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M

Child Study 1 with Executive Summary


Emma Young
November 24, 2014
EDUC 311
Family Diagram:
The Bronfenbrenner Bioecological Model gives us a big picture view of a child in
the context of their family, community, and wider influences. Each infant is influenced by the
world in a unique way from multiple environments. In order to better support each child it is
important to understand these influences.
Ms microsystem, the settings where she interacts directly, includes her home where she
interacts with her mother and father as their only child. Ms extended family is mostly distributed
in Florida and Connecticut. She does not have family members in the nearby areas. She lives
locally and has a short commute to her school, the infant classroom at the CDC. Her class is also
a component of her microsystem. At school M directly interacts with many individuals. Firstly,
she has two her primary caregivers at the CDC. In addition she interacts with the many student
workers, methods students, and nursing students that participate in the classroom. As M makes
new developments in her social skills she is eager to interact with the other infants in the
classroom. In addition, as she prepares to transition into the toddler classroom she often interacts
with the toddlers and their teachers. Outside of school and home, M also attends a weekly
movement and music class each week at a local university that her mother works at. At the class
she interacts with other children, families, and the instructor. The people that interact with M
directly are tremendously influential on her development.

The mesosystem involves interrelations among microsystems. Mesosytemss are abstract


ideas of relationships. For M her mesosystem involves the relationships between her parents and
her teachers both at the CDC and at her dance class. It is essential that M feels that these are
relationships of trust in order for her to feel safe and curious in new environments away from
home.
Children do not directly participate in the exosystem; however the settings of the
exosystem have an effect on the child. An example of this would be the parents work place. Her
father works at CNS and her mother works at a local university. M s mother just began a job at a
new university and is adapting to this change. Having a new place of employment has been a
stress for Ms mother. Stress within families can have significant influences on the child. In
addition her new job provides her with an opportunity to participate in a music and movement
class with her daughter. This is another way M is influenced by her familys workplace. M is
also influenced by the school board. The decisions they make on curriculum and center policies
directly affect this child.
The macrosystem encompasses culture, laws, and economic factors that influence a child.
M is immersed in the culture of New England, as she explores the leaves and fall foliage and
participates in community events such as the fall festival. The family does not consider
themselves to be religious but they do celebrate significant Christian holidays such as Christmas.
M.K. is also influenced by many laws and policies. For example she is influenced by policies
such as those surrounding napping at the CDC as well as laws for using an appropriate car seat.
It is invaluable to consider the many influences on a child in order to best support their
growth and development. Considering the many ways a child interacts and is influenced by the

world around them gives us a big picture of the child and the many influences on their
development. In addition it gives us a broad picture of the influences on the family; this allows
us to develop ideas on how to support the family as a whole. For example, talking with Ms
mother about transitioning into a new job offers her support at a time of stress that affects the
whole family. As we consider the influences on children we are better able to support the whole
child and their families.
Executive Summary:
Goal:
We are here today to discuss whether it is developmentally appropriate for M to transition
into the toddler room in the fall of 2015.
Overview:
Children in the toddler classroom are anywhere from 16-33 month. M demonstrates many
toddler qualities such as standing stable on her feet and curiosity to explore and investigate the
world. M demonstrates many other qualities across a range of domains that signify she will
thrive in the infant classroom. With appropriate developmental support and already established
relationships of trust just across the gate in the infant room I anticipate M will flourish in the
toddler classroom.
Ms Strengths:

Crawls ,walks forward, back ward, and trots to explore her environment
o M has been observed trotting and holding her arms close to her chest when
excited. Is this a concern?
Enjoys looking at and listening to books
Very clearly communicates wants, needs and desires non verbally
Is eager to engage in social interactions with caregivers and peers
Enjoys listening to and moving to music
Enjoys observing cause and effect
Is comforted and supported through narration

Physical

M is mobile- moving around to explore her environment and often visiting the toddler
side of the room to climb the stairs of their climber.
M stacks cups, holds markers and practices buckles to foster her fine motor development.

M is very interested in activities involving cause and effect. She often repetitively opens
and closes cabinets, gates, and doors.

Goals and Suggestions

Continue to develop Ms control of fine motor muscles particularly those used for writing
and feeding.
Continue to foster ms experimentation with different ways of moving her body
M needs plenty of space for free movement and exploration
Provide her with diverse environments to explore
Encourage her to participate in more activities with the toddlers throughout the spring,
such as joining them outside for walks and time on the playground, and participating in
other activities such as painting where she can foster her fine motor skills
Provide her with materials to practice fine motor coordination and control such as blocks
to stack- encourage exploration of these materials through demonstration.

