complement a colour. I have always
incorporated colour into my work and my
preferred medium is enamel. I matt back the
shiny surface to create a bold block of colour.
Do you have a favourite tool?
My favourite tool is my jewellery bench. The
bench was passed down to me from the late

William Kirk (19332009), an inuential


silversmith who taught at both Glasgow School
of Art and Edinburgh College of Art. I feel
extremely privileged to be able to work from
this bench.

also work for the University of Edinburgh as a


Lifelong Learning tutor, specialising in Etching
and Enamelling. This takes place in Edinburgh
College of Arts specialised workshops
overlooking the castle.

What are your goals?


My main goal is to continue running a
successful jewellery design and making
business. I love making one-o pieces for
collectors and I have been focusing on this
aspect of design and making for the last few
years. Recently I have been developing a more
commercial and accessible range of jewellery to
sit alongside my one-o pieces, which I hope to 6
launch within the next year.

Where do you exhibit/sell your work?


I currently have several stockists in the UK,
which include The Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh;
Contemporary Applied Arts, London; Studio
Fusion, London; and Victoria Sewart Gallery,
Plymouth. I also exhibit regularly with Dazzle
Exhibitions as well as sell through their online
store LoveDazzle. International galleries
7 Gallery Lulo, California.
include

Do you oer workshops and jewellery classes?


I oer one-to-one tuition at my Edinburgh
studio. Students are able to work at my bench
with access to all tools including my enamel
collection and kiln. I teach the basic jewellery
skills and techniques to get them started. I

What has been your greatest achievement?


I think my greatest achievement is simply
getting to be a jeweller for a living.

CONTACT
www.staceybentley.com
stacey.bentley@live.com

5
1. Blue Enamel Geometric Necklace: silver
and lapis enamel
2. Necklace with Orange Pendant: oxidised
silver, iron, enamel
3. Black and gold geometric studs: oxidised
silver, 23.75ct gold leaf
4. Black and Gold Ring: oxidised silver, 18ct
gold
5. Square Cuinks: oxidised silver

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P22-23 10Qs Stacey Bentley SHSD.indd 23

23

26/02/2016 15:27

Project Easy

FOLK-ART BIRDS
Sculpt these folk-art inspired birds using polymer clay. By Emma Ralph

mma is a project designer


passionate about polymer
clay. She has authored
two books on the subject and
numerous articles. She also owns
EJR Beads, providing tuition plus
beads and polymer clay supplies by
mail order.
Polymer clay is the perfect
material for making beads.
These stylised birds borrow from
traditional folk-art motifs, updated
with subtle shimmer, thanks to
luscious mica powders. Cernit
polymer clay comes in fantastic
colours and is very strong when
baked, but the project works
equally well with other brands.

24

MJ92_P24-26 Folk Bird Earrings SHSD.indd 24

MATERIALS

RESOURCES

block fuchsia Cernit


polymer clay
block turquoise Cernit
polymer clay
Cosmic Shimmer pale gold
mica powder
1 pair ice blue anodised
niobium ear wires
1 pair yellow anodised
niobium headpins
1 pair green anodised
niobium 6mm jumprings
Clay compatible varnish
Ceramic tile or other suitable
work surface

Metal ruler
Clay cutting blade or craft knife
Clay modelling tool or
knitting needle
Wooden toothpicks
Pasta machine
22mm and 18mm small teardrop
metal cutters
Soft medium paintbrush
Flat nose pliers
Round nose pliers
Wire cutters

www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop

CONTACT
eralph@ejrbeads.co.uk
www.facebook.com/EJRBeads

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:28

Easy Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

Flatten the balls between your


ngertips to shape them into plump
discs, approx. 5mm thick. You dont
need to get the discs perfectly
smooth any ngerprints or lumpy
areas will smooth away as you work
the beads further. Just try to ensure
they are nicely circular and match
each other in diameter as closely
as possible.

Fold each disc in half and pinch


the meeting edges close together.
Dont squeeze out any trapped air
from between the folded surfaces.
Just concentrate on nipping the
edges close together with your
ngertips until the seam gets
smaller and you can eventually
smooth it away with your ngertip
or a modelling tool. The folded
discs should start to look a little like
fortune cookies at this point.

Pinch one corner of each clay piece


between your thumb and forenger
to form a short, stubby tail. You can
shape and position the tail in any
way you choose. Smooth and shape
the clay with your ngertips and
ensure both pieces match. If the clay
gets too soft, pop both pieces in the
fridge for a few minutes to chill the
clay and stien it up a little.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, EMMA RALPH

STEP 1
Knead the fuchsia polymer clay
well to condition it ready for use.
Working on a ceramic tile or other
suitable work surface, roll the
clay into a log approx. 10mm in
diameter. Lay the log against a metal
ruler and with a craft knife or clay
cutting blade, cut two sections each
3cm long. Roll both the sections
into round balls.

STEP 5

STEP 6

STEP 7

STEP 8

Pinch and stroke the opposite


corner of each clay piece outwards
to make the birds head and neck.
Slowly coax the clay out into a
tapered point, smoothing the clay
as you go. Work on both birds
before proceeding to ensure their
necks match. Bend the rst 5mm or
so of the tapered point down back
towards the body to make a stylised
head for each bird.

Roll out a sheet of conditioned


turquoise polymer clay using the
thickest pasta machine setting. Lay
the sheet on the work surface and
cut out four small teardrop shapes
using the smaller sized metal cutter.
These simple shapes make ideal
wings! Apply a wing to each side
of both birds, placing them in any
position you choose.

To make the leaf charms, cut four


larger teardrops from the remaining
turquoise sheet. Sandwich a closed
niobium jumpring between two of
the teardrops. Hide the jumprings
opening between the clay layers
and be sure to allow at least half the
ring to overhang the clay to create
a generous hanging loop. Repeat
to create a second charm. Carefully
lift each charm and pinch the clay
together lightly to secure.

Add some textural pattern to each


leaf charm this not only adds
visual interest, but ensures the clay
pieces are well bonded and secure
around the jumpring. Use the end
of a knitting needle to push down
the clay by the jumpring and the
end of a wooden toothpick to crimp
a pattern around the edge of the
charm. You can adorn your charms
in any way you choose.

Designer tips
If the clay is too soft, layer it between sheets of clean paper for 10
minutes to absorb some of the oil, then reknead well.
Use a protective dust mask when using mica powders and wear
eye protection when cutting niobium wire.
Wrap a little sticky tape around the jaws of your pliers to protect
the anodised surface when working with niobium ndings.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P24-26 Folk Bird Earrings SHSD.indd 25

25

26/02/2016 15:28

Project Easy

STEP 9

STEP 10

Pierce a vertical threading hole


in each bird using a wooden
toothpick. Keep the birds in place
on the toothpicks and indent some
decoration using another toothpick
or suitable modelling tool. Adorn
the birds as you wish; Ive chosen
simple lines and dots, typical of folk
art. Add patterns to the wings and
tail if you wish and dont forget to
give your birds some eyes!

Make two small turquoise accent


beads. Brush the charms and beads
with mica powder using a soft
paintbrush. Ive used pale gold,
but any translucent or interference
powder works well, allowing
the clay colour to show through
the shimmer. Brush o any loose
powder and bake the clay pieces
following the manufacturers
instructions. When cool, varnish the
pieces to protect the mica powder
and allow to dry.

STEP 11

STEP 12

Wrap a little sticky tape around the


jaws of some round nose and at
nose pliers this will protect the
delicate oxide layer on the anodised
niobium ndings as you work.
Form a loop in the end of a niobium
headpin and attach one of the leaf
charms, closing the loop after using
both pairs of pliers. Repeat with
remaining headpin and leaf charm
to form a matching pair.

Snip the head o each headpin with


wire cutters. Wear eye protection
whilst cutting niobium as it is a
hard wire that can ping o in any
direction! Thread on the bird beads,
and the small turquoise accent
beads before turning a hanging
loop in the remaining headpin wire.
Attach the completed earrings to a
pair of niobium ear wires.

Extra Projects
Make a necklace and earrings
NECKLACE
Make larger birds and extra charms to create a necklace. Using a
larks head knot, attach a leaf charm to the centre of a metre length of
2mm diameter cord. Attach jumprings to the remaining leaf charms
and knot them and the bird beads along the cord following whatever
spacing you choose. Knot on accent beads to create tie ends for
simple fastening.

EARRINGS
Create matching earrings using leaf charms and accent beads with
anodised niobium ndings.

26

MJ92_P24-26 Folk Bird Earrings SHSD.indd 26

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:28

Regular

READERS PAGE
R
STA
LETT ER

Favourite
Make Friday
On Facebook we run a competition over
the weekend where we asl you to upload a
picture of something youve made that week,
and our favourite wins a prize. Here are some
recent winners.

Holiday memory

This is a Sterling silver pea pod


made using the fold-forming
technique with ve cream
freshwater pearls which I bought in China
last November when I was on holiday - its
a piece I made for myself as a memory of a
happy holiday.
Katherine, by email
Ellens reply What a beautiful piece to have
as a memory of your holiday Katherine. We
hope you get lots of inspiration from your
star letter prize.
Katherine is this months Star
Letter winner. She wins a
copy of Gems & Crystals, a
tour of the beautiful world of
gemstones.
www.thegmcgroup.com

JANET WOODS-LENNON
Soldered silver bracket bracelet

Making a change
I just wanted to say how much I enjoy reading
Making Jewellery. I am a mum of a 5 month
old beautiful baby girl and my goal is to turn my
hobby into my own little business.
I am so inspired by your magazine, and I
constantly try to learn new techniques and
improve.
Here is a small collection of my work.
Kind regards, Vanessa, by email

SCOTT CLEMENTS
Copper and dragons blood Jasper
pendant on hand made, Byzantine chain
maille chain.

Ellens reply Your pieces are gorgeous Vanessa!


Good luck with the business.

Send your letters and pictures to: Ellen Evans, Making Jewellery,
86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex, BN7 1XN or email: ellen.evans@thegmcgroup.com
Dont forget to follow us on Twitter at @makingjewellery or nd us on
Facebook by searching for Making Jewellery

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92 P27 Readers Page SHEE.indd 27

TARA HUFFER
Silver ring

27

04/03/2016 10:38

Wires.co.uk

We have the best range of High quality wires.


Knitted wires, silver wires, copper wires, plus many more!

WIRE FOR ANY PROJECT IN ANY QUANTITY

Trade
enquiries
welcome

Scientic Wire Company, Units 2 & 3 Zone A,


Chelmsford Industrial Estate, Great Dunmow CM6 1HD
Tel: 020 8505 0002 Fax: 020 8559 1114
Email: dan@wires.co.uk
www.wires.co.uk

028_MAJ_092.indd 28

3/8/16 12:23 PM

Feature

Designer profile

ZOE LYNHAM
Have you always been interested in craft and
making jewellery?
Yes, I have painted and drawn since childhood.
As an adult, I discovered card-making with
rubber stamps and scrapbooking. I happened
across jewellery-making by chance, and began
with simple stringing.
Tell us a bit about your background
and training.
I am an experienced primary school teacher.
I currently work part-time, as I have a young
family to care for too. About 15 years ago,
I began dabbling in jewellery-making as a hobby,
buying numerous magazines and books to learn
as much as I could about dierent techniques,
styles and materials, to use in my own designs.
Can you remember the rst piece of jewellery
you made?
No, but I do remember an early piece I made as
a Christmas present for my Mum; it was a
simple strung necklace. We all have to start
somewhere, but I have come a long way since
those early days!
Which materials do you most enjoy
working with?
My main passion is for polymer clay. I love its
versatility and also its ability to mimic other
materials, such as ceramics. I particularly enjoy
using surface techniques and I was delighted to
nd that my artists materials, as well as some of
my resources for card-making and scrapbooking,
transferred easily to this medium.
Where do you look for inspiration?
I have a small library of books and tutorials at
home, as I am very interested in learning new
techniques to apply to my own designs. I am a
huge fan of tutorials by Ginger Davis-Allman of
the Blue Bottle Tree, in particular. I also have
several Pinterest boards where I pin ideas that I
nd inspiring, whether it be a new product, a
way of joining elements or a new way to add

interest to a polymer clay bead! I look for


interesting shapes, textures and colours, not
only on Pinterest, but as I go about my everyday
life. I keep a book with sketches and notes of
ideas for potential projects (even impromptu
scribbles on post-it notes at unearthly hours). I
also take photographs on my smartphone; I have
been known to take photographs of interesting
patterns in paving, or the patina on rusty
scaolding! I also nd being given a theme for a
piece an interesting, creative challenge. It was
this approach that led to my rst ever tutorial
being published in this magazine.
How would you describe the style of the
jewellery you make?
I am still in the process of nding my own voice,
but I am very drawn to things from nature, such
as owers, seeds, pods etc. and anything with a
rustic or organic look. I love circles and nd I use
those a lot in the structure of my pieces. I have
more recently enjoyed making statement
pendants, which tend to stand alone in a piece. I
mostly use artists materials such as paint,
chalks and inks, but I am keen to explore further
the transfer of my own artwork onto polymer
clay, as this is a technique I nd fascinating.
What is the most challenging piece of jewellery
youve made?
I attended a fantastic weekend of workshops at
Polymania in Bristol last year. One of the
workshops was run by Cara Jane Hayman,
where I learned how to make a fabulous
complex cane that we later used to make a
necklace. It required precision and time, but it
was well worth the eort.
And this one to nish with: If I wasnt a
designer I would be
Working as an artist. I considered attending art
college when I was 16, instead of taking the
more traditional route of A-levels. I often
wonder what my life would be like now, if I had
pursued this direction all those years ago!

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P29 Designer Profile SHSD.indd 29

29

26/02/2016 15:33

Tips & techniques Top technique

SARAGURO STITCH
This basic net stitch is based on a traditional techniques used by the people of Saraguro.
By Clair Wolfe

his stitch is easy to learn and fun to


do. Once the basic stitch has been
mastered, it opens up a whole host of
possibilities for jewellery design. This weave
creates a Saraguro-style bridal collar.

