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EDLA309: Literacy Education 2

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LITERACY / UNIT PLANNER


Topic(s): My Place: Bertie 1918 Episode 10: On tick

Year Level: 5

Term: 2
1-3

My Place: Bertie 1918 Episode 10: Impact of war

Weeks:

Date: 13/4/15
1/5/15

My Place: Bertie 1918 Episode 10: Armistice


GRAMMAR FOCUS: (levels)
1. Whole text structure of an Information
Narrative
Orientation (introduction): the
characters, setting and time of the story are
established. Usually the answers to who,
when and where are provided in this part of
the narrative.
Complication and series of events
(middle): the situations, activities and
events involving the main character are
expanded upon. These events are written in
a fluent and cohesive sequence.
Resolution (end): the complication is
resolved satisfactorily but not necessarily
happily.
Reorientation: some narratives include a
reorientation in which either the characters
or their lives are described after the
complication is resolved or the events of the
narrative are drawn together and a moral or
message may be included.
2. Language features of the text-type:
Descriptive language to create vivid images
(use of appropriate verbs, adverbs,
adverbial phrases and clauses, adjectives,

Text type
and mode

Listene
d

Spoke
n

Read

Written

Viewed

Produce
d

to
Information
Narrative

Steps in Teaching and Learning Cycle: (adapted


Derewianka, 1990/2007)
1. Building topic knowledge
2. Building text knowledge/Model the genre
3. Guided activities to develop vocabulary and text knowledge
4. Joint construction of text
5. Independent construction of text
6. Reflecting on language choices
Frequently used Literacy Instructional Strategies: Gradual
Release of Responsibility Model Language Experience Approach
(R/W)
Picture Chat Read to
Shared R/W
Guided R/W
Modelled writing Interactive writing
Independent R/W
Literature Circles Reciprocal Teaching Mini lesson Roving
conferences
Teaching techniques: Think Aloud, Text analysis, Cloze
exercises, Note-taking,
Graphic Organisers: T-chart, Y-chart; Venn diagram, Data grid,
Sunshine wheel, KWL chart, Flow chart, Story map, templates for
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adjectival phrases, and clauses, similes,


metaphors, hyperbole, analogy,
onomatopoeia, alliteration)
Adjectives and related groups of words (e.g.
adjectival phrases and clauses) to provide
rich description of nouns (e.g. characters,
setting)
Adverbs and related groups of words (e.g.
adverbial phrases and clauses) to add extra
information about the verbs (to describe
how, when and where events take place)
First or third person pronouns
Dialogue
Tense changes present tense in dialogue
and usually past tense in the remainder of
text

text-types for planning

(Wing Jan, 2009, pp. 235-236).

CONTEXT: Overview of series of lessons and


background information
Over the course of the unit students will learn about the
time period of World War 1 and the ANZACS. They will
gain an understanding of/revise what an information
narrative is and the specific language features, as well
as how it differs from a fictional narrative. They will be
engaged in oral language activities which will develop
their understanding of topic vocabulary and the relevant
language features. The Gradual Release of
Responsibility Model is evident in the unit as it follows
the sequence of I Do, We Do and You Do. The teacher
models information narratives by constructing,
deconstructing and annotating them to develop
students understanding. Students then construct an
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information narratives together with the teacher and


peers and finally independently. The scaffolding
students require reduces over time to match the
students increasing abilities. By the end of the unit
students will have a solid understanding of what
information narratives are, have knowledge about the
time period of World War 1 and will have independently
written an information narrative based on World War
1/ANZACs.
Pre-assessment of students skills and
knowledge:
Standardized tests for reading/writing/ NAPLAN
Profile of Data Progression of Reading Development
Conferences/interviews
Student written work samples
Self-assessments
Literacy Learning intention:
We are learning to identify the structure and relevant
language features of an information narrative and
important information about World War 1 from a range
of texts. We are then learning to use these to
independently construct an information narrative that is
based on World War 1/ANZACs.
Learning behaviours:
I need to use the My Place resources to develop my
knowledge of the World War 1 time period. I will use a
range of listening, reading, viewing, oracy and writing
techniques to support my learning. I need to think about
what I have read/seen and consider how I can use this in
my own writing and speaking. I need to participate in all
class and group discussions and listen politely to other

Four resource model (Freebody & Luke, 1990/1999): Code


Breaker; Text Participant/Meaning Maker; Text User; Text Analyst
Comprehension Strategies: Predicting; Visualising; Making
connections; Questioning; Inferring; Determining important ideas;
Summarising; Finding evidence in the text; Understanding new
vocabulary; Synthesising; Comparing and contrasting;
Paraphrasing; Recognising cause and effect; Skimming and
scanning; Five semiotic systems: linguistics, visual, auditory,
spatial, gestural.
Question types: self-questioning; 3 levels; (literal, inferential,
evaluative); QAR
Thinking Routines: See, Think, Wonder; Headlines; +1, Three
word summary, 5VIPs, Give One, Get One (refer Ritchhart, R.,
Church, M., & amp; Morrison, K. (2011). Making Thinking Visible:
How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence
for All Learners. eBook online)

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peoples views and thoughts.