Cognitive

M is curious about the world and is eager to explore it.


She understands an incredible amount, responding appropriately to familiar words,
places, people, and things.
As M stacks cups, plays at the water table, opens and shuts cabinets and doors, and bangs
containers on her tray we can observe her increasing interest in exploring objects in a
multitude of ways with her body and senses.
M also enjoys and frequently engages in symbolic activities such as peek a boo and
feeding a doll

Goals and Suggestions:

M does not typically engage in stacking blocks as most infants her age do. While this is
not yet a concern for any atypical development it is important to recognize this and
encourage Ms exploration blocks through demonstration and providing her with blocks
of various qualities to explore.
Consistent narration, explanation, and dialogue with M will support her development of
connecting words with objects, people, places, and activities. Through frequent exposure
to language it is our goal that M will continue to develop her understanding and use of it.
Provide M with materials and opportunities to engage in pretend play.
How can we encourage M to play with Blocks?

Social

She often plays side by side to others and initiates social exchanges.
M often offers a toy, or hides to engage caregivers in play.
As M develops she continues to understand her sense of self and asserts herself in social
situations.

Goals and suggestions:


Continue to foster and build relationships of trust and respect
We are supporting M in engaging in play and interaction with her peers such as initiating
rolling a ball back and forth
Narrate social experiences
It is a goal for M to regularly participate in activities such as singing as a group
Language

Very communicative non verbally


Needs support with babbling and experimenting with a variety of sounds
Enjoys listening to singing
Enjoys exploring books
Uses hand signs for eat, more and diaper appropriately

Goals and suggestions:

We want to encourage M to use more words particularly those associated with care giving
routines and daily objects and activities.
Use narration to provide words and understanding for experiences.
Use songs to familiarize M with language
What other suggestions do you have for fostering Ms language development?

Emotional

M typically has a positive mood except for when she is tired and needs support to self
regulate.
M experiences feelings of frustration when she is unsure of what she needs and wants and
cannot communicate this.
As M grows and gains increased control of her body she is developing a sense of
autonomy.
M is very communicative, particularly of her strong emotions like frustration. However,
when she enjoys something she laughs and smiles and is persistent in it.
M demonstrates pride in her physical development accomplishments such as climbing up
the stairs or plopping up and down.
Throughout the past three months M has increased her ability to communicate which has
been tremendously beneficial in her processing of her emotions.
M uses a pacifier to assist her in self regulation. In September she used the pacifier all the
time, however in November she is only using it when she goes down for a nap
o What are the families goals involving Ms use of a pacifier?
She clearly asserts herself when she desires attention, care, and comfort (photo 10). M is
expressive and is progressively developing her understanding and ability to regulate her
emotions.

Goals and suggestions:

Talk with Ms family about temperament traits they observe at home and compare them
to our observations at school
Continue to develop relationships of trust and respect and begin to foster relationships
with toddler teachers through the spring.
Narrate emotional experiences for M to provide her with the language to communicate
and process her feelings

Creative Expression

M gets significant enjoyment out of listening to music and singing songs.


o One of her favorites is the itsy bitsy spider and is very useful in making M smile.
M is drawn to music; it captures her attention
M often engages in pretend play such as feeding a doll.
M engages in a variety of sensory experiences

Goals and suggested Activities

Provide materials for pretend play- I hope to observe M developing more in this area.
Sing songs regularly with M especially during care giving routines or while she is feeling
frustrated
Provide M with a wide variety of sensory experience such as sand, water, and outdoor
exploration.

Health and Safety

M is very interested in participating in self help skills.


She enjoys being in control and having an influence on people and things.
She often communicates her needs to be fed, changed, or given rest through non verbal
communication such as making physical contact with caregivers or making sounds near
the fridge as referenced in health and safety documentation.
M is very clear in communicating even though she does not yet use more than a few
words.
M actively participates in care giving routines by walking over to the food court or
changing area independently or holding out her hands to be washed.

Goals and suggestions

We want to support Ms development of using verbal language to communicate care


giving needs
o Support this through narration, song, and books.
Family wants M taking only one nap by next fall

Is M ready to Transition?
Will the toddler room appropriately support her development?