MATERIALS
Beading wire
Beading thread
Selection of size 15 seed beads
Glue
Findings
Snips
Beading needle
Bead board (optional)

RESOURCES
All tools and materials for this project
are available through companies who
advertise in this magazine.

CONTACT
www.etsy.com/shop/ClairWolfe

30

MJ92_P30-32 Saraguro Stitch SHSD.indd 30

26/02/2016 15:34

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CLAIR WOLFE

Top technique Tips & techniques

STEP 1 BEADED WIRE BASE

STEP 2 SECURING THE THREAD

STEP 3 FIRST ROW

Cut a length of beading wire a few inches longer


than required. Add a small section of masking
tape to one side, leaving an inch or two of excess
wire. Thread size 15 seed beads onto the section
wire which will become the design, the amount
added needs to be divisible by 3. Add a second
section of masking tape to the wire once again
leaving excess wire on this end.

Cut a length of thread, as long as you can


comfortably manage. Run it though your ngers a
few times to stretch and condition it. Pass the end
of the beading thread approx. 68 beads along
the beading wire and secure with knots, add a
dab of glue and allow to dry. Add a needle to the
beading thread.

Add six size 15 beads to the needle and position


the beads next to the beaded wire. Take the
needle behind the beaded wire, third bead
along, then over and back through the last of
the 6 beads added. Add ve size 15 beads and
repeat, taking the needle behind the beaded
wire, three more beads along, over and then
through the last bead added. Continue until the
rst row of beads has been added.

Our expert
Clair often nds herself looking for new beading techniques and has developed a real interest in
traditional beadwork produced around the world. South America is rich in culture and heritage
and each area seems to have a distinctive bead weave or technique.

Designer tips
Experiment with bead numbers in
each pass.
Keep adding runs to create a full collar.
Experiment with colour.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P30-32 Saraguro Stitch SHSD.indd 31

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26/02/2016 15:34

STEP 4 SECOND ROW

STEP 5 INCREASE

STEP 6 ADD/SNIP THREAD

Begin the second row by adding two of the 15s


the same colour used in the rst row and six
size 15s in the next colourway. Pass the needle
behind the rst loop of beads added in Step 1,
third bead along, over and back through the last
bead added, pull the thread snug. Add ve size
15s and repeat this stitch for the length of the
beading. Add two further rows.

Row ve needs to have a slight increase to allow


the nished collar to sit correctly. Add two size 15
beads the same colour of the last row added and
then eight of a new colour. Repeat Step 4, but
this time looping the thread four beads along.
Bead four more rows of eight before increasing to
ten and a further four before increasing to 12.

As you near the end of a length of thread, you will


need to add another manageable length. Use
an overhand knot, tied as close to the last bead
added as possible, add a dab of glue before
adding a second knot. Leave all the excess thread
in place until the collar is complete. Once nished,
use snips to carefully remove excess threads.

32

MJ92_P30-32 Saraguro Stitch SHSD.indd 32

STEP 7 SECURING THREAD

STEP 8 FINISHING

Once the last row has been added, sew the


remaining thread back up through the beadwork.
Make sure to work back and forth until happy that
the thread will not work its way loose. Snip any
excess thread away.

Remove the masking tape from the rst side.


Add a crimp tube and a wire guardian, passing
the beading wire back through the crimp.
Position the crimp as close to the beads as
possible before using crimping pliers to close
the crimp. Repeat on the second side of the
beading. Add ndings of your choice to nish.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:34

033_MAJ_092.indd 33

3/10/16 1:43 PM

Project Intermediate

STEP 1
Cut two 50cm lengths of 1mm wire.
Working from the reel of 0.3mm
wire, coil each length of frame wire,
leaving 5cm uncoiled at each end.
You may nd it easiest to coil at
one end of the wire and push the
coiled wire along the length of the
frame wire at regular intervals. Cut a
further frame wire 1m in length and
coil this wire, leaving 10cm uncoiled
at either end.

LACE CUFF
Make a delicate lace inspired adornment for your wrist in pretty
rose gold. By Sue Mason-Burns

he subtle pink undertones


of rose gold are ideal for
this project. They conjure
up images of a sunny day in a
cottage garden, sipping tea and
nibbling on cucumber sandwiches.
Sue has used rose gold wire in
two sizes, 1mm for the frame and
delicate 0.315mm to make the coils.
She has combined them to add
to the lace eect and used a wire
jig to swirl the coiled wire into an
image of lace. Sue has nished the
cu with a simple handmade clasp.

MATERIALS
1mm (18 gauge) rose gold
coloured wire
0.3mm (28 gauge) rose gold
coloured wire
0.5mm (24 gauge) rose gold
coloured wire
Flush cutters
Flat nose pliers
Round nose pliers
Chain nose pliers
Wire jig
Round bangle mandrel
Large bail-making pliers

CONTACT

RESOURCES

www.wonderfullywired.co.uk
sue@wonderfullywired.co.uk

www.wires.co.uk

34

MJ92_P34-35_Lace Cuff SHSD.indd 34

STEP 6
Position the large coiled and formed
section on the opposite side of the
frame wire. Coil three times around
the frame wire, the next loop of the
outer section, and the lowest loop of
the central section altogether. Coil
the frame wire for 1cm, then connect
the next loop in the outer section
with three coils. Continue in this
way until all sections are connected.
Repeat on the other side.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:36

Intermediate Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Set the wire jig up with the pegs in


two staggered lines. Form a 50cm
coiled frame wire around the pegs,
looping around each peg as you
go. When you reach the end of
the pegs, remove the formed wire
and position at the beginning of
the row of pegs. Carry on forming
the pattern until you have a 16cm
length. Repeat for the second 50cm
coiled wire.

Reposition the pegs in the jig


into two diamond shapes side by
side, missing out a hole in the jig
between each peg. Leave out the
last peg at the tip of the second
diamond. Form the 1m coiled
length around these pegs, taking
the wire from side to side across the
diamond, criss-crossing the wires
across each other and around each
peg as you go.

When you reach the end of the


second diamond, remove the
formed wire from the pegs and
reposition to start again at the rst
diamond. Form six shapes, adding
the nal peg of the diamond for the
last set of two shapes. Finish the
set of woven shapes by forming the
frame wire around this last peg.

Cut two 30cm lengths of 1mm wire


and one 2m length of 0.5mm wire.
Leaving a short tail, coil ve times
with the 0.5mm wire around one
length of 1mm wire. Position one
of the two lengths of wire formed
on the jig at Step 1 alongside.
Coil three times around the frame
wire and through the rst loop
to attach it. Continue coiling the
frame wire for 1cm

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, SUE MASON-BURNS

Extra Projects
Make a pendant
and earrings
PENDANT
Make a single section of the
lace pattern from the cu
design using the wire jig.
Hang from a chain made from
gure-of-eight links.

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

Coil a further 1cm at each end of


the inner frame wire. Wrap each of
the uncoiled ends of these frame
wires around the ends of the frame
wires of the central coiled section
in turn. Do the same with the
remaining frame wires. Trim these
wires and use round nose pliers
to make loops, securing them by
intertwining with other frame wires.

Form a spiral with a large central


loop with the central frame wires.
Use a round bangle mandrel to form
the shape of the bangle. As the
wire is coiled, you cannot hammer,
so use your ngers to manipulate
the coiled wires at against the
mandrel. Form the overall shape of
the bangle at a size slightly smaller
than desired. The bangle will then
snap back to the correct size.

Form a spiral in one end of an 8cm


length of 1mm wire. Make a hook
shape around the larger jaw of large
bail making pliers. Flush-cut the end
and bend the end 5mm at an angle.
For the eye, form a 6cm piece of
1mm wire around the smaller jaw of
bail making pliers. Spiral each end
towards each other until they match
and overlap. Attach to each end of
the bangle.

EARRINGS
Make two separate sections of
the lace pattern with the wire
jig and hang from earwires.

Designer tips
Coiling by hand is laborious, but the result is a coil that exactly
matches your frame wire. If you would rather not spend the time
coiling, try making the coils using a coiling gizmo tool.
Use a piece of Blu tack or similar to hold the pegs in position in the
wire jig.
Use a nylon hammer and steel bench block to work harden clasps
and hand made earwires so that they will hold their shape.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P34-35_Lace Cuff SHSD.indd 35

35

26/02/2016 15:36

Project Intermediate

STEP 1
Measure your donut bead. Youll
need the diameter of the inner
hole, the diameter of the bead and
the thickness of the bead. Draw a
diamond shape with the axis 6cm
and 2.8cm. Cut o 1.6cm from one
of the pointed ends. This is the form
of your bail. Draw a circle (diameter
4.4cm) for the centrepiece. Now
sketch your designs on both pieces.

STEP 6

CENTREPIECE
SILVER PENDANT

When the bail is dry rene it. If


necessary, close the gaps between
the meeting parts with syringe clay.
Add the decoration using syringe
clay. You can use the green and
blue nozzles. Hammer one end
of the wire at. Fix it between the
5mm circle and the pointed end of
the bail using syringe clay to ll the
gaps. Rene and let dry.

Embellish a donut bead with a metal clay bail and a centrepiece design.
By Sandra Quell

andra is a designer from


Luxembourg whose passion
is silver. She works with
metal clay and loves to add pearls,
stones and colour to her pieces.

36

MJ92_P36-37_Silver Pendant SHSD.indd 36

MATERIALS

RESOURCES:

1520g Art Clay silver


Art Clay syringe type
Donut bead
1.2mm (16 gauge) ne silver wire
Scratch-Foam (thin polystyrene)
Hammer
Brass brush and polishing pads
Clay extruder and claycore adapter
Agate burnisher
Liver of Sulphur

All metal clay materials are widely


available from craft suppliers and
advertisers in this magazine.

CONTACT DETAILS
www.qreations.eu
qs@qreations.eu

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:37

Intermediate Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Enlarge your designs by 111% on a


photocopier. Transfer the designs
onto tracing paper or onto another
thin paper and lay them on top of
a sheet of Scratch-Foam. Fix them
with sticky tape. Trace your designs
with a ballpoint pen. Remove the
paper and deepen the lines on the
Scratch-Foam by gently tracing them
with the pen.

Slightly oil the texture plate of the


bail. Roll the clay 6 cards thick. Lay
it onto the texture sheet and roll it
to a thickness of 4 cards. Peel away
the clay and turn it over. Cut out
your design. Wrap the shorter end
of the bail around a straw. Place a
syringe line where the end meets
the back and gently press them
together. Let it dry.

Transfer the design of the


centrepiece onto the clay in the
same way. Load the extruder with
clay and use the disc with a 7.5mm
hole and the 4.5mm ClayCore
Adapter to extrude a tube bead
of 1.5cm length. Roll out clay to
0.8mm and cut out a circle of about
5mm diameter. Let all the pieces
dry and rene them.

Rene your centrepiece. Inverse your


template and cover the inversed
version with clear sticky tape or
cling lm. Stick the centrepiece
onto it with a bit of syringe. Add
the ne lines of your design using
a syringe with a grey nozzle (wide).
Pay attention that the lines are
well attached to the centrepiece.
Reinforce the connections with
syringe if necessary.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, REN WERSAND

Designer tips

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

If the tube sits too loosely in the


donut, add a little belt for a closer
t. Drill a 1.2mm hole through the
tube, level with the top of the donut.
File back the tube to 1mm above the
hole. Attach the tube to the back of
your centrepiece, so that the axis of
the hole you just drilled aligns with
the vertical axis of your design.

Let everything dry completely


and re your pieces at maximum
temperature for the maximum of
time (900C for 2 hours). Brush
both pieces with a brass brush,
polish them and patinate them with
a weak solution of Liver of Sulphur.
Use polishing pads and an agate
burnisher to polish the raised parts
of your texture to a high shine.

Hammer the wire with a raw hide


mallet to harden it. Place the donut
bead onto the tube. Thread the wire
through the holes of the tube and
bend it around the tube once. Pass
under the wire from the bail. Gently
bend the lines of the front design
onto the face of the donut.

Scratch-Foam is a USA
brand of thin polystyrene.
Search online in the
UK for thin printmaking
polystyrene sheets.
The freestanding syringe
lines are very delicate in
the greenware state. If you
avoid them, the project
becomes much easier.
You can use Sterling silver
wire for the construction
but you have to solder it on
after ring because Sterling
silver becomes brittle
when heated to 900C
for 2 hours.

Extra Projects
Make a necklace
and earrings
NECKLACE
Use the texture plate for a
simple pendant.

EARRINGS
Use parts of your design for
a pair of stud earrings. Fire
the pieces at and solder on
studs after ring.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P36-37_Silver Pendant SHSD.indd 37

37

26/02/2016 15:37

Project Advanced

FLORAL
LACE EFFECT
Recreate a fl oral lace eect in silver wire to make this
stunning necklace. By Tansy Wilson

eproducing a geometric ower shape


in Sterling silver wire on a jig and then
soldering them all together really does
create an eect like lace. Being a geometric
shape the combinations of pattern are also
endless so you can create your own take on
this design.

38

MJ92_P38-40_Silver Floral Lace SHSD.indd 38

MATERIALS
4m of 0.8mm (20 gauge) Sterling silver
round wire (Code: AGSWR-080RD)
Large decorative link chain
Clasp
Jumprings
Panel pins
Snips
Thing-a-ma-jig (optional)
Flux
Solder and iron
Pickle
Flat steel block
Hammer
Polishing materials

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 14:17

Advanced Project
Fashion inspiration
Lace dress 45,
La Redoute

STEP 1

STEP 2

Draw a 35mm squared six-petal ower shape


either on the computer or by using a pair of
compasses and a protractor so you obtain a
perfect even, symmetrical shape. Add dots with
a pen to the very tips of the petals and where the
lines meet near the centre of the ower.

Place your drawing onto a block of wood and


hammer in 4cm panel pins exactly where the dots
are. Leave at least 3cm of panel pin showing. Using
heavy-duty snips, remove the head of each pin.

