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Table of Contents:

Unit Rationale
Stage 1: Desired Results

Stage 2: Assessment Evidence

Stage 3: Action Plan- Part I

Stage 3: Action Plan- Part II

Focus: WWII/Holocaust Background Information Scaffolding


Essential Question 1: Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?
Day 1 Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint
*Bonus Activity* Anne Frank/The Holocaust/WWII Pretest
Day 2 Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint
Day 3 A Walk Through Horror Article
Day 4 Holocaust KWL Worksheet; Holocaust Article
Day 5 Holocaust KWL Worksheet; Holocaust Article
Day 6 WWII/Holocaust Glossary Powerpoint
Day 7 WWII/Holocaust Glossary Powerpoint; WWII/Holocaust Timeline;
WWII/Holocaust Timeline Worksheet
Day 8 We Must Never Forget Film (1994); WWII/Holocaust Study Guide
Handout
Day 9 WWII/Holocaust Final Test A ; WWII/Holocaust Final Test B

Stage 3: Action Play- Part III *Bonus Days*


*Bonus Day 1* Perpetrator/Victim/Bystander/Rescuer
Handout; Roza Robota Article
*Bonus Day 2* Could Hitler Happen Again? Article
*Bonus Day 3* WWII/Holocaust Final Test Review Day

Focus: Diary of Anne Frank the Play


Essential Question 2: What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in
todays world?
Day 9 History of Anne Franks Diary Handout
*Bonus Activity* Anne Franks Diary Background
Information
Day 10 Life of Anne Frank Activity; Life of Anne Frank Activity Worksheet
Day 11 Diary of Anne Frank- Making of Play handout; Virtual tour of
Annes Annex
Day 12 Primary/secondary Sources Powerpoint Notetaker;
Primary/secondary sources powerpoint
Day 13 Act I: Scene i ; The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Information
Day 14 Act I: Scene ii ; Twenty Pounds Writing Exercise
Day 15 Act I: Scene iii ; Daily Routines Handout
Day 16 Act I: Scene iv ; Scared to Death Writing Exercise
Day 17 Act I: Scene v ; An Explanation of Hanukkah ; Hanukkah in
Auschwitz
Day 18 Anne Frank Act I Quiz A ;Anne Frank Act I Quiz B ; Act II: Scene i
Day 19 Act II: Scene ii ; Act I: Scene iii
Day 20 Act II: Scene iv ; Act I: Scene v ;
Day 21 Final Test A; Final Test B OR *Bonus Material* Act II Quiz A; Act
II Quiz B

The Diary of Anne Frank/Holocaust/WWII Unit


By Emily Evancho
Grade Level: 7
Time: 40 minutes
Timeline: 4 weeks

Unit Focus: World War II Background Knowledge/Scaffolding, Reading Comprehension Skills and Strategies, Elements of Drama, Effective
Writing Strategies (Argumentative/Compare and Contrast), Elements of Fiction/Nonfiction and Text structure

Unit Rationale
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World War II and the Holocaust and the Connection to the 21st Century Learning:
The effects of the tragedies of World War II and the Holocaust still send tremors through modern-day society everyday. Students undoubtedly have been exposed to these
events in the most mundane ways: through joking with their friends (Whats the difference between a pizza and a jew?), applying or receiving stereotypes (You have a
Jewish nose), and absorbing a constant barrage of modern-day propaganda that inflicts the memories of Hitler to invoke a response which students have seen most in the
recent 2016 Presidential Election. Beyond these mundane and everyday exposures, Students are also unknowingly taught about the repercussions of WWII and the
Holocaust everyday through the news and current events such as the on-going conflict between Palestine and Israel as well as the effects that this conflict has had on
America and American foreign relations in the Middle East. However, although students are exposed to these concepts daily, they do not truly understand the true
magnitude of their jokes or the consequences of comparing a politician to Hitler. They cannot truly understand the weight of these situations until they have been
educated and instructed in the topics of Holocaust and World War II. Because of this, it is vital for students to receive a proper and thorough exploration through these
tragic and horrific ordeals so they can become informed and conscientious citizens who understand the aftermath of these two events in our modern world.
In a Language Arts curriculum for seventh graders, however, teaching this time period can be overwhelming for most students if they are only exposed to the true
historical facts of the events. Even more so the facts and the events, without a personal connection to students lives, can desensitize students to these events. The Diary
of Anne Frank, written by Holocaust victim Anne Frank, age 13, is a valuable vehicle for students of this age to not only be exposed to literary text from this time period
in a primary source, but to also understand the events of the Holocaust and WWII and how they related to someone similar to themselves: Anne Frank, a thirteen year old
girl. For this Unit, the play version of the Diary has been chosen by Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich in order to expose students to the diary of Anne Frank as well as
the feelings and experience of this young girl, but also minimize the amount of reading required to understand Annes story as the play version is about 120 pages while
Annes actual diary is a long piece of literature for most seventh graders to maintain focus through. Students are also typically excited to perform in a play and break
away from the traditional novel reading. Lastly The Diary of Anne Frank by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett not only allows students the ability to learn about Anne
Frank and her familys ordeal through an interactive play, but it also gives students the opportunity to develop skills in reading dramatic literature, such as learning about
set design, stage direction, and setting. Furthermore the play version of Annes diary allows students to more easily learn about Annes life, her motivations, her
character, her desires, and her dreams. By learning about Anne in such an in depth way, students are able to form a connection with Anne and begin to find a connection
between themselves and Anne. Once students are able to reach this point of understanding, World War II and the Holocaust is no longer an abstract event that occurred in
history but a horrible life-altering occurrence that took the life of hundred of innocent children like Anne Frank.
Goals for this Unit:
The objective of this Unit is thus two fold. The first objective is to teach the historical background of World War II and the Holocaust as well as the modern day effects of
this conflict. As students begin to consider more deeply the effects of the Holocaust and the factors that led to Hitlers regime and World War II, they can begin to

conceptualize a response to this Units first essential question: Could an event like the Holocaust happen again? This essential question is important for students to
consider in order to more fully teach students to understand World War II and the Holocaust as not events of the past, but events that could easily occur again in todays
world. The second objective of this unit is to empathy and understanding through creating a personal connection to Anne and her life and extending this connection to a
deeper understanding of how the Holocaust affected the lives of millions of people, and children. In order to teach students the skill of empathy, students are asked to
consider through the instruction of Part II essential question 2: What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world? This question encourages students
to think beyond Annes experience in 1942 and extend this experience into their own lives. If they were Anne Frank, what would they do for eight hour a day to entertain
themselves? How would they cope with living in constant fear of death and slave labor? By asking students to consider these questions, Anne Frank, World War II, and
the Holocaust are no longer isolated events of history, but rather concrete thought experiments through which students begin to more fully consider the effect an event like
World War II and the Holocaust would have in their own lives.
In order to properly scaffold student understanding when reading the Diary of Anne Frank, several major pieces of background information need to be given to students.
Because of this need for scaffolding, the first part (Part I) of this Unit is devoted to grounding students in the necessary information they will need to understand the
events of World War II, the horror of the Holocaust, and how these two events are affecting Annes life in 1942. In this Part I, instruction begins with a background
information powerpoint focused upon teaching students the major points of understanding that they need to know about World War II, such as who the Allied and Axis
powers were, and how the war began and ended. After this students will begin to explore the Holocaust with first an introduction to the Holocaust Museum in D.C.
Washington and the event of the Holocaust. Students will then be exposed to the major vocabulary and dates that they will need to understand the world that Anne Frank
lived in during 1942. This piece of instruction is vital in teaching students the conflict of World War II and the tragedy of the Holocaust as well as the modern day effects
that these events still cause today. The instruction of this part of the Unit should lead students to begin to consider the first essential question: Could in event like the
Holocaust happen again? At the end of this instruction, students will be assessed with a WWII/Holocaust Final test. Because much of this part of instruction is focused
upon teaching facts, the performance task for this part of the unit is focused upon testing student retainment of this knowledge.
In Part II, students will begin reading the play of Anne Frank while enriching their reading with accompanying articles and pieces of literature. Students will begin to dive
deeper into Annes world and will have the opportunity to truly learn about her and understand her. This piece of instruction is valuable in the fact that it teaches students
to begin to think of Anne as person similar to themselves. Once students make this connection between themselves and Anne, the effect of World War II and the horror of
the Holocaust starts to become more concrete and relatable. In order to guide this connection, students will consider the essential question 2: What would it be like for a
teenager to be in hiding in todays world? For students, this question will help them to consider Annes situation and the persecution she faced in relationship to not only
Annes life as a teenager but also their own lives as thirteen year old young adults.
Standards for this Unit:
Students will address and understand six Pennsylvania State Standards throughout this Unit:
CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and content, choosing
flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.
CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading standards for
literature and literary nonfiction.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples; include
graphics and multimedia when useful
CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