The Toddler classroom includes a large motor area for running, climbing, dancing and
riding toys
The classroom also contains areas for manipulatives, books, dramatic play and creative
art materials
Sensory experiences such as water play are frequently offered
Toddlers participate in group time each day singing songs and reading stories.
Outdoor play and excursions are a regular part of the daily routine.
Strategies for Supporting M

Narration of experiences, feelings and environments


Singing songs
Going outside for fresh air
Having a nap
Having a bottle and moment to relax
M will be less resistant if she is given choices and opportunities to exercise her
autonomy.

Introduction
M was born a beautiful girl on June 6th, 2013 and is now nearly 18 months old. This is her
second year at the Keene State College Child Development Center (CDC) in the infant
classroom. With the support from caring relationships with her family and caregivers she is
growing, learning, and developing every day. At home, as the only child to her mother and father,
she receives love, nurture, and support. At school, she is highly respected by her caregivers. As
M begins to develop her language, she is frequently prompted to express herself, communicate,
and demonstrate her understanding of language. This has been very important to Ms
understanding and awareness of herself as she develops. Communication and respectful
relationships with children and families is fundamental to the philosophy at the CDC. Each
morning there is a dialogue between the childs mother and the classroom teachers about her care
giving needs. The classroom environment at the CDC is intentionally laid out to adapt to and
support each child as they develop. As M approaches her toddler years and explores her new
mobility, it has been invaluable for her to be able to explore the outdoors, gross motor room, and
toddler room in addition to the infant classroom. M is demonstrating her development each day
as she explores, discovers and participates in the rich sensory environments of our world
Narrative
Physical Development:
Overview:
The Early Learning Guidelines Task Force (NHELG) explains that physical development
considers how young children use their bodies to explore and participate in their worlds (2005).
Through movement and play, young children are able to gain increased control of their bodies as

they use them to understand the world. The NHELG categorizes physical development into three
interconnected strands; body awareness and control, large muscle development and coordination,
and small muscle development and coordination. Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer identify
that mobile infants up to eighteen months should be able to sit up, crawl, stand and walk, stoop,
trot, walk backwards, throw objects, and use marker on paper (2012). A major milestone
typically noticed at 17 months is being able to walk up steps (Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer
Eyer, 2012). When considering fine motor development, by 14 months we typically expect to see
children scribbling spontaneously (Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer, 2012). At eighteen
months typically developing infants are mobile and eager to explore their world.
Born on June 6th, 2013 M is nearly one and a half years. She is a truly mobile infant;
spending much of her time, moving around to explore often visiting the toddler side of the room.
When considering her physical development M is developing typically and has demonstrated
increased stability and coordination throughout the past three months. She enjoys her new
mobility by walking often curious to explore all areas of the classroom and school. As noted in
my documentation, many days M will walk herself into school. Often, she will walk herself over
to the toddler side of the room where she enjoys using the stairs on the climber. It is terrific she
has reached this milestone! Particularly when excited, M will bring her arms close to her chest
and trot around. While exploring the foam ramp set up in the classroom, M runs and walks up
and down several times falling into the pillows at the end of the ramp. M is very interested in
activities involving cause and effect. She often repetitively opens and closes cabinets, gates, and
doors. In addition she enjoys standing up and down. In the ball pit M laughs as she stands up and
then drops back down quickly multiple times (Photo 2). While completing the 14 month ASQ
with M in September, she engaged in stacking cups and blocks, as well as scribbling on paper
with a marker signifying her typical development in fine motor skills. As noted in my
documentation of language development, M often participates in reading books by turning the
pages. In addition she brings her hands to midline, clapping to music (creative expression
documentation). In photo 1, M practices with the buckle in the food court, working to connect
the two pieces and snap them together. This work takes significant control of her fingers as well
as demonstrates her problem solving development. As the months go by, M gets more and more
comfortable exploring the many ways her body can move. In early September M was falling
regularly, possibly from moving too fast as she was eager to be experimenting how her body
moved. By November M is showing much more control of her body. Each day she demonstrates
more and more control in the way she moves her body to explore and participate in the world.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations
As M continues to develop in her physical development it is essential to provide her with
plenty of space for free movement and exploration. We want to continue to support Ms curiosity
of the world by providing her with diverse environments to explore. As M, prepares to transition
to the toddler side of the classroom, we want to support her in venturing there. It is our goal that
she will be ready to transition to the toddler side in the fall of 2015. To support her readiness for