Success criteria:
I know Im doing well if I can:
Identify information about World War 1 and the
ANZACs from a range of texts and develop my
understanding and knowledge of these topics
Extend my vocabulary to include topic knowledge
about World War 1 and the ANZACs and text-type
specific words for information narratives
Identify the structure of an information narrative and
how this is different from a fictional narrative
Identify and provide examples of the language
features relevant for an information narrative
Develop my oral language skills by participating in a
range of activities
Work collaboratively with my peers in a variety of
activities
Construct an information narrative by myself
(research, plan, draft, edit and publish)
Share my work by confidently reading it aloud to the
class
Accurately assess my own work and set appropriate
goals for future information narrative writing
Topic-specific vocabulary for the unit of work:
era, decade, history, World War 1, ANZACs, Australian
and New Zealand Army Corps, war, Gallipoli, soldiers,
telegram, on tick, armistice, impact of war, orientation,
complication, resolution, reorientation, setting,
characters, information narrative, recruitment,
conscription, trenches, battlefront, digger, no-mans
land, Western Front, shellshock, troops, heroes,
mateship, battle, parade, remembrance, dawn, poppies,

Resources:
Australian Broadcasting Corporation. (2015). My Place. Retrieved
from http://www.abc.net.au/abc3/myplace/
Cummings, P. (2013). ANZAC Biscuits. Lindfield, Australia:
Scholastic Press.
Greenwood, M. (2014). Midnight. The Story of a Light Horse.
Newton, Australia: Walker Books Australia.
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lest we forget, conflict, homeland, generations, bravery,


Turkey, enlistment, medals, rising sun, uniforms, war
memorial,

Harper, G. (2015). Roly the Anzac Donkey. Rosedale, New Zealand:


Puffin Books.
Hertzberg, M. (2002). Teaching English Language Learners in
Mainstream Classes. Newton, Australia: Primary English
Teaching Association Australia.
Kane, G., & Allen, L. (2010). Anzac Day Parade. Rosedale, New
Zealand: Puffin Books.
McClesky. (n.d.). Paragraph Story Map Template and Checklist for
Who What Where When Why. Retrieved from
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/ParagraphStory-Map-Template-and-Checklist-for-Who-What-WhereWhen-Why-530360
Metzenthen, D. (2014). One Minutes Silence. Crows Nest,
Australia: Allen and Unwin.
My Place for Teachers. (2011a). Episode 10: 1918: BERTIE.
English: Teaching Strategies. Retrieved from
http://www.myplace.edu.au/teaching_activities/1918/episod
e_landing_10.html
My Place for Teachers. (2011b). Episode 10 | 1918: Bertie. Clips 1,
2, & 3 [Video file]. Retrieved from
http://www.myplace.edu.au/teaching_activities/1918/episod
e_landing_10.html
My Place for Teachers. (2011c). Bertie taking the news badly
[Digital Image]. Retrieved from
http://www.myplace.edu.au/behind_the_scenes/stills_gallery/
stills_gallery_landing.html?tabRank=1&subTabRank=10
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Ritchhart, R., Church, M., & Morrison, K. (2011). Making Thinking
Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and
Independence for All Learners. Retrieved from
http://acu.eblib.com.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/patron/
Saxby, M. (2014). Meet the ANZACS. North Sydney, Australia:
Random House Australia.
Seely Flint, A., Kitson, L., Lowe, K., & Shaw, K. (2014). Literacy in
Australia. Pedagogies for Engagement. Milton, Australia:
John Wiley & Sons Australia.
Teacher Vision (2015). Authors Chair. Retrieved from
https://www.teachervision.com/teachingmethods/resource/5047.html
Truss, L. (2006). Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance
Approach to Punctuation. New York, NY: Penguin Group USA.
Wakabi, E. (2015). Narrative Writing: Adding Dialogue. Retrieved
from http://www.education.com/lesson-plan/narrativewriting-adding-dialogue/
Wilson, M. (2015). Digger. The Dog Who Went To War. Sydney,
Australia: Lothian Childrens Book.
Winch, G. (2015). The Last ANZAC. Frenchs Forest, Australia: New
Frontier Publishing.
Wing Jan, L. (2009). Write ways: Modelling Writing Forms (3rd ed.).
South Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Analysing
Checking
Classifying

Estimating
Explaining
Generalising

Listening
Locating
information

Performing
Persuading
Planning

Reading
Recognising bias
Reflecting

Seeing patterns
Selecting
information

Testing
Viewing
Visually

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Cooperating
Considering
options
Designing
Elaborating
TEACHING & LEARNING
CYCLE
(Identify step in the T & L
cycle and the literacy
learning intention or
sessions focus)

Hypothesising
Inferring
Interpreting
Justifying

We are learning
to identify the
Who, What,
Where, When
and Why of a
story and how to
take brief and
specific notes.

Predicting
Presenting
Providing feedback
Questioning

WHOLE CLASS
Hook or Tuning In
(Identify a strategy or a
tool to help activate prior
knowledge and/or to
introduce the topic.)

MINI LESSON
(Explicitly model the use of a
new strategy or a tool to assist
with the literacy learning
intention or focus of the session
and to prepare students for
successful completion of the set
task. Reference to Wing Jan
include page details)

Brainstorm:

Read Aloud and


Modelled Writing:

We are learning to ...

1. Building
topic
knowledge
(step 1)

Making choices
Note taking
Observing
Ordering events
Organising

(My Place for


Teachers, 2011a,
p.3).