Throughout this unit, because the literature relates to the 1940s, students will be confronted with many words and concepts that they have not been exposed to before
because they are from the 1940s. Because of this, students will address CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade-level reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools in almost every piece of literature read. Students will be taught
how to identify words they do not understand and access if they can understand the word using context clues. If not, students will be encouraged to refer to a dictionary,
or the internet to research the meaning of this word.
Because much of the literature used to teach Part I of instruction is nonfiction, informational text, students will address CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary
nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently when they read and understand multiple forms of informational text. Students
will be encouraged to not only read these pieces of informational text for understanding but to also read for evidence that will further their opinions, inferences, and
analyses of WWII, the Holocaust, and Anne Frank. Because of this, students will address CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading standards for literature and literary nonfiction by referring to nonfiction, informational texts to gain
evidence to support their claims and beliefs about this time period as well as their responses to both essential questions. Students will also address CC.1.4.7.C Develop
and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful by
using the evidence that they have pulled from their informational texts to support and defend their opinions and claims regarding WWII, the Holocaust, and Anne Frank.
While reading the play, students will be asked to address two standards. Student will address CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact
and how setting shapes the characters or plot by exploring the setting of the play and analyzing how this setting (Amsterdam, 1942) affects the action of the play as well
as the characters development through the play. Students will also be asked to address CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its
development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text by identifying the central theme of The Diary of Anne Frank the play by Albert
Hackett and Frances Goodrich at the beginning of the play and tracing this theme and its development throughout the course of the play.
Adaptations for this Unit:
Lastly, this unit seeks to be accessible for all students regardless of their educational background or academic ability. Because of this, many adaptations have been
provided for students who need extra support and scaffolding to understand. Guided notetakers are provided with every powerpoint presentation in order to help students
who struggle with attention to have an active goal at hand to complete while watching the presentation. These notetakers, although specifically made for special needs
students, can be extended to students may not need these documents for understanding. Students with special needs are also provided with opportunities to read the text
and answer any notetaker questions as a class rather than as an individual in order to promote optimal understand and decrease the chance of confusion. Students with
special needs have also been allotted more time to complete readings, worksheets, and tests. Adapted tests have been included to address the specific testing needs of
some students with Individual Education Plans, such as grouping questions in fives, providing a word bank, and providing answer starts to help guide thinking. For
students who need the extra support, one on one instruction can be provided, tests can be translated, and the copy size of a paper can be enlarged.
This unit has also attempted to take into consideration the varied styles of learning that a typical classroom presents. For visual learners, there are powerpoint
presentations with pictures to illustrate the concept at hand as well as pictures of the Holocaust museum, and Annes Frank Annex to help these learners better understand.
The play of Anne Frank will also be acted out for visual learners to better visual the act of the play. For tactile learners, students are provided with the chance to touch
and feel replica artifacts from this time period such as the star of david and identification cards. For audio learners, presentations and video clips will provide audio
stimulation. Informational texts read throughout the unit as well as the play of anne Frank will also be read outloud/performed for audio learners which will help these
learners to understand the texts. For kinesthetic learners, several activities will be provided that will require student movement such as a gallery walk through Anne
Franks life as well as presenting information from a informational text to the class. The play of Anne Frank will also be acted out to provide kinesthetic learners with the
opportunity to move through the actions of the play to better understand the progression of the play.

Stage 1: Desired Results


Back to Table of Contents
Common Core State CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and content,
Standards: choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.
CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples;
include graphics and multimedia when useful
CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Understandings:

Essential Questions:

Students will understand the events leading up to and contributing to World War II.
Students will understand the Holocaust as an act of genocide against the Jewish communities and the repercussions of this
event such as the creation of the modern-day state of Israel and the Palestine/Israeli conflict.
Students will understand elements of drama and how a playwright uses setting and character interactions to develop the plot of
the play as well as the development of the characters.
1. Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?
2. What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?

Students Will Know


CC.1.2.7.K how to identify words they do not understand and
access if they can use context clues to understand the word or if they need
access to a dictionary or further research to understand the term.
CC.1.2.7.L how to read and understand non-literary, informational
text by focusing on headlines, graphics, and topics sentences to understand.
CC.1.4.7.S how to pull information and evidence from
informational texts to help them formulate opinions and analyses about a
certain topic. Students will know how to use this evidence to support their
claims.
CC.1.4.7.C how to synthesize and apply information from
informational texts, glossaries, and class discussions to develop and analyze
the topic of WWII and the Holocaust.
CC.1.3.7.C how to identify the setting of the play and explain how

Students Will be Able to


CC.1.2.7.K identify words they do not understand, rely on context
clues and information given from the text to understand the word, and
define a unknown word using a dictionary if context clues cannot be used.
CC.1.2.7.L Read literary nonfiction and informational texts on their
grade level, independently, while reading for understanding by talking to
the text.
CC.1.4.7.S identify information in a piece of nonfiction,
informational text that is helpful to their understanding of a topic and use
this information to explain why they came to a certain conclusion about
WWII/the Holocaust.
CC.1.4.7.C use relevant details, facts, definitions, graphics, and
information to help themselves develop an understanding of World War II
and the Holocaust and the effects of this event.

this setting affects the characters and the plot of the play
CC.1.3.7.A how to identify a central theme of the play and trace
this themes development through the course of the play, while analyzing the
purpose of this theme in the play.

CC.1.3.7.C recognize the setting of a scene and understand the


importance of this dramatic element when crafting the plot of a play.
CC.1.3.7.A identify a central theme of The Diary of Anne Frank
the play and recognize this theme throughout the course of reading the play
in order to trace the progression of this theme throughout the play.

Stage 2: Assessment Evidence


Back to Table of Contents
Performance Tasks (summative assessments):
WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18:


Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

*Bonus Material* The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz:


The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz A (Red and
Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz B (Yellow
and Green)

Other Evidence (formative assessments):


Completion of notetakers for:
Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Notetaker
Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet
WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes
WWII/Holocaust Timeline Questions
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-v
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene i-ii

Anne Frank Final Exam after Day 21:


The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test A (Red and
Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test B (Yellow and
Green)

The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene iii-v

Completion of "Thanks Brain" Journal Questions with accurate


responses

Twenty Pounds Writing Exercise

Scared to Death Writing Exercise

Stage 3: Action Plan- Part I


Back to Table of Contents

Day 1
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and

Standards:

content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.


CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful

Essential Question(s):
Guiding Questions:
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)

Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1. What is the name of the state-sponsored, systematic murder and persecution of 5 million Jewish people and 5 million
others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?
2. What was the name of Hitlers political party?
3. The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
4. The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
5. What year did WWII begin?
6. What event caused WWII to begin?
7. What event brought the United States in WWII?

*BONUS ACTIVITY*Anne Frank/The Holocaust/WWII Pretest


Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint
Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Notetaker

(if wanted) Administer Diagnostic Pretest- Anne Frank/The Holocaust/WWII Pretest (20 mins)
Emphasize to students that:
pretest is graded for completion and effort, not accuracy
pretest will be used to tell teacher what the students know and what they need to learn
Distribute Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Notetaker
Begin Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint (40 mins)
Slide 1: What was the Holocaust?

1st click- Ask students to make inferences about the picture

explain: the boys are children in the Warsaw ghetto at the beginning of
the war; the star on their chests is the star of David.
explain: these two children were killed a 1.5 months later when the
Warsaw ghetto was liquidated
2nd click- Ask students: What was the Holocaust?
3rd click- Give students definition of the Holocaust from the United States Holocaust
memorial Museum
Notetaker: ask students to write this definition (word for word) as an answer to Question #1 What is the Holocaust?
break down definition: ask students what state-sponsored, systematic,
persecution and murder mean; explain what they mean
Slide 2: What was the Nazi Party? (10 mins)
1st click- ask students what they know about the Nazi party; emphasize picture
2nd click- Nazi party came to power in 1933;

Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #2 When did the Nazis come to power?

emphasize that the party was a political party that came to power six

years before the war began;


ask students to consider what was happening in Germany during those 6
years (building army, beginning Jewish persecution, creating ghettos); literally built a war machine
emphasize the Great Depression, economic sanctions placed on
Germany after WWI and the widespread poverty that Germany experienced at the time; made vulnerable
to Hitler
3rd click- Nazis believe two majors things: the first is that the Aryan race was superior
as well as the inferiority of the Jewish population.
the aryan race was blond hair, blue eyes, and pale skin. Nazis wanted to
create this race as the dominant race in the world.
define aryan; write word on board
4th click- Nazis believed that Jews in inferior
explain that Jewish populations in Germany were typically wealthy, and
in control of major businesses. Hitler made the Jewish population a scapegoat for the widespread
poverty in Germany at the time.
define scapegoat; write word on board
Slide 3: Locations of major players in WWII (10 mins)
1st click- Where was Germany?
Emphasize: locations of Spain, France, Britain, Poland and their
proximity to Germany
Emphasize: location of America and isolationist policies that kept us out
of the war
Emphasize: location of Japan and involvement in war
2nd click Emphasize that there were 9 million jews in Europe;
Emphasize that 6 million jews were killed in the Holocaust; that is 60
percent of the population
Emphasize the dehumanization of the term final solution
Slide 4: How did WWII begin? When did the U.S. become involved? (10 mins)
1st click- Ask students to look at picture and comment on what they see
2nd click- WWII began on Sept. 1 1939 when Germany invaded Poland
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #3 How did World War II begin?
3rd click- France and Britain declared war on Germany
4th click- Hitler wanted to expand Germanys land after they lost so much in WWI and
he knows this will require war
5th click- Pearl Harbor was bombed on December 7th 1941
6th click- US declared war on Japan immediately
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #4 What drew the United States into World War II?

7th click- Germany and Italy declared war on the US four days after this
Slide 5: Axis/Allied Powers; who were the Axis powers? (5 mins)
1st click- The war involved almost every major nation in the world (hence the world
war)
2nd click- the main players in the war were grouped into two groups: the axis and the
allied powers
3rd click- the main axis powers were Germany, Italy, and Japan
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #5 Name the Axis Powers
Slide 6: Where were the Axis powers? (5 mins)
1st click- emphasize locations of Germany, Italy, and Japan; discuss the involvement of
Austria, Hungary, Slovenia, Bulgaria, and Denmark in the Axis powers
2nd click- Finland found with Germany against the Soviet Union; Spain was sympathetic
to the movement but did not become involved militarily.
Collect notetakers at the end of instruction
Quick Review of Guiding Questions:
What is the name of the state-sponsored, systematic murder and persecution of 5 million Jewish people
and 5 million others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?
What was the name of Hitlers political party?
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
What year did WWII begin?
What event caused WWII to begin?
What event brought the United States in WWII?
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s) Day 1: Extended Thinking Question Holocaust WWII
Powerpoint Part A in journal
Adaptations:

Assessment:

Powerpoint Guided Notes/Notetaker provided


Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete notetaker responses
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the notetaker as a group rather than
individually.
Key words may be highlighted.
For classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) questions on the notetaker will be read orally.
For those who need it:
Notetaker font size can be enlarged.
one on one instruction can be provided.
some students may orally complete the Notetaker
For classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient), students may read and answer Notetaker questions independently rather
than as a group.