this we should encourage her to participate in more activities with the toddlers, such as joining
them outside for walks and time on the playground, and participating in other activities such as
painting where she can foster her fine motor skills. As M gains increasing control and develops
diverse ways of moving her body one activity we wan to support her development in is kicking
and throwing a ball. By bringing her to open spaces such as the gross motor room or outside, we
can support this. It is also important we continue to provide her with structures for climbing
where she can engage all of her large muscles. Some of these structures can be as simple as a
couch that she can climb on to while others may have more features such as climbing structures
designed for toddlers. We also want M to have opportunities to practice her fine motor skills. For
example, allowing her time to practice with buckling herself in or offering her paper and markers
for scribbling will be extremely beneficial in fostering this fine motor development. It is our goal
that before M transition to the toddler side of the room that she is comfortable with and regularly
enjoys scribbling and utilizing writing tools. Providing her with materials to do this in addition to
opportunities to explore new environments will allow M to freely develop at her individual pace.
Analysis of Assessment Strategies:
I used many strategies to document and assess Ms development in this domain,
including; a checklist for an overview, anecdotes, and photos. I also utilized the ASQ for
screening Ms development in this domain. The checklist was very useful in comparing Ms
abilities to what is typical for infants her age in this domain. The ASQ was also very useful for
this. Using photos and anecdotes however allowed me to document her abilities in this domain in
a way that made her development visible. It was challenging to keep daily note on Ms physical
development because she was moving so quickly and doing so much each day, however it
provided me with the most descriptive examples of her development.
Cognitive Development:
Overview:
Cognitive development is a broad domain in the sense that it refers to a childs growing
understanding of how the world works through their involvement with people and things
(NHELG). In this sense cognitive development is interrelated to a childs physical, language, and
social development, as well as all other domains. The New Hampshire Early Learning
Guidelines identifies that infants and toddlers demonstrate progress in this domain when they
recognize familiar places and things, use their body and senses to investigate, and observe and
respond to cause and effect. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention identifies important
cognitive developmental milestones for the end of the first year that include, finding hidden
objects, exploring objects in many ways, imitating gestures, using objects correctly, and making
connections between words and objects. Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer explain that
typically developing infants up to eighteen month often try to build with blocks (2012). Piaget
identifies in his Stages of Cognitive Development theory that from birth to age two infants are in

the sensorimotor stage. During this stage infants progress in their reflexes and symbolic
activities; they have the ability to separate themselves from objects (Gonzalez-Mena and
Widmeyer Eyer, 2012). From twelve to eighteen months, typical sensoimotor activities involve
experimentation with objects to create new events objects (Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer,
2012). The process of experimentation is observable throughout each domain.
M is curious about the world and is eager to explore it. Throughout the past three months
we have observed M developing typically in this domain. She understands an incredible amount,
responding appropriately to familiar words, places, people, and things. For example she always
responds to being asked if she would like to eat or needs a diaper with appropriate body
language. While outside in mid October, M comfortably explores outside. This again
demonstrates her recognition of familiar places and references the cultural influence of the New
England area she lives in. As M stacks cups, plays at the water table, opens and shuts cabinets
and doors, and bangs containers on her tray we can observe her increasing interesting exploring
objects in a multitude of ways with her body and senses. M also enjoys and frequently engages in
symbolic activities. In photo 11 she plays a game of peek-a-boo behind the curtain and in photo
11 she engages in pretend play, bottle feeding a baby doll. As M explores many different
environments we are able to observe her typical cognitive development. It is interesting to note
that M does not typically engage in stacking blocks as most infants her age do. While this is not
yet a concern for any atypical development it is important to recognize this. Cognitive
development is intertwined through each domain and should be fostered this way.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations
Fostering Ms cognitive development should be done in a variety of ways in sensory rich
environments. Working with her family it is important for us to provide her with opportunities to
experience a wide variety of settings. Consistent narration, explanation, and dialogue with M will
support her development of connecting words with objects, people, places, and activities.
Through frequent exposure to language it is our goal that M will continue to develop her
understanding and use of it. Another goal we have for M is to foster her engagement in symbolic
activities such as pretend play. Having objects like baby dolls, spoons, and bottles out for M to
explore will be beneficial. In addition we can talk with Ms family about the importance of her
active participation in routines and daily tasks. For example, M may enjoy watching and helping
her mother prepare dinner. Another goal I have for M is developing her interest in collecting,
organizing, and combining objects for play. Providing M with objects such as; colored blocks,
cups, balls and other toys of various size, color, and texture, will be tremendously supportive in
her development of this. Lastly, in an effort to encourage M to play with and stack blocks, I
recommend offering her various types of blocks and demonstrating stacking them. M often
responds through imitation; therefore this may be very supportive for her. Interaction is the
foundation to cognitive development; therefore increasing Ms opportunities to interact with
people, places and things will support her development.

