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Day 1

11:00am 12:30pm

Supervised Access and Therapeutic


Access . . . Part of CYC Scope of
Practice?
Presenter: Debbie Sliwinski and Luke Carty
Brayden Supervision Services Inc. ONTARIO

Participant Maximum: No Max


Children of parents who are separating are often caught in the ensuing dispute. Separation and divorce is never easy for children and in those
situations that there is high conflict children are often caught in the middle, trying to be loyal to both parents and often paying a big price. Social,
academic and emotional spheres are all affected and the cost to the child can be immense.
This workshop will review our experience providing private supervised access services and the role of the supervisor. The skills that supervisors bring
to these situations can be the difference in providing appropriate and positive child centered visits.
We believe Child & Youth Care education and experience is important for supervisors to possess as it provides an important foundation on which
effective services can be provided. This workshop will review the relevant skills, knowledge and experience that practitioners need to bring to assist
children through this difficult time.

Competencies: Professionalism, Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

Family Services...A Child and Youth Care Design


Presenter: Mardi Ennis-Gregory,
Bartimaeus, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: 25
Child and Youth Care practitioners have historically worked specifically with children and adolescents and with their families. Our role has often been
defined specific to individual children and youth, where other disciplines have been seen primarily in the role of family counselling, therapy, and
support.

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In 2014, Bartimaeus redesigned our Family Service to meet the needs of families, as a whole, who are struggling with a child or children with difficult to
manage behaviour, using a Child and Youth Care orientation, strategies and interventions.
The support provided to families is generally provided in-home using a coordinated, consultation model that utilizes very experienced and skilled Child
and Youth Care practitioners.
This workshop will outline the model, the struggles in initial set up, and review the results of the first two years of service. Using case examples, the
presenter will highlight the families that appear to benefit from this type of service and those that require a different type of clinical approach.
Competencies: Professionalism, Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

Solution Creators
Presenter: Janet White, Ba. Ms, Rcc
University of Victoria, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
This workshop is designed to invite all to consider the possibilities that we strive to create solutions, rather than problems, and thus what we see as
problems now is actually solutions that have outlived their usefulness. This workshop thus invites us to see this on the individual level and on the
organizational level and to consider what solutions have been created, and how they might be updated to create better solutions. In actual practice, or
in supervisory practice, this also celebrates the intent of those we work with to create solutions that meet their needs. This strength based perspective
thus speaks to Strong Clubs, Strong Voice and Strong Together.
This workshop includes a power point, experiential learning, a case study and practical `how to' article and speaks to a variety of ways that this can be
brought into actual practice.
Competencies: Professionalism and Relationship & communication

4D North Center
Presenters: Kelly Shaw and Jennifer Green
Atlantic Youth, NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
Operating a residential group treatment program in the high arctic poses multiple challenges. The first ones that might come to mind are language,
culture, geography, and climate. Then there is the complexity of positioning to be supportive of indigenous people who have been oppressed and have
experienced cultural genocide at the hands of the Canadian Federal Government for decades.
As we have worked to translate our previous practice contexts into one that might be meaningful to this community, we have created relationships,
learned culture, been challenged and grown as practitioners.
This interactive session will be focused around sharing what learning we have had about ourselves, our practice and colonization.
Competencies: Cultural & human diversity, Professionalism and Applied human development

Developing Effective Social Skills Training Programs: Why


and How?
Presenter: Marleigh Pirnasar, MEd (Cand), CYC-P
YouthLink

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Maximum Participants: 10
This interactive workshop aims to introduce research in Social Skills Training Programs (SST); in particular, examining the evaluation process. The
workshop will continue to explore the problem of practice of evaluation and offer suggestions and techniques to program developers on including
learning outcomes for SST Programs. Participants will have the opportunity to learn how to write learning outcomes and incorporate it into their own
SST programs. "
Competencies: Applied Human Development and the Development of Practice Method

Look at My Life: Education Program for Incarcerated Young


People
Presenters: Tina Nadia Gopal, Wiyanna Trevis and Sarah Woods
Amadeusz, ONTARIO
Maximum Participants: No Max
Amadeusz, guiding principles and techniques for implementing education programs for youth in Toronto was used to launch the Look at my Life Project
in 2009. The LAMLP provides the opportunity, support and resources for youth ages 18-30 to complete their high school education and pursue postsecondary studies while on remand.
Our workshop will share knowledge and create a critical discussion regarding our learning's, impacts and challenges to providing access to education
for incarcerated youth in Toronto. The workshop will increase awareness about access to education on the inside as a human right, grassroots youth
led organizing and social change and how to implement progressive education programs on the inside.
www.amadeusz.ca
Specific Target Audience: Front-line workers, students, teachers, researchers
Competency Certification: Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development and Developmental practice method

Understanding & Minimization of Transition Trauma


Presenters: John Digney and Maxwell Smart
Participant Maximum: 25
Hidden or Invisible transitions are encountered by young people in residential child care, these include anticipated events that didn't happen and
although not traditionally thought of as transitions these events impact young people's lives and can influence how they manage 'major' change and
transitions - such as leaving care.
Our session will

Examine the meaning(s) of transition & change

Discuss the 'impact' of transition trauma

Provide some appreciation of the importance of 'invisible transitions'.

Review effective aspects of contemporary CYC practice to minimize the negative effect of 'transitioning'

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Competency Certification: Professionalism, Applied human development and Relationship & communication

1:45PM 3:15PM

Information Certification - Open Group


Presenters: James Freeman
This workshop is an information session on the benefits and processes of certification through Child and Youth Care Certification Board (CYCCB). This
is open to the public, in a way to promote certification in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.
"The Child & Youth Care Certification Board provides an assessment process and certification to child and youth care practitioners who demonstrate
their commitment to high standards of care and commitment to ongoing professional development." (www.cyccb.org)

Consistency in Preservice delivery through collaboration


and the use of technology
Presenters: Kelly Shaw and Michelle Chalupa
Nova Scotia Community College, NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
As Child and Youth Care practice areas are recognized more broadly to include academia and pre-service education of CYC practitioners, it is essential
for an understanding of team and collaboration to also be understood within these practice contexts.
As faculty within the same institution, yet practicing on geographically distant locations, the opportunities and challenges that are faced are unique.
These opportunities and challenges impact on delivery and offer multiple occasions for faculty practitioners to creatively negotiate collaboration and
thus team relationships.
A solution focused approach with such barriers is important to seek opportunities to promote team cohesion and collaborative efforts to prevent having
an isolated approach to practice. In the technology driven society that we live in it is important to seek new opportunities to implement technology and
use it to our benefit. Technology can lessen some of the economic and geographic obstacles that contemporary CYC learners encounter.
Presenters will discuss tools that have been effective and engaging for collaboration, training and sharing of resources to strengthen practice. They will
open discussion with participants to share how their organizations use technology or envision using technology to increase collaboration in our field of
practice both with learners and to strengthen faculty collaboration.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Applied human development and Relationship & communication

Developmental and Behavioral CYC Approaches, Treatment


Strategies That Are Often Incompatible
Presenters: Jack and Marilyn Phelan
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: No Max
Professional CYC practice is relational and developmental. Effective CYC programs use behavioural approaches as a simple, safety-based strategy, but
not as a long range treatment approach. CYC treatment does not embed behaviour modification theory because this is incompatible with our
understanding of professional CYC approaches. Come to this workshop to examine some bad practice implications of attempting to use behavioural
strategies in CYC treatment with youth and families.
Competency Certification: Developmental practice methods and Applied human development

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Target Audience: Target audience is CYC supervisors, administrators, mature front line practitioners, and trainers. This workshop is very relevant to
practitioners seeking Certification competencies

Beating the Odds


Presenter: Crystal Stalker
Lethbridge College, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 10
Statistics
We can't ignore the staggering number of youth who age out of care. In Canada each year, around 6,000 youth reach the age of majority (Mann-Feder,
2011). There has been limited Canadian research on what happens to youth when they leave the child welfare system. Martin studied twenty-nine
former youth in care who had turned eighteen years old in 1994. She found that two-thirds were still in high school yet none had completed high school,
38 percent received welfare, 50 percent of the females were mothers and 38 percent of all participants were parents, 7 percent were in jail at the time
of the interview (over half had been in jail since leaving care), and 90 percent had moved in the previous year. (Tweddle, 2007)
Challenges Youth Face
Some youth, regardless of their challenges while involved with the Child Welfare System are able to transition into adulthood with little difficulties, while
others face a more challenging future. Some of those issues: substance abuse, becoming single parents, involvement with the criminal justice system,
struggle with self-esteem issues, mental health concerns, and the emotional wounds from the trauma that resulted from abuse and neglect.
Helping in a Systematic & Collaborative Approach
While connected with the Child & Welfare System, youth and their families are dealing with and working through many of the immediate needs, as a
direct result of this, there isn't always enough time to prepare them for what lies ahead. How, as professionals, can we help foster change moving
forward, in applying and implementing strategic strategies to help enhance success into adulthood?
The focus of this workshop is the following:
1.