Conduct a class
brainstorm about
what students
know about
World War 1.
Record students
responses on the
IWB in a table as
the class tries to
group them
under the
headings Who,
What, Where,
When and Why
(see appendix

(My Place for Teachers,


2011a, p.3).

Read One Minutes


Silence asking
students to focus on
Who, What, Where,
When and Why of
WW1.
Using the above
sub-headings
model how to
read for specific
information and
write brief notes
on the IWB (Wing
Jan, 2009, pp.
128).

Reporting
Responding
Restating
Revising

INDEPENDENT
LEARNING
(Extended opportunity for
students to work in pairs, small
groups or individually on a set
task. Time for teacher to probe
students thinking or work with
a small group for part of the
time. Reference to Wing Jan
include page details)

Independent
Learning:

Self-assessing
Sharing ideas
Summarising
Synthesising

SHARE TIME AND


TEACHER SUMMARY
(Focussed teacher questions
and summary to draw out the
knowledge, skills and
processes used in the session)
Link back to literacy learning
intention and key points of
effective reading/writing,
speaking, listening and
viewing.

Share Time:
Each group shares
(My Place for Teachers,
their responses and
2011a, p.3).
the teacher adds
these to the original
Split the class into 5
table, but in a
groups and give each different colour.
group a copy of
Students also need
Meet the
to find the evidence
ANZACS and a subin the text so the
heading of either
class can check this
Who, What, Where,
and use it for further
When and Why.
references. After the
These are mixed
groups have shared
ability groups.
the teacher can ask
Students will discuss if anyone can add to
their responses and
their table even if
then write them in a
they did not do that
brainstorm (see
sub-heading.
appendix 2).

representing
Working
independently
Working to a
timetable

ASSESSMENT
STRATEGIES
(Should relate to literacy
learning intention or focus of
the session. Includes how &
what you will use to make a
judgment on students
attempt/work)
Success criteria written for
students to know what the
minimum expectation is.

Observation and
anecdotal notes:
Students will be
assessed on:
Active
participation in
class and group
discussions
Ability to
identify
accurate
information
from the text
for Who, What,
Where, When
and Why
Ability to take
brief and
specific notes
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1). There may
need to be an
additional place
for suggestions
which do not fit
under any of the
sub-headings.
Focus Questions:
Who do you
think was
involved in
World War 1
(WW1)?
What
happened in
WW1?
Where did
WW1 happen?
Where did
people come
from?
When did
WW1 happen?
Did it just last
a year?
Why did WW1
happen?

Jessica

Emphasise the
differences
between taking
notes in dot
points instead of
full sentences.

Shared Reading:
Read Meet the
ANZACS with the
students joining in
for the dialogue
sections. This is the
text used for the
independent learning
activity. It is read as
a whole class to
ensure that students
listen to all
information and not
just the information
which is related to
their heading.

Students will need to Focus Questions:


provide evidence
From this book
from the text so
what have we
suggest to students
learnt about
it may be helpful to
WW1 in terms of
write down page
the 5 Ws?
numbers where they
o Who
locate information.
o What
Teacher will conduct
o Where
roving conferences
o When
with the students
o Why
and help those in
Were our original
need, particularly
thoughts
assisting ESL and low
accurate?
ability students.

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Ability to
provide
evidence to
support their
responses
Ability to
respond to and
build on peers
ideas
Ability to
confidently
share ideas

Success Criteria:
I am doing well if I
can:
Accurately
identify the
Who, What,
Where, When
and Why of the
book and
provide
supporting
evidence
Take brief and
specific notes
Work
cooperatively in
my group
Participate in
class and group
discussions and
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share my
responses

2. Building
topic
knowledge
(step 1)
We are learning
to identify key
vocabulary
specific to the
WW1 time
period through
video clips and
reading books.
3. Building
text
knowledge/
Model the
genre (step
2)
We are learning
to identify the
structure of
information
narratives and
how they differ
from fictional
narratives. We
also learning to
summarise each
section of the

Students will watch Berties episodes of My Place On tick, Impact of war and Armistice. After each video
clip the class will have a discussion about what they learnt about WW1 and the time period. They will also
focus on the semiotic systems which students are familiar with as well as asking students to share any new
knowledge they have gained ask them to share any new vocabulary which can be added to a brainstorm.
After watching all 3 video clips students will spend time making a Word Wall with all the new vocabulary
they have learnt so far. During this lesson students will have access to books about ANZACs and WW1 and
can read this and identify any new vocabulary. Teacher will conduct roving conferences with the students
and help those in need, particularly assisting ESL and low ability students.

Review:
Students are in
groups of 3-4
(mixed ability)
and each group
is given a wellknown narrative
(see appendix
3). Students are
to briefly analyse
them and their
structure. After
select a few of
the narratives
and get students
to explain what
happens in the
orientation,

Class Discussion:
(Wing Jan, 2009, p. 255256)

Ask students if they


know what an
information narrative
is and how it differs
from a fictional
narrative. Discuss
the differences
between the two
(see appendix 4).
Think Aloud and
Modelled Writing:
(Wing Jan, 2009, p. 257).

Read Simpson and

Summary and Spot


the Facts in the
Plot:
(Wing Jan, 2009, p.257)

In groups of 3-4
students read
Digger. The Dog
Who Went to War.
They work together
to compete a
summary and spot
the facts in the plot
(see appendix 5).
Students will use the
skills they have
observed and
practiced in the mini-

Share Time and


Collaboration:
The class comes
back together and
shares their
responses. Each
group can share
their summary and
facts included for
each section of the
information
narrative. These
responses can be
added to the
template on the
IWB. This will
provide a summary
of the book and the

Observation and
anecdotal notes:
Students in the
whole class and
focus group will be
assessed on:
Ability to
identify the
structure of
narratives
including
information
narratives
Ability to
identify what an
information
narrative is and
how it differs
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narrative and
identify the facts
included.

complication and
series of events
and then in the
resolution. Then
as a class revise
the structure of a
narrative. What
happens in the
Orientation
o Characters,
setting and
time are
established
o Answers to
who, when
and where
are
provided
Complication
o Situations,
activities
and events
involving
the main
character
are
expanded
upon
o These
events are
written in a
fluent and
cohesive

Jessica
his Donkey and then
model how to
deconstruct and
annotate its
structure. Teacher
shows the class how
to complete a
summary and spot
the facts in the plot
(see appendix 5).
The teacher thinks
out aloud so
students can
understand the
process the teacher
goes through in
identifying the facts
and summarising the
main sections of the
narrative.
Focus Questions:
What is an
information
narrative?
How does an
information
narrative differ
from a fictional
narrative?
What is fictional
information? What
is factual

lesson to complete
the task.
Focus Group:
(Wing Jan, 2009, p. 73)

This group contains


ESL students and
low-ability students
who require extra
assistance. They
complete the same
activity as the whole
class but they have
the assistance of the
teacher. This will
provide students
with the opportunity
to look at the
structure of an
information narrative
with the support of
the teacher. Students
will read Digger. The
Dog Who Went to
War. Together as a
group and complete
the activity as they
read.

facts it includes.
Focus Questions:

What happened
in the orientation,
complication and
resolution?

What facts were


included in each

of these
sections?

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from a fictional
narrative
Active
participation in
class and group
discussions
Ability to work
in a group
Ability to
summarise
each section of
the narrative
and identify the
relevant facts
Ability to share
their response
to the class and
build on other
people/groups
responses

Success Criteria:
I am doing well if I
can:
Identify the
structure of a
an information
narrative and
how it differs
from a fictional
narrative
Accurately
summarise the
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structure
Resolution
o Complicatio

n is
resolved
satisfactoril
y but not
necessarily
happily
(Wing Jan, 2009,
p.235).
These
explanations of
the structure can
be written on
poster paper/IWB
for future
reference.

4. Building
text
knowledge/
Model the
genre (step

Jessica
information? How
do we know the
difference?
What happened in
the orientation,
complication and
resolution?
What facts were
included in each
of these sections?

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orientation,
complication
and resolution
of the text
Accurately
identify facts
which are
included in the
orientation,
complication
and resolution
of the text
Participate and
cooperate in
class and group
discussions and
share my
responses

Focus Questions:
What do all of
these texts
have in
common?
What
structure do
they all
follow?
Read Aloud and Shared Writing:
Before reading aloud the book The Last Anzac the teacher will ask the students to pay particular attention
to how the author weaves information throughout the story to create an information narrative. After reading
together the class completes a summary and spot the facts in the plot (see appendix 5, Wing Jan, 2009,
p.257). This is the same activity as last lesson however this time the students are involved in completing
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2)
We are learning
to understand
how authors
weave
information into
narratives and
how to
summarise each
section of the
narrative and
identify the facts
included.
5. Guided
activities to
develop
vocabulary
or specific
language
feature
(step 3)
We are learning
to identify
information from
a visual text
and use
interesting
adjectives to
describe images
of the 19141918 to paint a

Jessica

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the table (we do) instead of watching the teacher (I do) (Seely Flint, Kitson, Lowe & Shaw, 2014, p. 150).
Read Midnight. The Story of a Light Horse as a class and then students will independently (you do)
complete a summary and spot the facts in the plot. Teacher will conduct roving conferences with the
students and help those in need, particularly assisting ESL and low ability students. Students in the focus
group will do the same activity but will do it as a small group with the support of the teacher (Wing Jan,
2009, p. 73). Get the class to come back together and as a class fill in the summary and spot the facts in
the plot (Wing Jan, 2009, p.257) on the IWB using what the students wrote individually.

Picture
Chat/SeeThink-Wonder:

Review adjectives:
Ask students explain
what they
(Ritchhart, Church,
know/remember
& Morrison, 2011, p. about adjectives. As
55).
a class generate a
list of adjectives
Conduct a
which could be used
Picture Chat
in the students
using the still
Bertie taking the information
news badly from narratives. The
teacher will have
My Place (see
appendix 6). Ask prepared a number
of sentences about
the students to
WW1/ANZACs which
focus on what
do not have
they can see in
adjectives (see
the image and
what information appendix 7). The
teacher will ask

Barrier Game:

Cloze Exercise:

(Hertzberg, 2012, p. 5457).

(Seely Flint et al., 2014,


p. 306-307).

In pairs students will


then play the Barrier
Game using images
from the time period
of WW1
(see appendix 8).
Student A describes
an image using lots
of describing words
and Student B needs
to guess which
image they are
describing. To ensure
there is lots of
describing and

Conduct a cloze
exercise with the
class using the book
Anzac Day Parade.
Adjectives will be
hidden from the text
and get students to
suggest possible
adjectives and why
it is possible and
then reveal the real
adjective. As a class
discuss if there is
any similarity
between their

Observation and
anecdotal notes:
Students will be
assessed on:
Active
participation in
class and group
discussions
Ability to
accurately
locate
information
from the visual
text
Ability to define
adjectives and
provide
appropriate
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picture in our
audiences
minds.

it tells us about
the time period.
Also ask
students to add
in adjectives to
their description
of the image.
This picture chat
can include
questioning from
the thinking
routine See
Think Wonder.

Jessica
students to suggest
some adjectives
which could be
added to the
sentences.

Focus Questions:
Who can
remember what
adjectives are?
What do
adjectives add to
our writing?
What are some
Focus Questions:
examples of
What can you
adjectives which
see?
can be used to
What
describe WW1/
adjectives can
ANZACs? These
we use to
may be ones you
describe the
have read.
image?
What adjective
What do you
could we add to
think is going
this sentence to
on this
make it more
image?
interesting and
Why do you
exciting?
think that?
What does it
make you
wonder
about?
How do you

clarifying there is a
point system 1 point
if the answer is
guessed after asking
only one question
and 3 points are
given if they ask 2 or
more questions. This
will prompt students
to use adjectives to
describe and clarify.
Students can add
any new vocabulary
to the Word Wall.
Teacher will conduct
roving conferences
with the students
and help those in
need.
Focus Group:
(Wing Jan, 2009, p. 73)

This group contains


ESL students and
low-ability students
who require extra
assistance. The
teacher will revise
adjectives in more
depth with students.
As a group they will
read Anzac Biscuits
and look at the

suggested
adjectives and the

real one. Finish off


with a brief
discussion about
what adjectives are

and how students


writing benefits from
using them.
Focus Questions:
What could this
adjective be?
Why could it be
that adjective?
Were our
suggested
adjectives similar
to the adjective
used in the book?
Who can remind
me what
adjectives our?
Why do we use
them in our
writing? How do
they benefit our
writing?

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examples
Ability to add
adjectives into
pre-written
sentences
Ability to
describe an
image using a
range of
adjectives
allowing their
partner to
guess the
image
Ability to use
adjectives to
clarifying which
image their
partner is
describing
Ability to
suggest
appropriate
adjectives
which could be
used to
describe words
in the text
Ability to
identify and
explain how
adjectives can
improve writing
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think Bertie
was feeling?
Why do you
say that?
What does
this image tell
us about
World War 1
and the
ANZACs?

adjectives used in
the book. The
teacher will ask
students what other
adjectives they could
use to describe
objects/ people
besides those
already used. Then
the teacher can help
the students to play
the same barrier
game as the rest of
the class.

Success Criteria:
I am doing well if I
can:
Identify and
locate
information
about World
War 1 from the
visual text
Add in
appropriate
adjectives to
the pre-written
sentences to
make them
more
interesting
Play the barrier
game
cooperatively
with my partner
and use
adjectives to
describe and
clarify the
image being
guessed
Suggest
appropriate
adjectives
which could be
used in the
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6. Guided
activities to
develop
vocabulary
or specific
language
feature
(step 3)
We are learning
to add dialogue
to our narratives
to make them
more interesting
and engaging
and allow us to
convey the
mood of the
narrative.

Jessica

Class
Discussion:

Think Aloud and


Modelled and
(Wakabi, 2015, para. Shared Writing:
1).

Explain to the
class that they
will be told two
quick stories and
after heading
both stories you
will vote for
which story is
better. Ask the
class to consider
why one story is
better than the
other. Tell the
class one story
without dialogue
and another
without see
appendix 9) to
show how adding
dialogue to

(Wakabi, 2015, para. 5).

Have a story about


ANZACs/WW1 with
no dialogue on the
IWB. Initially begin
with the teacher
demonstrating to the
students how to add
dialogue to a story.
Then begin to
involve the students
more in the process
so it becomes shared
writing.
Focus Questions:
What is dialogue?
What are
examples of
dialogue?
What could we

Readers Theatre:

Readers Theatre:

(Wing Jan 2009, p.247).

(Wing Jan 2009, p.247).

Split the class into


groups of about 6
students. These
groups are made up
of students who are
of mixed abilities.
Students are to write
a script, which has
lots of dialogue in it.
There may be a
narrator that reads
the other parts of the
script, which are not
dialogue. Remind
students of how to
incorporate dialogue
into a narrative. Give
students time to
practice presenting
their narrative.
During this time the
teacher will conduct

Students will
present their
dialogue filled
narratives to the
class. Remind
students they need
to read their scripts
with expression and
fluency in order to
convey the mood
without using props.
After everyone has
presented have a
brief class
discussion about
dialogue and how
this can be
incorporated into
their information
narratives about
ANZACs/WW1.

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book
Explain how
adjectives can
improve my
writing
Participate and
in class and
group
discussions
Observation and
anecdotal notes:
Students will be
assessed on:
Active
participation in
class and group
discussions
Ability to notice
how narratives
benefit from
dialogue
Ability to add
dialogue into a
story
Ability to
identify what
needs to be
used to show
that someone is
talking
Ability to work
in a group and
produce a script
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stories can be
more
entertaining as
well as helps the
listener better
understand the
characters
thoughts and
emotions
(Wakabi, 2015,
para. 1).
Focus Questions:
Which story
was better?
What made
that story
better?
What is the
purpose of
dialogue?
How does it
make our
narratives
better?

Jessica
add to this part of
the story to make
it more interesting
and engaging?
What do we need
to use to show
that someone is
talking?
o Talking marks
o How they spoke
said, asked,
yelled, sung,
etc. conduct a
brief word hunt
for said and
write this up as
a class
brainstorm for
future reference

roving conferences
with all groups,
particularly assisting
ESL and low ability
students.

Focus Questions:
What is the
benefit of adding
dialogue to your
information
narrative?
How can you add
dialogue to your
information
narrative about
WW1/ANZACs?
Who can give me
an example of
how they would?

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which contains
multiple
examples of
dialogue
Ability to
confidently
present the
narrative to the
class using lots
of expression
and fluency

Success Criteria:
I am doing well if I
can:
Identify what
dialogue is and
how narratives
benefit from it
Identify what
needs to be
used to show
that someone is
talking talking
marks and how
they spoke
Participate in
the class adding
in dialogue into
a narrative and
other
discussions
Work in a group
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and produce a
script which
contains lots of
dialogue
Confidently
present the
narrative to the
class using lots
of expression
and fluency
7. Joint
As a class brainstorm all the information they have learnt about ANZACs and World War 1, which could be
construction incorporated into an information narrative. Through modelled writing the teacher will demonstrate how to
of text (step weave information into their narrative (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 49). The teacher will write a sentence which
4)
could be part of an information narrative using the facts and information students have learnt throughout
the unit. Students complete Wacky Tales in groups of 3. Each group is given a character by the teacher
We are learning
and each group member is to write either the orientation, complication or resolution for the information
to identify which narrative. This is to be done independently and without the input of their group members (Wing Jan, 2009,
information we
p. 248). Students are to add in the facts that they have learnt so far through the unit. Teacher will conduct
can incorporate
roving conferences with the students and help those in need, particularly assisting ESL and low ability
into our
students. After writing students share their story to their group and then the class will come back together
information
and discuss the importance of ensuring that all elements/sections of a story go together. Ask students how
narratives. We
they can make sure this happens in their own information narrative. If necessary prompt students to realise
are also learning the importance of planning the whole information narrative before writing.
how to weave
this information
into a narrative.
8. Joint
Read Aloud
Planning concept
Icy pole sticks:
Share Time:
Observation and
(Wing
Jan,
2009,
p.
244).
construction and Cloze
maps:
Each group of
anecdotal notes:
(Wing Jan, 2009, p. 245).
of text (step Exercise:
students will
Students will be
Students
will
work
in
4)
Do a cloze
verbally share their
assessed on:
exercise for Roly As a class brainstorm groups of 3 (mixed
plan for their
Active
all the different
ability) to plan their
We are learning
the Anzac
information
participation in
characters, settings
own information
to identify the
Donkey.
narrative. This
class and group
narrative. There will
setting and what Adjectives will be and complications
sharing will provide
discussions
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life was like for
soldiers during
WW1. We are
also learning to
identify
appropriate
characters,
settings and
complications
which we can
use in our own
information
narratives.

hidden from the


text and get
students to
suggest possible
adjectives and
why it is possible
and then reveal
the real
adjective. This
will help
students to focus
on the adjectives
used to describe
the setting and
what life was like
for the soldiers.
Also focus on
how the
illustrations help
the audience to
gain an
understanding of
the setting and
time period.
Focus Questions:
How does the
author
describe the
setting?
How did they
describe what
life was like
for the

Jessica
they have read/seen
in texts based on
ANZACs and WW1.
These can be done
on 3 separate
brainstorms. Then
students can make
own suggestions
which can be added
to these brainstorms.
The brainstorms can
also include lists of
adjectives, which can
be associated. These
can then be
displayed around the
classroom for
students to refer to
when writing their
own information
narrative.
Focus Questions:
What characters
could be in an
information
narrative about
WW1/ANZACs?
How could we
describe these
characters?
Where could an
information

be 3 containers of icy
pole sticks and on
them will be an
element of a story
related to
ANZACs/WW1
character, setting
and complication
(see appendix 10;
Wing Jan, 2009,
p.244). Each
member will pick an
icy pole stick from
one of the
containers. They will
then work together
to create a plan for
an information
narrative (see
appendix 11).
Students need to use
their oral language
skills to discuss and
work together.
Students are to add
in the facts that they
have learnt so far
through the unit.
Teacher will conduct
roving conferences
with the students
and help those in
need. The teacher
may need to

students with an
opportunity to
develop their oral
language skills.

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Ability to
accurately
identify the
setting and
description
given in the text
Ability to
identify the
structure of the
text and what
happens in each
section
Ability to
suggest
appropriate
characters,
settings and
complications
for an
information
narrative about
WW1/ANZACs
Ability to work
with their group
to plan an
information
narrative that
matches their
icy pole sticks
Ability to add in
facts and
information
they have
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soldiers?
Can you give
examples
from the text?
What can we
learn about
the setting
from the
illustrations?
What
happened in
the
orientation?
What was the
complication
in this book?
And what was
the
resolution?
What facts
were in each
section?

Jessica

narrative about
WW1/ANZACs be
set?
What adjectives
could we use to
describe the
setting?
What could be a
possible
complication that
happens in an
information
narrative about
WW1/ANZACs?

particularly focus on
ESL students and
low-ability students.

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learnt
Ability to
confidently and
effectively
share their
information
narrative to the
class

Success Criteria:
I am doing well if I
can:
Actively
participate in
class and group
discussions
Identify the
setting and
description
given in the text
Identify the
structure of the
text and briefly
explain what
happened in the
orientation,
complication
and resolution
and the facts
included in
these
Suggest
appropriate
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characters,
settings and
complications
for an
information
narrative based
on
WW1/ANZACs
Work
cooperatively
with my group
to plan an
information
narrative which
matches our
icy pole sticks
Weave facts
and information
into our
information
narrative plan
Confidently
share our
information
narrative plan
to the class
9. Independen Students will write a narrative that is based on ANZACs/WW1. To begin the construction of their text they
t
will need to write down what they know about the topic, what they need to find out and any questions that
construction will help them with the research. Students will then need to make notes while researching ensuring to
of text (step group information under headings which they have had experience doing for other tasks throughout the
5)
year (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 259). Remind students that their writing will be assessed against a rubric and give
students a copy of this (see appendix 12). This means students know what they need to do to be successful
We are learning
and can use it as a checklist. Teacher will conduct roving conferences with the students and help those in
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to identify what
information we
already know
and what we still
need to find out
about WW1. As
well as learning
to use our note
taking skills to
find out any
additional
information we
require for our
information
narrative.

need, particularly assisting ESL and low ability students.

10. Independ
ent
construction
of text (step
5)

Students will finish off any research they need to do, however this should not take the majority of the
lesson because they need to have completed a plan at the end of the lesson. Students need to complete a
plan/story map using a template similar to the one used in lessons 3 and 4 (see appendix 13). They need
to match some of the facts they have found to each section of their plan/story map and determine which
facts can be incorporated into the character and setting descriptions (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 259). Teacher will
conduct roving conferences with the students and help those in need, particularly assisting ESL and low
ability students.

We are learning
to plan out our
information
narratives using
a template to
ensure that we
weave facts
throughout our
information
narrative.

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11. Independ Students will spend this lesson writing their draft (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 95 & 259). Encourage students to use
ent
thesauruses, dictionaries and the vocabulary on the Word Wall throughout their writing. Remind students
construction of the language features in a narrative and that there should be examples of these in their own work.
of text (step Students can begin editing their work if they finish early. Teacher will conduct roving conferences with the
5)
students and help those in need, particularly assisting ESL and low ability students.
We are learning
to use our plan
to write a draft,
which includes
all the language
features of a
narrative.
12. Independ
ent
construction
of text (step
5)
We are learning
to proof-read our
own work and
edit it to
improve our
writing. We are
also learning to
give advice to
our peers on
how they can
improve their
writing in a safe
and encouraging
environment.

During this lesson students have time to finish off writing their draft (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 95 & 259). It is also
the lesson when students will edit their own work. Remind students of the importance of punctuation and
encourage them to use thesauruses, dictionaries and words from the Word Wall. Read students Eats,
Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation to remind them about punctuation. Students
will also have the opportunity to participate in authors circles. Authors circles will be made up of 3-4
students (mixed ability) and students are able to share their unfinished narratives. They are able to ask
their group members for help with a particular aspect of their writing. This strategy demonstrates how
authors gain new perspectives of their drafts (Seely Flint et al., 2014, p. 155). Teacher will conduct roving
conferences with the students and help those in need, particularly assisting ESL and low ability students.
After this lesson students will give the teacher their draft and their teacher can edit this for grammar and
punctuation and make suggestions/changes.

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13. Independ
ent
construction
of text (step
5)
We are learning
to make the
appropriate
changes to our
writing and then
type our
narrative up so it
can be posted to
the class blog.
We are learning
to apply the
features which
make text easy
to read to our
own writing.
14. Reflectin
g on
language
choices
(step 6)

This lesson students will make the changes and do their final copy (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 95 & 259). Students
will type up their final copy so that it can be added to the class blog and made available to the school
community and their families to read. Remind students about considering formats and design aspects
(layout, colour, font, graphics, etc.) when publishing (Wing Jan, 2009, p. 95). Students need to produce a
final product which is neat, attractive, easy to read and considers the audiences needs (Wing Jan, 2009,
p. 95). Teacher will conduct roving conferences with the students and help those in need, particularly
assisting ESL and low ability students. Teacher will assess students information narrative against the rubric
(see appendix 12).

During students will share their information narratives to the class. They will sit up the front of the class in
the authors chair to read their narrative aloud. The class will be able to provide them with positive
feedback (Teacher Vision, 2015). After they have shared their narrative they will complete a selfassessment and set goals for their next information narrative (see appendix 14; Wing Jan, 2009, p. 89 90).

We are learning
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to share our own


writing and see
ourselves as
authors. As well
as assess our
work and set
goals for future
information
narrative writing

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Appendix 1 Who, What, Where, When and Why Chart


McCleskey, n.d.

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Appendix 2 Sub-heading Brainstorm


**Can be changed to suit groups sub-heading

Who

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Appendix 3 Well-known Narratives


Alexanders Outing
Allen, P. (1992). Alexanders Outing. Melbourne. Australia: Penguin Group.
Fearless
Davis, S. (2009). Fearless. Sydney, Australia: Harper Collins Childrens Books.
Grandads Teeth
Clement, R. (1997). Grandads Teeth. Sydney, Australia. Harper Collins Publishers.
Hairy Maclary from Donaldsons Dairy
Dodd, L. (2005). Hairy Maclary from Donaldsons Dairy. London. United Kingdom: Penguin Group.
Koala Lou
Fox, M. (1998). Koala Lou. Melbourne. Australia: Penguin Group.
Where the Wild Things Are
Sendak, M. (2000). Where the Wild Things Are. London. United Kingdom: Red Fox.
Who Sank the Boat?
Allen, P. (1982). Who Sank the Boat? Camberwell. Australia: Penguin Group.
** These books may seem simple for the students but the focus is on getting students to notice the structure that narratives
have. It also makes the activity accessible to EAL students and low ability students. By using picture books students can
quickly read them and gain this understanding of structure.

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Appendix 4 Differences between information and fictional narratives

Information narratives involve the inclusion of significant facts that are woven into a well-structured narrative. Other
narratives may not include significant factual information, but rather everyday, common-sense information, or indeed
information that is the product of the writers imagination.
The factual information is conveyed to the reader through the use of the characters, events, situations, setting or objects
included in the story.
The settings or descriptions may be real or written in such a way that they are believable.
(Wing Jan, 2008, p. 255-256)

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Appendix 5 Summary and Spot the Facts in the Plot

Title
Summary

Facts included

Orientation

Complication and
series of events

Resolution

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Appendix 6 Bertie taking the news badly (Picture Chat)

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Appendix 7 Sentences to add adjectives to


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** Examples of possible sentences which can be used in this activity


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The soldiers waited in the trenches for days.


The men and women travelled to Gallipoli on a boat.
The soldiers fought for days.
Soldiers ate their meals in a hall.
After war had finished the soldiers left.

Appendix 8 Barrier Game (example images)


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Appendix 9 Adding dialogue


Story 1: I was walking through the grocery store one day with my mom. She saw a cart coming straight toward me, but I
didnt see it. I ran right into the cart and landed in a heap on the floor. It was such a disaster.
Story 2: I was walking through the grocery store one day with my mom. All of a sudden she yelled out, Watch out for that
cart! I was starting to turn around to see what she was talking about but the cart was coming too quickly. I yelled out, Oh
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no! Stop! as the cart came crashing into me. As I landed on the heap on the floor I screamed, Ouch, watch out next time!
It was such a disaster.
(Wakabi, 2015, para. 2).

Appendix 10 Story starter icy pole sticks


**Examples of possible options
Character
Soldier

Setting
Home

Complication
Injured
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Mother of a soldier
Father of a soldier
Sibling of a soldier
Officer in charge
Nurse
News reporter
Child of a soldier
Wife of a soldier
Neighbour of a soldier

Boat
News room
War
Battlefront
Sign up office
Trenches
Hospital
Corner store
School

Death
Going to war
Cant contact family member/missing
War started
Homesick
Reunited

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Appendix 11 Story Starter Planning Template


Character:

Setting:

Complication:

Summary

Facts/Information

Orientation

Complication and
series of events

Resolution

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Appendix 12 Information Narrative Unit of Work Rubric


Adapted from Wing Jan, 2009, p. 263-264
Clearly
demonstra
ted

Partially
demonstra
ted

Not
evident

Comments

Uses information
narratives appropriately
Understands the purpose of
information narratives and
the difference between
information and fictional
narratives
Identifies and uses the basic
structure of a narrative
Distinguishes the facts from
the fiction in information
narratives
Writes well-structured
information narratives
Includes an orientation,
complication and resolution
Includes facts in the narrative
structure
Weaves factual information
around a character, setting or
an event
Writes a logically sequenced,
cohesive narrative
Uses appropriate
language features of
information narratives
Uses language appropriate to
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narratives
Writes clearly using correct
sentence structures
Uses descriptive writing to
establish characters, settings
and mood
Uses adjectives and related
phrases to add detail (what,
whom)
Uses adverbs and related
phrases to add detail (how,
when, where)
Uses appropriate grammatical
features
Writes interesting first
sentences and lead
paragraphs
Uses direct speech
appropriately
Uses appropriate
strategies to plan and
write information
narratives
Identifies information needs
Uses guiding questions or
headings to focus research
Uses a range of resources to
gain information
Identifies important key
words and information
Takes brief notes
Draws a story map/plan and
identifies where factual
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information can be inserted


Edits texts carefully
Demonstrates a positive
attitude towards writing
Settles to writing quickly and
with no/minimal assistance
Demonstrates an ability to
accurately assess and set
goals
Able to accurately assess
their own work providing both
positive and constructive
feedback
Able to set appropriate goals
for future information
narrative writing
Overall Comments:

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Appendix 13 Planning Template/Story Map

Summary

Facts included

Characters
Setting
Orientation

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Complication
and series of
events
Resolution
Other

Appendix 14 Self assessment


Adapted from Wing Jan, 2009, p. 89-90.
Writing self-assessment
Name:

Date:

Title of writing:

Text type:

What I think about my writing:

What I would like you to notice about my writing:

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What I would do differently next time:

What I know about this type of writing:

Goals for next time I write this text type:

44