Guided notes checked for accurate completion


Quick Review at the end of class:
What is the name of the state-sponsored, systematic murder and persecution of 5 million Jewish people

and 5 million others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?


What was the name of Hitlers political party?
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
What year did WWII begin?
What event caused WWII to begin?
What event brought the United States in WWII?
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 1: Extended Thinking Question Holocaust WWII Powerpoint Part A

Extended Thinking:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 1: Extended Thinking Question Holocaust WWII Powerpoint Part A
The Nazi party came to power because they promised from alleviation from the wide-spread poverty
German citizens faced after World War I. Do you think a political party like the Nazis could take control in America if
the country was going through a similar depression?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 2
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and
Standards: content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)

Materials Needed:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Who were the axis powers?


Who were the allied powers?
What is the name of the major Allied victory which brings World War II to an end in Europe?
What is the date of this invasion?
What happened to Hitler at the end of the war?
What event ends WWII in the Pacific?
What year does WWII officially end?
What happens to Holocaust survivors after the war?

Day 2: "Thanks Brain" Holocaust WWII Powerpoint Part A


Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint

Action Plan:

Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Notetaker


Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 2: "Thanks Brain" Holocaust WWII
Powerpoint Part A on scrap paper:
What is the name of the state-sponsored, systematic murder and persecution of 5 million Jewish people
and 5 million others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?
What was the name of Hitlers political party?
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
What year did WWII begin?
What event caused WWII to begin?
What event brought the United States in WWII?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Notetaker
Continue Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint (40 mins)
Review briefly Slide 1-6: What was the Holocaust? (5 mins)
Slide 7:Who were the Allied powers? (5 mins)
1st click- ask students to comment on the picture. How do the people in the picture
look? Explain who the people are
2nd click- Soviet Union joined the allied powers when Germany invaded in 1941.
Joseph Stalin, Roosevelt, and Churchill were the leaders who made up the allied powers (Britain, United States,
Soviet Union)
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #6 How did the Soviet Union become involved in WWII?
Slide 8: World War II in the Pacific (5 mins)
1st click- Japan expanded into China in 1931 in order to gain access to more natural
resources
2nd click- US imposed economic sanctions on Japan to stop the aggression
3rd click- Japan allied with Germany to gain support for attacking US (as revenge for
sanctions)
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #7 Name the Allies
Slide 9: Locations of major theatres in WWII (5 mins)
1st click- Explain what a theatre in war is
Emphasize locations of Japan, Hawaii, the United States, and Europe
Emphasize the limits of Japanese expansion a year after Pearl Harbor
Explain the African continents involvement in WWII
2nd click- explain proximity of Hawaii to Japan; emphasize the this bombing of Pearl
Harbor prevented American involvement in Japanese military affairs for a short amount of time

Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #8 In your own words, why did Japan become involved in World War II?
Slide 10: World War II ends (10 mins)
1st click- D-Day- June 5th soldiers storm Normandy Beach, France
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #9 What is D-Day and when did it occur?

2nd click- Hitler commits suicide in a bunker on April 29th 1945; germans surrender on

May 7
Notetaker ask students to answer Question #10 What happened to Adolf Hitler, and how did the war in Europe end?

3rd click- US drops atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki;


4th click- WWII in Japan ends in September

Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #11 How did the war in the Pacific end?
5th click- 55 million deaths caused by WWII
Slide 11: Defeat of Germany (military movements) (10 mins)
1st click- emphasize attacks from Soviet Union, Britain attack across France, and
movement up through Italy (from Africa)
2nd click- Allied forces began liberated concentration camps; many people had been
forced to participate in death marches that led them to the interior of Germany
Slide 12: Aftermath of WWII (10 mins)
1st click- 1945- concentration camps liberated;
2nd click- Only then do the allied powers realize the extent of the Holocaust
3rd click- Holocaust survivors immigrated to United States and Israel; explain
connection to modern day conflict between Palestine and Israel
Notetaker: ask students to answer Question #12 What did survivors of the Holocaust do after the war?
Collect notetakers at the end of instruction
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 2: Extended Thinking Questions Holocaust/WWII
Powerpoint Part B in their journals.
Adaptations:

Powerpoint Guided Notes/Notetaker provided


Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete notetaker responses.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the notetaker as a group rather than
individually.
Key words may be highlighted.
For classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) questions on the notetaker will be read orally.
For those who need it:
Notetaker font size can be enlarged.
one on one instruction can be provided.

some students may orally complete the Notetaker


For classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient), students may read and answer Notetaker questions independently rather
than as a group.
Assessment:

Guided notes checked for accurate completion


"Thanks Brain" Question(s) for Day 2: "Thanks Brain" Holocaust WWII Powerpoint Part A
What is the name of the state-sponsored, systematic murder and persecution of 5 million Jewish people
and 5 million others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?
What was the name of Hitlers political party?
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
The Nazis believe in two things. Write those two things for Question 3 and Question 4.
What year did WWII begin?
What event caused WWII to begin?
What event brought the United States in WWII?
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 2: Extended Thinking Questions Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Part B

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 2: Extended Thinking Questions Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Part B:
As you may recall, Hitlers political party, the Nazis, came to power legally in Germany by procuring
votes and winning the support of the people, as an other political party would. What do you think would have happened
if the Nazis were not able to come to power in this way?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 3
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
Standards:
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):

Materials Needed:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1. What three sections is the Holocaust museum divided into?
2. What do you think is the mood of the Holocaust Museum? What text evidence can you point to to support your answer?

A Walk Through Horror Article


A Walk Through Horror Pictures

Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Action Plan:

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 3: "Thanks Brain" Holocaust/WWII
Powerpoint Part B on scrap paper:
Who were the axis powers?
Who were the allied powers?
What is the name of the major Allied victory which brings World War II to an end in Europe?
What is the date of this invasion?
What happened to Hitler at the end of the war?
What event ends WWII in the Pacific?
What year does WWII officially end?
What happens to Holocaust survivors after the war?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute A Walk Through Horror Article
Asks students to read each paragraph
Ask students read, present the corresponding picture to the class and explain; then pass the picture around the room
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 3: Extended Thinking Questions A Walk Through
Horror Article in their journals.

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read A Walk Through Horror Article.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will read all or part of the A Walk Through Horror Article as a group
rather than individually.
Key words may be highlighted.
For those who need it:
Notetaker font size can be enlarged.
one on one instruction can be provided.
some students may orally complete the Notetaker
For classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient), students may read independently rather than as a group.

Assessment:

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Day 3: "Thanks Brain" Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint Part B on scrap paper:


Who were the axis powers?
Who were the allied powers?
What is the name of the major Allied victory which brings World War II to an end in Europe?
What is the date of this invasion?
What happened to Hitler at the end of the war?
What event ends WWII in the Pacific?
What year does WWII officially end?
What happens to Holocaust survivors after the war?
Extended Thinking Question for Day 3: Extended Thinking Questions A Walk Through Horror Article
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 3: Extended Thinking Questions A Walk Through Horror Article
What is one exhibit that you would like to visit in the Holocaust Museum? Would you want to visit the
Holocaust Museum? Why or why not?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 4
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
Standards:
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)
Materials Needed:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1.
2.
3.
4.

What does the word Holocaust mean? Where does the word come from?
What is a genocide? What is another example of a genocide besides the Holocaust?
Why is the Holocaust different from other acts of genocide?
What is a ghetto? Why were Jews sent to ghettos?

Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet


Holocaust Background Information Article
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Action Plan:

Brian Coffee: Day 4: Quick Review with Think Pair Share:


WWII began in what year?
WWII ended in what year?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Students independently complete sections Know and Want to Know on Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet (5 mins)
On board- students share responses (25 mins)
Distribute Holocaust Article (Holocaust Background Information Article)
Students read Holocaust Background Information Article independently (red and blue) or as a class (yellow and green)
pages 5 until Hard Times in Germany section on page 8 (10 mins)
encourage students to talk to the text (write notes, underline/circle key facts, ask questions); credit will be
given
Collect Holocaust Article
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s)

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will:


have extended time to read the article and complete the worksheet.
complete all or part of the worksheet as a group by reading and answering questions orally.
be permitted to work with a partner during part of the worksheet.

will read the article out loud as a class.


highlight key words as a class
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) will read article silently and answer worksheet questions silently rather than
as a group.
For those who need it:
Font size of the article can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.
Assessment:

Teacher check for completion of L Section on KWL chart on Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet
Brian Coffee: Day 4: Quick Review with Think Pair Share:
WWII began in what year?
WWII ended in what year?
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 4: Extended Thinking Activity The Holocaust Article Part A

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 4: Extended Thinking Activity The Holocaust Article Part A
In your opinion, what is another event in American history that caused just as many deaths and horror as
the Holocaust did?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 5
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
Standards:
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)
Materials Needed:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1.
2.
3.
4.

Why was the Nazi party able to come to power in Germany?


What did the Nazi party tell the German populations concerning the superior race and the Jews?
What position did Hitler hold in the German government?
Why should we study the Holocaust?

Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet


Holocaust Background Information Article
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Action Plan:

Adaptations:

Assessment:

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 5: "Thanks Brain" The Holocaust
Article Part A on scrap paper:
What is the systematic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of 6 million Jewish people and 5 million
others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?
What is the complete destruction of a racial group or a specific group of people called?
What is the place called with Jewish communities were forced to live prior to deportation during the
Holocaust?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute Holocaust Article (Holocaust Background Information Article)
Students read Holocaust Background Information Article independently (red and blue) or as a class (yellow and green)
pages Hard Times in Germany section to end (15-20 mins)
encourage students to talk to the text (write notes, underline/circle key facts, ask questions); credit will be
given; model this for students by annotating and writing notes on your own copy.
Complete Vocabulary and Comprehension Questions on Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet; share answers as a class
(20 mins)
Red- complete vocabulary and questions independently; share responses as a class
Blue and Yellow- complete questions with partners; share responses as a class
Green- complete one assigned vocabulary word and one assigned question independently; share
responses as a class
Completion of L Section on KWL chart on Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet independently
Collect Holocaust Article
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s) Day 5: Extended Thinking Questions The Holocaust Article
Part B

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will:


have extended time to read the article and complete the worksheet.
complete all or part of the worksheet as a group by reading and answering questions orally.
be permitted to work with a partner during part of the worksheet.
will read the article out loud as a class.
highlight key words as a class
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) will read article silently and answer worksheet questions silently rather than
as a group.
For completing Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet Vocabulary and Comprehension Question sections:
Red will complete vocabulary and questions independently and then share responses as a class
Blue and Yellow will complete questions with partners and then share responses as a class
Green will complete one assigned vocabulary word and one assigned question independently and then
share responses as a class
For those who need it:
Font size of the article can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Teacher check for completion of L Section on KWL chart on Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet

Day 5: "Thanks Brain" The Holocaust Article Part A:


What is the systematic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of 6 million Jewish people and 5 million
others by the Nazis and their collaborators called?
What is the complete destruction of a racial group or a specific group of people called?
What is the place called with Jewish communities were forced to live prior to deportation during the
Holocaust?
Extended Thinking Question(s) Day 5: Extended Thinking Questions The Holocaust Article Part B

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) Day 5: Extended Thinking Questions The Holocaust Article Part B
Completion of Furthering Thoughts section on Holocaust KWL Chart Worksheet- Why do you care?
Talk about the ideas in the article that you can relate to and learn from.

Summary/Close:

Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 6
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and
Standards content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)

Materials Needed:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1. Who were the Axis and Allied powers?
2. What does anti-semitism and how does it relate to the Nazi party and the Holocaust?
3. What was the Aryan race?
4. What is a ghetto? How are they similar to the American internment camps that were used during the war for Japanese
Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor?

Action Plan:

WWII/Holocaust Glossary: Vocabulary in Pictures Powerpoint


WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 6: "Thanks Brain" The Holocaust
Article Part B on scrap paper:

Why was the Nazi party able to come to power in Germany?


What did the Nazi party tell the German populations concerning the Jews?
What position did Hitler hold in the German government?
Why should we study the Holocaust?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes
Explain to students that they must respond to each definition in complete sentences; completed notes will
be graded for completion and effort (complete sentences; thoughtful definitions)
Review WWII/Holocaust Glossary: Vocabulary in Pictures Powerpoint (40 mins)
Slide 1- Intro
Explain to students that there are many words used in the Holocaust unit that they may
never have heard of. This presentation is to show students in pictures the vocabulary they need to know to
understand the Holocaust.
explain to students that they will create their own definitions on WWII/Holocaust
Glossary- Student Notes and that they should use complete sentences in their definitions
Slide 2- Allied Powers
Explain to students who the Allied powers were (France, Britain, US, Soviet Union, and
Canada) and designate their corresponding leaders.
prompt students to recall when France and Britain entered the war, why
the Soviet Union entered the war, and why America entered the war
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Allies
Student response should be similar to: The allies were the nations who
fought against Germany. They were the United States, Britain/England, France, the Soviet Union, and
Canada.
Slide 3- Axis Powers
Explain to students who the Axis powers were (Germany, Italy, and Japan) and designate
their corresponding leaders
prompt students to recall why Japan joined this alliance with Germany
and Italy, and why Italy joined Hitlers forces
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Axis Powers
Student responses should be similar to: The axis powers were
Germany, Italy, and Japan; They fought against the Allied powers.
Slide 4- Anti-Semitism
Ask one student to read the words on the graphic outloud to the class
Ask students to explain in their own words what these words mean
Break down the word for students
note for students the word anti- ask students to recall what this
means; explain that anti means to be against or opposed to something
explain to students what the word semitism relates to; explain that the
word can be used as a synonym for the word jewish and that it is often used to describe Jewish people
because their original language Hebrew originates from a kind of language founded in the Middle East

called semitic language

put the words together- anti plue semitism means to mean anti-

jewish
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Anti-Semitism
Student responses should be similar to: Anti-Semitism
means.opposing the Jewish culture; ...being anti-jewish;... hating jews
Slide 5- Aryans
Ask students to comment on the pictures; ask students to make inferences about the
characters in each picture
explain to students
that these as propaganda photos used by the Nazi regime to encourage a
belief in the superiority of the Aryan race
that the Aryan race was typically seen as blond hair, blue eyes, pale skin,
and strong nordic build
that Nazism believe this race to be superior to all others
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Aryan
Student responses should be similar to: the Aryan race are people the
Nazis considered to be of pure racial background; caucasian gentiles; usually a person with blond hair,
blue eyes, pale skin, and strong nordic build.
Slide 6- Concentration Camps
Ask students to comment on the pictures; ask students to make inferences about the
characters in each picture
Explain to students
that the middle picture is the front gate to Auschwitz, the largest
concentration. The sign above the entrance reads Hard work will set you free
prompt students to consider the irony of this statement
that the picture on the bottom right is of a bunker in a concentration
note for the students the thinness of the men, the rough
hard wooden bunks, the lack of mattresses and pillows
that the picture in the upper left is of the bunkers that the prisoners lived
in
note the condition of the buildings; explain that many of
the bunkers were infested with rats and bugs, with no heat or air conditioning
Explain to students that a concentration camp was where Hitler sent all undesirables to
basically be disposed of. At this concentration camps, the prisoners were either executed in gas chambers,
medically experimented on, or worked to death.
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Concentration Camps
student responses should be similar to: prison camps that the Nazis
used to imprison and murder millions of Jews, Gypsies and others whom they found undesirable.

Slide 7- Fuhrer
Ask a student to read the quote on the picture out loud; ask for student responses to the
quote; ask students to pick out key phrases in the quote such as may not be scrutinized by a judge that give
clues as to what a fuhrer means
ask students to infer based off of this quote what a fuhrer is and how much power he
holds in government
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Fuhrer
student responses should be similar to: the title given to Adolf Hitler by
his followers which means supreme leader.
Slide 8- Gestapo
ask students if they have seen figures like the men in the photos in movies or tv shows
explain that the gestapo is the secret police force that searched for and imprisoned the
jewish people under Hitlers orders
note that Anne Frank and her family were discovered by the gestapo
police
Ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Gestapo
student responses should be similar to: The Nazi secret police that
hunted for, and imprisoned Jews.
Slide 9- Ghetto
ask students to comment on the pictures; what do they notice that looks unusual
emphasis the wall and the barbed wire in the photos
explain photos are of the Warsaw ghetto in Poland (where the two little boys in the
Holocaust/WWII Powerpoint were from)
explain to the students that a ghetto is very different from the ghetto we typically think
of today; in WWII a ghetto referred to a section of a town or city that housed Jewish populations during the Nazi
Regime and was segregated from the rest of the community by a large wall and barbed wire
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Ghetto
student responses should be similar to: A section of the city where Jews
were forced to live.
Slide 10- Internment Camps
ask students to comment on the pictures; ask students if there are similarities between
these photos and the photos of the concentration camps
prompt students to recall what event pulled America into WWII (Pearl Harbor)
explain that after Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed an executive order that placed
all Japanese Americans in neighborhoods called internment camps as they were now suspected of being
sympathetic to the Japanese bombings.
emphasize the picture on the bottom right (children pledging allegiance); ask students to
comment on this picture and what it shows about the Japanese Americans in these camps
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student

Notes for internment camps


student responses should be similar to: Internment camps were similar
to the Nazi ghettos; Japanese Americans were sent to these camps following Pearl Harbor because they
were seen as a threat due to their Asian heritage.
Collect WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 6: Extended Thinking Question WWII/Holocaust
Glossary Part A in their journals
Adaptations:

Assessment:

Powerpoint Guided Notes/Notetaker provided


Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete notetaker responses
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the notetaker as a group rather than
individually.
Key words may be highlighted.
For classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) questions on the notetaker will be read orally.
For those who need it:
Notetaker font size can be enlarged.
one on one instruction can be provided.
some students may orally complete the Notetaker
For classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient), students may read and answer Notetaker questions independently rather
than as a group.

Teacher-check for completion of definitions on WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes


Day 6: "Thanks Brain" The Holocaust Article Part B on scrap paper:
Why was the Nazi party able to come to power in Germany?
What did the Nazi party tell the German populations concerning the Jews?
What position did Hitler hold in the German government?
Why should we study the Holocaust?
Day 6: Extended Thinking Question WWII/Holocaust Glossary Part A

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended thinking Question(s) for Day 6: Extended Thinking Question WWII/Holocaust Glossary Part A:
When have you heard of any of the words from our glossary sheet before this class? Who said it? How
was the word used?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 7
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and

Standards

content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.


CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful

Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)

Materials Needed:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?


1. What was Kristallnacht? What is a pogrom?
2. What does it mean to be a Nazi?
3. What were the Nuremberg laws? How did the Nuremberg Laws affect the Jewish communities of Germany?
4. What is propaganda?
5. What symbol represented the Jews and what symbol represented the Nazis?
6. What does Hitler promise the German people when he first comes to power? What solution does he provide to the
countrys problems?
7. What event begins World War II? When?
8. What event ends the war in Europe?

WWII/Holocaust Glossary: Vocabulary in Pictures Powerpoint


WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes
WWII/Holocaust Glossary
WWII/Holocaust Timeline

WWII/Holocaust Timeline Worksheet

WWII/Holocaust Timeline Questions


Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Action Plan:

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 7: "Thanks Brain" WWII/Holocaust
Glossary Part A on scrap paper:
Who were the Axis and Allied powers?
What is anti-semitism and how does it relate to the Nazi party and the Holocaust?
What was the Aryan race?
What do fascists value?
What is a ghetto?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes
Explain to students that they must respond to each definition in complete sentences; completed notes will
be graded for completion and effort (complete sentences; thoughtful definitions)
Review WWII/Holocaust Glossary: Vocabulary in Pictures Powerpoint slides 1-10 (Allied powers, axis, aryan, antisemitism, concentration camps, fuhrer, gestapo, ghetto, and internment camps) (5 mins)
Finish WWII/Holocaust Glossary: Vocabulary in Pictures Powerpoint (30 mins)
Slide 11- Kristallnacht
ask students to comment on the pictures; emphasize the bottom left photo of a burning
synagogue; explain that this is the church or the holy place of worship for the Jewish religion; note the Star of
David on the synagogue
explain to students that Kristallnacht was a pogrom, or a government sponsored attack,

which targeted the jewish communities in German towns November 9-10, 1938; the attacks destroyed Jewish
stores, looted Jewish homes, and burned Jewish synagogues; the event is called Kristallnacht which means night
of broken glass because of the amount of damage the event caused
note the map; explain that the dots show every city in Germany where Kristallnacht took
place.
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Kristallnacht
student responses should be similar to: Kristallnacht occurred on
November 9-10, 1938 and it means the Night of Broken Glass; this was a state-sponsored pogrom which
encouraged the looting and destruction of synagogues, Jewish businesses, and homes.
Slide 12- (National German Socialist Workers Party) Nazis
ask students to comment on the pictures
emphasis the photo on the left; explain that these children are members of a group called
the Hitler Youth; try to avoid comparing the group to the boy scouts; rather explain that Hitler targeted children
with these groups by educating these young impressionable children to believe in his beliefs
explain that
nazi was the shortened term used to refer to a member of the National
Socialist German Workers Party
a nazi is not only someone who supported Hitlers beliefs; a true Nazi is
a member of the Nazi party as in they are registered in the party and carry a membership card;
emphasis that it is a common misconception that all of the German people were Nazis; in
reality, only a small portion of the country belongs to the party
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Nazi
student responses should be similar to: Nazi is an abbreviation for the
National Socialist German Workers Party that ruled Germany from 1933 to 1945.
Slide 13- Nuremberg Laws
ask students to read newspaper headlines outloud and comment on these headlines
emphasize to students that the US knew of these laws and did nothing until Pearl Harbor
because of our Neutrality policies
explain that the nuremberg laws removed a jew their right to citizenship, an education,
and their businesses
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Nuremberg Laws
student responses should be similar to: The laws which deprived
German Jews of their citizenship, their businesses, and their right to an education..
Slide 14- Propaganda
ask students to comment on the picture; what are the picture telling the viewer to do
how are the pictures representing the people in the pictures?
explain that these photos are examples of propaganda and that propaganda were
advertisements, commercials, pictures, or stories that were meant to encourage the read to believe a certain idea
by using exaggeration, lies, and mockery
ask students to explain what each picture is telling the reader and what parts of the

picture help the read come to that conclusion


ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for propaganda
student responses should be similar to: Propaganda is one-sided or
biased information intended to help or hurt a cause.
Slide 15- Ration books
ask students if they have ever seen these books
explain the picture on the left that the woman is buying food and needs a certain amount
of rations to buy the food
explain what a ration is
ask students why they think countries place rations on their people during wartime or
times of shortages
explain the ration system; that the books comprised of coupons that limited the amount
of food each family could buy
note that we will hear about ration books when begin reading Anne
Frank
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Ration books
student responses should be similar to: Coupons issued by the
government for food and other supplies. The amount per person was strictly limited.
Slide 16- Star of David
ask students to recall where they have seen the star before
explain that
the star is used as a symbol to represent the Jewish religion and was
used by the Nazi party to identify Jews
the two photos of yellow badge stars are the actual stars that the Jewish
people were forced to wear on their clothing
that the stars were reprinted in different languages depending on which
country they were used in
the star in the middle is for the Netherlands and Holland
and is the kind of star that Anne Frank wore
the star on the right was used in Germany
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Star of David
student responses should be similar to: The symbol used by the Nazi
party to identify Jewish people.
Slide 20- Swastika
explain to students that this is picture of the Nazi flag
explain that the swastika was the symbol chosen by Hitler to represent the Nazi party
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Swastika
student responses should be similar to: The symbol of the Nazi party.

Slide 22- Typhus

ask students if they can explain typhus


as students to comment on the pictures
explain that typhus is a disease that causes a headache, delirium, and a red rash; most of
the prisoners in concentrations were exposed to this disease and many died because of it, including Anne Frank
and her sister, Margot
explain that people infected with typhus were normally restricted to a typhus ward that
was unsanitary and many died in these wards
ask students to write their own definition on the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student
Notes for Typhus
student responses should be similar to: A deadly disease often
transmitted by body lice and marked by high fever, delirium, intense headache, and a dark red rash.
Distribute WWII/Holocaust Glossary; explain to students that they can use their notes and this handout as reference
throughout the play
Ask students to complete WWII/Holocaust Timeline Worksheet as a class (Classes Yellow and Green) and
individually (Classes Blue and Red);
Answers should be:
1933: Hitler comes to power; The Nazi party comes to power
1935: Nuremberg Laws are created; they limited the rights of Jews to own a business,
recieve an education, and have citizenship
1938: Kristallnacht; Jewish homes and business are burned throughout Germany
September 1st, 1939: Germany invades Poland; WWII begins
December 7th, 1941: Japan bombs Pearl Harbor; America enters WWII
June 6th, 1944: D-Day, first major allied victory; Allied forces begin to break Germanys
control in Europe
April 1945: Hitler commits suicide in his Berlin Bunker
May 1945: Germany surrenders; WWII in Europe ends
August 1945: America drops two atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Nagasaki and
Hiroshima
September 1945: Japan formally surrenders; WWII in the Pacific officially ends
Prompt students to answer "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)
Adaptations:

Powerpoint Guided Notes/Notetaker provided


Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete notetaker responses
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the notetaker as a group rather than
individually.
Key words may be highlighted.
For classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) questions on the notetaker will be read orally.
For those who need it:
Notetaker font size can be enlarged.
one on one instruction can be provided.
some students may orally complete the Notetaker

For classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient), students may read and answer Notetaker questions independently rather
than as a group.
Assessment:

Teacher-check for completion of the WWII/Holocaust Glossary- Student Notes


Day 7: "Thanks Brain" WWII/Holocaust Glossary Part A
Who were the Axis and Allied powers?
What is anti-semitism and how does it relate to the Nazi party and the Holocaust?
What was the Aryan race?
What do fascists value?
What is a ghetto?
Day 7: Extended Thinking Question WWII/Holocaust Glossary Part B

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 7: Extended Thinking Question WWII/Holocaust Glossary Part B:
When do you see propaganda in your own life? What message is the propaganda used to promote?
Homework:
Read WWII/Holocaust Timeline
Answer WWII/Holocaust Timeline Questions

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 8
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
Standards: examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
Essential Question(s):
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?

We Must Never Forget Film (1994)


We Must Never Forget Notetaker
WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 8: "Thanks Brain" WWII/Holocaust
Glossary Part B on scrap paper:
What was Kristallnacht? What is a pogrom?
What does it mean to be a Nazi?
What were the Nuremberg laws? How did the Nuremberg Laws affect the Jewish communities of
Germany?

What is propaganda?
What symbol represented the Jews and what symbol represented the Nazis?
What does Hitler promise the German people when he first comes to power? What solution does he
provide to the countrys problems?
What event begins World War II? When?
What event ends the war in Europe?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute We Must Never Forget Notetaker
Explain to students that this notetaker will be graded for completed; responses must be written in
complete sentences to receive full credit
Play We Must Never Forget Film (1994); Prompt students throughout film to answer We Must Never Forget Notetaker (30
mins)
Collect We Must Never Forget Notetaker
Distribute WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
Explain to students that they will receive 5 bonus points if they return the study guide completed and
with each answer completed in full sentences.
If there is time begin reviewing the study guide
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may complete the handout in teacher
assigned pairs
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) may complete the handout as a class
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 8: Extended Thinking Questions We Must Never
Forget
Adaptations:

Assessment:

A guided notetaker will be provided (We Must Never Forget Notetaker)


Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extra time to complete the We Must Never Forget Notetaker.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the worksheets as a group rather than
individually.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete WWII/Holocaust Study Guide
Handout.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
as a group rather than individually.
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may work with a partner to complete WWII/Holocaust Study Guide
Handout.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have the questions on the WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
orally.
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Completion of We Must Never Forget Notetaker


Day 8: "Thanks Brain" WWII/Holocaust Glossary Part B:
What was Kristallnacht? What is a pogrom?

What does it mean to be a Nazi?


What were the Nuremberg laws? How did the Nuremberg Laws affect the Jewish communities of

Germany?

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

What is propaganda?
What symbol represented the Jews and what symbol represented the Nazis?
What does Hitler promise the German people when he first comes to power? What solution does he
provide to the countrys problems?
What event begins World War II? When?
What event ends the war in Europe?
Day 8: Extended Thinking Questions We Must Never Forget

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 8: Extended Thinking Questions We Must Never Forget:
What are your feelings towards the Holocaust? Are you apathetic, sad, confused, etc? What has
influenced the way you are feeling?
What more do you want to study about the Holocaust/WWII?
Completion of WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout.

Summary/Close:

Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Stage 3: Action Plan- Part II


Back to Table of Contents

Day 9
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
Standards:
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
Essential Question(s):

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?

Guiding Question(s):

1. When did Anne Frank keep her diary from?

(Thanks Brain exercise


next day)

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


2. When did she receive her diary?
3. Why did Anne decide to rewrite her diary?
4. Who found Annes diary before the Nazis searched the Annex?

5. Why did Otto Frank decide to publish Annes diary?


6. What argument do Neo-Nazi supporters give against Annes diary?
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

WWII/Holocaust Final Test


WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)
Diary of Anne Frank Play Background Handout (as Homework or Bonus Activity)
History of Anne Franks Diary Handout
History of Anne Franks Diary Notetaker
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Show Day 9: "Thanks Brain" WWII/Holocaust Final Test


Administer WWII/Holocaust Final Test
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)
Distribute History of Anne Franks Diary Handout and the History of Anne Franks Diary Notetaker
For Red and Blue, assign students to groups of two and ask students to read History of Anne Franks
Diary Handout and complete the History of Anne Franks Diary Notetaker in their groups
For Yellow and Green, ask students to read each paragraph out loud
Prompt students to answer questions on History of Anne Franks Diary Notetaker
Prompt students Day 9: Extended Thinking Questions History of Anne Franks Diary

*Bonus Activity* Distribute Diary of Anne Frank Play Background Handout


For all classes: Divide students into four equal groups and assign each group one section (Germany and
the Rise of Hitler/Aryan Myth, Star of David/Facts about Judaism, The Play: Docu-Drama, and Hollands Efforts against
the Anti semitic Onslaught)
Explain that each group will read one section and identify the main point of the section and three key
pieces of information from the section that they will present to the rest of the class
Why students work in groups, circulate amongst groups and ask the questions below to encourage deeper
thought
Section Germany and the Rise of Hitler and Aryan Myth on Diary of Anne Frank
Play Background Handout
Ask students to read each bullet point out loud
Explain to students the connection between World War I and World War
II- that Germany lost the War in 1918 and had to pay major reparations to France, Britain, and the United
states, impoverishing the country.
Germany lost its military superiority and its pride, making the country
ripe for the need of a strong leader who can bring the country back to glory.
New Weimar government in Germany is weak- political parties that are
against this new government include The National Socialist Workers Party or the Nazis
Hitler came to power over the Nazis in 1933; he ruled the party under

extreme nationalism and extreme racism


Hitler and his followers blamed the Jewish people for Germanys defeat
in World War
Ask students to recall what the Aryan race is and what its physical
characteristics include
Section Star of David and Facts about Judaism
Ask students to read each paragraph out loud
Ask students to recall that the Nazis used the star of david as a symbol
for the Jews
Teach students to draw a Star of David
Section The Play: Docu-Drama
Ask students to read each paragraph out loud
Ask student to consider what a docu-Drama means and what it must
include
Section Hollands Efforts Against the Anti-Semitic Onslaught
Ask students to reach each paragraph out loud
Have students present their sections to the class
Adaptations:

Assessment:

All classes will be given a test that is adapted for their ability level:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete WWII/Holocaust Final Test B.
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may read History of Anne Franks Diary Handout and complete the History
of Anne Franks Diary Notetaker in teacher assigned groups.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will read History of Anne Franks Diary Handout and complete the
History of Anne Franks Diary Notetaker as a class
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Summary/Close:

WWII/Holocaust Final Test


WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 9: Extended Thinking Questions History of Anne Franks Diary
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 9: Extended Thinking Questions History of Anne Franks Diary:
Imagine your family was forced into hiding today. What concerns would be on your mind if your family
went into hiding?
Homework:
Read Diary of Anne Frank Play Background Handout
Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 9:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 10
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
Standards: standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1. What was Anne Franks life like before the war?
2. Why did her family decide to enter hiding?

Life of Anne Frank Activity photos


Life of Anne Frank Activity Worksheet
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 10: "Thanks Brain" History of Anne
Franks Diary on scrap paper:
When did Anne Frank keep her diary from?
When did she receive her diary?
Why did Anne decide to rewrite her diary?
Who found Annes diary before the Nazis searched the Annex?
Why did Otto Frank decide to publish Annes diary?
What argument do Neo-Nazi supporters give against Annes diary?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Life of Anne Frank Activity photos
Set up the seven stations around the room
Assign students to seven equal groups
Explain that there are seven stations in this activity; each group will go to each activity for 3-5 minutes
and write down the key details in the station on the Life of Anne Frank Activity Worksheet
Every 3-5 minutes ask students to move to the next station

At the end of the activity, ask students to share their thoughts


Prompt students to answer Day 10: Extended Thinking Questions Anne Franks Diary in their journals

Adaptations:

Assessment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete Life of Anne Frank Activity photos.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the worksheets as a group rather than
individually.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will be prompted when needed to write down the important information
for the activity.
Adjustments may be made in the amount of work assigned.
Key words may be highlighted.
Questions on worksheets may be read orally.
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Completion of Life of Anne Frank Handout


Day 10: "Thanks Brain" History of Anne Franks Diary:
When did Anne Frank keep her diary from?
When did she receive her diary?
Why did Anne decide to rewrite her diary?
Who found Annes diary before the Nazis searched the Annex?
Why did Otto Frank decide to publish Annes diary?
What argument do Neo-Nazi supporters give against Annes diary?
Day 10: Extended Thinking Questions Anne Franks Diary

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 10: Extended Thinking Questions Anne Franks Diary:
What similarities can you find between yourself and Anne?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 11
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
Standards: examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful

CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1. What would you need to consider when turning a diary into a play?
2. How does a director use stage directions to create the set design of a play?

Diary of Anne Frank- Making of Play handout


The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings
Annex Diagram
Virtual tour of Annes Annex
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 11: "Thanks Brain" History of Anne

Franks Diary on scrap paper:


What was Anne Franks life like before the war?
Why did her family decide to enter hiding?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute the Diary of Anne Frank- Making of Play handout
Break students into groups of 4
Tell students that they have been tasked with turning Anne Franks diary into a play
Consider what you would need to know to change a diary into a play
Using the first scene of the Diary of Anne Frank, design the scene for Anne Frank
Ask students to present their considerations and their set designs to the class
Distribute Annex Diagram
Ask students to make comments on what they see
Explain the key areas of the Annex
Stress the size of the annex and that eight people lived in this small space for two years; this leads to
arguments and fights as we will see in the play
Project the Virtual tour of Annes Annex
Prompt students to answer Day 11: Extended Thinking Questions Making of the Play in their journals
Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete Diary of Anne Frank- Making of
Play handout.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have teacher-assigned partners.
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) will be allowed to work individually or in groups.
Key words may be highlighted.
Questions on worksheets may be read orally.
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may act as peer tutors.


Assessment:

Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Completion of Diary of Anne Frank Making of a play worksheet


Day 11: "Thanks Brain" History of Anne Franks Diary:
What was Anne Franks life like before the war?
Why did her family decide to enter hiding?
Day 11: Extended Thinking Questions Making of the Play

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 11: Extended Thinking Questions Making of the Play:
Would you want your life to make into a play?
What considerations would you hope people would have before turning your diary into a play?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 12
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.8.5.6-8.B Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source
Standards: distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CC.8.5.6-8.I Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1.
2.
3.
4.

What is primary source? Give one example.


What is a secondary source? Give one example.
What is one reason why historians use primary sources?
What is one reason why historians use secondary sources?

Primary/secondary Sources Powerpoint Notetaker


Primary/secondary sources powerpoint
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 12: "Thanks Brain" Making of the Play
on scrap paper:
What would you need to consider when turning a diary into a play?
How does a director use stage directions to create the set design of a play?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute Primary/secondary Sources Powerpoint Notetaker

Primary/secondary sources powerpoint


Slide 1: Introduction
Explain to students that they should answer the questions on the notetaker as they are
provided in the powerpoint; notetakers will be given credit for completeness
Explain the objective to students: that they will be able to identify primary and
secondary sources
Slide 2: Primary Sources
Give students the definition of a primary source
Ask students to think of primary sources they have seen in their lives
Explain that there are typically three kinds of primary sources:
First-hand accounts of events
Data collected for scientific studies
Historical documents
Slide 3: Primary Sources (cont)
Explain that primary sources can be written after an event occurs; it just need to be
written by someone who was present at the event
Slide 4: Why use primary sources?
Ask students to wonder why historians would want to use primary sources
Explain that primary sources are used
to make connections between major events in history
to distinguish between fact and opinion
to see a point of view
Slide 5: Why use primary sources? (cont)
Explain that Primary sources help
historians to draw conclusions about history
historians recognize failures and success in the past
students understand their pasts by examining documents from people
who lived in the past
Slide 6: Primary Source examples
Ask students to think of primary sources in their lives
Ask students to write down three examples of primary sources on their notetakers
Slide 7: Primary Source examples (cont)
Review sources provided on slide
Slide 8: Secondary Sources
Give students the definition of secondary sources
Ask students to consider secondary sources that they have used in their own lives
Explain that there are two kinds of primary sources
Summaries of primary sources
Analyses or interpretations of primary sources
Slide 9: Why use secondary sources?
Explain to students that historians use primary sources
to gain expert opinions on events

to gain insight by evaluating an event from multiple perspectives


to form an opinion on an event
to gain information efficiently by reading the synthesized material of

multiple sources
Slide 10: Secondary Source examples
Ask students to record three different examples of secondary sources on their notetaker
Slide 11: Secondary source examples (cont)
Discuss the examples of secondary sources provided
Slide 12: Secondary source examples (cont)
Discuss the examples of secondary sources provided
Slide 13: Both Primary and Secondary Sources may have a slant or bias
Explain that in much of a writing, the author presents their own opinion through their
writing or presents a bias
In both primary and secondary sources you will find biases
Because of this it is important to review sources not only for credibility but also for the
opinion they seem to be presenting
Ask students to read the two paragraphs presented
Ask students to comment on the two paragraphs and what kind of bias or opinion they
are seeing
Slide 14: Reading Sources
Emphasize to students that not everything they read will be fact or accurate
Explain to students that they need to ask themselves these five questions even if the
answers seem obvious
Who wrote this?
What does it say?
When was it written?
Where was it written?
Why was written?
Ask students to consider why they may need to ask these questions
Slide 15: "Thanks Brain" Question(s):
Prompt students to answer Extended Thinking Question(s)
What is an example of primary source in your life?
What is an example of a secondary source in your life?
Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete the Primary/secondary Sources
Powerpoint Notetaker and Primary/secondary sources powerpoint.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the Primary/secondary Sources Powerpoint
Notetaker as a group rather than individually.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have the questions on Primary/secondary Sources Powerpoint
Notetaker read orally.
For those who need it:

Assessment:

Copy size can be enlarged.


One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Primary/Secondary Sources notetaker completed


Day 12: "Thanks Brain" Making of the Play:
What would you need to consider when turning a diary into a play?
How does a director use stage directions to create the set design of a play?
Day 12: Extended Thinking Questions Primary and Secondary Sources

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 12: Extended Thinking Questions Primary and Secondary Sources:
What is an example of primary source in your life?
What is an example of a secondary source in your life?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 13
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
Standards:
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain exercise
next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1. Why are stage directions important to a play and a reader who is reading a play?
2. What is the setting of the play?
3. What is a flashback? How do the playwrights use flashback in this play?

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p. 3-9


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Information
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 13: "Thanks Brain" Secondary and

Primary Sources on scrap paper:


What is primary source? Give one example.
What is a secondary source? Give one example.
What is one reason why historians use primary sources?
What is one reason why historians use secondary sources?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Distribute/Review The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Information
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i (p. 5-9 in book)
Assign students to the role of Miep, Otto, and Annes voice
P. 5-6 Read stage directions out loud
Ask students to consider the importance of stage directions
Why are they necessary for the director?
Why are they necessary for the reader to understand whats happening in the play?
Ask different students to draw different pieces of the the set of the play on the whiteboard
Explain to students that we are learning about the setting of the play- the setting is the time and place of
story
Read The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene i as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene i individually and correct answers as a group.
Prompt students to answer Day 13: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene i in their journals
Adaptations:

Assessment:

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i .
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene i on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker as a
group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene i on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker
individually and correct answers as a group.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Day 13: "Thanks Brain" Secondary and Primary Sources on scrap paper:
What is primary source? Give one example.
What is a secondary source? Give one example.
What is one reason why historians use primary sources?
What is one reason why historians use secondary sources?
Extended Thinking Questions for Day 13: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene i
Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 13: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene i:
From this beginning scene, how do you feel about this play? Are you curious? Are you nervous? Are you

excited?
Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 14
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:

CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.

Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1. What is the character Anne like? What evidence from the text can you point to to support your answer?
2. Who are the main characters in the play?
3. What are the rules that the Franks and the Van Daans must live under while in the Annex?

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p. 11-24


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene ii
Twenty Pounds Writing Exercise
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 14: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene i on
scrap paper:
Why are stage directions important to a play and a reader who is reading a play?
What is the setting of the play?
What is a flashback? How do the playwrights use flashback in this play?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene ii (p. 11-24 in book)
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, and Peter
Read stage directions out loud

Read scene ii
Distribute Twenty Pounds Writing Exercise
Read prompt to students
Explain to students that they need to answer this question fully and in complete sentences to receive
credit
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene ii as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene ii individually and correct answers as a group.
Prompt students to answer Day 14: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene ii in their journals
Adaptations:

Assessment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act I: scene ii and complete Twenty
Pounds Writing Exercise.
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene ii on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker as a
group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene ii on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene i-ii Notetaker
individually and correct answers as a group.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Day 14: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene i:


Why are stage directions important to a play and a reader who is reading a play?
What is the setting of the play?
What is a flashback? How do the playwrights use flashback in this play?
Day 14: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene ii
Twenty Point Writing Exercise

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 14: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene ii:
Twenty Pounds Writing Exercise

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 15
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:

CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.

Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1. Why do Anne and Mr. Dussell quarrell?
2. What does it say about Mr. Van Daan when he refused to take in Mr. Dussell?

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p. 25-52


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii
Daily Routines Handout
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 15: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene ii on
scrap paper:
What is the character Anne like? What evidence from the text can you point to to support your answer?
Who are the main characters in the play?
What are the rules that the Franks and the Van Daans must live under while in the Annex?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii, p. 25-52 in book
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, Peter, and Mr. Dussel
Daily Routines Handout
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iii as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iii individually and correct answers as a group.
Prompt students to answer Day 15: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene iii in their journals

Adaptations:

Assessment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act I: scene iii.
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iii on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker as
a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iii on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
individually
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Day 15: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene ii on scrap paper:


What is the character Anne like? What evidence from the text can you point to to support your answer?
Who are the main characters in the play?
What are the rules that the Franks and the Van Daans must live under while in the Annex?
Extended Thinking Questions for Day 15: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene iii

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 15: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene iii:
How do you think you would have done living in this Annex with eight other people?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 16
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)

CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?
1. What are the nightmares that Anne is having? Why do you think she is having these nightmares?
2. How do the other characters in the play, besides Annes family, feel about Anne?
3. What is the relationship between Mrs. Frank and Anne like?

Materials Needed:

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p. 53-59


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iv
Scared to Death Writing Exercise
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help

Action Plan:

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 16: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene iii on
scrap paper:
Why do Anne and Mr. Dussell quarrell?
What does it say about Mr. Van Daan when he refused to take in Mr. Dussell?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iv, p. 53-59
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, Peter, and Mr. Dussel
Distribute Scared to Death Writing Exercise
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iv as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iv individually and correct answers as a group.
Prompt students to answer Day 16: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene iv in their journals

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act I: scene iv and complete Scared to
Death Writing Exercise.
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iv on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker as
a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iv on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
individually
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Assessment:

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Day 16: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene iii on scrap paper:


Why do Anne and Mr. Dussell quarrell?
What does it say about Mr. Van Daan when he refused to take in Mr. Dussell?
Day 16: Extended Thinking Question Act I: Scene iv:
Scared to Death Writing Exercise
Extended Thinking Question(s) For Day 16: Extended Thinking Question Act I: Scene iv:
Scared to Death Writing Exercise

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 17
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:

CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful

Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1.
2.
3.
4.

What is Hanukkah?
How did the holiday of Hanukkah begin?
What is the importance of Hanukkah to the Jewish culture?
What is revealed to you about Annes character in this scene?

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p. 60-75


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene v
An Explanation of Hanukkah
Hanukkah in Auschwitz
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Study Guide
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 17: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene iv on
scrap paper:
What are the nightmares that Anne is having? Why do you think she is having these nightmares?
How do the other characters in the play, besides Annes family, feel about Anne?
What is the relationship between Mrs. Frank and Anne like?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
An Explanation of Hanukkah
Hanukkah in Auschwitz
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene v, p. 60-75
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, Peter, and Mr. Dussel

Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker


Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene v as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene v individually and correct answers as a group.
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Study Guide
Prompt students to answer Day 17: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene v in their journals
Adaptations:

Assessment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act I: scene v and complete An
Explanation of Hanukkah and Hanukkah in Auschwitz.
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene v on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker as a
group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene v on The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii-iv Notetaker
individually
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act I Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Day 17: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene iv on scrap paper:


What are the nightmares that Anne is having? Why do you think she is having these nightmares?
How do the other characters in the play, besides Annes family, feel about Anne?
What is the relationship between Mrs. Frank and Anne like?
Day 17: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene v

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 17: Extended Thinking Questions Act I: Scene v:
How would you feel if you were not able to celebrate a holiday that is meaningful to you?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18
Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)

Day 18
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:

CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.

Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)
Materials Needed:

What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?


1. Why are the characters in the play beginning to fight?
2. What are the relationships that are building in this scene?

The Diary of Anne Frank Act I Quiz on Day 18


Anne Frank Act I Quiz A (Red and Blue)
Anne Frank Act I Quiz B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p. 77-92
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene i
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Vocabulary Help

Action Plan:

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 18: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene v on
scrap paper:
What is Hanukkah?
How did the holiday of Hanukkah begin?
What is the importance of Hanukkah to the Jewish culture?
What is revealed to you about Annes character in this scene?
Act I Quiz
Classes Red and Blue: Anne Frank Act I Quiz A
Classes Yellow and Green: Anne Frank Act I Quiz B
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene i, p. 77-92
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, Peter, and Mr. Dussel
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene i as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene i individually and correct answers as a group.
Prompt students to answer Day 18: Extended Thinking Questions Act Ii: Scene i in their journals

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete Act I Quiz and read Act II: scene i.
Classes Yellow and Green will answer questions for Scene i on The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker as a
group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene i on The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
individually
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act II Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.

Assessment:

Some students may read silently rather than as a group.


Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Day 18: "Thanks Brain" Act I: Scene v on scrap paper:


What is Hanukkah?
How did the holiday of Hanukkah begin?
What is the importance of Hanukkah to the Jewish culture?
What is revealed to you about Annes character in this scene?
Day 18: Extended Thinking Questions Act Ii: Scene i

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 18: Extended Thinking Questions Act Ii: Scene i:
Do you think you would be able to live in an Annex with eight people without fighting?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


*Bonus Material* The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test after Day 21
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 19
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)
Materials Needed:

CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?
1.
2.
3.
4.

How do Anne and Peter both benefit from their friendship?


Why are Anne and Peters parents upset about their friendship?
How has Anne changed throughout the play until this point?
Why does Mr. Van Daan steal the food?

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene ii
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene iii-v Notetaker

The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Vocabulary Help


Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Action Plan:

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 19: "Thanks Brain" Act II: Scene i on
scrap paper:
Why are the characters in the play beginning to fight?
What are the relationships that are building in this scene?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene ii, p. ______
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, Peter, and Mr. Dussel
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene iii
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene ii as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene ii individually and correct answers as a group.
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene iii-v Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iii as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iii individually and correct answers as a group.
Prompt students to answer Day 19: Extended Thinking Questions Act II: Scene ii-iii in their journals

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act II: scene ii and Act II: scene iii.
Classes Yellow and Green will answer questions for Scene ii and iii on The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii
Notetaker as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene ii and iii on The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
individually.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act II Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Assessment:

Day 19: "Thanks Brain" Act II: Scene i on scrap paper:


Why are the characters in the play beginning to fight?
What are the relationships that are building in this scene?
Day 19: Extended Thinking Questions Act II: Scene ii-iii

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 19: Extended Thinking Questions Act II: Scene ii-iii
Why you think that this friendship with Peter is so important to her?
Do you sympathize with Mr. Van Daan in scene iii?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


*Bonus Material* The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test after Day 21
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 20
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
(Thanks Brain
exercise next day)
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?
1. Why are the characters nervous the beginning of scene iv?
2. How does the character of Mr. Frank behave through the play?
3. Why do you think the playwrights chose to end the play like this?

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p.


The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene iv
The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene v
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene iii-v Notetaker
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Study Guide
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Vocabulary Help
Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker

Bell Ringer: Ask students to complete the questions for "Thanks Brain" for Day 20: "Thanks Brain" Act II: Scene ii-iii
on scrap paper:
How do Anne and Peter both benefit from their friendship?
Why are Anne and Peters parents upset about their friendship?
How has Anne changed throughout the play until this point?
Why does Mr. Van Daan steal the food?
Record the accuracy of student responses on Thanks Brain Assessment Tracker
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act II: Scene iv, p. ______
Assign students to the roles of Mrs. Van Daan, Mr. Van Daan, Mr. Frank, Mrs. Frank, Mr. Kraler, Miep,
Anne, Peter, and Mr. Dussel
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene iii-v Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iii as a group.

Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iii individually and correct answers as a group.
Begin The Diary of Anne Frank Act I: Scene v
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene iii-v Notetaker
Classes Yellow and Blue will answer questions for Scene iii as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iii individually and correct answers as a group.
Distribute The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Study Guide
Prompt students to answer Day 20: Extended Thinking Questions Act II: Scene iv-v in their journals
Adaptations:

Assessment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act II: scene iv and Act II: scene v.
Classes Yellow and Green will answer questions for Scene iv and v on The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii
Notetaker as a group.
Classes Blue and Red will answer questions for Scene iv and v on The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Scene i-ii Notetaker
individually.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them (The Diary of
Anne Frank Act II Vocabulary Help).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Day 20: "Thanks Brain" Act II: Scene ii-iii on scrap paper:
How do Anne and Peter both benefit from their friendship?
Why are Anne and Peters parents upset about their friendship?
How has Anne changed throughout the play until this point?
Why does Mr. Van Daan steal the food?
Day 20: Extended Thinking Questions Act II: Scene iv-v

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s) for Day 20: Extended Thinking Questions Act II: Scene iv-v:
Why are the characters nervous the beginning of scene iv?
How does the character of Mr. Frank behave through the play?
Why do you think the playwrights chose to end the play like this?
Do you like the ending of this play? Why or why not?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative
Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


*Bonus Material* The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test after Day 21
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Day 21
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core
Standards:
Essential Question(s):
Guiding Question(s):
Materials Needed:

CC.1.3.7.C Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact and how setting shapes the characters or plot.
CC.1.3.7.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
What would it be like for a teenager to be in hiding in todays world?
1. None- Final Test

The Diary of Anne Frank and Related Readings, p.


*Bonus Material* The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test after Day 21
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Action Plan:

*Bonus Material* The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz


The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Act II Quiz B (Yellow and Green)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test after Day 21
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test A (Red and Blue)
The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read Act II: scene iv and Act II: scene v.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have key words highlighted or emphasized for them.
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Assessment:

The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s):


None- Final Test

Summary/Close:

Final Test

Formative
Assessment:

The Diary of Anne Frank Final Test

Part III: Bonus Days


Back to Table of Contents

Bonus Day 1*
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and
Standards: content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.
CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
Essential Question(s):
Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?
Materials Needed:

Action Plan:

Perpetrator/Victim/Bystander/Rescuer Handout
Roza Robota Article
Roza Robata Notetaker
For Classes Yellow and Green- Roza Robata Unknown Words Defined
Distribute Perpetrator/Victim/Bystander/Rescuer Handout
Ask students to explain what they know what the four categories of words: perpetrator, victim, bystander,
rescuer
Ensure that all students know what each word means (for example: students in may not have heard of the
word perpetrator)
Explain that many people from the Holocaust and WWII could fall into three categories: perpetrators,
victims, and bystanders
Define what a perpetrator, bystander, and victim is
Ask students to identify people in WWII who were
Perpetrators (Nazis, Hitler, Mussolini, Japanese soldiers)
Victims (Jews, Gypsies, disabled people, homosexuals)
Bystanders (this may be the most difficult category for students to
identify; encourage students to consider what a bystander means which they should understand as it was
a vocabulary word for Unit 9. Answers so be similar to anyone who watched and did nothing to help.)
Explain to students that there is a possible fourth category: a rescuer
Ask students to consider what a rescuer would like
Emphasize to students that being a rescuer does not mean there needs to
be grand displays of bravery or physical fighting; a rescuer could be anyone who tries to help in any way
Ask students to think of examples of rescuers whom they may have
heard of
Suggest rescuers to students such as Irena Sendler and

Oskar Schindler

Adaptations:

Assessment:

Explain to students that anyone could be a rescuer; ask students to read


the ways that bystanders and victims could become rescuers
Connect students to Roza Robata- explain that we are going to read a story about a brave
young woman who was a rescuer in the Holocaust and lost her life because of it
Distribute Roza Robota Article
For classes Blue (proficient), Yellow (basic), and Green (below basic) distribute Roza Robata Notetaker; explain
to students that they will receive a grade for completion of the notetaker
For class Red (advanced) ask students to read article independently; students must talk to the text (write
notes and underline key details) to receive full credit for the assignment
For class Blue (proficient), Yellow (basic), and Green (below basic), ask for students to read a paragraph
outline at a time; as you go through the text, encourage students to answer notetaker at prompted points
Collect Roza Robata Notetaker
Prompt students to answer "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)
Classes Blue (proficient), Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read and complete Roza
Robota Article and Roza Robata Notetaker.
Classes Blue (proficient), Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) all or part of the Roza Robota Article and Roza Robata
Notetaker as a group rather than individually. Questions on Roza Robata Notetaker will be read orally.
Class Red (advanced) will read article and complete notetaker silently rather than as a group.
For class Yellow (below basic) and Green (below basic) unknown words will be highlighted and students will be a
handout with words defined (Roza Robata Unknown Words Defined).
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.
Completion of Roza Robata Notetaker
"Thanks Brain" Question(s):
o What is the difference between a bystander, perpetrator, victim, and rescuer?

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s):


o If you were alive during WWII, what role do you think you would have played in the Holocaust? Why?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 13:
o WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
o WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Bonus Day 2*
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and

Standards:

content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.


CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.

Essential Question(s):

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?

Materials Needed:

Could Hitler Happen Again? Article


Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet

Action Plan:

Distribute Could Hitler Happen Again? Article and Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may read Could Hitler Happen Again? Article in teacherassigned partners and answered questions on the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet in these groups
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) may read Could Hitler Happen Again? Article as a
class and complete the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet as a class;
as you read the article with the class, prompt students to answer the questions as they are
answered in the article
Distribute WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
Explain to students that they will receive 5 bonus points if they return the study guide completed and
with each answer completed in full sentences.
If there is time begin reviewing the study guide
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may complete the handout in teacher
assigned pairs
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) may complete the handout as a class

Adaptations:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to read the Could Hitler Happen Again?
Article and complete the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article
Worksheet as a group rather than individually.
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may work with a partner to read the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article
and complete the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have the questions on the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article
Worksheet read orally.
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may act as peer tutors.

Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Assessment:

Completion of Holocaust Note taker


Why was Hitler able to seize and maintain power after WWI?
What three conditions, as explain in the Could Hitler Happen Again? Article, must be met for a
dictator like Hitler to take power again?

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s):


Complete Question 8 on Could Hitler Happen Again? Article Worksheet:
Do you think another Hitler could happen? Do you think an event like the

Holocaust could happen again in todays modern world? Explain your response.
What are your final concerns/ questions about the holocaust? What are you confused
about? What are you still wondering about?
Summary/Close:

Discussion of "Thanks Brain" Question(s) and Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 13:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)

Bonus Day 3*
Back to Table of Contents
Common Core CC.1.2.7.K Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade-level reading and
Standards: content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies and tools.
CC.1.2.7.L Read and comprehend literary nonfiction and informational text on grade level, reading independently and proficiently.
CC.1.4.7.C Develop and analyze the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and
examples; include graphics and multimedia when useful
CC.1.4.7.S Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research, applying grade-level reading
standards for literature and literary nonfiction.
Essential Question(s):

Could an event like the Holocaust happen again?

Materials Needed:

WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout


Whammy! WWII/Holocaust Final Test Review Game

Action Plan:

Distribute WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout


Explain to students that they will receive 5 bonus points if they return the study guide completed and
with each answer completed in full sentences.
If there is time begin reviewing the study guide
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may complete the handout in teacher

assigned pairs

Adaptations:

Assessment:

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) may complete the handout as a class

Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have extended time to complete WWII/Holocaust Study Guide
Handout.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will complete all or part of the WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
as a group rather than individually.
Classes Red (advanced) and Blue (proficient) may work with a partner to complete WWII/Holocaust Study Guide
Handout.
Classes Yellow (basic) and Green (below basic) will have the questions on the WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout
orally.
For those who need it:
Copy size can be enlarged.
One on one instruction may be provided.
Some students may read silently rather than as a group.
Some students may act as peer tutors.
Some students may orally complete the activities requiring writing.

Completion of WWII/Holocaust Study Guide Handout


Completion Whammy! WWII/Holocaust Final Test Review Game

Extended Thinking
Activity/Assignment:

Extended Thinking Question(s):


What are your final concerns/ questions about the holocaust? What are you confused about? What are
you still wondering about?

Summary/Close:

Discussion of Extended Thinking Question(s)

Formative Assessment:

"Thanks Brain" Question(s) answered accurately.


WWII/Holocaust Final Test on Day 10:
WWII/Holocaust Final Test A (Red and Blue)
WWII/Holocaust Final Test B (Yellow and Green)