Analysis of Assessment Strategies:


Cognitive development encompasses such a wide range of behaviors it is challenging to
document and assess. For M, my most effective strategy was reflecting each day on my general
observations of her behavior and engagement. As I consider each of the other domains I noticed
development of Ms cognition. Again I used a checklist to compare Ms behaviors to what was
typical for infants her age. All of the photos I took throughout the semester additionally
documented Ms development of cognition by capturing how she interacted with objects, people,
and places. Anecdotes were helpful as well, however the true assessment using anecdotes came
from my analysis of how the event demonstrated Ms understanding of how the world works.
The running record I took of M was most beneficial to me in this domain because I was able to
observe the wide range of ways she interacted with our world in just a short amount of time.
Social Development:
Overview:
Throughout infancy the forming of close bonds with responsive and affectionate
caregivers is a critical developmental achievement. As infants become mobile they typically play
side by side with peers interacting occasionally (McDevitt, 2013). In fact, as they continue to
develop many social interactions will occur in play. As infants establish relationships with others
they are simultaneously developing an awareness of themselves. Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer
Eyer explain that mobile infants up to 18 months are typically observed exploring objects with
another as a foundation for a relationship and finds pleasure in getting others to do things for
their enjoyment. They also identify showing considerable interest in peers, and indicating a
strong sense of self through assertiveness and direct actions with others as typical of mobile
infants ( 2012). Providing mobile infants with a consistently safe and nurturing environment
allows them to establish trust in others which lays the foundation for their ability to navigate
future social situations.
Ms mother who drops her off each morning engages in friendly interactions with
everyone at the CDC. Each morning when her and M arrive they enthusiastically enter school.
Ms mothers positive attitude and comfort at school supports these feelings for M as well. M
demonstrates she is developing typically socially at eighteen months. She often plays side by
side to others (photos 2,3, 5,6, and 9) and initiates social exchanges. M often offers a toy, or
hides to engage caregivers in play. As M develops she continues to understand her sense of self
and asserts herself in social situations. As observed on November 4, M takes initiative and shows
two children playing with coasters her idea. M has also been observed giving hugs, and sitting in
laps of familiar caregivers. She craves social interaction and is continuing to develop her ability
to engage in it.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations

Infants need to have strong relationships with caregivers in order to feel safe in their
environments and curious to explore. Caregivers can foster these relationships with children by
being attentive and caring. It will always be important to foster relationships of trust with M to
reinforce her sense of security in the world and keep her curious to explore. Each day M craves
more and more social interaction, it is my goal to support her in continuing to develop her ability
to engage in social interactions. Ms family takes her to a music class once a week where she has
the opportunity for new social encounters. Infants use their hands, bodies, and senses to explore,
it is only natural for them to feel urged to interact with people in the same way. It will be
beneficial for us to continue to allow M to explore other interested infants and caregivers through
touch, while ensuring they are gentle. Narrating experience for M can support her gentle
behavior during these interactions. It will be beneficial to support M in engaging in social
interactions such as rolling a ball back and forth, ensuring to narrate this activity. M enjoys
playing peek a boo with caregivers, supporting her to engage other infants in her games will be
an enjoyable way for M to foster her social experiences. As M engages in social interactions we
want to continue to support her understanding of herself. We can do this through continued
narration of what she is doing, talking with her about her family, and what makes her different
and the same from others. Narration and exploration are essential to promoting Ms concept of
herself and her place in the social world.
Analysis of Assessment Strategies:
I used photos and anecdotes to observe and document Ms social development. The anecdotes
were very beneficial in providing a detailed account of her interactions in a way that was
descriptive and informative. The photos were beneficial after they had been analyzed to
demonstrate the ways M engage in social interaction. The photos were very helpful in making
Ms progression in this domain observable.
Emotional Development:
Overview:
Feelings and emotions continually develop overtime. Emotional development involves
childrens awareness of not only others around them but awareness of themselves. This
awareness plays a significant role in a childs experiences and learning. As children develop we
want to support them in developing a sense of self and the ability to express feelings and
understand behaviors. Erikson explains in his theory of Psychological Development that during
infancy, the primary task is for infants to learn if they can trust other people (McDevitt, 2013).
Trust is built through relationships with primary caregivers. These relationships of trust foster
infants development of attachment through emotional connections. As infants enter their toddler
years Erikson identifies the Autonomy versus Shame and Doubt stage in his theory (McDevitt,
2013). As mobile infants gain control of their bodies they typically develop a sense of autonomy.
Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer explain that typically developing infants up to eighteen