STEP 4
Using 0.8mm Sterling silver wire, start to wrap it
carefully around the pins. Keep the wire moving
in the same direction. Keep rotating the jig to
make it easier to manipulate the wire and keep
control of the tension.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

STEP 3
Remove the paper so you have your nished
jig. Alternatively you can make a ower shape
on a tool called a thing-a-ma-jig, which has
plastic pins that you push into a bed to create
lots of dierent designs.

STEP 5

STEP 6

Cut the wire away from the roll leaving no more


than 1cm at each end. Remove from the jig and
manipulate the wire with your ngers to obtain a
perfect daisy shape tweaking the wires so they
meet perfectly. Cut away any excess wire. Repeat
Steps 4 and 5 to make 10 owers.

Place a daisy onto your soldering block and add


some ux and a tiny square (paillon) of easy silver
solder to the join. Heat with a small ame until the
solder runs joining the two wires together. Pickle
and rinse. Repeat this step to solder all the owers.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P38-40_Silver Floral Lace SHSD.indd 39

39

04/03/2016 14:17

Project Advanced

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

Place a ower onto a at steel block and hammer


it using the at end of the hammer. Then using the
ball end of the hammer, gently tap all around the
wire to create a dimpled texture. Repeat this step
to texture all the owers.

Now you need to plan the design of your piece,


ensuring that all the petals touch each other to
create a continuous pattern. This design has two
rows containing ve ower shapes on top of each
other, but there are lots of other combinations
you can play with.

Carefully recreate your pattern onto your


soldering block and add ux and paillons to each
petal where they join one another. Solder the
piece in sections to make this step easier. Pickle
to remove all the re-stain and rinse.

STEP 10

STEP 11

STEP 12

If you want to polish to a high shine it is important


that if you do this that you place your piece onto
a at rigid surface such as a piece of wood to
support it whilst you polish it ensuring you do not
catch the wire in the polishing mop.

Use a large decorative link chain to join to either


side of your silver lace by either using small
jumprings or the gure-of-8 connectors that are
actually already on the chain holding the links.

Finally add a clasp again either using jumprings or


the gure-of-8 connectors. I have used a toggle
clasp so it blends in with the chain design but you
could add a statement clasp for a dierent look.

Designer tip
RESOURCES
Silver round wire from: Betts Metals
www.bettsmetalsales.com
0121 2332413
bms@bettsmetals.co.uk
Chain and clasp can be sourced from suppliers listed in this magazine.

40

MJ92_P38-40_Silver Floral Lace SHSD.indd 40

Hammering the texture onto the piece


work hardens the silver wire making
the nal piece nice and rigid. Ensure you
hammer the piece again after soldering
at Step 9 and before polishing it. This will
be the nal chance to stien the metal.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 14:17

Cufinks by Josef Koppmann

Making and selling


precious metal jewellery?
Remember to get it
hallmarked, its the law *
The UK Hallmark is one of the oldest forms of consumer protection
and a legal requirement for anyone selling their goods. Not only is it
a guarantee of quality, it also includes your very own sponsors mark.
Unique to you, your sponsors mark can be an invaluable marketing
tool leading to increased recognition and additional sales.
* Weight exemptions apply.

Find out more about hallmarking:


T: 020 7606 8971
E: info@assayofficelondon.co.uk
www.assayofficelondon.co.uk
Hallmarking Laser Engraving Laboratory Services Antique Plate Authentications Educational Seminars Valuations

041_MAJ_092.indd 41

3/3/16 12:04 PM

14-146 MJ app ad F/P.indd 42

3/8/16 10:19 AM

Regular

BOOK REVIEWS
This month Imogen Cooper reviews three books to spark your creativity.

FANCIFUL FINDINGS

BEAUTIFUL ELEMENTS

GEMS & CRYSTALS

HOLLY WITT-ALLEN
LEISURE ARTS, 6.99
ISBN 9781464733529

HEATHER POWERS
KALMBACH BOOKS, 15.50
ISBN 9781627002059

GEORGE E. HARLOW & ANNA S. SOFIANIDES


AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY,
19.99
ISBN 9781454917113

They say beauty can be found in the most


mundane of things and this book proves
just that! This guide to thrifty making
explores the possibilities of found objects,
turning them into pieces that remain entirely
individual to the wearer.
Owner of handmade jewellery shop Witt
N Whimsy, the authors talent for turning
the everyday into the original is clear in her
inventive projects. Take the Gear and Nut
jewellery set, a quirky trio of pieces that can
be adapted to suit whatever you have to spare.
Add your own character with the Key Charm
necklace and substitute the beads shown with
personal mementos.
Fanciful Findings concentrates on taking
what you already own and getting creative,
so theres no need for a huge shopping list!
The advantages to found object jewellery are
endless. Whatever youve got to hand, youre
certain to nd a project in this charming
little book to transform it into a creative new
addition to your jewellery box.

An absolute treasure trove of information, this


highly detailed guide takes you through the
steps to create gorgeous personalised jewellery.
With the use of metal, polymer clay and wire,
you can experiment with your chosen material
or even nd a new favourite. Inspired by nature
and forest scenes, each page will have you
stamping, embossing, and layering to produce
dainty leaves and acorns. Omit or include
suggestions as preferred to make an entirely
custom piece.
Beginners will benet from the Basics
section as they get to grips with technique,
leading to the 30 projects and more advanced
methods. The star of the show has to be the
delicate metal-sketching skill, which is versatile
and quick to achieve; while the possibilities
of customisation become endless. Not only
can you follow the dozens of ideas, but the
comprehensive instructions will help you create
original designs. Combine as many or as few
methods as you like as you imitate the authors
beautifully earthy, understated style. Just a
simple combination of these materials will add a
much-envied touch of this authors techniques.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P43_Book Reviews SHEE.indd 43

A celebration of 25 years in print, this book is


back with a newly designed twist. Revised and
more spectacular than ever, this classic from
the American Museum of Natural History is
their most remarkable edition to date.
Those looking for extensive knowledge
of crystals and gems will nd all they need.
Covering almost 150 of the most impressive
gemstones, everyone from the admirer to the
greatest geologist is sure to gain something.
An in-depth data section displays each stones
properties, making for easy identication and
providing welcome advice to ne jewellers.
There are also stories of the most mythical (and
sometimes bizarre) beliefs behind the stones.
Equally a coee-table book and a reference point
for professionals, each topic gives a fascinating
insight into the properties, origins, and history of
the worlds nest jewels. All is made crystal clear
with the aid of the authors years of expertise
and photography from an award-winning pair.
Showing the gems alone and the masterpieces
that theyve played a part in, this book will enthrall
and inspire jewellers everywhere.

43

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044_MAJ_092.indd 44

3/1/16 3:30 PM

Regular

WEB REVIEWS
Lauren Johnson surfs the web for the latest online stores, blogs and jewellery profiles
ALL WOMEN STALK
www.diy.allwomenstalk.com/glitterdiy-projects
As the cold weather ebbs away and the heavy
shades of winter fashion come to an end,
wouldnt it be nice to add a little sparkle to your
nights out? Check out All Women Stalk Glitter
diy projects gallery for lots of glittery ideas
to brighten up your makes. Glitter and a little
sparkle can be added to almost anything you
choose. The website oers ideas of what you
can do with glitter, whether that is a personal
project, or one undertaken with children or
grandchildren; either way the fun and mess
is endless. With help from the blogger Lisa
Washington you can take her pointers and tips
on how to make this making process one you
will not forget.

DIVINE CAROLINE

HOBBY LOBBY

www.divinecaroline.com

www.hobbylobby.com

This website is resourceful and easy to use,


allowing you to search for new and exciting
projects to quench your making thirst. However,
Divine Caroline doesnt just focus on jewellery
as you will see there are multiple tabs on the
navigation bar at the top of all the pages. Her
DIY fashion segment, however, shows you how
to make woven necklaces, statement pieces and
rings. So, your entire making needs are met in
one easily accessible place! The website oers
you a how-to in regards to making your chosen
pieces with links of where to purchase these
projects when you double tap their name. Divine
Caroline is simple yet eective in the creation
of jewellery, which may inspire you to create
something similar.

As one of the biggest craft suppliers in the USA,


Hobby Lobby has an extensive website that not
only sells all the products but has a wealth of
projects and videos. Under the DIY Projects
& Videos tab there is a category for Jewelry
Making, which is full of beginners projects
and ideas for the budding designer. Most of the
projects have free downloadable instructions
that you can either print at home or save
to use when not online. As well as written
instructions you get the opportunity to watch
tutorial videos with step-by-step help on how
to complete some projects. Scroll down the list
to nd the videos.

BROKE & HEALTHY


www.brokeandhealthy.com
This site is a composite of all sorts of things
from recipes to nances. Mixed in are some
great crafting ideas. I spied this 50 Fun Ways
to Hang Your Jewelry post (use the search bar
to nd the title). So, if you dont want to put
something youve worked hard on in a dark,
unloved corner of your drawer, why not go to
Broke & Healthy and check out these multiple,
stylish ways to show o your projects?
From antlers to hollow picture frames, nd
whichever ts your dcor best or has the feel
you want your jewellery to have. They have
a link through to a Pinterest board, which
you can use to link through to the projects to
make these display boards.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P45 Web Reviews SHSD.indd 45

45

26/02/2016 15:44

Project Easy

BUDS AND
SHOOTS
The colours and shapes found
in an early summer garden
are the inspiration for this
necklace. By Sue Corrie

ue is a member of Polymer
Art East Midlands, who hold
clay days at Long Eaton Art
Room near Nottingham. She no
longer sells her jewellery, but is
still a polymer clay fanatic.
Soft pastels are wonderful for
adding colour to raw polymer
clay. They adhere surprisingly
well once the clay is baked, but it
is always worth sealing a surface
nish onto beads that will rub
against clothes and skin. Here the
beads are sealed by dipping into
acrylic varnish. Mica powder adds
an extra bit of shine.

MATERIALS
Polymer clay (Fimo): 65g white,
10g yellow, 5g green,
2g magenta
Soft pastels in magenta, yellow
and green
Mica powder in gold, pearl
400-grit sandpaper
Clay extruder (3mm round hole
disc and 6mm square hole disc)
Glass or ceramic tile work surface
Pasta machine
Acrylic roller
Clay blade or craft knife
Bead piercing pins or cocktail
sticks
15mm diameter round cutter
Acrylic varnish (for polymer clay)
Cotton wool buds
Assorted silver spacer beads
80cm beading wire
Wire cutters
Crimps
Flat nose pliers or crimping pliers

46

MJ92_P46-47 Sue Corrie SHSD.indd 46

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:46

Easy Project

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

Condition the clay. Roll a sheet of


each colour out on the thickest
setting of your pasta machine.
Cut some pieces with a 15mm
diameter round cutter and mix to
make a soft spring green. Use Fimo
in proportions: 1 magenta: 2 true
green: 6 true yellow: 16 white. If
you use dierent clay, mix a small
amount rst, in case you need to
tweak the proportions.

Make a log of green to t the


extruder. Extrude a string of clay
through the 3mm round hole disc.
Cut into 8mm lengths. Taper the
ends, then wrap each length around
a piercing pin or cocktail stick.
Give an extra twist to make sure the
bead holds together well. Stroke
a little gold mica powder over the
top surface with your nger tip to
highlight the shape.

Make a log of white and t it into


the extruder. Extrude it through
the square hole disc and cut into
5cm lengths. Compress each piece
slightly, pushing the ends towards
each other to make the bead shorter
and fatter. Reduce the length
by half. Make a hole lengthways
and thread onto a piercing pin or
cocktail stick. Be careful not to
distort the shape.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, MIKE CORRIE

Extra Projects
Make a pendant
and earrings
PENDANT

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

Squeeze the ends of the bead to


taper them. Try to keep the edges
fairly sharp. Now start adding
colour. Rub stick pastels on a piece
of 400-grit sandpaper rst to
release the dust. Pick up colour on
the edge of a triangular make-up
sponge. First sponge a good line
of magenta on the top two-thirds of
the bead edges. Sponge yellow on
the bottom third.

Give each bead a couple of twists,


then gradually build up colour
on the top and bottom using
the sponge. Blend the colours
towards the centre with a soft
clean brush. Add a little green
to the bottom edges for more
contrast. When you are happy,
brush pearl mica powder over the
bead with a clean brush. Bake for
at least 30 minutes according to
the manufacturers instructions.

Pour acrylic varnish into a narrow


jar. If its too thick, mix with water
until fairly runny. Put each bead
on a pin and dip it. Stick it into
a polystyrene block to dry. Any
excess varnish will form teardrops
at the base of the bead. Soak
them up with a cotton bud as they
appear. String the beads together
when dry. Close with a crimp,
tucking away the wire ends.

EARRINGS
Make matching earrings and
wrap the ear wires in the
same way
way.
y.

RESOURCES

Designer tips
To reduce the length of a rectangular bead with minimal distortion,
squeeze the ends towards each other, then roll each side straight
with a roller. Repeat as many times as necessary.
To pierce the beads with minimal distortion, insert the pin or
cocktail stick at one end. Twist gently until it reaches halfway
through the length of the bead, then repeat from the other end.
White clay will show every mark. Keep pastels away from your main
work surface, and wipe hands, tools and surfaces regularly. You
can get some marks o clay if you rub it gently with a baby wipe.

Polymer clay, tools and accessories:


www.clayaround.com
Spacer beads, jewellery ndings
and tools: www.thebeadstore.co.uk

CONTACT
www.ghostshift.co.uk
East Midlands Polymer
Playground events: info@
polymerartseastmidlands.co.uk
British Polymer Clay Guild website:
www.bpcg.org.uk

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P46-47 Sue Corrie SHSD.indd 47

Thread a bail onto 10cm


curved silver wire. Wrap
tendrils of green clay each
side. Twist one end of a bud
bead to a point. Decorate
with more tendrils. Bake.
Attach the bead with a
headpin. Make loops in the
end of the wire for attaching
a chain.

47

26/02/2016 15:46

Caverswall Minerals
MAKE YOUR OWN JEWELLERY

Set your own stones, ceramics, resins etc into our silver 925 mounts.
We have a very large selection of silver settings and mounts including
inss
pendants, brooches, cufinks, rings, lockets, earrings, bracelets, stick pins
and tie bars etc in many different styles from modern, classic and celtic
c all
a
polished and easy to set.

JEWELLERY
TOOLS NOW
AVAILABLE
ONLINE

We supply a large range of semi precious cabochons


Tel: 01782 393838

email: phil@caverswallminerals.com

www.caverswallminerals.com

048_MAJ_092.indd 48

3/7/16 10:28 AM

Business matters Regular

BRANDING YOUR BUSINESS


PHOTOGRAPH: RAWPIXEL.COM/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

What things should you consider when naming your jewellery business and
creating your brand? By Jessica Rose

hen you are just starting out with


your jewellery business it can feel a
bit highfalutin to talk about brand.
But when you decide what to name your
business, what colour bags or boxes to use or
the typeface on your yers, you are actually
choosing what makes your business dierent
from other ones and this all aects how
people perceive it. In other words, these are all
items that help create your brand.
The process starts with choosing a name
for your jewellery business. It is important to
choose one that your customers will remember
and associate with your jewellery. So, if you
want to use your name as the business name, it
may be a good idea to add the word jewellery
or gems to the business. Jane Smith Bangles
is more memorable as a jewellery business than
just Jane Smith although you may not want
to restrict yourself just to bangles.
On the other hand, you could choose a name
that means something to you, such as your
childrens names or a place that inspires your
work or perhaps there is a name that you think
matches the style of your jewellery. If this is the
case, make sure you have a story to tell about
the name. A good story will engage a potential
customer a lot more than if your name is just
some randomly chosen words.
It is a good idea to test your business name
on other people and think about all the
implications of a name. For example, you might
decide on the name Polka Dot Stegosaurus for
your jewellery business. Ask yourself and others
questions like these:

Will it make your customers think about


jewellery specically your jewellery?

Does the style of name, in this case quirky, t


with your style of jewellery?
Can people spell it? This is very important
if people are going to nd you again and could
reduce the risk of costly printing errors.
How will it look/sound as a web address?
With our example www.polkadotstegosaurus.
net could end up being understood as www.
polka.stegosaurus.net.
Are there any issues with the initials? For
example, a quick web search turns up more
than 40 meanings for PDS.
If you are planning to have a limited registered
company, you will also need to check with
Companies House that there is no clash with
another business.

Identifying your business

Flyers, business cards, labels and other


printing: These should use the colours you
have chosen and the logo if you have decided
to have one. They should also all use the
same font or typeface and style of pictures
again this is to make it easy for customers to
recognise you.

Once you have decided on your business name


you need to start thinking about the other
things that will help identify your business:

Websites and social media: Make sure you use


your business name in your website address and
for any social media accounts you set up. Where
possible use the same colours, logo, images and
typeface that youve used elsewhere.

Colour scheme: These are the colours you will


use in all your business materials packaging,
labels, business cards, yers and website. You
will need to be clear about how you use those
colours. This means they should be practical
choices. You dont want to be spending
valuable making and selling time tracking
down an obscure shade of green ribbon to
make your packaging plan work. And if your
business name mentions a colour or a pattern,
that should feature in you colour scheme. It
might seem very clever for all the Polka Dot
Stegosaurus packaging to be striped, but in
reality it will confuse the customer.

By being consistent for all aspects of your


business and taking your time to think about
what a customer is likely to think about your
name, colours, and so on, you are creating a
brand identity. Not only does this identity give
your customers something to help recognise
your stall, label or website, it also can give an
air of professionalism to your business, which
can mean that people trust you and value your
work more.
So, a bit of work now to plan your brand is a
worthwhile investment.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P49 business matters SHSD.indd 49

Logo: Start with whether you want a logo. It


may be that you would prefer to use images
of your work along with your business name
in a particular typeface and style. In this case,
choose one and stick with it. But if you decide
to go for a logo think about it in the same way
as you did for your business name. Does the
logo style go with your jewellery style? Will it
make people think of jewellery and of you?

49

26/02/2016 15:48

Tips & techniques Top technique

TRANSLUCENT
POLYMER
Translucent polymer has unique qualities that
work beautifully in jewellery.
By Debbie Carlton

orking with translucent clay is


intriguing and fascinating. It doesnt
look translucent before baking but
certainly will do afterwards. Its also possible to
add colour using alcohol inks as well as creating
translucent canes and rainbow Skinner blends.
Many of the techniques are similar to using
other polymer clay but the results create pieces
which show the light!

Our expert
Debbies bold Jewellery designs explore
the fantastic potential of polymer. She
has become a passionate explorer of and
advocate for these dynamic materials.
Debbie teaches both metal clay and
polymer to beginners and advanced
students at her studio in North West London.

MATERIALS
Translucent polymer clay
Pinata or Adirondack
Alcohol inks
Krylon leang pen
General polymer clay tools:
Tissue blades
Acrylic roller
Pasta machine
Textures
Cookie cutters
400, 600, 800 grit wet
and dry paper

RESOURCES
www.clayaround.com
www.craftcellar.co.uk
www.ejrbeads.co.uk
www.metalclay.co.uk

CONTACT
www.debbiecarltonjewellery.co.uk
Debbie@debbiecarlton.com

50

MJ92_P50-52 Translucent Polymer SHSD.indd 50

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 11:37

PHOTOGRAPHS: DEBBIE CARLTON

STEP 1 BRANDS

STEP 2 BAKED CLAY

There are a number of dierent brands that make


a transparent clay including Sculpey Premo!,
Kato, Fimo, Cernit and Pardo Art Clay. The one I
use is Pardo Art Clay.

Pardo and Cernit polymer clays start out quite


white in the raw state. Kato and Premo are
coloured in their raw state. Its no surprise that the
clays stay that colour once they are baked. Cernit
polymer is just as white and as clear as Pardo
when baked at the recommended temperatures.

Designer tips
STEP 3 ALCOHOL INKS

STEP 4 MIXING INKS IN CLAY

Alcohol inks are an intensely concentrated dye


dissolved in alcohol. They come in dropper
bottles in a wide range of colours from the most
intense brights to subtle colours.

Condition the translucent clay very thoroughly;


roll out on setting no. 3 or 4 on a pasta machine
(1.5mm thick). Wearing latex gloves, paint the
ink onto the clay and let it dry completely. Then
recondition it to blend it in very well.

STEP 5 INK COLOURED CLAY

STEP 6 EARRINGS

These are examples of ink coloured transparent


clays. Each colour has been rolled through a
pasta machine to create a thin sheet.

To create earrings, cut out the shape youd like,


using cookie cutters or a template and bake
according to the brand. Use 400/600 and 800
grit wet and dry abrasive papers to polish the
edges and then use a Krylon silver or gold pen to
paint onto the edges which creates a lovely nish.
Attach charms and earwires to nish the earrings.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P50-52 Translucent Polymer SHSD.indd 51

Make small metal clay charms


Make your own unique template shapes
for pendants and earrings
Dierent translucent techniques include
mokume gane and extruder canes.

51

04/03/2016 11:37

Tips & techniques Top technique

STEP 7 SKINNER BLENDS

STEP 8 MIX AND CONDITION

Choose three colours for the Skinner blend


(I used red, blue and yellow). Roll out sheets of
clay and paint on the ink. Allow the ink to dry.

Mix the ink into the clay well and roll out
sheets of each colour on the thickest setting
on a pasta machine.

STEP 9 MAKE A BLEND

STEP 10 SKINNER BLEND


EARRINGS

Cut each colour into thin strips, and place the


strips together carefully to make sure they dont
come apart in the pasta machine. Feed through
the machine, then fold in half and repeat the
process until the colours blend.

When the skinner sheet is ready, choose the


cutter shape you like and cut out pieces for
earrings. You can add other small canes to the
cut out pieces on both sides, as they will show
through. Bake to the recommended temperature;
this is essential as transparent clay burns easily.

STEP 11 CANES
Making canes with translucent clay. Create a
large ball of plain white translucent clay having
conditioned it very well. Then roll it into a log
shape. Cover with a very thin sheet of ordinary
white polymer (setting 7 or 8 on the pasta
machine) then repeat with a sheet of black
polymer (setting 5 or 6). Using a tissue blade cut
a thin disc and lay another smaller cane onto it.

STEP 12 CANE EXAMPLES


Let your imagation go and create whatever
combination of canes works for you. The choices
are endless!

52

MJ92_P50-52 Translucent Polymer SHSD.indd 52

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 11:38

Traditional Czech Beads

PRECIOSA ChilliTM
PRECIOSA Rocailles

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PRECIOSA Rocailles

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Art No. 331 19 001


Size: 7/0, 9/0

preciosa-ornela.com

053_MAJ_092.indd 53

3/3/16 12:05 PM

The latest issue is welcoming Spring with more than 100 fresh recipes from substantial salads and easy
one-pot meals, to sweet treats! Superfood oers everything you need to know for a balanced diet, from
nutritional information to the myths about food, and features tips and tricks for eating and living
well from healthy lifestyle experts, including dietician Nichola Whitehead and food writer Nicky Corbishley,
making it a must have for anyone wanting to enjoy nutritionally-balanced, delicious and natural food.

On sale now for 5.99 from all major magazine retailers & supermarkets

HURRY WHILE STOCKS LAST!


To order a copy please call 01273 488005
Additional 2.95 (per copy) P&P cost will be charged. Subject to availability

090_MAJ_092.indd 90

3/8/16 9:53 AM

Trends Shopping

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www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P55 Trends SHSD.indd 55

55

26/02/2016 15:51

Project Intermediate

CRYSTAL GARDEN
Dierent beaded elements combine for this sparkling fl oral necklace
perfect for day or evening wear. By Chloe Menage

hloe has a passion for beads and all


things sparkly! A magpie at heart, she is
a member of the Starman Trendsetter
design team and enjoys teaching her beadwork
patterns around the UK.
This project is just so versatile. Once youve
mastered the beaded owers and bezelled
crystals, you can use them for almost anything.
Chloe says she was inspired by the soft pastels,
but in reality the petal beads and crystals come
in such a rainbow of colours you can recreate
this piece in any scheme you like.

MATERIALS
4 or 5 x 14x10mm Swarovski 4610 fancy stone
in Aquamarine, Peridot, Light Rose
and Tanzanite
20 x 8mm CzechMates rose petal beads
in a variety of colours
20 x 3mm Swarovski Xilions in variety of colours
Approx. 1g x size 11 seed beads
Approx. 1g x size 15 seed beads
4 x 10mm acrylic roses
2 x 15mm acrylic roses
Approx. 3g x size 11 Miyuki Delica beads
7 strand Beadalon Bright
2 x necklace ends (callotes)
2 x crimp beads
Chain
2 x jumprings
Trigger clasp
Scissors
Chain nose pliers
Cutters
Toning beading thread (One-G, Miyuki
or Fireline)
Size 12 beading needle
Synthetic wax

RESOURCES
All supplies: www.perlesandco.co.uk
15mm acrylic owers from The Bead Shop
Nottingham (Ltd): www.mailorder-beads.co.uk

CONTACT
info@pinkhot.co.uk
www.pinkhot.co.uk

56

MJ92_P56-58_Crystal Garden SHSD.indd 56

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:53

Intermediate Project
Fashion inspiration

Karolina pinafore dress


59, Monsoon

1
2

3
4

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

Flowers: Pick up 2 x size 11 beads,


1 x petal (back to front), 1 x size 15,
1 x Xilion, 1 x size 15, 1 x petal.
Tie the ends in a knot. Pass through
the 2 x size 11, the rst petal and the
size 15. Pick up 1 x Xilion, 1 x size 15,
1 x petal, 2 x size 11s.

Pass up through the previous petal


and the size 15, Xilion, size 15 (s15)
and down through petal 3. Pick up
2 x size 11s (s11), 1 x petal, 1 x s15 and
1 Xilion. Pass down through the s15,
petal 3 and 2 x s11. Pass up through
petal 4 and the s15. Pick up 1 x
Xillion, pass down through the s15
and petal 2. Pick up 2 x s11 and
pass up through petal 4.

You should have 4 Xilions on top


with a s15 each side and 8 x s11
on the back. Pass through the next
Xilion. Pick up 1 x s15, pass into the
Xilion, repeat around to add a s15
between each. Pass down though
a petal and pass through all the size
11s. Finish each of the ends.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE

DIAGRAMS: CHLOE MENAGE

3
2

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

Bezelled crystals: Using single


needle Right Angle Weave (RAW),
pick up 4 x Delicas and pass
through all the beads again.
*Pick up 3 beads and pass through
the bead you exited from and the
next 2. Repeat from * until you
have 16 units. Make sure the strip
is not twisted: pick up a bead, pass
through the rst bead in the strip,
pick up a second bead and back
into the nal unit to join. Reinforce.

Row 2: exit from an edge bead.


Pick up 3 beads and pass back
through the edge bead. Thread
through the next bead in the new
unit. *Pick up 2 beads and thread
into the next bead along in row 1,
(working back towards the rst unit
of the second row), pass around
the new unit and into the next edge
bead in row 1.

Repeat along in single needle RAW


until you reach the beginning again.
You will only need to add one bead
to complete this unit, which nishes
the second row. Work through to
exit an outer bead.

Designer tips
Wax your thread well or use Fireline for strength; crystals have
sharp edges and can cut your thread.
Try not to kink the Beadalon when youre threading on the bezelled
crystals, take it slow and make sure the threads do not twist or cross.
Why not use exactly the same method for the necklace but turn it
into a dramatic cu bracelet?

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MJ92_P56-58_Crystal Garden SHSD.indd 57

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26/02/2016 15:53

Project Intermediate

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

Pass through all the outer beads


and when you reach the beginning
again, pull the thread to draw in
the beads slightly. Thread through
a couple of beads (into the bezel)
to lightly anchor. Drop the stone
in. Work the thread through to exit
from an edge bead on the other
side and repeat this step. Tighten
the thread so that the stone is held
securely and the bezel is even.

Work through and create a half hitch


knot to secure. Pass through to exit
from a horizontal bead in the middle
of the bezel. Pick up a Delica and
thread into the next bead along.
Repeat around to create a ridge.
Finish your thread.

Make four bezelled stones and ve


owers (or any combination you
prefer). To make up the necklace,
cut two 30cm lengths of Beadalon.
Thread both through a necklace
end and a crimp, crush the crimp
near the end, trim the excess and
close the cover.

Extra Projects
Make a pendant
and a bracelet
PENDANT

STEP 10

STEP 11

STEP 12

Stitch a bezel as before


and embellish with crystal
pendants and owers. Make
a bail by creating two strips of
ladder stitch ve beads long
from the back of the bezel.
Reinforce and then nish the
thread. Thread onto a chain of
your choice.

Thread both ends through a pearl,


then pass one end through two of
the seed beads on the back of the
ower. Take the other end through
the two seed beads opposite.

To thread on a bezelled crystal, pass


one thread through a Delica on the
back, then across the stone and into
another Delica on the opposite site.
Repeat with the second length of
Beadalon. With the acrylic ower
beads pass both threads through
the hole.

Continue to add bezelled crystals,


beaded owers and acrylic owers
in a pattern that suits you. Finish
with a pearl. Pass both ends through
a necklace end and add a crimp.
Ensure you have everything sitting
right and crush the crimp. Add a
length of chain to each necklace
end and nish with a clasp.

Create beaded owers and


thread them on to two lengths
of Beadalon, with seed beads
and pearls in between. Pass
the thread through the pearls
in opposite directions to
create the crossover pattern.

58

MJ92_P56-58_Crystal Garden SHSD.indd 58

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Project Easy

DAISY DELIGHT
Daisies are the quintessential summer flower and really easy to make in polymer clay.
By Amelie Harrison

aking owers like these is addictive!


The process is quick and you get a
really nice adaptable result easily.
Follow the steps to make a pair of earrings, or
make one and hang it as a pendant.

RESOURCES
All materials are widely available from advertisers
in this magazine.

60

MJ92_P60-61 Sian daisy project SHSD.indd 60

MATERIALS
Polymer clay in turquoise, lime, pearl white
and green
4 x jumprings
2 x earwires
Pasta machine
Roller
Tissue blade
Craft knife
Cocktail stick
Circle cutters (45mm, 67mm, 3550mm)
Non-stick surface (to work on)

Designer tips
If you are taking on making anything
with polymer clay you really do need a
pasta machine, such as an Atlas 180.
Condition all the clay used in this project
before you begin.
As you only need a small amount of
green clay for the daisy centres you can
mix some turquoise and lime together
to make a green.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 14:27

Easy Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

Fill up the turquoise strip with


lime strands then place the other
turquoise strip. Press down gently
along the whole length and roll
over with a roller (very gently, as
you dont want to distort the lime
strands). Cut two lengths with the
tissue blade that are about 2mm
thick. Set to one side.

To make the ower petals, roll a


sheet of pearl clay on setting 3 (5
playing cards, 1.6mm). Using a 4
or 5mm circle cutter, cut out lots
of discs. Roll them up individually
into balls and then roll on one side
to create a tear shape. Keep rolling
until it becomes long and thin. This
is a petal and you will need to make
about 24 on each ower (but this
will vary depending on how big the
balls are and how closely you pack
them together).

Roll a sheet of lime clay on setting 4


(4 playing cards, 1.3mm). Lay it down
and roll a small piece of green clay on
setting 4 too. Cut out two discs from
the green clay that are about 6mm
(this doesnt have to be exact use
whatever cutter you have around that
size). Start to lay down the petals, its
easiest if you work in opposites so
lay four down at the quarter points
and then ll in between. You can use
a cocktail stick to pick up the petals
and place them.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, AMELIE HARRISON

STEP 1
Firstly make the cane that goes
around the ower. Roll out a sheet of
turquoise clay on a pasta machine at
setting 4 (4 playing cards, 1.3mm).
Cut two long strips with a tissue
blade that is as long as the blade
and about 30mm wide. Using the
clay extruder and the disc with 1mm
holes, extrude long strands of lime
clay. Chop the strands into short
lengths and lay along one of the
turquoise pieces.

Extra Projects
Make a brooch and a ring
BROOCH
Cut the shape out of paper rst and then cut the clay shape out with
a craft knife using the paper as a template. The shape is surrounded
with the cane and nally the daisies are added with a turquoise line in
between each daisy. After baking, rene the outside shape with very
ne grit sandpaper.

STEP 5

STEP 6

RING

When all the petals are in place


and you are happy they are evenly
spaced. Press the cocktail stick into
the point of the petal with the point
of the cocktail stick against the side
of the green central disc. This will
make a dent in the petal and create
the petal shape. Go around all the
petals and press each one down
individually. This also sticks them to
the base sheet. Texture the central
green disc with the point of the
cocktail stick too.

Cut around the daisy shapes with


a cutter, then take the cane made
from Step 2 and fold it around the
edge of the daisy. Cut it o where it
overlaps and gently press the edges
together. Gently push the cane
outside edge against the daisy to
stick the clay together. Back these
pieces with a sheet of turquoise
clay rolled at setting 4. Cut them
out and then nish with a small hole
le
for a jumpring. Bake in the
e oven
and when cooled,
d, attach to
earwires with jumprings.

To make a ring, follow Steps 1 to 5. The ower has shorter petals


and about three layers. Do the rst line of petals then add more in
between the rst ones and build outwards. Stop when you are happy
with the shape and
nd size of the ower. Cut the shape out and bake it,
then glue the piece
ece to a ring blank with a at pad.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P60-61 Sian daisy project SHSD.indd 61

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26/02/2016 15:58

Tips & techniques Top technique

PEYOTE STITCH
BEADED HOOPS
Use a basic peyote stitch to create these
fun and versatile beaded hoops.
By Clair Wolfe

his stitch is easy to learn and fun to


do. Once the basic stitch has been
mastered, it opens up a whole host of
possibilities for jewellery design. This weave
creates a Saraguro-style bridal collar.

MATERIALS
Beading thread
Selection of size seed beads (delicas and 15s)
Snips
Beading needle
Bead board

Our expert
Clair says she is inspired by the 3D
properties seed beads have. They can
be used to produce a whole host of
3D shapes, which can be used in many
designs. Usually the basic technique
involved in producing a 3D shape is a
simple, one, which is easily learnt.

RESOURCES
All tools and materials for this project
are available through companies who
advertise in this magazine.

CONTACT
www.etsy.com/shop/ClairWolfe

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MJ92_P62-64 Beaded Hoops SHSD.indd 62

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:59

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CLAIR WOLFE

Top technique Tips & techniques

STEP 1 PREPARING THE THREAD

STEP 2 ADD DELICA BEADS

Cut a manageable length of thread and pull


through your hands to condition, then thread
through a beading needle. Add 60 delica beads
to the thread, securing them into a circle with a
couple of knots. Pass the needle through approx.
10 beads after the knot.

Add a bead to the needle and then pass the


needle through the next but one bead, then
continue to add beads for the circumference of
the circle. Add the nal bead and pass through
the next but one bead as well as the rst bead
added in this step. Gently pull on the thread to
align the beads.

STEP 3 ADD DELICA BEADS

STEP 4
ADD DELICAS
AND SIZE 15s

Repeat Step 2, once again adding a bead and


then passing the needle through the next but
one bead. It is easy to see where the beads need
to be added and slots have been formed in the
previous step. Once again, gently pull on the
thread to align the beads and retain tension. Do
not pull too tightly.

Add a third row of delica


beads the same as before.
For the fourth round of beads
use size 15 beads in place of
the delicas. When you pull
the thread you will begin
to see the curve form
in the beads. This is
meant to happen
and helps with
zipping the
beads together.

Designer tips
Try increasing the number of beads in
the base; as long as an even number is
used these hoops should work.
Experiment with dierent numbers of
runs; as long as they add up to an odd
number of runs, the beads will be in the
right position to zip together.
Have fun using this technique on
dierent sizes of seed bead.

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26/02/2016 15:59

Tips & techniques Top technique

STEP 5 PASSING THROUGH


Pass the needle at a diagonal, though the bead
next to the last bead added. Then follow the
angle of the beads, passing through each until
the needle is on the opposite side of the hoop.

STEP 6 FINAL BEADS

STEP 7 ZIPPING

Add two runs of the size 15 beads to this side of


the hoop. Pull the thread and a deeper curve
will appear and the size 15 beads will sit neatly in
between each other like zip teeth.

Pass the needle through the bead that sits next


to the nal bead added in Step 6. This will be a
bead on the opposite side of the hoop. Thread
the needle back and forth through the beads sat
next to each other, gently pushing the side in, if
needed. Pull the thread after a few stitches to pull
the zip together.

STEP 8 CONNECTING HOOPS


Once the hoop has been zipped, sew the loose
thread back through the beads until secure,
snipping away any excess. Take a length of
beading thread; add 50 beads and two of the
beaded hoops before securing the base circle
with knots. Connect the two hoops, with a third
hoop by following all of the above steps. Repeat
until you have made a chain of hoops to use in
your design.

64

MJ92_P62-64 Beaded Hoops SHSD.indd 64

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 15:59

Tools and mediums for the experimental jewellery designer. Art Clay
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Access the latest projects, interviews, articles, techniques,
competitions and behind-the-scenes blogs of your
favourite craft magazines...

PHOTOGRAPHS: RENATE STETTLER

Where your
jewellery begins.

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kanate / Shutterstock.com

065_MAJ_092.indd 65

Sleek, sophisticated and always in trend,


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charms, focals and components.
FusionBeads.com/BeadUK

3/8/16 10:01 AM

Project Easy

Create totally
dierent designs
using exactly the
same technique.
By Tansy Wilson

BEAUTIFUL
BEAD
CLUSTERS

ometimes beads are so


beautiful you just want to
use as many as possible in
one design. Making these clusters
is a great way to do this, creating
stunning pieces very easily.

MATERIALS
String of 10mm black agate
beads (approx. 38 beads)
16mm x 16mm rhombus striped
agate bead
Packet of 6mm silver stardust
beads
2 x 1mm x 1mm crimp tubes
2 x 2mm crimp covers
40cm length of nylon thread
12 x 16mm rhombus square bead
frames (Code MB12)
2 x 3mm silver beads
10 x silver ball headpins

RESOURCES

Designer tip
Add as many beads as
possible so you cant see
what they are attached onto
to get a real cluster eect.

Ring shanks, agate, turquoise


& lapiz lazuli beads:
www.hcbeads.com
Rhombus bead frames from eBay
seller bellabeadsuk:
http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Sara-JaneJewellery
6mm stardust beads from eBay
seller thecharmsellection:
http://stores.ebay.co.uk/
thebeadselection
All other materials can be sourced
from suppliers listed throughout
this magazine

66

MJ92_P66-67_Beautiful Bead Clusters SHSD.indd 66

26/02/2016 16:00

Easy Project

STEP 2
Thread a combination of agate,
stardust and rhombus beads onto
the nylon, also threading the 4cm
tail through the rst few beads
added. Ensure your design keeps
one rhombus bead at the centre of
the string. The design in this picture
is 40cm long.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, TANSY WHEELER

STEP 1
Thread a crimp tube onto a 40cm
length of nylon lament and pass
one end through a rhombus bead
and back through the crimp tube.
Slide the tube up the nylon so it rests
against the rhombus bead leaving
approx. 36cm length and a 4cm tail.
Crimp the tube using crimping pliers
and add a crimp cover keeping the
nylon thread sticking out the bottom.

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

Thread a 3mm silver bead onto a


headpin and then thread the headpin
through your agate rhombus bead.
Add another 3mm bead and make
a wrapped loop at the top (see
page 96). Open a 9mm x 4mm oval
jumpring and link this agate focal
bead onto the central rhombus bead
of the strung necklace.

You can now add as many beads as


you like to form the pendant cluster
with your focal agate bead. Thread
a headpin through a selection of
agate and stardust beads and make
a hook at the very top of each one.

Take one hooked bead and thread


the headpin through the wrapped
loop made at the top of the focal
agate bead. Hold the stem of the
hook in your pliers and wrap the
remaining excess wire from the
headpin around the stem securing
it on. Repeat to add a bead to the
other side of the loop.

Continue adding as many beads


as you like to the 9mm x 4mm oval
jumpring. Add them both at the
front and back of the jumpring to
achieve a large tight cluster.

Extra Projects
Make earrings
and rings
This method of clustering
beads can be used to make
a matching pair of earrings.
It can also look very eective
when used in other designs
too. Add lapis lazuli and gold
beads to a looped ring for this
stacked up eect or try adding
bead cups to these turquoise
beads for a more layered silver
and blue cluster eect.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

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04/03/2016 14:32

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2/29/16 12:32 PM

Feature

What inspires

Justine
Nettleton

Justine shows how art and photography inspire her


jewellery designs. By Kira Withers-Jones
MY DESIGNS
Ive always loved making things, painting and
drawing. I went to university in Newcastle
in the 1980s and studied Fine Art. After I
graduated I carried on painting and making,
then in 2008 I got a studio in the town where
I live and started painting for shows. I made
jewellery from the scraps left over from the
painting process and found they started selling
when I exhibited them. This gave me the
condence to experiment more and more.

PHOTOGRAPHS: JUSTINE NETTLETON

MY INSPIRATION
My jewellery is inspired by
the colour and textures in
my landscape paintings,
and the things I photograph
on my travels. It all feeds
back into the process
painting, photography,
design, making,
experimenting. The

process is constantly evolving. I transform


my photographs of birds, plants, owers and
trees with the use of my own colours to make
them unique. The colours and patterns I use
to bring them to life are borrowed from my
landscape paintings.

MY TECHNIQUES
At the moment most of my jewellery is wood
based. I create the imagery on my computer,
then attach it to the surface of laser-cut wood.
My animal shape brooches are decorated
with colours from my paintings.
My botanical designs are on
circular and oval wood
shapes and come as
brooches and pendants.
Im particularly fond
of my colourful bird
designs. Trees are a
big inspiration for my
paintings and I have

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MJ92_P69_Inspirations SHSD.indd 69

a range of tree brooches and pendants. Im


now experimenting with porcelain and silver,
incorporating my designs into something even
more precious.

CONTACT
www.justinenettleton.com
www.artyouwear.co.uk
justinenettleon69@gmail.com

69

04/03/2016 14:35

Project Easy

BEADED LACE
COLLAR
Create a beaded lace collar,
using one simple beading technique.
By Clair Wolfe

lair has created a lace


collar that is both delicate
and subtle. The lace
sections are easy to make and this
necklace can be created in a few
hours. It would be perfect for an
early summer tea party!

STEP 1
Cut a manageable length of
beading thread, then condition it by
running it through your ngers a few
times, straightening out the thread.
Pass the thread through a beading
needle; it is best to use size 12
needles for this style of beadwork.
Add 6 x size 15 beads to the needle
and thread and position approx.
10cm from the end of the thread.

MATERIALS
Size 15 seed beads
Beading thread
Beading needle
Glue
Snips
Findings

STEP 6
Keep adding rounds of beads,
adding 7, then 9 then 11, then 13 etc.
depending on the size required.
Make at least two of each size, and
one central section of lace.

Designer tips
Make a multicoloured
necklace to wear with a
plain cotton summer dress.
Try using larger seed beads
for a chunkier look.
Make more of the lace
sections and create a full
bib-style necklace.

RESOURCES
All tools and supplies are available
from: www.beadsdirect.com

CONTACT
ClairWolfeJewellery@gmail.com

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Easy Project

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Add 1 x size 15 bead to the thread


and pass the needle through the
next bead in the circle of the base
beads. Add another bead and pass
the needle through the next bead
in the base. Repeat until 6 beads
have been added in total. End the
round by passing the needle up
through the rst of the 6 beads
added in this step.

Add 3 x size 15 beads to the thread


and then pass the needle through
the next of the beads added in the
previous step. Continue to add three
beads until the round is complete.
Finish this round by passing the
needle up through two of the rst
three beads adding in this step.

Do another round, this time adding


5 beads, passing the needle
through the second of the three
beads added in the previous step.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CLAIR WOLFE

STEP 2
Pass the needle back through the
6 beads and gently pull to form
a circle of beads. Then pass the
needle through the next two beads.
This will form the base for the lace.

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

One you have nished the number


of rounds needed for a section, sew
the thread through the whole of the
outer beads. Then following the
path of the beads, sew the thread
back to the lace and end when the
thread ends up at the same bead as
the tail left from step one. Repeat
this on all of the sections. This will
stien each section of lace.

Once both ends of the thread are


coming out of the same bead, use
a double overhand knot to secure.
Using the needle, guide the knot to
sit as close the beads as possible.
Add a dab of glue to the knot; allow
to dry before snipping away any
excess thread.

Condition another length of thread.


Take the smallest section of lace and
starting on one of the six points, sew
around the outside until you reach the
opposite point. Add 1 x size 15 seed
bead before sewing through the next
lace section in the same way. Repeat
until all have been sewn together.
Finish by sewing a length of chain to
each side and adding a clasp.

Extra Projects
Make a pendant
and a cu
PENDANT
Create one large section of
lace; add a jumpring and chain
to create a simple pendant.

CUFF
Create lace sections in a
variety of bead sizes and
colours, sew them together
and then then sew them onto
a length of ribbon.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

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71

26/02/2016 16:03

MIX AND
MATCH
Make a unique necklace from lengths of chain
linked together and embellished with charms
and beads. By Joan Gordon

his design is the perfect


accessory for a spring
garden party with a
hint of sparkle without being
too dramatic. The necklace was
made using short sections of the
same linked chain. The beauty of
this piece is that sections can be
unclipped to be worn as bracelets
or removed to add new links and
additional focals.

MATERIALS
35cm x Sterling silver or chain
with 6mm long links
21 x 4mm wide silver jumprings
3mm wide ring
6 x 5cm long silver eye pins
5 x parrot clasps
Heart-shaped watch face
12mm square Swarovski
mirrorback crystal
10mm oval Swarovski mirrorback
crystal
8mm round Swarovski mirrorback
crystal
3cm long key, assorted charms
for decoration
8mm long lamp bead
2 x 4mm crystal beads
8 x 4mm yellow crystal beads
4 x 4mm pink toned crystal
beads
10 x 3mm green crystal beads
Round, pointed at and snipe
nose pliers

Designer tips
Avoid wearing perfume
when wearing mirrorbacked crystals as the
alcohol can damage the
mirror coating.
Crystals with scratched
mirror coating can be
repaired with Krylon
Looking Glass Mirror-Like
paint or silver spray paint.
Use semiprecious stones
or pearls to further
embellish other links of
chain to further the use of
this accessory.

RESOURCES
Silver chain, eye pins and ndings:
www.cooksongold.com

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MJ92_P72-74 Joan G SHSD.indd 72

www.craf tsinstitute.com

02/03/2016 11:39

Easy Project
Fashion Inspiration
Overlay dress
35, La Redoute

STEP 1

STEP 2

Add a parrot clasp to a jumpring


and then the open ring to one end
of a length of chain measuring
17.5cm. Close the jumpring
securely. To the other end add
another 4mm jumpring using snipe
nose pliers. This plain chain link is
the back of the necklace.

Thread 5 of the coloured 4mm and


3mm crystal beads onto two eye
pins. Form a neat wrapped loop at
the end of each eye pin using round
and pointed at nose pliers. Trim o
any excess wire with sidecutters.
Attach jumprings to either end of
the eye pins. Make three separate
beaded drops using 4 small crystals
on two eye pins and ve on another
eye pin. Link these three together
(with the 5-beaded eye pin in the
middle) with a 3mm jumpring and
set aside to link with the base of the
watch face.

STEP 3

STEP 4

Lay out the three Swarovski crystal


links. Open six jumprings and attach
one either side of the crystal links.
Attach a parrot clasp to a jumpring
and then secure this ring to a 6cm
length of chain. Link the open
jumpring to the free end of chain
and close. Also close the ring on
the other side of the crystal. Open
another jumpring and link this to the
closed ring, link the key to the ring
and another 4cm length of chain.
Link a jumpring to the end of chain,
add a beaded link, 2cm of chain, the
oval crystal and a parrot clasp.

Thread an eye pin with a 4mm


crystal, the lampwork bead,
another crystal and then form a
wrapped loop. Attach a jumpring
to either side of the eye pin. Add a
jumpring to one free end of 7cm of
chain and link the other end to the
beaded eye pin. To the other side
of the beaded link add a heart motif
and one end of a 4.5cm length of
chain. See how the round crystal
is attached followed by chain, a
crystal beaded eye pin nishing
with a pearl clasp. Finish with a
jumpring and parrot clasp.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P72-74 Joan G SHSD.indd 73

73

26/02/2016 16:04

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, JOAN GORDON

Project Easy

STEP 5

STEP 6

Join all the parrot clasps to the


jumprings at each end of the chain
links. The easiest way to check how
the links will drape is to hang it
from a jewellery display. Add more
charms if you wish to make it more
tactile or colourful. Link the end
parrot clasps to the jumpring at the
top of the watch face; this forms the
focal of the necklace. The rst plain
chain made in Step 1 sits at the back
of the neck.

Attach a jumpring to the top and


the base of the watch face and
close securely. Open the 3mm
ring attached to the beaded
three eye pins and link this to a
small parrot clasp. Attach the
parrot clasp to the 4mm jumpring
attached to the base of the
watch face. This forms the drop
that nishes the necklace. Make
several dierent coloured drops to
interchange with the necklace to
colour match with your wardrobe.

Extra Projects
Make focals,
earrings and
bracelets
FOCALS
You can make lots of
interchangable focal pieces
for the necklace. Take the
piece you want to use and
thread onto a headpin then
make a wrapped loop above
the piece. Attach the loop to
a parrot clasp.

EARRINGS
Thread crystals onto eye pins,
colour matching them to
links on your necklace. Form
wrapped loops at the top
of the pins and then link to
jumprings and earwires.

BRACELETS
When making the necklace
components, make sure they
are the right length to use as a
bracelet, that way you get lots
of jewellery pieces in one!

74

MJ92_P72-74 Joan G SHSD.indd 74

www.craf tsinstitute.com

02/03/2016 11:40

OVER 100

NEW CRAFT BOOKS


in store at

RELAX AND UNWIND WITH A GREAT CRAFT BOOK!


Find pages of inspiration and project ideas, from books for beginners to expert hints and tips,
and colouring books for adults, we stock crafting books for every level of experience and ability.

To browse the selection and/or nd your nearest store:

www.hobbycraft.co.uk

075_MAJ_092.indd 75

07/03/2016 14:16

Project Easy

STEP 1
Start by pulling a 1mm diameter
stringer from the rod of turquoise
and put this to one side. Youll use
this stringer later to add dots to
the centre of the ower. Using the
Crocus glass, make a basic round
donut-shaped bead. This base bead
will determine the nished size of
your ower. This one is about 10mm
diameter and the owers end up
about 22mm across.

FLOWER BEAD GARLAND


Create a chain necklace featuring lampwork glass fl ower beads.
By Laura Sparling

his long chain necklace


is adorned with lavender
and yellow ower-shaped
lampwork glass beads, and spacers
in pretty early summer colours. It
would look fabulous with a long
maxi dress or just with a plain
T-shirt and jeans. Change the
bead colours and the metal for a
dierent look.

MATERIALS
2.4mm dipped mandrels
1.6mm dipped mandrels
Tweezers
Creation is Messy (CiM) glass in
Crocus
Eetre glass in Turquoise 232
Spacers are CiM Crocus and
Peacock Green, Eetre Ivory 264,
Pale Amber 008, Turquoise 232,
and Reichenbach 104 in Opal
Raspberry
920mm of 3mm x 2.5mm antique
copper-plated curb chain
110 x 2in antique copper-plated
headpins
140 x 3mm antique copperplated round beads

12mm antique copper-plated


lobster clasp
2 x 4mm antique copper-plated
jumprings
6mm antique copper-plated
closed jumpring

STEP 6
Bring the top half of one petal to a
glow and with the warm-but-notglowing tip of the Crocus rod, touch
the top of the glowing petal, count
to two and slowly and gently pull
your rod back. Flame cut the rod
from the petal. This petal-pulling
action takes place outside the ame.
Repeat on the other four petals and
then place your bead into a hot kiln
for annealing.

Designer tips
Instead of a copper bead at the centre of each ower, try using
a 3mm crystal or re-polished glass bead.
This necklace would look great in shades of just one colour.
This would look fabulous in crystal and white with silver chain
and ndings.
These owers are a good way to use opal glasses that you might
nd otherwise tricky when making normal beads.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P76-77_Flower Bead Garland SHSD.indd 76

26/02/2016 16:05

Easy Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

This step is great for honing your


dot placement skills. Let your base
bead cool a little so that you dont
disturb its surface with the next
part. Using the rod of Crocus, add
ve largish dots around the centre
of the bead. Heat the tip of the
rod, press it onto the bead and pull
back and ame-cut the rod from
the bead. You can make six dots (or
however many you prefer).

Melt the ve dots in a little, let the


glow come out of the bead and then
go round again, adding more glass
to each dot. Repeat this process
until your bead is looking a bit like a
starsh. Now you need to melt the
dot stacks into round blobs. Do this
by holding the bead under the ame,
so that the ame skims over each
stack, slowly condensing it down.

Bring the glow out of the bead and


reheat one of the blobs. Once it is
glowing, bring the mandrel just out
of the ame and grab and squash
the centre of the blob between the
tips of your tweezers to make a petal
shape. Repeat on the other four
blobs, making sure to occasionally
quench your hot tweezers in some
cold water so that they dont get
stuck to the hot bead.

With the turquoise stringer you


pulled earlier, add some dots
to the centre of the ower. They
dont all have to be the same size
or evenly-spaced. Dont place the
dots too near the mandrel or the
end user might have trouble wiring
or stringing the bead. Once youve
added your little turquoise dots,
melt them in enough that they are
securely attached, but slightly raised.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, CHRIS GREGORY

Extra Projects
Make earrings
and a bracelet
EARRINGS
Make some 6mm spacers
and attach them to lengths of
chain. Add a small jumpring
to each one and attach them
to earwires.

STEP 7

STEP 8

STEP 9

For this necklace owers were also


made using Eetre Pale Amber
with dots of Reichenbach 104 Opal
Raspberry. You can etch these
ones using Dip N Etch for a velvety
matt nish. I made a batch of about
a hundred 9mm spacers (in the
colours listed) on 1.6mm mandrels.
Again, I etched the Pale Amber
ones. This is where the possibilities
for colour choices are endless.

To wire the owers, thread a 3mm


copper bead onto a headpin, then
a ower face down so that its dots
face the at end of the headpin and
then another 3mm copper bead.
Using pliers, make a loop, slip it onto
the chain and wrap the loop (see
page 96). For the spacers, thread
one straight onto a headpin, add a
3mm copper bead and ax to the
chain in the same way as the ower.

Work your way along the chain,


adding the owers and spacers
in whatever order you prefer.
You could alternate between the
lavender and yellow owers, adding
three spacers between each one.
You neednt attach a clasp to a long
necklace as it can just be slipped
over the head, but you could
add a lobster clasp and ring with
jumprings so that the wearer can
unfasten it if needs be.

RESOURCES

BRACELET

Glass: www.tunellglass.com
Findings:
www.bluestreakbeads.co.uk
Chain: www.angs-attic.co.uk

Make a bracelet in exactly the


same manner as the necklace.
Try using ve ower beads
and fourteen spacers to make
the bracelet.

CONTACT
www.beadsbylaura.co.uk

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P76-77_Flower Bead Garland SHSD.indd 77

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26/02/2016 16:05

Tips & Techniques Product Test

BEAD BAGS
This months test is not a tool or kit, but a selection of beautifully designed and hand-cast beads.
By Clair Wolfe
THE PRODUCT
The Bead Bag is a great way to sample some of
the most beautiful beads available from the
lovely people at The Celtic Beadshop. Annie,
the owner of The Celtic Beadshop, not only
designs each of the beads, but also casts them
from pure pewter in her Welsh hillside studio.

WHAT DOES IT DO?


This little bag of 12 beautiful beads is a great
way to introduce you to part of the range of
these gorgeous handcrafted pewter beads.

WHAT IS INCLUDED?
The beads come well packed and in a small tie
bag, to keep them safe and together. Also a card
with the name of each of the beads included.
There are three dierent bags available.

HOW GOOD ARE THE


INSTRUCTIONS?
There are no real instructions as these beads are
ready to use in your jewellery designs. However,
if you go to the website, there is an About Us

78

MJ92_P78-79_Product Test SHSD.indd 78

page, where they have the story of beads, how


they are made and how to care for them

WHAT ELSE WILL YOU NEED?


You will need to grab your design book,
pencil and jewellery making supplies.

CAN IT BE ADDED TO?


Once you have sampled these beads you
will most denitely want to add more to
your designs.

OVERALL SCORE
These beads are beautiful, and that is not just
because they are created in my home country,
Wales. They are tactile and have the most
gorgeous sheen on them. They appeal to me as
they can be used in unisex designs, and due to
the nature of pewter, will get better with age.

SCORE

IS IT VALUE FOR MONEY?

COST

These beads oer great value for money;


there are not many places you can buy such
beautifully designs and hand cast beads for
under a pound each.

10 (inc. VAT)

RESOURCES
www.celticbeadshop.com

IS IT EASY TO USE?
The way these beads have been designed
and made mean that they are easy to use;
the perfect hole size allows for various
leathers and cords to be used and well as
micro macram.

ABOVE The beads

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 16:06

Product Test Tips & Techniques

1. The package

2. The bead bag

3. The clasp

4. Other versions available

5. Beads in use

6. Earrings

8. Bracelet

9. Necklace

10. Necklace

PHOTOGRAPHS: CLAIR WOLFE

7. Clasp

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P78-79_Product Test SHSD.indd 79

79

26/02/2016 16:06

Regular

GARDEN
PARTY
This month Joan Gordon
suggests some bright new ideas
for designs for special occasions.

arden party invitations are always


something to look forward to. What
better way to celebrate a special
occasion than out in the open air or a large
marquee set in superb, well-manicured
gardens? Using these pieces as inspiration,
you can theme your new collection into oral
motifs, cocktail rings, bracelets and brooches.
Garland Jewelled Necklace, 27.50
www.whitestu.com

Designer tips
When making moulds of links or charms,
ensure they are copyright free.
At markets or fairs use unusual props
when displaying jewellery photos,
boxes, shells, quirky items such as
miniature cars or dolls house furniture can
be used to draw attention to your work.
Consider placing an ad in the local
newspaper or newsletter oering
bespoke jewellery for all occasions.

FLORAL MOTIFS
This simple inexpensive bracelet is delicate and pretty, perfect for using
as an accessory to wear with a party frock. For those makers who work
in ne or precious metal clays collect vintage or vintage style motifs
to make moulds in latex putty that may be used to create stylish and
sophisticated bracelets, necklaces and earrings. For those who work
with wire draw oral images and place a wire jig over the images. Peg
out the design to then form the shapes with your chosen wires. Solder
the joins to ensure a secure link and add a patina to further increase
the vintage look.
Silver Vintage Look Cut Out Floral Bracelet, 4.99
www.lyliarose.com

CONTACT
Joan Gordon, jg.makingjewellery@gmail.com

80

MJ92_P80-81_Ask the Expert SHSD.indd 80

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 16:07

Regular

CAMEO STYLE
Floral prints come back into fashion year after
year. This authentic vintage brooch proves you
can work a ourish of oral into your outt all
year round. With a delicate snowdrop owers
framed elegantly in a metal, chain eect setting,
this 1950s brooch is like wearing a miniature
piece of art, delicately hand-painted and in
excellent condition. It is as vivid as the day it was
made. Exquisite brooches are highly collectable,
with this piece in particular being part of a wider
collection of cameo-style ower illustrations. If
you enjoy working with ceramic clay, consider
making and hand-painting a range of focals that
can be sold to other jewellery makers who may
work them into bezels or wire-wrapped settings.
Vintage TLM Brooch, 12
www.rockmyvintage.co.uk

BROOCHES
These bright new-look hazy daisy brooches come in a range of bold colours and are a fun and
aordable way to brighten up anything, from a dress to a cashmere cardigan. Worn either alone
or in a trio, they add a bright pop of colour to your partywear. Consider adding inexpensive oral
motifs to your range of jewellery using dried owers set in crystal clear resin, formed from polymer
or ceramic clays. Its always good business practice to oer jewellery over a broad range of prices to
suit all pockets. Several small sales soon add up!
Hazy Daisy Brooches, 3.50
www.acornandwill.co.uk

WOOD AND SEMI-PRECIOUS STONES


These handmade moon earrings are inlayed with wooden moon-shaped crescents and are set
with Kenyan mined and hand cut semiprecious stones. They oer a casual sophisticated charm
that would work well with linen frocks or trouser suits. Remember when making accessories for
a theme such as a garden party that not everyone likes romantic, pretty jewellery. If working to
commission sit with your client and discuss their preferences for shape, colour and texture.
Always sketch your original designs and oer these for approval before making the jewellery.
Clear, concise coloured sketches save on your valuable time and material expenses.
Mwezi Earrings by Loyangalani, 85
www.standseven.com

GOLD
PLATING
The Pietra
cocktail
ring has a
striking and
sophisticated
design. The
piece features
a baguette-cut
semiprecious
amethyst gemstone in
a raised prong setting. The linear setting and
cut is contrasted by several organic, interwoven
gold bands. The inspiration for this design
comes from architectural and uid shapes that
fuse together bold statement structures with
intricate details. The main material used is
Sterling silver with a vermeil (plating) of 18ct
gold. A product may be described or marked
as vermeil if it consists of a base of Sterling
silver, coated or plated on all signicant surfaces
with gold or gold alloy of not less than 10 carat
neness, which is 2 microns (or approx.
1/10000th of an inch) of ne gold. The ring is
currently available in green amethyst by Neola.
Pietra Gold Cocktail Ring / Gold Ring Green
Amethyst by Neola, 145
www.not-on-the high-street.com

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P80-81_Ask the Expert SHSD.indd 81

81

26/02/2016 16:07

making

NEXT MONTH IN

52

Issue 93
June 2016
www.craftsinstitute.com

ONLY

4.99

PROJECTS TO
INSPIRE YOUR
SUMMER
WARDROBE

In this issue...
ON
SALE 28
APRIL
MJ92_P82_Next Month.indd 82

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE

Polymer, paper, wirework, copper clay and more...

04/03/2016 14:42

Regular
CZECH PRESSED GLASS
BEAD MIX
This lovely Meadow in Bloom mix of ower beads
and mixed pressed glass and re-polished beads
comes in a 50g pack, ideal for adding a splash
of colour to your designs. Beads vary in size from
4mm to 14mm in size. There are 24 dierent bead
mix packs to choose from, including Ladybirds,
Water Empire and Mystic Violet.
2.50 for 50g
www.spoiltrottenbeads.co.uk

CEBU ORCHID SHELL BEADS


These gorgeous cebu shell beads will add
something special to any nature-inspired
design. They are perfect for long or multistrand necklaces, easy wrap-around
bracelets and dangle earrings.
Handcrafted from completely
natural, beautiful shells, each one
resembles the petals of a ower.
Available as a strand, each bead is
5mm in size.
9.36 per strand
www.ibeads.co.uk

PINK SQUARE FLOWER DESIGN


GLASS BEADS
Create oral-themed pieces with these beautiful
pink glass beads featuring a white and pink
ower design. Try them combined with beads
and strung onto elastic to create a fancy charm
bracelet. They also come in yellow red, blue,
black, violet or orange colourways. Sold as a
pack of 5, each bead measures 16mm x 10mm
with a 1.5mm hole.
1.50 for pack of 5
www.beadsjar.co.uk

TOP 5

GARDEN PARTY
This month we are having a garden party think florals, lace,
bunting and high tea on the lawn! By Linzi Alford Buckmaster
This month we have chosen lovely owery components for your jewellery creations. From handmade
polymer owers through to glass beads, there is a whole plethora of pretty items suitable for garden party
attire. Here are ve items to add to your craft box:

LISA PAVELKA TEXTURE STAMP


BLOOMIN
This Lisa Pavelka textured stamp design is
called Bloomin with a oral pattern to create
beautiful designs on polymer clay, metal clay, airdry clay and many other materials. These texture
stamps come in a variety of unique patterns. Each
is extra deep to give highly detailed results for
both dimensional design and surface imprinting
and is unmounted for optimal use. Ideal for
polymer clay, applications include: textile eect,
mica shift, patterned dichroic, sutton slice and
faux tapestry techniques. Stamp size is approx.
110mm x 140mm.
9.60 each
www.palmermetals.co.uk

ROSE GOLD LACE EFFECT OVAL


FILIGREE CONNECTOR

DONT MISS!

Next months top five summer florals


www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P83 Top 5 SHSD.indd 83

Connect a few of these rose gold-plated lace


eect oval ligree connectors together for a
stylish bracelet or necklace. These are perfect
for something with a vintage feel, with an
old-fashioned look of textured metallic lace.
The connector is super thin and has intricate
detailing. Measuring approx. 18mm x 25mm,
it is also available in gold and titanium-plated
nishes.
4.99 each
www.beadsdirect.co.uk

83

26/02/2016 16:08

Shopping Product review

REFRESH AND RENEW


Spring is the time for renewal, so nows the time to learn a new technique or to brush up
on your business acumen and books are an ideal place to start. By Sue Mason-Burns
WIREWORK
Linda Jones is the doyenne of wirework in the UK. Lindas rst
published book, The Complete Guide to Wire & Beaded Jewellery,
carries a wealth of information to those starting out with wire and
provides detailed step-by-step tutorials for over 50 beautiful pieces of
jewellery. It is a comprehensive guide, perfect for cutting your wirework
teeth. Many specialised and informative books later, Lindas newest
book focuses on hammered wire designs. Most of the 25 beautiful
projects teach you how to get the most out of the Whammer, the wire
hammer Linda designed specically for use with wire in How to Make
Hammered Wire Jewellery. It is easy, accessible jewellery making for
beginners or more advanced crafters. Lindas books are widely available
and prices are around 12 to 15.
www.wirejewellery.co.uk

BUSINESS KNOW HOW


Beads Direct boasts an extensive range of books, covering a wide variety
of jewellery making techniques and disciplines. They also have these
books to help you turn your hobby into a lucrative business. Both Craft a
Creative Business by Fiona Pullen and Setting up a Successful Jewellery
Business by Angie Boothroyd look at dierent aspects of the business
side of a jewellery making business, including branding and marketing,
photographing your products and creating a unique selling point. They
also give invaluable tips on the nance side of setting up your business
and that all-important skill, pricing your work. Expect to pay around
12.99 for each of these books.
www.beadsdirect.co.uk

GANUTELL
The ancient art of making owers from wire
and thread originates on the island of Malta
and the acknowledged expert in all things
ganutell is Maria Kerr. Maria has teamed up
with the Scientic Wire Company to produce
this comprehensive book covering the subject.
Covering all aspects of the art, from dierent
shaped petals to leaves and describing in great
detail the materials you will need and how best
to use them, this book is an invaluable resource
if you want to give ganutell a go. Ganutell
is only available from the Scientic Wire
Company, and they also stock a wide variety of
the tools and materials you will need to achieve
the art, including silk covered aluminium wire,
farfalla or crinkle wire, precoiled wire lengths
and silk yarn. The book is 12.58 and comes
with a free sample of craft wire.
www.wires.co.uk

84

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26/02/2016 16:09

Product review Shopping


New releases

ESSENTIAL REFERENCE
If you like to keep abreast of jewellery making techniques, The New Encyclopedia of Jewellery
Making Techniques by Jinks McGrath will prove an invaluable guide. Combining informative
text with full colour photography, this reference tool will help you get to grips with everything
from the basics to more advanced techniques, and priced at only 12.99. If you are a metal worker,
The Jewellers Directory of Decorative Finishes, also by Jinks McGrath, will provide you with
an indispensable reference for creating a wide range of spectacular eects in your work. From
enamelling to engraving, this book covers it all and all for only 18.99.
www.kernowcraft.com

METAL CLAY
Metal clay is a very popular medium right now, and these books from specialist retailers Metal
Clay Ltd, provide you with guidance to get the best out of your metal clay. Silver Clay with Style
by Natalia Colman is suitable for every level of metal clay artist, from beginner to advanced. It
covers a wide array of techniques, including step-by-step projects for you to try out, available for
16.95. When youre ready to take that extra step in metal clay designs, Metal Clay and Mixed
Media Jewelry by Sherri Haab provides you with the know how to incorporate other media, such
as ribbon, resin, pottery shards, leather, glass, paints, polymer clay and even concrete. This book
costs 15.99.
www.metalclay.co.uk

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P84-85 Product Review SHSD.indd 85

Did you know that MJs publisher, GMC


Publications, also produces a wide range
of crafting books? An extensive range
of jewellery making books is available,
including a number of titles by our very
own Editor, Sian Hamilton. Among the new
releases for jewellery makers this month
is Timeless Beadwork Designs by Cynthia
Rutledge. Create some truly beautiful and
classic looking jewellery from the projects
in this book, exploring colour, threedimensional form and mixed media, priced
at 19.99. Or why not check out Earthy
Boho Jewelry by Holly Witt-Allen? You
can learn to create 12 dierent bohemian
pieces using natural, earthy materials
for 5.99. Or if youre thinking about
summer and looking for some design
ideas for beachwear, Beach Chic Jewelry,
introducing tranquil designs featuring
seaglass beads, turquoise, sea charms,
shells and other natural elements may
interest you. This title is also 5.99.
www.thegmcgroup.com

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26/02/2016 16:09

Project Easy

INITIAL IT!
Everyone loves jewellery with their initials,
so heres a really quick and easy way to make
a pendant. By Sian Hamilton

tamping is quick and very


easy. Kids could make these
with supervision whilst using
the hammer and punches!

MATERIALS
10mm aluminum discs
6mm jumprings
Fine chain necklace with clasp to
your desired length
Beads and headpins (optional)
3mm letter stamps (ImpressArt
Juniper)
Old hammer
Steel block
Ultra-ne permanent marker pen
Scotch pad (green washing-up pad)

86

MJ92_P86-87 Inital project SHSD.indd 86

RESOURCES
ImpressArt letter punches:
cjbeaders.com
cooksongold.com
Aluminium blanks:
stampingblanks.co.uk
metalstampingblanks.co.uk
blanksforstamping.co.uk
reectivemetals.co.uk
littlefreckle.co.uk

www.craf tsinstitute.com

04/03/2016 14:41

Easy Project

STEP 2

STEP 3

Take the protective coating o


the discs and clean up the holes.
You may have a burr around the
edge. You can use a bead reamer
to clean this o or you could just
clean the burr with a round needle
le or sandpaper.

On a steel block, take the punch


with the letter you want and line
it up centrally under the hole.
It doesnt matter if its a bit o,
though you may want to mark the
disc with pencil if you want to be
completely accurate. Aluminium is
a very soft metal so you dont need
to hit the punch too hard (I used an
old DIY hammer).

PHOTOGRAPHS: LAUREL GUILFOYLE, SIAN HAMILTON

STEP 1
Take the aluminium discs and with
the protective coating still on them
punch a pilot point where you need
to drill a jumpring hole. You could
use a centre punch to do this, or just
do this with an old knitting needle.
The hole should be about 2mm in
from the edge. Drill the holes using
a handheld rotary drill and a 1.5mm
drill bit. Tape the discs to a piece of
wood, as they are too small to hold
whilst drilling. They also heat up a
lot so keep that in mind when using
the rotary drill.

Extra Projects
Make a pendant
and a keyring
PENDANT
One initial can make a
statement pendant. This one
is backed with a silver leaf
textured disc that is slightly
bigger so it shows around
the edge. Both of these
discs are attached to a cord
necklace with jumprings.

KEYRING
These initial discs can be
used to make a keyring.
Add beads on headpins and
charms and attach them all
to a carabiner clip with large
link chain.

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

If you would like the discs to


have a satin nish, you can use
green (dish washing) pads to bu
the surface. You cant patinate
aluminium, so colour in the letters
in if you want them to stand out
using a Sharpie ultra-ne marker.
Or you can just leave them plain
for a more subtle nish.

Thread each disc onto a jumpring


and then nd the middle of your
chain and place the middle letter
there and each of the other letters
about 10mm away on either side. If
you only have two letters, place them
equally either side of the centre.

You could add a couple of beads


on headpins just to add a little more
interest to this necklace; or you can
leave it plain just with the discs if you
want. The beads are each attached
with more jumprings.
See page 96 for how to
make wrapped loops
on headpins.

Designer tips
ImpressArt stamps are very good quality, but expensive, so look
around for cheaper alternatives if the price is a bit high for you.
Plenty of small companies do aluminium shapes. The 10mm discs
used were found on eBay.
If you dont have a rotary drill you can get punches that will punch
out the holes for jumprings.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P86-87 Inital project SHSD.indd 87

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054_MAJ_092.indd 54

3/3/16 12:07 PM

Project Easy

MERMAID NECKLACE
AND WRAP BRACELET
Using the colours of the sea, make a beautiful jewellery set featuring a mermaid
pendant and seaside charm. By Holly Witt-Allen
MATERIALS
25mm diameter brass mermaid
pendant
Silver seashell charm
40 x 6mm x 14mm mint green
twist beads
Translucent blue seed beads
(about 325)
Metallic gold seed beads (about 350)
20 x 10mm teal round beads
4mm teal round bead
2 x 7mm rice pearls
49-strand x 0.5mm bead
stringing wire
Antique brass square toggle clasp
6 x antique brass crimp beads
Antique brass headpin
3 x silver ball headpins
3 x 3mm silver daisy spacer beads
2 x 5mm antique brass jumprings
2 x 5mm silver jumprings
Silver memory wire
Crimp tool
Variety of pliers
Memory wire shears
Wire cutters

Book details

NECKLACE

BRACELET

1. Cut three 70cm wire lengths. Use crimp beads to


attach the wire lengths to one toggle clasp piece (Fig.1).

1. Use memory wire shears to cut a coil of memory wire


that is long enough to wrap around your wrist ve times,
plus 5cm. Using round nose pliers, make a loop on one
end. Thread beads on the wire in the following order:
58 gold seed beads, 63 blue seed beads, 1 blue seed
bead, 1 gold, 1 blue seed bead, mint green twist bead;
6 times total, 1 blue seed bead, 68 gold seed beads, 20
teal round beads, 34 gold seed beads.

2. Thread gold seed beads on one wire length until


the beaded area measures 56cm. Use a crimp bead
to attach the wire to the remaining toggle clasp piece.
Repeat using blue seed beads for the second wire.
3. Beginning and ending with 3 blue seed beads,
follow Step 2 to alternately thread blue seed beads and
mint green twist beads on the remaining wire and to
attach the wire to the clasp.
4. Thread a rice pearl, a daisy spacer bead and a gold
seed bead on the antique brass headpin. Make a
wrapped loop.
5. Use the antique brass jumprings to attach the
wrapped loop to the gold strand and the mermaid
pendant to the blue strand. The necklace should
measure about 56cm.

2. Leaving about 10mm for a loop, use the memory wire


shears to trim any excess wire. Using round nose pliers,
make a loop on the end.
3. Thread a rice pearl, daisy spacer bead, and gold
seed bead onto a headpin. Make a wrapped loop.
Use silver jumprings to attach the wrapped loop and
seashell charm to the centre of the bracelet.
4. Thread the 4mm teal bead and a daisy spacer bead
on a headpin. Make a wrapped loop, attaching the
headpin to one end of the bracelet. Repeat using a gold
seed bead and a daisy spacer bead.

Fig. 1

Beach Chic Jewelry by Holly


Witt-Allen, published by
Leisure Arts (5.99, available
from www.thegmcgroup.com)

92

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26/02/2016 16:11

Easy Project

93

MJ92_P92-93 Book extract SHSD.indd 93

www.craf tsinstitute.com

93

26/02/2016 16:11

Blog

ITS A JEWELLERS LIFE


Passionate jewellery maker Eleanor Swinhoe keeps us up to date on life behind
the scenes at bespoke jewellery making business, Eleanor Christine Jewellery.

have been building my jewellery business


for ve years and it is an incredibly hard
thing to do more so I think because you
pretty much have to do it on your own. This,
however, is the thing that attracts lots of people
to run their own business you dont work to
anybody elses agenda, you can work in your PJs
if you so wish and you dont have to attend dull
company meetings!
But you do have to be terribly driven and
disciplined the buck stops with you and only
you. If you have a o day, there is no one there to
tell you to buck up and get on with things.
I would love to spend all of the time in my studio
designing and making jewellery, but the thing
is I do have to sell it! Having the condence to
sell your own work is the hard part.
I love art and I have lots of artist friends
whose work I reckon Id be brilliant at selling,
because when the work is by someone else you
dont have any issue with telling people how
much you love it. When it comes to your own
work, it seems crass to be over-condent
you dont want to look proud and cocky but
self-belief is crucial and an understanding that
your work might only appeal to a select few
is essential. Finding those few and the right
audience is what its all about!
Marketing is a mineeld. Ive been swept
along by many salespeople from the likes of
Vogue, Tatler and GQ who tell you how great
your work is and how it would appeal to their
readership. They always oer a discounted

rate if you take them up on their oer swiftly.


The adverts are expensive and for someone like
me and the way I work they are absolutely not
the right thing. My work tends to be unique
and bespoke and it is only me making it being
put alongside massive jewellery making rms
is not the right message and I cant compete
with that anyway. I always refuse this type of
marketing now.
What does work for me is social media.
Some people nd Facebook, Twitter and
Instagram the stu of nightmares, but used
in the right way it is hugely valuable. You are
able to build much more personal relationships
with likers and customers. By its very nature,
jewellery purchasing can be a very slow burner
a considered purchase that might take
someone a couple of years before they take
the plunge. I have had people follow me on my
Facebook page since the very beginning and
only now after seeing many, many images of
commissions and designs do they feel they are
ready to make that investment. Patience is a
jewellery designers friend!
Facebook also allows you to get feedback and
opinion on your work does anybody actually
like the design youve been working on for ages?
It is a good platform for oers and giveaways,
especially if people share your posts it builds
your audience. Trying to post something
every day is a good goal even if it is work in
progress, or you are sharing somebody elses
work. Sharing is GOOD.

I use Twitter and Instagram in a more casual,


momentary fashion shots of the studio, of
unnished work. Jewellery is a completely
visual discipline so photos are crucial. A picture
denitely says it all; so make sure that they are
tagged properly so that you come up in searches
(#jewellery #gold #fashion).
I love Pinterest too, but Im not all that
convinced that it is a good marketing tool
for me. It is a brilliant way of cataloguing
inspiration and nding interesting pieces to
use within my social media for example, by
linking images of beetles and butteries to
illustrate fabulous colour combinations.
The best marketing tool you have is yourself
getting out to markets and shows, and joining
Open Studios means that you are talking to
potential customers, and you are hopefully
talking about something that you love your
craft! And if you have built a relationship with a
customer and they love your work, they are more
than likely going to return to you for further
purchases nurture those relationships.
Repeat business and business through
word-of-mouth and recommendation is critical
for me. I am lucky to have some wonderful
customers and friends who happily giveaway
my business cards and direct people to my
site I dont think that Id survive as Eleanor
Christine Jewellery without them.
Find out more about Eleanor and her jewellery
at www.eleanorchristinejewellery.co.uk

Some people find Facebook, Twitter and Instagram the stu of nightmares, but used in the right way it
is hugely valuable. You are able to build much more personal relationships with likers and customers.

94

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26/02/2016 16:11

Blog

Jewellery is a completely visual discipline so


photos are crucial. A picture definitely says it all.

Eleanors Instagram and Pinterest pages

The best marketing tool you have is yourself getting out to markets and shows,
and joining Open Studios means that you are talking to potential customers, and you are hopefully
talking about something that you love your craft!

www.craf tsinstitute.com

MJ92_P94-95_Jewellers Life SHSD.indd 95

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Tips & Techniques Jewellery Basics

BASIC TECHNIQUES
HOW TO MAKE A WRAPPED LOOP

Thread a bead onto a head or eye


pin. Grip the wire with round nose
pliers next to the bead.

Bend the wire above the plier jaw to


a right angle. You will need about
2mm of wire above the bead before
the bend.

Move the plier jaws to sit at the top


of the bend.

With your thumb push the wire back


around the pliers, keeping it tight to
the jaw.

Keep pushing the wire around the


jaw until you meet the bead.

Move the pliers around the loop


to and continue to bend the wire
around until it is facing out at a right
angle and you have a complete loop.

Use a pair of chain nose pliers to


hold across the loop rmly.

Wrap the wire around the neck of


the loop until it meets the bead.
Snip o any excess wire and push
the end against the coil to nish.

Roll the wire around to meet the


bead. If it does sit centrally move the
plier jaws around the loop to sit by
the bead away from the open end.
Bend the loop back to sit directly
about the bead.

Use chain nose pliers to tighten the


loop by twisting it from side to side
do not pull it outwards as that will
distort the shape.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SIAN HAMILTON

MAKING A SIMPLE LOOP

Thread the bead onto a head or eye


pin and cut the pin about 1cm above
the bead. Bend the wire to a right
angle above the bead.

96

MJ92_P96_Basic Techniques SH.indd 96

Using round nose pliers, grasp


the wire at the very end and curl it
around the plier jaws.

www.craf tsinstitute.com

26/02/2016 16:12

Armadilla Cuff featuring


CzechMates 2-Hole Crescent
beads by TrendSetter Carole Ohl.
Visit www.Etsy.com/shop/openseed

Dimensional Beading System

ASK YOUR LOCAL BEAD STORE FOR CZECHMATES OR ORDER FROM:


CJ Beaders
www.CJBeaders.co.uk
Creative Beadcraft Ltd
www.CreativeBeadCraft.co.uk
Fru Parla
www.FruParla.se
Glitzerperlen
www.Glitzerperlen.de
Gyngysziget
www.Gyongysziget.hu
I-Beads
www.I-Beads.eu

Kadoro
www.Kadoro.pl
Les Perles De Paline
www.LesPerlesDePaline.fr
Natascha Kralen
www.NataschaKralen.nl
Prltorget
www.Parltorget.se
Perlenexpress.de
www.PerlenExpress.de
Perles & Co
www.PerlesAndCo.com

Robins Beads
www.Robins-Beads.co.uk
The Southampton Bead Shop
www.TheSouthamptonBeadShop.co.uk
Stitchncraft Beads
www.Stitchncraft.co.uk
Tanzee Designs
www.TanzeeDesigns.co.uk
WirWar Kralen
www.WirWarKralen.nl

CRESCENT

TILE
DAGGER

BRICK
LENTIL
TRIANGLE
BAR

QuadraTile
QuadraLENTIL

Consistent hole spacing ensures no warping or bunching.

Bead Storesregister as a reseller:

EUROPE: Koralex: +420 483 360 288 www.CzechBeads.eu Sales@SeedBeads.eu


US, ASIA: Starman: +1 888 683 2323 www.StarmanInc.com Sales@StarmanInc.com
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3/1/16 3:31 PM

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