Barriers to transitioning & how to overcome them

2.

Resources to aid them in being successful

3.

How can practitioners support youth who are beginning the transition from the Child Welfare System into other living arrangements.
(Community connections, natural connections, life skills, social skills, employment skills, vocational skills, safety at home and community).

4.

What role can the individual play in their own transition and how can he/she ensure that those needs are met

Competency Certification: Professionalism and Developmental practice methods

How to be inclusive to the LGBT+ community


Presenter: Shawn Wood
NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: 50
This workshop is designed to help the participants have a stronger understanding of sexual orientation and gender identity. The workshop is a
participant centered interactive and practical approach to working with LGBT youth. It will provide practical skills for professionals to create safe spaces,
use inclusive language, identify oppression, and have a stronger sense in supporting someone "coming out".

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Competency Certification: Cultural & human diversity, Relationship & communication and Professionalism

Working with Youths and Emerging Adults: A Family


Intervention
Presenters: Delia Noel and Jennifer Davis
Amcal Family Services, QUEBEC
Participant Maximum: 80
For over 35 years Amcal have successfully used a family systems approach for working with youth and emerging adults to support positive, healthy
community families. We would like to share our program: the strengths and challenges we have faced in that time. Using qualitative survey responses
we can pinpoint what it is that speaks to the community allowing them to trust in the program.
This workshop will be a review of the programs and therapeutic theories that are the backbone of Amcal Family Services, a not-for-profit- community
organization that has been around for 40 years in the suburbs of Montreal. In addition we will take the opportunity to highlight our Emerging Adults
program as it is one of the few programs in Montreal geared specifically towards working with parents and their adult children.
Competency Certification: Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

Field Work in Child and Youth Care Education


Presenter: Heather Snell
BCYC Faculty Humber College and Chair of Research Committee CYCEAB, ONTARIO,
Participant Maximum: 50
This presentation will describe how CYC student field practice is conducted across Canada. Based on a recent survey of 22 post-secondary CYC and
CYW programs by the Child and Youth Care Education Accreditation Committee of Canada the presentation will be of interest to CYC educators,
students and agency practitioners who supervise CYC student interns. Discussion will include topics such as student supervision models,
student/agency placement processes and approaches to field work evaluation.
Competency Certification: Professionalism and Developmental practice methods

Tricks and Treatment: Using a Skate park Milieu with High


Needs Children
Presenter: Joel Pippus
Hull Services, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 50
James Whittaker defines a therapeutic milieu as, a specially designed environment in which the events of daily living are used as formats for teaching
competence in basic life skills. The living environment becomes both a means and the context for growth and change, informed by a culture that
stresses learning through living. In the short time that we have had the Matt Bannister Memorial Skate Park as a resource at Hull Services, we have
quickly recognized what an incredible therapeutic milieu the skate park is, as demonstrated by the incredible growth and change in the lives of a
number of our persons served.
In this presentation, I will share my experiences in spearheading the development and utilization of an incredible new resource on our main campus at
Hull Services, Calgary, AB: the Matt Bannister Memorial Skate Park. The Skate park has allowed me to connect the work that I do as a Child and
Youth Care Counsellor with skateboarding, both huge passions in my life. A number of youth from around the agency have been utilizing this resource,
and in particular 4 or 5 kids from my home program, a residential treatment cottage. This has provided me a front row seat to what an incredible

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context for treatment the milieu of this new skate park is proving to be. I will introduce the topic by playing a short training video demonstrating how the
skate park is set up to be a therapeutic milieu. I will then explore a case study of a particular youth who uses the skate park an average of five days per
week. Through this case study, I will highlight the amazing skill development that this young person has experienced in the areas of therapeutic
relationships, social skills, problem-solving, self-mastery, self-regulation and resilience. Lastly, I will address the incredible connection between
skateboarding (and other action sports) and the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT), which is used in our Agency.
It is my hope that other Child and Youth Care Counsellors will be inspired to capitalize on skateboarding and other action sports available in their
communities, and recognize them as the incredible resources that they are to affect lasting change in the lives of our young people.
Competency Certification: Relationship & communication, Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

3:30PM5:00PM

Who Cares? Exploring Student Understandings of Care in


Practice
Presenters: Catherine Smey Carston, PhD and Monica Pauls, MA
Mount Royal University, Department of Child Studies and Social Work, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 50
In September 2015, the Bachelor of Child Studies (BCST) was launched at Mount Royal University, where students began their journey to becoming
Child Studies practitioners with a major in child and youth care or early learning and child care. One concept familiar to both majors is that of care;
both in the discipline title and the practice. Exploring and teaching about care in a way that is distinct to these professions, therefore, is an important
consideration when preparing future practitioners. The BCST incorporates the concept of care into its curriculum, but it unclear how students
understand and experience care as they move into the field.
In order to explore the connections made between theory and practice by students in the BCST and to gain greater insight into how the concept of care
is understood, the presenters are currently undertaking a study, which uses an innovative digital storytelling methodology. Digital storytelling requires
the participants to reflect on a particular topic and, using both narrative and digital content, tell a story that represents their own experience (Educause,
2007). As soon-to-be graduates entering the field, this experience can support the students in developing professional self-awareness (LaFontaine &
Pantin, 2015). Student participants will give voice to their experiences and participate in reflexive practice.
The proposed presentation will take an interactive approach by exploring workshop participants understanding and interpretation of care in practice.
Workshop participants will be asked to reflect on their own experiences and engage in exercises to support the development of their own stories. The
digital story telling methodology, as a means of engaging participants in reflexive thought and discovery will then be presented, along with the findings
from the study. Digital stories of care will be shared in the session.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Relationship & communication and Applied human development

Organizational Nourishment: Supporting and Nurturing


Organizational Growth
Presenter: Heather Modlin
Key Assets, Newfoundland and Labrador
Participant Maximum: No Max
Key Assets Newfoundland and Labrador

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This session will provide an overview of the process through which our organization underwent significant organizational growth in a very short time
frame. We will explore the learning that has taken place throughout this process, with a particular focus on management and leadership practices.
Competency Certification: Professionalism and Developmental practice methods

Knowledge is Power! Taking Control of your Self-Care!


Presenter: Charlene Pickrem
NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
This workshop is designed to guide and support participants while they engage in therapeutic activities and discussion to develop self-awareness, selfefficacy and knowledge as potential interventions to cope with the physiological, psychological, social, and spiritual drains of caring (vicarious trauma,
burnout and compassion fatigue). Particular focus will be placed on individuals life balance practices.
Competency Certification: Applied human development, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

Merging Arts and Research: Highlights from Two Fourth Year


Course-Based Research Projects in Child and Youth Care
Education at MacEwan University
Presenters: Shasily Matowe, Michelle Clark, Linda Agyemang, Dunia Nur, Jacky Lam, Kaitlyn Browne, Caitlin Flach, Brennon Long, Krystal Villeneuve,
Rae-Lynn Olsen and Tricia Hicks
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: No Max
In this interactive presentation we will engage participants in an active discussion about the contributions to undergraduate CYC education of two
course-based research projects using arts-based data collection methods. The first one is a qualitative inquiry that explored the lived experience of
CYC students with distinct cultural or religious beliefs to discover whether or not they felt the classroom is a safe enough space to share their views on
CYC matters. The second qualitative inquiry examined the perceptions of first year CYC students regarding the use of self-disclosure to teach selfawareness throughout their first year learning experience as CYC students. The analysis of the value of both course-based research projects highlights
the importance of providing undergraduate students the opportunity to not only do research but to do it in a way that compliments the inter-subjectivity
and interpretive meaning-making process that is so central to relational CYC practice.
We are passionate fourth year students of the Bachelor of Child and Youth Care program at MacEwan University. Our deepest aspiration begins with
believing that we have the ability to evoke change and positively contribute to the greatness that our field has to offer.
Competency Certification: Applied human development and Professionalism

STORIES FROM THE FIELD, OR THE GARDEN, OR THE


KITCHEN THE LIFE SPACE
Presenters: Thom Garfat and Kelly Shaw
QUEBEC and NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: 30
View Description

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We all have them; moments from our practice that made us laugh, cry, or sweat with anxiety. They become the drops in our bucket so to speakthey
fill us. We learn from them, we cherish them and we cower from them. We save them, in our own little collections. Sometimes we share them they are
intimate and they expose the children, youth, and families we work with and us. But in the end they connect us. They connect us to the field and
they connect us to the individuals who have shared their lives with us through our work.
This interactive workshop will offer opportunity to share stories and to use those stories to build reflective practice.
Competency Certification: Applied human development and Relationship & communication

Resiliency in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children and Young


People
Presenter: Shay Erlich
ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: 30
Deaf and Hard of Hearing children and young people face a number of unique circumstances that often contribute to poorer outcomes than hearing
peers on a number of vectors such as educational attainment, employment, mental health, etc. This presentation will explore current best practice
research when working with Deaf and hard of hearing young people as child and youth care practitioners. As an often underrepresented and
understudied minority group, Deafness is often viewed as a risk factor, when the true risk factor is often systemic discrimination and lack of resources.
This workshop will provide participants with a better understanding of the systems and complexities that Deaf and hard of hearing young people exist
within, and will leave them better equipped to work with Deaf and hard of hearing young people in their practice.
Competency Certification: Developmental practice methods, Cultural & human diversity and Relationship & communication

Half Day 1:45PM 5:00PM

BRAIN GAMES!
Presenters: Danna Ormstrup and Pam Henheffer
Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: No Max
In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to learn about brain functions through "brain games" that are designed to encourage
understanding, create empathy and explore strategies related to successful interactions with children and youth.
Join Pam and Danna in an exploration of the brain and how brain functioning leads to behaviors that are often difficult to understand. You will leave this
workshop inspired to make a difference, excited to share your learnings with others and determined to be a creative responder!
Competency Certification: Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development and Relationship & communication

CREATIVITY AS A CYC CORE COMPETENCY


Presenters: Mary Ventrella and Theresa Fraser
Sheridan College, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: No Max

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View Description
Creativity is defined as being novel and useful (Langer, 2004, Puccio, 2013). Creativity is not a talent it is a skill that empowers people by adding
strength to their natural abilities which includes teamwork, productivity and where appropriate, profits (Debono, 1994). Creative approaches to child and
youth care require that practitioners think differently. Working creatively in relational work, means seeking out other points of view because relational
work is inclusive and not limited to the practitioners own ideas or bags of tricks (Ventrella, 2015).
Come explore your creativity and how it can be applied to your child and youth care practice. A creativity model (Torrance leap skills) will be introduced
and applied to self/relationships/systems and CYC curriculum. Participants will practice using and applying the Torrance model in a case consultation
process. As practitioners we need to consider not so much what we think, but rather how we think in order to respond to, support and be in
relationships with the children, youth, families and communities with whom we work.
Competency Certification: Applied human development, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

The Habits of Happiness


Presenter: Monique Howat
Participant Maximum: No Max
View Description
Happiness is relevant to everyones lives and thats why the most popular course at Harvard University is titled The Psychology of Happiness. In an
entertaining presentation, Monique combines her motivational finesse and creativity to teach participants how to feel more happiness. In this highly
interactive workshop, participants learn how to turn Habits of Happiness into behaviors that infuse and influence their personal lives and workplace!
"One should never consent to creep when one feels the impulse to soar."- Helen Keller
Competency Certification: Professionalism and Professionalism

Full Day 11:00AM 5:00PM

Trauma Isn't Just for Clients Anymore; the Corrosive Effects


of Trauma on Clients, Staff, and Organizations.
Presenter: Dr. Joseph Benamati
Andrus Sanctuary Institute, NEW YORK
Participant Maximum: No Max
View Description
The Sanctuary Model of Care is a trauma-informed organizational change model. It addresses not only the trauma of our clients but the stress and
pressure of the staff and the organization. It is the only evidence-informed organizational change model recognized by SAMHSA and the NCTSN in the
U.S. The presentation will focus on the 4 Pillars of Sanctuary: (1) The Psychobiology of Trauma. In this section we will discuss how trauma affects the
individual client, staff member, and organizations which can lead to errors in thinking, feeling, and behaving on all levels. Organizational trauma
manifests itself in the form of re-enactments (making the same mistakes over and over again), collective disturbances, and negative parallel processes.
(2) An organizing lens of Sanctuary called S.E.L.F which stands for Safety, Emotional Management, Loss, and Future. S.E.L.F. is a problem-solving
tool for client and organizational issues such as client impasses or agency downsizing dilemmas ; (3) The 7 Commitments; and (4) The Sanctuary Tool
Kit which are the 9 tools that operationalize Sanctuary in everyday practice such that everyone in an organization can become part of the change
process from CEO to maintenance staff.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Relationship & communication Developmental practice methods and Applied human development.

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Target audience: Everyone

Day 2
11:00AM - 12:30PM

Culture, religion, spirituality and CYC practice: Considering


the complexities
Presenters: Daniel Scott and Shemine Gulamhusein
University of Victoria, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Participant Maximum: 22
View Description
Through literature exploration, experiential sharing, dialogue and small group activities participants will engage in a lively discussion to dismantle
current assumptions that have led to the exclusion of spirituality and religion from child and youth care practice. Questions asked will include: how does
the conflation of spirituality and religion impact practice? What factors influence the inclusion and/or exclusion of spirituality in practice? What is the
significance for children and youth? How does context influence spiritual inclusion and/or exclusion? How do transnationalism and the complexities of
cultural diversity that include religious and spiritual differences impact spiritual beliefs and practices of individuals? And how does that impact the
relationship of practitioners and clients in therapeutic and programmatic settings? Participants will leave with few answers but plenty of questions to
provoke transformation in practices within various culturally sensitive and relevant child and youth care settings.
Competency Certification: Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

Becoming a Family: Nourishing Growth


Presenters: Jaime Lundrigan and Kyle Lundrigan
Key Assets, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: No Max
View Description
In this workshop, we will describe our transition from residential care to family based care. Participants will learn about the extraordinary potential that
exists to provide therapeutic care in a family setting.
Areas of discussion will include; safety, foundries, relationships, intergrading biological family, family and friends support, filling developmental gaps,
becoming connected to community, building self-esteem, and the therapeutic use of daily life events.
Competency Certification: Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

The Music Never Stopped: Healing at the Speed of Sound


Presenter: Trevor Goodwin
Youth Impact Jeunesse & CYCANB, NEW BRUNSWICK
Participant Maximum: N/A

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View Description
The Music Never Stopped will showcase research and techniques on utilizing the power of recorded music to help break through barriers formed via
trauma, depression, and grief or memory loss due to addiction or medication.
Workshop participants should expect some interactive components, PowerPoint presentation, video examples and a question and answer period.
Booklets of the key information and techniques will be provided for take home and implementation.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity and Relationship & communication

The International Child and Youth Care Network (CYC-Net)


and The Learning Zone at CYC-Net
Presenters: Martin Stabrey and Thom Garfat
CYC-Net, , INTERNATIONAL
Participant Maximum: No Max
View Description
Since 1999, The International Child and Youth Care Network and The Learning Zone (www.cyc-net.org) have been one of the most valued and visited
CYC resource websites in the world. It presently receives nearly 5000 unique daily visits. Its main objectives are (primarily through the internet and
electronic media) to promote and facilitate reading, learning, information sharing, discussion, networking, support and accountable practice amongst all
who work with children, youth and families in difficulty. CYC-Net is free to all end-users. This presentation is an introduction into what CYC-Net and The
Learning Zone is how it operates and what it offers the CYC field.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development, Relationship & communication and
Developmental practice methods

The Emperor Has No Clothes: Leaders in the Field of Child


and Youth Care
Presenters: Kim Snow and Christine Gaitens
Ryerson University and TDSB/OACYC, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: 50
View Description
Child and Youth Care is an emerging discipline. There are many leaders in our field, past, present and future. This workshop will explore how leaders
are recognized, confirmed, defined and celebrated. With a view towards identifying what we want from future leaders in our field, we will examine how
gender, role and professional self-image can conceal true leaders and promote charlatans. We need to beware of the "I's, celebrate the "We's" and
seek out the "Not me's".
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity, and Applied human development

Power to Be
Presenters: Sylvia Storryn and Gabrielle Emmett
Power To Be, BRITISH COLUMBIA

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Participant Maximum: 75
View Description
Our passion is nurturing youth and families through nature, we work collaboratively within their ecological systems to build strength that
goes beyond expectations.
The Wilderness School at Power to be uses nature as the backdrop for learning. It is a program that builds a therapeutic milieu in nature, allowing youth
space for emotional growth, development of life skills and nurtured self-esteem. We offer a unique perspective through incorporating play, reflection in
nature and adventure based learning into our practice. With a progressive skills curriculum which includes sea kayaking, backpacking, surfing, voyager
canoeing and snowshoeing, we support youth in building mastery while modeling healthy lifestyle choices and environmental stewardship.
We will provide an overview of our program model, highlighting our inclusive family programming (mom's programs, family days, celebrations etc.)
and exploring our relational approaches to building a supportive and inclusive community for youth. Workshop attendees will leave with tools to
incorporate the healing aspects of nature into their practice. This presentation will aim to inspire others to think outside.
Competency Certification: Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

Making space for creative expressions in post-secondary


education
Presenters: Jenny McGrath and Catherine Hedlin
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 40
View Description
This workshop will highlight the many benefits of creative pedagogies. On an individual level, they can promote student awareness and confidence,
accommodate various learning styles and communication patterns, and are effective outlet for students who struggle with the fast-paced and highly
structured nature of mainstream education. More systemically, they can transcend cultural differences, consider impacts of globalization and challenge
dominant models of education that favour primarily cognitive and verbal forms of teaching and assessment.
We will present examples from our experience of arts-based assessments, classroom activities, and community engagement that facilitate critical
reflection on the learning process for both students and instructors. We will also discuss various challenges that have arisen while utilizing this
approach. Participants, from their experience as either a facilitator or learner, will be encouraged to share their successes and challenges so that we
can collectively explore innovative ways to better support students in their learning. The experiential format will engage participants through
presentation, interactive activities and group discussion.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity and Applied human development

Child and Youth Care Research and the Deaf Community


Presenters: Shay Erlich
Participant Maximum: 30
View Description
While the Deaf community is small, deafness and Deaf culture pose particular challenges for Child and Youth Care practitioners, which are only
exacerbated by the lack of high quality research on the particular needs of Deaf and hard of hearing young people and their families. This workshop will
explore some of the unique research challenges that working with Deaf and hard of hearing young people can present researchers, as well as how the
central goals of child and youth care research are well suited to act as a guide when navigating the many research and ethical challenges that
researchers will face in this endeavour. Participants will gain a better understanding of the Deaf community, particularly why work with Deaf clients must
be modified, an understanding of the research approaches the Deaf community advocates for, as well as how child and youth care researchers can
create research studies that are ethical to both child and youth care as well as the Deaf community.

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Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity and Applied human development

1:45PM 3:15PM

1:45 pm to 3:15 pm
CYCTalks
Presenters: Shawn Wood BSW CYC-P, Patrick Daigle MSW RSW, Kim Clark, Andrew Middleton and Dypmna Martin CYC-P
NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
CYCTalks is designed to engage the audience in a series of presentations. Each presentation is 20 -25 minutes and varying in topics. This years topics
include.
1.

Collaborate Problem Solving (CPS) - Helping kids build new pathways

2.

Game Noob: Are Video Games are effecting our Society

3.

Affected Others: Those who are effected by others harmful involvement with substance and or gambling.

4.

One Size Fits All: Using Play to engage Youth from Coast to Coast

5.

To be Determine

Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development, Relationship & communication and
Developmental practice methods

No, I am not a babysitter: Exploring the professional


presentation of Child and Youth Care Professionals
Presenters: Michelle Briegel and Pennie Sibbald
Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta (CYCAA) and Mount Royal University, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 25
This workshop looks at the presentation of Child and Youth Care Workers in comparison to the larger human service community. Our field has spent
much time looking at "who we are" by determining our identity, but how are we doing at projecting our PROFESSIONAL selves and PROFESSIONAL
practice in the community? Using legislation, education, and professional development as the tools to take our field into the next stage of growth we will
examine a framework for the Child and Youth Care profession to follow.

What identifies a profession


What is professional identity
Legislation: Why is this important?
Education requirements
Professional Development: How can you do this with no money in the budget?

Join us to hear about the Alberta experience and how the rest of the Country can nourish, nurture, and connect their passion to the profession of child
and youth care by accessing our model.
Competency Certification: Professionalism

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Restorative Options for Youth in Care


Presenters: Trish O'Brien and Selena Guildford
HomeBridge Youth Society and Community Justice Society, NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: 45
Restorative Options for Youth in Care represents a true collaborative partnership with representatives from the Department of Justice, Department of
Community Services, HomeBridge Youth Society, Community Justice Society, and the Department of Health. This collaboration allows a more
complete Restorative Justice experience for youth in care.
ROYC is a collaboratively developed intervention model, which allows for a timelier and relevant provision of Restorative Justice Services to youth in
residential care facilities who come into conflict with the law.
In this process, the Restorative Practices model of intervention is complimented by the Youth Care approach.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

CYC Practice That Is both Passionate and Sustainable:


Overcoming Secondary Trauma
Presenter: Charlene Penner
Hanover School Division, MANITOBA
Participant Maximum: 60
As those who work in "the other 23 hours," Child and Youth Care Practitioners are adept at nourishing strength in the young people with whom we
spend our days. Given the unique therapeutic relationship that exists in CYC practice, it is surprising how little consideration is given to how this
connection affects the ways we process the trauma to which we are exposed.
Drawing on the wealth of knowledge of notable individuals such as Brene Brown and Laura van Dernoot Lipsky, in addition to the presenter's own
experiences living and working in an isolated community in Northern Ontario for six years, this workshop will encourage participants to acknowledge
the ways that secondary trauma has affected them both personally and professionally. Furthermore, participants will be offered a practical framework to
move forward in a way that is both passionate and sustainable, honouring the young people we work with, both past and present.
Competency Certification: Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development and Relationship & communication

Laughter Yoga & Positive Psychology


Presenter: Bruce Miller
NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
Laughter Yoga and Positive Psychology are scientifically proven methods that help individuals to learn to change their ability to choose how they view
life and to take control of their own emotions. During the session people will experience Laughter Yoga and will also learn some of the science of
Positive Psychology.
Competency Certification: Applied human development, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

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Bridges for Learning: An Alternative Learning Perspective


Presenters: Shane Theunissen, Melanie Frost-Goyetche, and Meghan Taylor
Homebridge Youth Society, NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: 30
Our presentation focusses on communicating the theoretical and operational foundations of the Bridges for Learning program. We will outline the
benefits of our multidisciplinary approach, and include discussion on topics of classroom practices. Topics will include our practices in experiential
learning, developing therapeutic rapport, and an awareness of social, behavioral, and cognitive development. Further emphasis will be placed on the
ongoing processes and importance of building and maintaining community partnerships.
The Bridges for Learning program is unique to Nova Scotia; however, the guiding principles that underlie our documented success in educating youth
cared for by D.C.S. can be operationalized in contexts throughout the country. Our presentation will offer the unique opportunity for members of the
Child and Youth Care community to gain insights and perspectives attained over a decade of successful operation.
Competency Certification: Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

3:15PM 5:00PM

Counselling Targets of Bullying


Presenter: Deb Cockerton
CYC Assests
Participant Maximum: No Max
Bullying is a problem both in schools and the community. There are many initiatives that aim to reduce the occurrences but there are still victims, or
targets, who need help to overcome the effect bullying has on them. This workshop will give you strategies to assist a child feel more in control and
empowered.
Learning Outcomes:
You, as a Child and Youth Practitioner, in a school or community setting, will be able to:
- Design an effective program that may reduce the number of bullying incidences for the target.
- Discuss bullying with the target in a relational, empathetic way.
- Create a different thought process and reaction to bullying for the child or youth.
- Assist the target to feel more in control of the events, building self-esteem and empowerment.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

School BasedChild and Youth Care in Ontario


Presenter: Christine Gaitens
OACYC and Toronto District School Board, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: 30
School based child and youth care in Ontario is as diverse as the children and youth receiving support. The job titles, expectations and programs are
different from board to board and school to school. While many aspects of CYC Practice in schools have remained underdeveloped, there are examples
of growth and advancement in some of the school boards.
At the Toronto District School Board, Child and Youth Care Practitioners have been a part of the team supporting students to achieve success for over
25 years. They play a crucial role in supporting the success of students from kindergarten to grade 12.

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This workshop will present a view of the child and youth services department at the Toronto District School board and discuss some comparisons to
practice in other school boards in Ontario. A definition of school based child and youth care will be offered along with descriptions of roles,
collaborations, strengths and challenges.
All participants will be asked to share information about school based child and youth care in their communities so that we can compile more
information to further develop and describe this area of child and youth care practice. Be a part of defining this sector!
Competency Certification: Applied human development and Relationship & communication

Nurturing First Nations Youth


Presenters: James Thunder and Tanisha Tan
MANITOBA
Participant Maximum: No Max
This presentation addresses the problem of rising number of First Nations youth in care nationwide. It will discuss 'best practice' as a means of
nourishing the strengths of youth care workers who are working to nurture families towards restoration.
This workshop poses the question, "What would happen if we were to build an entire new system for First Nations youth from the ground up?"
The workshop is based on a hypothetical new system in which best practice and the outcome of changed lives and reunified families are the final end
result.
It looks at all the potential flaws of the current system and posits a completely new way of distributing funding for youth in care and fostering a new set
of standards for licensing as well as a system of monitoring the nurturing culture of the company of treatment homes using a best practice rating
system.
Participants are invited to discuss the new system, point out potential flaws and posit some of their own ideas.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity, Applied human development and Relationship & communication

Yes, and.games and activities to promote connection and


community
Presenters: Dr. Stephanie Griffin and Luke Smith
Algonquin College and Youturn Youth Support Services, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: No Max
In this workshop, participants will refresh and add to their toolbox of experiential games and activities for creating connections, improving
communication, and create productive spaces for learning.
As child and youth care practitioners, purposeful play and interactivity are keys to our practice. Using experiential methods, participants will discover
and participate in an assortment of activities, games, and strategies that can be used in the classroom, residential setting, and throughout the
community.
The activities used in this workshop can be used with: individuals, dyads, in small or large groups. It will allow participants the opportunity to find new
ways of building common concepts such as communication, relational practice, and collaboration into their work with families, young people, students,
and staff teams.
Be prepared to participate this is not a sit-down workshop.
Competency Certification: Applied human development and Relationship & communication

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Healthy Living Education: An Innovative Model for Engaging


Young People in Exploring the Issues that Impact their
Health
Presenters: Laura and Kim Sheppard
Chebucto Connections, NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: 30
A new set of lesson plans for Grade 9 Healthy Living classes has been developed in an effort to normalize help-seeking behaviour and build a better
understanding of the way that expectations of masculinity and femininity can affect health. Over the last three school years, these lesson plans have
been implemented in several schools within Nova Scotia. The first 45-60 minutes of the workshop will take the participants through one of the lesson
plans to demonstrate exactly how the health class is run.
In the schools, Grade 9 health classes are separated into male-identified and female-identified groups, where students followed a discussion-based
model on a range of topics from social media to healthy relationships to mental health. Outside facilitators, who are trained on delivering the specific
material, work with staff from each school to lead the classes. In keeping with the lesson plan design, staff are there to facilitate the classes, but youth
are in charge of driving the discussions and moving to content that is relevant and important to them. Results from the evaluation of these lesson plans
show significant positive changes in students knowledge and attitudes around help-seeking behaviour. Additionally, there is evidence to suggest that
these classes are helping students build critical thinking skills, empathy and self-reflection skills.
In the last 30-45 minutes of the workshop, the presenters will outline all of the topics covered through the whole lesson plan and discuss the results of
the evaluation. The presenters will also comment about their experience facilitating the classes and the impact that they are seeing in the student
participants. The presentation during this time will be short to allow a lot of time for questions from the participants. We want the information taken away
from the workshop to be applicable to those who attend, which is why the formal presentation will be short. Additionally, the presenters are willing to
share hard copies or digital copies of all of the lesson plans for anyone who is interested in using them in their work.
Competency Certification: Applied human development, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

Half Day 1:45PM -5:00PM

Seeing things differently: Challenging what we think we


know
Presenters: Ben Anderson-Nathe and Grant Charles
Portland State University and University of British Columbia
Participant Maximum: 30
Child and youth care practice is based upon a number of premises that are often accepted as fact but seldom deeply explored or interrogated.
Examples may include concepts (such as boundaries, "at-risk" status, attachment, relationship, and resilience) or practices (including life space
interviewing, assessment, and intervention). This interactive workshop will draw on participants' practice experience and education to generate
examples of these taken-for-granted premises, interrogate and critique them, and speculate about possibilities that may be opened by reconsidering
what we think we know.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Developmental practice methods and Applied human development

All Strategies Training


Presenters: Monique Howat

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Participant Maximum: No Max
Build Youth Confidence, Motivation & Empowerment
This highly interactive training gives participants the most current and successful strategies to engage, motivate and raise youth confidence.
Training Outline:
1.

Participants gain the tools needed to engage and motivate youth.

2.

Participants will not only learn new strategies to inspire and motivate youth but also fully participate in all activity.

3.

Trainees report using their new skills in their personal lives as well.

4.

Learn why anyone with low self-esteem does not usually act beyond who they think they are.

Competency Certification: Professionalism and Applied human development

Full Day 11:00AM 5:00PM

Building Connections
Presenters: Simone Brown and Darcie Gage
McMan Calgary, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 30
View Description
Based on the Family Finding model created by Kevin Campbell, participants will learn tools that can help lonely and vulnerable youth find and create
lifelong connections. Many of the youth in our systems struggle to form an identity and often become disconnected from their family and natural
supports. It is important that there be an attempt at looking for lifelong connections that care and love these youth unconditionally
Competency Certification: Relationship & communication and Professionalism

BUILDING SUPERVISORY RELATIONSHIPS WITH


MILLENNIALS...BRIDGING THE GENERATION GAPS
Presenters: Frank Delano, LMSW and Jenny Hoit, LMFT ATR
Participant Maximum: No Max
This highly interactive workshop will look at the many dynamics that are emerging as more and more of the CYC workforce is in the Millennial age
range. The stories about this new generation can be at best, an exercise in frustration and at their worst, marginalizing and stereotyping. Much has
been written, posted and spoken about the challenges of supervising the millennial employee in all fields. Even more so, there have been stories and
opinions that have achieved an almost mythological status in the worksite. But these "stories" don't tell the story of the many new skills and wonderful
energy for a better world this younger generation brings to the table. This training will examine the concerning myths and realities, look at many of the
dynamics of the Millennial generation, and examine strategies to combine best of each generation in building more substantial supervisory relationships
to ultimately increase the level of excellence in service to children and families. Supervisors who supervise Millennial workers, Millennial workers,
Millennials who are supervisors themselves, and agency Senior Management are all welcome to attend to contribute to discussion
Competency Certification: Relationship & communication and Professionalism
Target Audience: All interested- Supervisors as well as direct service workers wanting to learn and share insights on inter-generational issues in the
workplace. Millennials are particularly welcome to share their points of view

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Day 3
10:00 am to 1:00pm
Cultural Humility and Child and Youth Care: A meaningful
alignment
Presenter: Dr. Ahna Berikoff
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 30
With the expansion of diverse peoples enriching Canadian landscapes, we as Child and Youth Care students, practitioners and instructors work within
classroom and community spaces that we would like to describe as inclusive, open and safe. As easy as this might sound it is infinitely complex. We
might ask ourselves "how can we understand one another?" "What do we need to know and do to be effective in the support we provide?" These
questions are asked by students, instructors and practitioners alike. The answer could be becoming culturally competent. By learning about differences
we gain competence and in turn skilled in our approaches with others that we relate to, support and teach. But this is not the answer provided by this
presentation.
I propose a theoretical and practice framework based on Cultural Humility that is aligned with the longstanding philosophy and foundation of Child and
Youth Care as a relational and strength-based practice. Cultural Humility provides a framework that requires in-depth self-reflection. This includes
awareness of personal cultural identities within socio-historical and political contexts where intersections of privilege, inequity and/or discrimination
occur. Based on humility, equity, awareness and accountability, Cultural Humility challenges all of us to stand before another with an attitude of humility
and hospitality. It is an attitude of 'not knowing' that welcomes learning upon a ground that diminishes imbalances of power that suggest superiority and
inferiority. Cultural Humility takes place upon a ground where imbalances are leveled, where working together in awareness, openness, learning, and
acceptance takes place. Working together informed by Cultural Humility means working toward equity and social justice whether it be in the classroom,
the CYC department, human service agencies, family and community spaces.
During this presentation, we will explore our personal cultural identities in complex social systems that may or may not be open and safe spaces for
sharing and understanding, especially for those defined as different. An intersectionality lens will assist us in revealing our multi-cultural identities such
as ethnicity, 'race', gender and sexuality, ability, image, age, class, religion/spirituality in social locations and experiences of both privilege and
discrimination. Through a Cultural Humility lens we will deliberate upon ways to diminish power imbalances between ourselves and those we work 'with'
to strive for equity and social justice together.
Cultural Humility provides a framework applicable for Child and Youth Care in the many spaces of interaction, learning, support and advocacy that we
are engaged in.
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Cultural & human diversity and Applied human development

Play as part of an overall treatment intervention. Out Door


Space?
Presenter: Theresa Fraser
OACYC, Sheridan College, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: 40
Play as part of an overall treatment intervention. This workshop has been presented in Ireland, England and Canada. Objectives are:
1.

Be able to identify why play is beneficial for children/teens/families

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2.

Be able to identify how and which types of play can enhance the parent (caregiver)/child relationship

3.

To play with workshop participants who are working in CYC milieus to brainstorm how to incorporate play into the life space.

4.

Identify how Play (not necessarily Play Therapy) needs to be part of an overall treatment intervention when program planning

Please Note this workshop is outside the Westin in a Green Space.


Competency Certification: Applied human development and Relationship & communication

At Risk Kids Have Strengths Too!


Presenters: Ashley Black
Youth Impact, NEW BRUNSWICK
Participant Maximum: 30
A 90 minute workshop that focuses on using a strength based approach to working with at risk youth. Discover the meanings behind the behaviors and
how to reframe problem behaviors to create more effective care plans. This is an interactive session where participants will be encouraged to present
their most challenging clients to the group and we will find the hidden strengths.
Competency Certification: Applied human development

Becoming a "Capable Care-Giver": Reflections on Our First


Year of CYC Practice
Presenters: Joanne Fraser and Ryan Wilkie
Phoenix Youth Programs and Chisholm Youth Services, NOVA SCOTIA
Participant Maximum: No Max
Joanne Fraser and Ryan Wilkie are 2015 graduates of Nova Scotia Community College's (Truro Campus) Child and Youth Care Diploma Program. In
this presentation, they will discuss how their CYC education prepared them for their first year of practice. Employed after graduation by two different
Halifax agencies, these graduates will reflect on their personal experiences of Child and Youth Care practice during this first year. Using Jack Phelan's
"Stages of Child and Youth Care Worker Development", Joanne and Ryan will discuss how they position themselves in relation to their development
thus far.
Competency Certification: Applied human development

Beyond Physical Restraint: Re-examining Coercive


Practices
Presenters: Panel: Kathleen Mulvey (Scotland), Kelly Shaw (Nova Scotia, Canada), Okpara Rice (Iowa, USA), Frank Delano (New York, USA), James
Freeman (California, USA)
Participant Maximum: No Max
Physical restraint of children is a contentious topic with little research of the efficacy and long term effects both on children and the workers who restrain
them. The practice occurs across the world and has contributed in reviews into toxic cultures and deaths of children in care and custody. This session
will lay the foundations for a discussion that explores how to develop further our practice in relation to how we respond to children who are hurting.

22 | P a g e
Child and Youth Care/Social Pedagogy programs have made progress toward removing punitive and coercive practices, yet many still struggle with
providing safety in settings where there is the potential for violence.
This session will present an overview of differing views of the ethics and efficacy of physical restraint. The topics will be explored from a practice,
education and organizational viewpoint. Rights and needs of young people will be identified.
It is intended that this 90 minute workshop (60 Minute presentation 30 minute discussion / questions) will provide a safe space to rethink and reflect
together the impact that physical restraint has on the daily lives of children, workers and organizations.
Competency Certification: Applied human development, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

Loss and Separation


Presenters: Donna Jamieson and Catherine Hedlin
Macewan University, ALBERTA
Participant Maximum: 40
The children, youth and families with whom we are involved often have histories of repeated loss and separation. Often they have not recovered from
one loss before they are in the midst of another and another... It is important to understand the dynamics of the loss experience in order to provide
more meaningful support towards recovery. This workshop will explore the process of loss and grief, and look at ways that we can better facilitate
healing.
Competency Certification: Cultural & human diversity and Applied human development

"Yes, and..." the Theory and Practice of Improvisation in


Child and Youth Care
Presenter: Wolfgang Vachon
Humber College, ONTARIO
Participant Maximum: 30
How does improvisation theory, and practice, relate to child and youth care? Saying "yes, and... crafting and accepting offers, listening, and making
your partner look good are all actions central to improvisation- and child and youth care. The purpose of this workshop is to look at our own practices,
understand where we use improvisation concepts already (consciously or not), and explore how improvisation might be a useful framework when facing
challenging situations with children, youth, and families.
The workshop will begin with a short introduction to some of the foundational concepts of improvisation. This will be followed by several
theatre/improvisation activities. These activities will facilitate exploring our own CYC practices, leading to a larger discussion on the effective use of
improvisation when working with young people and families. No theatre or improvisation experience is necessary
Competency Certification: Professionalism, Applied human development and Developmental practice methods

Passion in Practice
Presenter: Janet White, Ba. Ms, Rcc
University of Victoria, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Participant Maximum: No Max

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This is an actual practice workshop in which I will demonstrate actual practice to elicit both discussions and learning. The participants will thus be given
the chance to both experience and witness my illustrating of how child and youth skills may appear in practice. This workshop is designed to move
actual practice into the `room' rather than just be something `discussed'.
Competency Certification: Applied human development, Relationship & communication and Developmental practice methods

Presenters
Ben Anderson-Nathe
Portland State University, OREGON
Ben Anderson-Nathe directs the Child & Family Studies program at Portland State University in Portland,
Oregon. He has worked with youth in therapeutic foster and group care, community mental health, juvenile
corrections, homeless and street settings, community education, sexuality education and sexual health, and
recreation/camping. His research and scholarship focuses on youth and young adults, critical and qualitative
epistemologies, gender and sexuality, and professional development of youth workers in the United States.
Laura Bartlett
Pathways to Education, NOVA SCOTIA
Laura has received formal education in ASL/English interpretation, and has worked in both education and
community settings. Laura, a native of Halifax, is currently working as a Student Parent Support Worker with
Pathways to Education, Spryfield. She mainly works with high school students, but also provides support to
students in junior high by facilitating a new Grade 9 health curriculum.
Dr. Ahna Berikoff
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Dr. Ahna Berikoff is on the Faculty of the Bachelor of Child and Youth Care program at MacEwan University in
Edmonton, Alberta. Ahna's academic as well as personal interests are related to social justice, identity and
diversity/difference informed by contemporary theoretical frameworks such as Cultural Humility, Cultural
Hybridity and Intersectionality to name a few. In classroom contexts, Ahna engages students in theoretical

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frameworks based on social justice and diversity, key to 'working with' children, youth and families from
increasingly diverse backgrounds and situations.
Ashley Black
Youth Impact, NEW BRUNSWICK
Ashley Black is a mother of three from New Brunswick. She is the residential program manager for the
Cumberland Residential Facility with Youth Impact. Prior to becoming a manager she was a front line youth care
worker for six years, and specializes in a Strength Based Approach.
Simone Brown
McMan, ALBERTA
Simone Brown has worked with children and families for the last 25 years. During her career she has worked in
residential settings, in home and is a credentialed facilitator, coach and trainer for High Fidelity Wraparound.
Simone is currently the Manager of Family Engagement Services with McMan Calgary.
Dr. Joseph Benamati
Andrus Sanctuary Institute, NEW YORK
Dr. Joseph Benamati was trained as a medic during Vietnam and served in a military hospital treating active duty
personnel suffering from war trauma (PTSD). For the past 40 years he has worked in children's mental health and
child welfare positions. He is an affiliate member of the National Childhood Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)
and co-author of the NCTSN Juvenile Justice Toolkit, Think Trauma. Presently he is a senior faculty member for
the Andrus Sanctuary Institute.
Michelle Briegel
Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta and Mount Royal University, ALBERTA
Catherine Smey Carston, PhD
Mount Royal University, ALBERTA
Associate professor in the Department of Child Studies and Social Work at Mount Royal University in Alberta,
Canada. Her thirty year career span includes a variety of front line, leadership, research and teaching roles in the
field of child and youth education. Her doctoral studies explored the role of relationships and mentoring for new
graduates. Catherine is the co- lead of a team of researchers and practitioners who are exploring learning and
implementation strategies for the Alberta Early Learning and Care Curriculum Framework. She is currently on a
sabbatical year and is enjoying opportunities to bring work, research and travel together.
Luke Carty
Bartimaeus Inc , Ontario

25 | P a g e
Managing Director, was a founding member of the management team that created Brayden Supervision Services
in 2012 as a service divestment from Bartimaeus Inc. Previously, Luke was a residential worker in a childrens
mental health facility in the Toronto area.
Grant Charles
British Columbia Children's Hospital, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Grant Charles is Associate Professor in the School of Social Work and Affiliated Associate Professor with the
Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics at the British Columbia
Children's Hospital. Grant's research falls into two board categories of vulnerable children and youth and
system change. He is currently involved in projects with young carers, children of parents with mental illness,
families where there is a parental mental illness, youth homelessness, child sexual abuse images on-line, youth
in care and peer to peer abuse in residential schools.
Michelle Chalupa
NOVA SCOTIA
Michelle Chalupa is currently core faculty at the Nova Scotia Community College in the Child and Youth Care
Diploma Program and Board Member of the Nova Scotia Child and Youth Care Workers Association. Michelle
has her BA in Child and Youth Study and currently has provisional certification from the CYC Certification
Board. Michelle worked for HomeBridge Youth Society for 14 years in a number of capacities while working
part-time as a Youth Support and Family Support worker with Mikmaq Family and Childrens Services.
Michelle emphasized relational and program based approaches as a Child and Youth Care Practitioner and seeks
opportunities to model these approaches within the Child and Youth Care Diploma Program
Deb Cockerton
CYC Assets, ONTARIO
Jennifer Davis
Amcal Family Services, QUEBEC
Jennifer is currently an Educator at a local high school in Montreal that has a high volume of at risk youth. She
has also worked at Amcal Family Services for the last 9 years both in the Residential program as well as
facilitating the agency's community Anger Management program. Jennifer completed her undergraduate degree
in Applied Human Sciences at Concordia University. Jennifer is a Special Care Counsellor by trade.
Frank Delano
Professional Package Consulting, NEW YORK
Frank Delano, LMSW is currently the President of Professional Package Consulting. He worked for 25 years in a
large residential center near New York City beginning as a Child and Youth Care worker and spent the last 13
years there as the agency Associate Director. He has been on a number of national boards and was on the
committee that revised the CWLA Standards of Excellence for children in residential care in the United States. He
is currently on the board of the Association of Child and Youth Care Practice. He has published numerous articles

26 | P a g e
on supervision and has presented extensively nationally and internationally including every Canadian National
and International CYC Conference since 1997.
John Digney
Gabrielle Emmett
Power to Be, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Gabrielle has been involved with Power to Be for over 7 years first as a volunteer and currently as a program
facilitator in the Wilderness School and in Adaptive Recreation. From an early age, she has been passionate
about outdoor education and the benefits of nature to children and youth. She has combined a portfolio of
wilderness certifications with a BA in Child and Youth Care from the University of Victoria in order to provide
nature-based programs that challenge and empower youth to meet their full potential.
Mardi Ennis-Gregory
Bartimaeus Inc., ONTARIO
Mardi Ennis-Gregory is the Bartimaeus Family Service Director in the Toronto Area. Mardi has twenty years of
experience as a Child and Youth Care practitioner working with children, adolescents and their families in a
variety of mental health and social service settings. Mardi is also a part-time instructor in the Child & Youth
Care program at Humber College.
Theresa Fraser
Sheridan College, ONTARIO
Threresa Fraser is a certified play therapist currently completing her PhD in play therapy. I graduated from
CYC College programs and have worked in the field for 27 plus years and are professors at the "get creative"
Ontario College. I believe that creativity is implemented in all facets of CYC practice. I am passionate in the
belief that teaching creativity helps our children/youth become more resilient.
Joanne Fraser
Phoenix Youth Programs, NOVA SCOTIA
James Freeman
CYC-Net and Casa Pacifica Centers for Children and Families, CALIFORNIA
James Freeman is co-editor of CYC-Net (www.cyc-net.org) and training director for Casa Pacifica Centers
for Children and Families in California USA. He has over two decades of experience in a variety of practice
settings, serves on the number of international boards including the Association of Children's Residential
Centers, and has published over 40 articles on relational child and youth care practice. He can be reached at
james@cyc-net.org.
Melanie Frost
HomeBridge Youth Society (Bridges for Learning), NOVA SCOTIA

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Melanie Frost-Goyetche - BAA (Child & Youth Care) - Youth Care Worker/Specialist at HomeBridge Youth
Society (Bridges for Learning). Melanie has worked in multiple youth care settings, currently in the classroom
at Bridges for Learning.
Darcie Gage
McMan, ALBERTA
Darcie Gage has worked with youth, children and families for the last 16 years. Her experience ranges from
working with sexually exploited youth, justice, experiential wilderness, foster care and spent time as an
evaluator of services. She is also a credentialed facilitator, coach and trainer for High Fidelity Wraparound and
supports implementation of the family finding model on an ongoing basis with her team at McMan Calgary.
Dr. Stephanie Griffin
Algonquin College, ONTARIO
Dr. Stephanie Griffin has worked in the children and youth care field for twenty years. She completed a PhD in
CYC at the University of Victoria and teaches full time in the Child and Youth Care program at Algonquin
College and part time in the CYC degree program at Ryerson University. Prior to teaching in CYC programs,
Stephanie worked frontline as a youth community developer, outdoor adventure facilitator, shelter and street
outreach worker.
Trevor Goodwin
Board Member CYCANB, NEW BRUNSWICK
Trevor has worked in the field of Education and Child and Youth Care for over a decade with emphasis on
young offenders, the outreach community and integrating multimedia and the arts into the field of youth care.
He is a board member with the Child and Youth Care Association of New Brunswick, a Certified Music and
Memory Facilitator and a Veteran Roller Derby Coach.
Shay Erlich
ONTARIO
Jenny Hoit
Assistant Vice President Residential Services Aviva Family & Children's Services
Los Angeles, California USA
Jenny Hoit is currently the Assistant Vice President of Residential Services for Aviva Family and Children's
Services in Los Angeles, California. She has worked for a number of years in the Child and Youth Care field in
California as a direct service CYC counselor, Clinician and Art- Therapist before moving into more senior
administrative roles. She is fluent in Spanish and has a strong background in trauma sensitive work with children
Christine Gaitens
TDSB/OACYC, ONTARIO

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Thom Garfat
CYC-Net, INTERNATIONAL
Tina Nadia Gopal
Founder of Amadeusz and The Look at my Life Project, ONTARIO
Tina-Nadia Gopal is the Founder of Amadeusz and The Look at my Life Project and part-time professor at
Humber College in Toronto. She has been working with children and youth in Toronto for 18 years and
currently works with youth and their families for a large Community Development Unit. Throughout her
personal and professional development, her goal has always been to create social change using education as her
tool.
Jennifer Green
4D North, NOVA SCOTIA

Selena Guildford
ROYC Caseworker,Community Justice Society, NOVA SCOTIA
Shemine Gulamhusein
University of Victoria, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Shemine Gulamhusein is a Doctoral student at UVic in the School of Child and Youth Care. She is interested in
spirituality and religion and how individual belief systems appear in Child and Youth Care practices
Catherine Hedlin, MPM, CCYC
MPM, CCYC, MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Catherine Hedlin is an assistant professor in the Bachelor of Child and Youth Care program at MacEwan
University in Edmonton. She has a long history in CYC beginning her career in intensive treatment programs for
adolescents and moving into management in a womens shelter, a sexual assault center and a provincial umbrella
organization.
Pam Henheffer
Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, ALBERTA
Before coming to the Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society Pam Henheffer worked for 28 years as Assistant
Manager in a family based Residential Program for Children in Social Services. Pam and her Husband of 40
years Alan were also Directors of their own Supported Independent Living / Foster Care Program for 18
years. They have four children of their own, 10 Grandchildren, numerous foster children and now many
Foster Grandchildren. Pam has a wealth of knowledge and experience to bring to families living with this
disability. She was a member of the steering committee when F.A.S was first brought to High River area.

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Many of the children that Pam worked and lived with throughout the years had this disability. Pam is the
Program Manager at the Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society.
Monique Howat
Monique Howat has almost 20 years of professional speaker experience, Monique exudes high- energy and
earns rapt attention from audiences. She is an entertaining speaker who combines the perfect blend of strategies,
information and humour. She is a popular speaker with both genders and diverse audiences from associations,
professions and industry.
Donna Jamieson, M.Ed., CCYC
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Donna Jamieson is an assistant professor and Chair of the Bachelor of Child and Youth Care Department at
MacEwan University. She was the program supervisor for an Alberta government program that provided
assessment and intervention for high risk families for nearly twenty years. Her areas of interest are family
work, parenting, attachment, separation and loss; and abuse and neglect
Kyle and Jaime Lundrigan
Key Assets, NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR
Kyle and Jaime Lundrigan work with Key Assets Newfoundland and Labrador. They are both Live-In
Carers. In addition to that Kyle works with Eastern Health at the Youth Treatment Centre for Complex
Behaviours as a child and Youth Care Counsellor. Jaime is a Program Supervisor with Key Assets. Both
have extensive experience with residential care, complex mental health and behaviours and the family based
care model
Jenny McGrath
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Bruce Miller
NOVA SCOTIA
Bruce Miller is from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. He has worked in the Mental Health Field for over 20 years. Bruce
became a Certified Laughter Yoga Leader in August 2013. This has been one of the best things Bruce Has done.
He is also a student of Positive Psychology and believes that Laughter improves your mental health and how you
view the world and your own life
Heather Modlin
Key Assets NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR
Delia Noel
Amcal Family Services, QUEBEC

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Delia is currently the Residential and Family Work Coordinator at Amcal Family Services where she has worked
for 17yrs. She completed her undergraduate studies in Applied Human Sciences and her Masters in Human
Systems Intervention, both at Concordia University. She is a Special Care Counsellor by trade.
Trish OBrien
HomeBridge Youth Society, NOVA SCOTIA
Danna Ormstrup, B.A.
Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, ALBERTA
Danna is the Executive Director of the Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, a nonprofit Society that provides
services to rural communities in Southern Alberta. She began her career working with children, youth and
adults with Learning Disabilities, continued working with children in a variety of school settings and worked
as a manager with a rural agency that places people with developmental challenges in inclusive work and
community settings. Danna and her family are residential support providers to a young man with
developmental challenges. Danna believes that FASD is often misunderstood. She believes that with
compassion, understanding and a creative spirit great things can happen both in the areas of support and
prevention in the world of FASD.
Monica Pauls, MA
Mount Royal University, ALBERTA
Has been a researcher in the social science field for over a decade. Upon completing her Masters' degree in
2002, she worked as the Coordinator for Alberta-based Research Projects at the Canadian Research Institute
for Law and the Family (CRILF). Monica went on to teach at Mount Royal University, but continued to
conduct research as both an independent consultant and as a member of the academic community. Monica is
currently appointed to Assistant Professor in the Department of Child Studies and Social Work at Mount
Royal University.
Charlene Penner
Hanover School Division, ONTARIO
Jack Phelan
MacEwan University, ALBERTA
Jack is a faculty member in the CYC degree program at MacEwan University in Edmonton. He is a frequent
workshop presenter and a regular contributor to CYCOnline as well as other journals.
Marilyn Phelan
ALBERTA
Marilyn is a retired psychologist who has been a CYC practitioner and CYC teacher and trainer.
Charlene Pickrem

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NOVA SCOTIA
Charlene Pickrem has twenty-three years of experience in the Child and Youth field as a Residential Child and
Youth Care Worker, with HomeBridge Youth Society, and as an instructor of a Child and Youth program. A
Mount Saint Vincent two-time graduate Charlene attained her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Anthropology
and completed her Master of Arts in Child and Youth Studies. As an individual who experienced vicarious
trauma, burnout therefore compassion fatigue she focused her thesis on Burnout in Residential Child and Youth
Care Workers and is eager to share her experiences and awareness with others.
Joel Pippus
Hull Services, ALBERTA
Joel is a senior Child and Youth Care Counselor and Team Leader at the Cottage One Program with Hull
Services in Calgary, Alberta. He has been working in the field of Child and Youth Care for about 6 years, and
has been Certified under the Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta since 2013. Joel is a Therapeutic
Crisis Intervention and Risk Management trainer for the Agency, supervises half of the Cottage One relief team,
and this year won the John Russel Teague Award at Hull Services (awarded to the most outstanding front line
worker in the agency) as well as the Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta Counselor of the Year. Joel
has enjoyed skateboarding for the last 16 years, and is currently orchestrating the rollout of the Matt Bannister
Memorial Skatepark for the Agency.
Marleigh Pirnasar, MEd (Cand), CYC-P
Youthlink, ONTARIO
Marleigh has worked and volunteered with children and youth for 5 years in diverse settings; mental health,
youth justice, education, and community-based. Her experience and research lies in facilitation and social
skills training programs where she has developed curriculums for children, youth, and their families.
Okpara Rice
Tanager Place, IOWA
Okpara Rice, LISW is the Chief Executive Officer of Tanager Place located in Cedar Rapids Iowa. Mr. Rice
is an active member of the Cedar Rapids community and sits on various boards relating to the care and
welfare of children.
Kelly Shaw
Nova Scotia Community College, NOVA SCOTIA
Kelly Shaw is currently core faculty at the Nova Scotia Community College in the Child and Youth Care
Diploma Program & Child and Youth Care Supervisor with 4D North Centre for Youth which is believed to
be the most northerly group care program in the world. She has an MA in Child and Youth Study, holds
certification from the CYC Certification Board and is completing a PhD in Educational Studies at Brock
University. She is a believer in creative interactive programming with youth and with learners and is interested
in exploring further how creative programming can be used to build essential practice skills within a Child and

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Youth Care educational setting and how to support Child and Youth Care Workers in their continued
professional development.
Daniel Scott
University of Victoria, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Daniel Scott has been on the faculty of the School of Child & Youth Care since 2000. He has been working in the
area of child and adolescent spirituality since the early 1990s.
Kim Sheppard
Pathways to Education, NOVA SCOTIA
Kim Sheppard, (BFA NSCAD 2006, BEd. MSVU 2013) is an artist and educator from Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Sheppard has worked with youth in classrooms and in the community around Nova Scotia, focusing on health,
LGBTQ education and art education. Kim currently works with Pathways to Education in Spryfield as a Student
Parent Support Worker, providing support to students in junior high. In particular Kim has been facilitating a
new health curriculum developed in partnership with Pathways, Heartwood Centre for Youth Development and
the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness.
Pennie Sibbald
Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta, ALBERTA
Debbie Sliwinski
Service Director, is a certified Child & Youth Counselor with over forty years of experience. Debbie has been
managing Brayden Supervision Services over the past year in support of our growth and service development
initiative. She has extensive experience teaching, supervising and managing Child & Youth Care practitioners
throughout her extensive career.
Maxwell Smart
Heather Snell
BCYC Faculty Humber College and Chair of Research Committee CYCEAB, ONTARIO
Kim Snow
Ryerson University, ONTARIO
Martin Stabrey
CYC-Net, INTERNATIONAL
Sylvia Storryn
Power To Be, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Sylvia's commitment to more than 10 years of working in child and youth care is matched only by her
unwavering love of time spent outside. She holds a BA in Sociology from the University of Calgary and

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completed CYC certification through the Alberta CYC certification program. Currently Sylvia is the
Community Development Coordinator of the Wilderness School at Power To Be in Victoria, British Columbia.
Luke Smith
Youturn Youth Support Services, ONTARIO
Luke Smith, CYC Cert., is a graduate of the Algonquin College Child and Youth Worker program.
Currently employed at Youturn Youth Support Services as part of their Community Support Team; working
with youth in conflict with the law.
Crystal Stalker
Lethbridge College, ALBERTA
Meghan Taylor
HomeBridge Youth Society, NOVA SCOTIA
Meghan Taylor - M. Sc., Psychologist (Cand. Reg.) at HomeBridge Youth Society. Specializes in educational
psychology, mental health and assessment.
Shane Theunissen
HomeBridge Youth Society, NOVA SCOTIA
Shane Theunissen - Ph.D. (Candidate) - Teacher at HomeBridge Youth Society (Bridges for Learning). Expertise
in research and practice of education with vulnerable populations.
James Thunder, MBA candidate
University of Manitoba, MANITOBA
James Thunder is a First Nations student and MBA candidate at the University of Manitoba with aspirations to
start up his own Youth Care Agency upon graduation. He is currently working as a Youth Care practitioner and
has been doing so for 3 years. His long-term goal is to work toward becoming a Grand Chief and instilling
needed changes to the youth care system in his province.
Tanisha Tan
MANITOBA
Tanisha Tan has graduated from Red River College with a Diploma in Child and Youth Care. She is a front line
worker with 2 years experience most of which were in a very successful youth care agency.
Wiyanna Trevis
Look at My Life Project, ONTARIO
Wiyanna is a Child and Youth Care practitioner and has been a part of the Amadeusz team since 2010. She is
currently the Look At My Life Project program manager, overseeing front-line work as well as facilitating group
and individual education programming. Throughout the past 5 years, Wiyanna has worked in 4 different detention

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facilities helping young people achieve some of their education-related goals. Prior to joining Amadeusz,
Wiyanna worked with young people in B.C. and also internationally, in South Africa and Nepal.
Janet White
University of Victoria, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Shawn Wood BSW, CYC-P
NOVA SCOTIA
Shawn Wood is a Child and Youth Care Practitioner (CYC-P) who has been working in the Mental Health and
Addictions field for ten years. He has recently graduated with a Bachelors of Social Work at University of
Manitoba. He recently became a certified Child and Youth Care Worker through the Child and Youth Care
Certification Board. Shawn has a broad range of professional experiences, such as working with at-risk youth
in Toronto, and assisting the homeless population and working with clients with Mental Health and Addiction
needs in hospital based care. He has also worked as a community educator for the LGBT+ community,
educating schools and providing professional development for organizations across Nova Scotia
Ryan Wilkie
Chisholm Youth Services, NOVA SCOTIA
Sarah Woods
Amadeusz, ONTARIO
Sarah is currently the Project Manager and Research Coordinator of Amadeusz. Sarah also currently works at a
children's mental health agency in Toronto coordinating a project for youth involved in the justice system. Sarah
has worked with youth aged 12-29 in front-line, management, and program development positions in the areas of
education, employment, criminal justice and newcomer services. Sarah is the current President of the Board of
Directors at Times Change Women's Employment Service. Sarah's work is driven by her belief that everyone
deserves equal opportunities and equal access to those opportunities.
Wolfgang Vachon
Humber College, ONTARIO
Wolfgang Vachon has been working with children and youth as an educator, artist, and advocate for over two
decades. During the late 1980s he began employing interactive theatre processes to explore health choices with
marginalized youth. Wolfgang has continued his community arts practice by writing, directing, and performing
in dozens of productions through North America, Europe and Africa. He has used an arts based approach with
diverse youth populations, including those in detention facilities, youth in care, street involved & homeless, trans
identified, and survivors of trauma. Wolfgang is a full-time faculty member in the Child and Youth Care
programs at Humber College, he also hosts CYC Podcast: Discussions on Child and Youth Care
(www.CYCpodcast.org).
Mary Ventrella
Sheridan College, ONTARIO

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Mary Ventrella has researched creativity in leadership for the last five years for her PhD. I graduated from
CYC College programs and have worked in the field for 27 plus years and are professors at the "get creative"
Ontario College. I believe that creativity is implemented in all facets of CYC practice. I am passionate in the
belief that teaching creativity helps our children/youth become more resilient.