month show pride and pleasure in new accomplishments, express negative feelings, show
pleasure in mastery of skills, and assert themselves (2012). During infancy a large part of
emotional development involves establishing self-calming and self regulation techniques. A
childs temperament and natural style of interacting with people, places, and things plays a
significant role in their emotional development particularly in their self-calming and regulating
techniques.
M typically has a positive mood except for when she is tired and needs support to self
regulate. M experiences feelings of frustration when she is unsure of what she needs and wants
and cannot communicate this. As M grows and gains increased control of her body she is
developing a sense of autonomy. She is independent in the sense that she wants to do many
things and wants to have choice and control over where she is and what she is doing. Resistance
is a sign of growth; it requires children to assert their individuality and independence (GonzalezMena and Widmeyer Eyer, 2012). This is often a source of frustration for her as noted in the
event on October 9th when she was conflicted about whether or not she wanted to sit in a chair in
a gated area to eat. M is very communicative, particularly of her strong emotions like frustration.
However, when she enjoys something she laughs and smiles and is persistent in it. For example
playing peek-a-boo is one of Ms favorite games, she smiles with pride and pleasure when others
engage in this game with her (photo 11). M also demonstrates pride in her physical development
accomplishments such as climbing up the stairs as documented under physical development. M
is persistent in communicating her wants and needs; this temperament trait plays an underlying
role in her emotional development. Throughout the past three months M has increased her ability
to communicate which has been tremendously beneficial in her processing of her emotions. In
addition M uses a pacifier to assist her in self regulation. In September she used the pacifier all
the time, however in November she is only using it when she goes down for a nap. She also
reaches her arms out for hugs and to be picked up when she feels she needs comforting. She
clearly asserts herself when she desires attention, care, and comfort (photo 10). M is expressive
and is progressively developing her understanding and ability to regulate her emotions.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations
Understanding Ms temperament traits has been fundamental in supporting her emotional
development as well as her development in other domains. It would be beneficial to talk with her
family about temperament traits they observe at home and compare them to our observations at
school. Continuing to develop relationships of trust and respect will support Ms development of
self regulating and self calming techniques. As M prepares to transition to the toddler classroom
will be beneficial for her to establish trusting relationships with caregivers from that side of the
classroom. Engaging in activities she enjoys and exploring the toddler side will support the
development of these relationships. Narration will also support Ms understanding of her
emotions and establish her sense of self. For example when she is crying in frustration, narrating
the experience and assuring her it is okay that she is feeling this way will promote her
understanding of her feelings. I want to continue to support Ms communication of her wants and

needs as well as encourage her willingness to assert herself. By giving M choice and allowing
her opportunities for independence such as walking herself to the changing table and asking her
to sit down in a chair if she wants to eat will allow her to practice her autonomy. Talking with
Ms families to provide opportunities similar to this at home will ensure that M is consistently
developing her sense of self.
Analysis of Assessment Strategies:
I used anecdotes primarily to document Ms temperament and emotional development.
Through close observation of her behaviors and engaging with her I was able to observe the
ways she expresses herself. The photographs I took allowed me to observe her growing
autonomy and sense of self. However, they were not very effective in capturing the wide range of
motions M expresses.
Creative Expression:
Overview:
The arts- music, dance, drama, visual arts- foster children ability to conceptualize and
solve problems, develop their imagination, and experience joy(NHELG). During infancy,
curiosity guides children to experiment with a variety of colors, textures, movement, sounds and
more. Curiosity is central to infants progressing in this domain. Infants and toddlers demonstrate
typical development in this domain when they respond to external stimulus and express
themselves with a variety of vocal, bodily, and facial expression (NHELG). Infants also
demonstrate development in this domain when they demonstrate an interest in listening,
vocalizing, singing, and moving, particularly in response to music (NHELG). Lastly, engaging
in pretend play is significant of the development of creative expression at this age (NHELG).
Creative expression fosters development in all other domains as it brings joy, imagination and
exploration into a learning environment.
M is developing outstandingly in this domain. Out of everything in the classroom, M gets
the most enjoyment out of listening to music and singing songs. One of her favorites is the itsy
bitsy spider and has a nearly one hundred percent success rate in making M smile. If M hears
singing or music she almost always stops what she is doing and focuses her attention on the
music. Often walking over to the source and asking for more. She often engages in pretend play
as shown in photo 12 when she feeds a baby doll a bottle. In addition, she explores a variety of
materials such as drums, shakers, and paint as shown in photo 13. M also engages in a variety of
sensory experiences such as the water table as shown in photos 3 and 6. In September M was
interested in listening, singing and moving to music and found it a joyous experience. Within the
past few weeks she has begun to develop an interest in exploring a wide variety of materials
regularly and has engaged in pretend play.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations

To support M and her development of creative expression it is crucial to continue to


provide her with opportunities for exploration and experimentation in a sensory rich
environment. M is very communicative and is close to meeting milestones in her language
development. Hearing repetition of words in familiar songs and tunes will foster her language
development. M enjoys listening to music very much and singing to her can be very beneficial in
helping her process experiences. For example I created a song to sing to her throughout our
feeding routine (Appendix 1). It is fantastic that M enjoys listening to music; however it is my
goal that she will soon start more actively participating in singing. One idea I have to foster this
is allowing M to participate in the toddlers snack time when they sing songs as a group. I feel
that having the opportunity to repetitively watch other children participate in singing will
encourage her to do the same. My hope is that singing will support her language development. I
hope to share the song with Ms family so she can consistently hear the song even at home. I also
want to work with Ms family to come up with other songs for times they feel M could be
supported in this way. I am also very interested in supporting Ms imagination develop. I want to
continue to set out materials for pretend playa round the classroom such as dolls, household
items, and pretend doctor supplies. I want to share these ideas with Ms family and communicate
the benefits of providing these materials for M.
Analysis of Assessment Strategies:
Observing Ms intense curiosity of the creative qualities of the toddler classroom made
her fascination with creative expression very evident. I used anecdotes to observe her
development in this domain, however it was the pictures that truly captured her recent interest
and curiosity in creative expression.
Health and Safety:
Overview:
Health and safety are significant during infancy because young children are completely
dependent on care givers for nutrition, hygiene, basic safety, and self-care. However as infants
develop in this domain they typically increase their ability to recognize bodily needs such as
hunger, thirst, and needing to be changed (NHELG). They begin to show interest in basic self
help skills such as eating, diapering, and dressing (NHELG). Lastly, typically developing infants
will recognize danger and seek help when afraid (NHELG). When considering nutrition and
feeding it is important to note that babies go through many stages as they learn to chew and
swallow solid foods and begin feeding themselves table foods (Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer
Eyer, 2012).
M is very interested in participating in self help skills. She enjoys being in control and
having an influence on people and things. She finds joy in doing things herself which represent
significant social and emotional development. She often communicates her needs to be fed,
changed, or given rest through non verbal communication such as making physical contact with

caregivers or making sounds near the fridge as referenced in health and safety documentation. M
is very clear in communicating even though she does not yet use more than a few words.
Additionally M actively participates in care giving routines by walking over to the food court or
changing area independently or holding out her hands to be washed.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations
Care giving routines are an opportunity to foster the development of familiar language for infants
and focus on the process rather than the final product. M is very communicative in many ways
other than verbal expression. I am hoping to support her development of verbal communication
through narration and songs during care giving routines, due to Ms enjoyment of music. I
created two songs for feeding and diapering to sing to M during these routines (Appendix A and
B). I want to share these songs with Ms family in an effort to provide M with repetitive
exposure to the language and familiarize her with the processes of these care giving routines. My
hope is that as she becomes to learn the language she will use it to communicate her care giving
needs rather than solely through non verbal communication. Ms family hopes to have M taking
only one nap by the end of the year. In an effort to respect the families goals for their child we
have started allowing longer periods of time in between naps for M. However, we still follow
Ms cues closely ensuring she has enough rest to be comfortable, and happy discovering. Over
all we want to continue to support Ms participation in and communication of self care skills.
Fostering relationships of trust will encourage her ability to communicate fear and ask for help.
Lastly, as M develops awareness of body and self It will be beneficial for her to be able to
identify parts of her body. I will foster this understanding through the Head Shoulders Knees and
Toes song as well other conversation and discussion with M.
Analysis of Assessment Strategies:
I used anecdotes primarily to document Ms development in health and safety. Using anecdotes
allowed me to note her non verbal communication, facial expression, and body language in
regards to her health and safety. It would have been beneficial to observe M more outside where
she had more space to explore and encountered unfamiliar experiences that may cause fear.
Within the classroom there were few instances when M felt unsafe.
Language
Overview:
Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer explain that mobile infant playfully experiment with
language and communicate with a purpose whether it be to engage in a social interaction or
communicate a need or desire. They also explain that during the period of 6-18 month infants
often speak their first words (2012). Mobile infants up to eighteen months are typically observed
babbling long sentences, looking at picture books, using words like I and me, shaking their
head yes or no, and saying two or three clear words (Gonzalez-Mena and Widmeyer Eyer, 2012).

The New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines suggest that infant and toddlers are typically
progressing in this domain when they engage in face to face interactions with others, respond to
verbal and nonverbal cues, repeat sounds, and begin to put sounds together to form words. In
addition NHELG explains that we can also observe typically developing infants and toddlers
showing interest in books, communicating their needs and ideas through verbal and non verbal
expression and identifying every day people, objects, and places. Lastly, the NHELG notes
infants and toddlers will begin to experiment and explore writing tools and scribbling.
M clearly communicates her wants, needs, and desires to familiar caregivers through non
verbal communication. Through her facial expressions and body language she is able to
communicate effectively. M utilizes hand signs for more, eat, and diaper regularly. She shows a
strong interest in exploring books as show in photos 8 and 9. M typically responds appropriately
to familiar questions like would you like to eat or sleep as noted in language development
documentation. M engages in face to face interactions with caregivers and increasingly other
infants in the room. M does not babble a significant amount. It is interesting to not that though
she loves hearing music, I rarely observe her singing or babbling.
Goals and Suggested Activities/ Recommendations
It is my goal for M to develop the language associated with care giving routines and body parts
in an effort to foster not only language development but self help skills and social development
as well. Providing M with the language to describe familiar objects, actions and people will be
tremendously beneficial to her as she is increasingly interested in engaging in social interactions.
I will use songs in the classroom and provide copies of songs for Ms family to support language
development due to Ms strong interest in music. My second goal for M is for her to begin
experimenting more often with different writing utensils. I want to share this goal with Ms
family so they can provide opportunities for this at home as well as provide M with materials for
this exploration at school.
Analysis of Assessment Strategies:
I used a combination of anecdotes and photograph to document this domain. The anecdotes were
very useful in my documentation of her verbal communication in the sense that I could document
the exact words being said and the associated event. Photographs were helpful for documenting
Ms interest in exploring books.

Conclusion
Since September I have observed M developing beyond spectacularly in each domain.
She is engaging with the world in a variety of ways; involving skills she has learned in each
domain. I primarily used photos and anecdotes to document her progression in each domain. M
crawls ,walks forward, back ward, and trots to explore new and familiar environments. She
enjoys looking at and listening to books, flipping through the pages and noticing the pictures. M
is very interested in manipulating objects for a desired effect. She very clearly communicates
wants, needs and desires without the use of verbal communication; however she is eager to
engage in social interactions with caregivers and peer. As we interact with M in a variety of ways
it is always important to expose her to language, repeating important words slowly and clearly;
each time familiarizing herself with them more. Music, singing and movement bring M a
tremendous amount of joy. Music and narration often comfort M and provide her with
understanding and tools to self regulate. Most importantly when considering goals for M I want
to continue to support her verbal language development through continued exposure and
encouragement. I am hoping that by the end of the year she is regularly using words to
participate in self help skills. It is important to continue to provide M with sensory rich
environment where she has the opportunity to interact with a variety of people, and things.

References
Early Learning Guidelines Task Force (2005). New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines.
Concord, NH: Child Development Bureau
Gonzalez-Mena, J. & Widmeyer Eyer, D. (2012). Infants, toddlers, and caregivers. (9th ed.) NY:
McGraw-Hill.
McDevitt, T. M., & Ormrod, J. E. (2013).Child development and education (5th ed.). Boston:
Pearson
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention.