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Comparative Study Introduction: My comparative study focuses on the technical aspects between four very different artists,
 

Comparative Study

Comparative Study

Introduction: My comparative study focuses on the technical aspects between four very different artists, all from different time periods, art movements, and thematic focuses. Three of the artists included in this Comparative Study - Frank Auerbach, Gustave Courbet, and Alexander Calder - have been used as inspirations for my own art work. The other artist, Timothy Meyerring, was included as one of my gallery visits. Alongside the technical aspects, I will also be comparing and contrasting how each artist expresses emotion through their subject matter as well as the application of their mediums.

One of the first things that I noticed about this piece was how rough it appeared
One of the first things that I noticed about this piece was how rough it appeared in texture. The
lines were sharp and jagged, and seemingly placed at random, yet still able to create a recognizable
form of a face. Considering this, it is also quite easy to identify the facial features of the face like
the eyes, nose, lips, and shape of the hair. In comparison
to an actual image of Frank Auerbach, the simplistic lines of the
portrait do in fact show an accurate interpretation of what Auerbach
actually looks like.
The contrast between the harsh graphite and the white paper
provides some sort of dimension to the otherwise flat drawing. The
heavy and dark lines coupled with the slightly “smudgy” lighter lines
gives the features, such as the nose, the roundness that would be seen
were you looking at someone from that specific angle.
Additionally, the contrast adds a significant amount to the
interpretation of the meaning of the piece. Commonly, artworks
done in a multitude of colours are more likely to be considered as
more expressive compared to artwork done in a monochromatic
style. However, that isn’t always the case, and a good example of that
is with Auerbach’s self -portrait. The congregation of the lines
Frank Auerbach
by Stuart Walker
bromide print, 29 November
2007
14 3/8 in. x 14 5/8 in. (365 mm
x 370 mm) image size
Frank Auerbach
by Frank Auerbach
pencil and graphite, 1994-2001
30 ⅛ in. x 22 ¾ in (764 mm x 577 mm)
almost provides a shadow-like appearance, which could allude to a multitude of thematic elements.
Considering the fact that the work is also a self-portrait also suggests that these darker themes are
centered around the artist.

Formal response to Frank Auerbach’s Self Portrait

Cultural Context of Frank Auerbach’s Self Portrait

As stated by the National Portrait Gallery, Auerbach “[acknowledges] the difficulty of 'chasing one's own shadow'[.]
As stated by the National Portrait Gallery, Auerbach “[acknowledges] the difficulty of
'chasing one's own shadow'[.] self-portraits are a rare aspect of Auerbach's work and
this drawing is only one of five in existence.”
My interpretation of the phrase “chasing one’s own shadow” is the feeling of an endless
chase because it is physically impossible to catch your shadow. In terms of emotions
and feelings, this could imply hopelessness due to the fact that one has a goal that they
will never reach. With Auerbach acknowledging the difficulty of virtually getting
nowhere, could possibly be from personal experience or witnessed experiences of
others.

Taking into consideration the events that transpired during Auerbach’s childhood, it's no surprise that some of Auerbach’s work takes on some darker themes. In 1939, Auerbach was sent to England in order to escape the Nazi regime. His parents, who had stayed behind in their home of Berlin, died in concentration camps, resulting in Auerbach spending his childhood in a progressive boarding school. These extremely dark times that Auerbach experienced have no doubt influenced many of his works.

Cultural Context of Frank Auerbach’s Self Portrait As stated by the National Portrait Gallery, Auerbach “[acknowledges]

For example, Auerbach’s Primrose Hill, is a painting of the titled park in London, England. After creating over 50 different sketches of the park in various seasons and times of day, the final painting’s changing appearance was influenced by the development of the painting. The technical application of the work with the broad strokes and dulled colours suggests that there is a darker theme to the work.

Primrose Hill

by Frank Auerbach oil paint on board, 1967-1968 Support: 1219 x 1467 mm frame: 1345 x 1595 x 80 mm

Formal Response to Gustave Courbet’s “The Desperate Man”

The most defining feature of this piece is the eyes. There is a lot of emphasis
The most defining feature of this piece is the eyes. There is a lot of emphasis
placed on the eyes and facial features in general due to the angle of the light
source. Because of the contrast between the darker shadowed skin and the
brighter whites of the eyes, the first thing the focus is drawn to are the eyes.
Furthermore, the placement of the face as the centerpoint of the piece in
relation to the space leads to the attention becoming focused on the facial
expression. This is otherwise known as a focal point.
Formal Response to Gustave Courbet’s “ The Desperate Man” The most defining feature of this piecehttp://i.dailymail.co. 176FBDF1000005DC-311_634x477. jpg The Desperate Man is a highly emotional work. Besides the very exaggerated and startled appearance of the eyes, the motion of tugging on the hair also elicits an emotional response. Pulling hair is a common human response to frustration or the feeling of being overwhelmed. Considering that the painting is a self-portrait, these emotions could be directly related to how the artist is feeling. On a technical standpoint of appearance of the painting, true to the Realism art movement, the painting appears smooth and rounded with no uk/i/pix/2013/03/10/article-0- extreme use of sharp lines . The Desperate Man is also an accurate representation of what Gustave Courbet actually looks like. The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet oil paint on canvas, 1844-1845 45cm x 55cm " id="pdf-obj-3-8" src="pdf-obj-3-8.jpg">

The Desperate Man is a highly emotional work. Besides the very exaggerated and startled appearance of the eyes, the motion of tugging on the hair also elicits an emotional response. Pulling hair is a common human response to frustration or the feeling of being overwhelmed. Considering that the painting is a self-portrait, these emotions could be directly related to how the artist is feeling.

On a technical standpoint of appearance of the painting, true to the Realism art movement, the

painting appears smooth and rounded with no

  • uk/i/pix/2013/03/10/article-0- extreme use of sharp lines. The Desperate Man is also an accurate representation of what Gustave Courbet actually looks like.

Formal Response to Gustave Courbet’s “ The Desperate Man” The most defining feature of this piecehttp://i.dailymail.co. 176FBDF1000005DC-311_634x477. jpg The Desperate Man is a highly emotional work. Besides the very exaggerated and startled appearance of the eyes, the motion of tugging on the hair also elicits an emotional response. Pulling hair is a common human response to frustration or the feeling of being overwhelmed. Considering that the painting is a self-portrait, these emotions could be directly related to how the artist is feeling. On a technical standpoint of appearance of the painting, true to the Realism art movement, the painting appears smooth and rounded with no uk/i/pix/2013/03/10/article-0- extreme use of sharp lines . The Desperate Man is also an accurate representation of what Gustave Courbet actually looks like. The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet oil paint on canvas, 1844-1845 45cm x 55cm " id="pdf-obj-3-37" src="pdf-obj-3-37.jpg">

The Desperate Man

by Gustave Courbet oil paint on canvas, 1844-1845 45cm x 55cm

“I am fifty years old and I have always lived in freedom; let me end my
“I am fifty years old and I have always lived in freedom; let me end my life free; when I
am dead let this be said of me: 'He belonged to no school, to no church, to no
institution, to no academy, least of all to any régime except the régime of liberty.”
As a central leader to the Realist movement, Gustave Courbet focused strictly on painting only what he
could observe. At the time, in 19th century France, this went against every established academic
convention about panting and denied the use of Romanticism of the previous generation of artists. It
became quite clear that Courbet was an artist willing to make bold social statements through his work.
Self portraits were not uncommon in Courbet’s early career, most notably his Man With A Pipe. With
such a strong belief that artists should paint the life of which surrounds them, Courbet’s self portraits
were a perfect example of that belief.
Man With a Pipe
by Gustave Courbet
oil paint on canvas, 1848-1849
45 cm x 37 cm
This belief is what ultimately led to the development of the Realism art movement. Courbet painted
ordinary figurative compositions, still lifes, landscapes and seascapes, but began to insert social
controversy by painting subjects that were considered vulgar.
For Courbet, Realism was not about perfection with things such as line and form, but about depicting the harshness in life through rough
brushstrokes and the questioning of the irregularities in nature. This is precisely what made Realism appear “real”; nothing was sugar coated
and everything was just human.

Cultural Context of Gustave Courbet’s “The Desperate Man”

Auerbach

Self Portrait

Courbet Man

Frank

Gustave The Desperate ➢ One of few ➢ Self Portrait ➢ One of many ➢ Attempts
Gustave
The Desperate
One of few
Self Portrait
One of many
Attempts to
Focus on texture,
Focus on emphasis,
line, and form
express emotion
➢ Focused on that
space, and contrast
➢ Drawing
➢ Painting
Modern Art
of which they
could observe in
everyday life
Realism movement
➢ 1994 - 2001
➢ 19th century France
Self Portrait Courbet Man Gustave The Desperate ➢ One of few ➢ Self Portrait ➢ One

Compare and Contrast

Formal response to Timothy Meyerring’s “Rio Rancho I”

Formal response to Timothy Meyerring’s “ Rio Rancho I” The main aspect that I caught my

The main aspect that I caught my attention within this piece is the texture. The lines and shape almost remind me of perspiration rings from setting a cold drink on a table, or coffee or tea stains of the same nature, given the colours of the composition. There is no real subject matter, but rather a focus on a central point, giving this painting a more abstract quality.

 

Considering that this painting is on a larger scale at 76.2 cm x 76.2 cm really allows this painting to make a bold statement. In some form, the painting almost reminds me of a

 

eye, more specifically an iris, due to the focus on the center of the painting. The gold lines extend outwards from a central point like the layers of the iris surrounding the pupil.

Because of its abstract quality, the meaning of this piece is widely open to interpretation. I

Because of its abstract quality, the meaning of this piece is widely open to interpretation. I have many personal feelings about this piece. On one hand, there is the eye theory, but at the same time something about it seems cosmic in nature. Almost like a blurred close up of a star, or a representation of something sacred due to the use of gold and silver leaf along with the oil paint on canvas.

 
Rio Rancho I by Timothy Meyerring Oil, mixed media, gold & silver leaf on stretched canvas
Rio Rancho I
by Timothy Meyerring
Oil, mixed media, gold & silver leaf on stretched canvas
76.2 cm x 76.2 cm
A big part of Meyerring’s paintings focus on texture. Texture does many things to a composition,
A big part of Meyerring’s paintings focus on texture. Texture does many things to a
composition, but most importantly gives off a sense of “feel”. This is beneficial in
creating an emotional response and therefore a more memorable piece because there
is a sense of “realness” presented.
A common use of texture is the extending lines from a central point, seen again in
Agave. Although more abstract and close than Rio Rancho I, there is still that
sense of a close up of an eye.
However, Meyerring’s use of texture and colour is also heavily influenced by his
experience of exploring the Sonoran Desert through art early in his career.
A big part of Meyerring’s paintings focus on texture. Texture does many things to a composition,

“All of my painting works are loaded with good energy, big texture, gesture, and the fruits of experimentation.”

A big part of Meyerring’s paintings focus on texture. Texture does many things to a composition,

Agave

by Timothy Meyerring oil, wax, mixed media on steretched canvas 60.96 cm x 60.96 cm

A big part of Meyerring’s paintings focus on texture. Texture does many things to a composition,

Cultural Context of Timothy Meyerring’s “Rio Rancho I”

Formal response to Alexander Calder’s

Formal response to Alexander Calder’s “Medusa” Medusa by Alexander Calder Wire 31.115 cm x 43.815 cm

“Medusa”

Formal response to Alexander Calder’s “Medusa” Medusa by Alexander Calder Wire 31.115 cm x 43.815 cm

Medusa

by Alexander Calder Wire 31.115 cm x 43.815 cm x 24.13 cm

The most important feature of this piece is the stark lines and contrast between the darker wire and white background that the wire sculpture was photographed in front of.

The face of the sculpture is abstract in nature with over-emphasized facial features and single strands of hair. However, the message still comes across with a depiction of Medusa, the overall subject of the

piece.

The technical aspect of the twisting of wire is very clean and crisp and rather than looking like random knots where things are being held together, the twisting motion of the wire appears apart of the form itself. This gives the piece the illusion of a suspended drawing.

The composition is also very balanced. No one side is weighted heavier than the other even with the over exaggerated facial features. The use of line is clear and precise, which overall adds to the appearance of balance.

The focus of a lot of Alexander Calder’s work is all around feats of engineering. Which is no surprise, due to the fact that Calder studied mechanical engineering at the Stevens Institute of Technology.

Most of his work was kinetic sculpture in the forms of what Marcel Duchamp would define as mobiles, like Red Mobile. These mobiles were not stationary and had the ability to move and swing.

Later on in his career, Calder found a theme for his

works that he was thoroughly obsessed with. It

started with a commissioned sketch from the

Red Mobile

by Alexander Calder Painting sheet metal and steel rods

The focus of a lot of Alexander Calder’s work is all around feats of engineering. Which
The focus of a lot of Alexander Calder’s work is all around feats of engineering. Which
Cirque Calder by Alexander Calder Mixed media sculpture 137.2 cm × 239.4 cm × 239.4 cm
Cirque Calder
by Alexander Calder
Mixed media sculpture
137.2 cm × 239.4 cm × 239.4 cm
National Police Gazette of the Ringling Brothers and
Barnum and Bailey circus. This played heavily into
the creation of Cirque Calder.

“I wanted to be an engineer because some guy I rather liked was a mechanical engineer. That’s all.”

Cultural Context of Alexander Calder’s “Medusa”

Meyerring

Rio Rancho

Timothy

Alexander Calder Medusa ➢ Mixed media canvas ➢ Wire Sculpture ➢ Abstract in nature painting ➢
Alexander Calder
Medusa
Mixed media canvas
Wire Sculpture
Abstract in nature
painting
Focus on line, form,
➢ Focused on line
Focus on texture,
and balance
in relation to
colour, and shape
Large scale
movement within
the pieces as well
as shape and
form
Small scale
Kinetic, Surrealist
➢ Contemporary
➢ 1930
I
Meyerring Rio Rancho Timothy Alexander Calder Medusa ➢ Mixed media canvas ➢ Wire Sculpture ➢ Abstract

Compare and Contrast

Evaluation of Expression of Emotion

Evaluation of Expression of Emotion Frank Auerbach Frank Auerbach ➢ Monochromatic colour scheme suggests sadness, sorrow,

Frank Auerbach

Frank Auerbach

Monochromatic colour scheme suggests sadness, sorrow, and/or darkness Erratic placement of lines suggest chaos, confusion, stress, and shadow. Quick application suggests “venting” or the discharge of negative emotions Self-portrait suggests personal expression and/or relation to the artist’s sense of self

Gustave Courbet

The Desperate Man

Emotion concentrated in facial expression Nature of “Realism” gives way to a revolutionary perspective Gesture suggests stress through tugging on the hair Neutral “earthy” colours suggests durability and the classic sense of nature Self-portrait suggests personal expression and/or relation to the artist’s sense of self

Timothy Meyerring

Rio Rancho I

Aesthetically pleasing

Aesthetic focus suggests the “knowledge

emotion” of interest. Neutral “earthy” colours suggests durability and the classic sense of nature as well as calm Texture suggests “realness” like honesty, loyalty, and sincerity

Evaluation of Expression of Emotion Frank Auerbach Frank Auerbach ➢ Monochromatic colour scheme suggests sadness, sorrow,

Alexander Calder

Medusa

Engineering focus suggests structure,

stability, and security Aesthetic focus suggests the “knowledge emotion” of interest. Subject matter of “Medusa” suggests love, adoration, and/or, adversity Nearly symmetrical balance presents calm state of mind

Throughout all of the pieces, it becomes apparent that the expression of emotion plays a vital
Throughout all of the pieces, it becomes apparent that the expression of emotion plays a vital role in the creation of the art itself.
The most similar works in terms of emotion are Frank Auerbach’s, Frank
Auerbach, and Gustave Courbet’s, The Desperate Man. One of these
similarities is the idea of expressing the emotion of stress. Frank Auerbach’s
self portrait’s use of erratic placement of lines suggests stress by
demonstrating a sense of urgency. In the same way, Gustave Courbet’s self
portrait expresses stress through subject matter rather than process. The
gesture of the hands present the idea of an inability to relax or being
overwhelmed.
The Desperate Man
In contrast, Timothy Meyerring’s, Rio Rancho I, and Alexander Calder’s,
Medusa, are focused more with a sense of calm and balance.
by Gustave Courbet

oil paint on canvas, 1844-

1845

45cm x 55cm

Frank Auerbach

by Frank Auerbach pencil and graphite, 1994-2001 30 ⅛ in. x 22 ¾ in (764 mm x 577 mm)

Throughout all of the pieces, it becomes apparent that the expression of emotion plays a vital
Medusa by Alexander Calder Wire 31.115 cm x 43.815 cm x 24.13 cm
Medusa
by Alexander Calder
Wire
31.115 cm x 43.815 cm x
24.13 cm
Throughout all of the pieces, it becomes apparent that the expression of emotion plays a vital

The neutral “earthy” colours of Rio Rancho I suggest durability and strength, all aspects that reflect a sense of calm. The balance of Medusa is extremely contrasting with Frank Auerbach just simply based on the simplicity of the sculpture.

Rio Rancho I

by Timothy

Meyerring Oil, mixed media, gold & silver leaf on stretched canvas 76.2 cm x 76.2 cm

Throughout all of the pieces, it becomes apparent that the expression of emotion plays a vital

Comparing and Contrasting Expression of Emotion

Evaluation of Application of Medium

Evaluation of Application of Medium Frank Auerbach Self Portrait ➢ Graphite on paper ➢ Smearing of

Frank Auerbach Self Portrait Graphite on paper Smearing of graphite suggests a quick sketch- like piece Large paper size of 764 mm x 577 mm - “statement piece” Focus on line

Gustave Courbet

The Desperate Man

Rough brush strokes Oil paint - dries slowly, and can be easily blended, providing a softer merge of values Oil paint remains wet for a long time, and mistakes can be scraped away with a painting knife more easily and selectively

Evaluation of Application of Medium Frank Auerbach Self Portrait ➢ Graphite on paper ➢ Smearing of

Timothy Meyerring Rio Rancho II

Mixed Media Layering of mediums creates

unique appearance Gold and silver leaf imply shine and attention grabbers Larger canvas size of 76.2 cm x 76.2 cm - “statement piece” Focus on texture

Alexander Calder

Medusa

Wire - flexible and malleable Method of twisting two or more wires together adds strength and creates texture Focus on line Relatively small sculpture

The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet The application of media within a work is a key
The Desperate Man
by Gustave Courbet
The application of media within a work is a key aspect of evaluating a piece of
art. Although each work is created through different mediums, it becomes
obvious that there is a connection. Firstly, the focus on line shared between
Frank Auerbach and Medusa. The nature of the mediums that both pieces
are created in is what emphasizes this focus. Due to the fact that Medusa is
rather flat and could be described as a suspended drawing, it is easy to
distinguish the similarity. Similarly, The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet
and Rio Rancho I by Timothy Meyerring have a strong focus on texture.
Although the medium of The Desperate Man - oil paint - can be used to
provide a smoother altogether appearance, the rough application of
the medium creates the “scratchy” texture that is found
within Rio Rancho I as well. Texture is also found
in the application of the wire in Alexander
Calder’s Medusa through the
Frank Auerbach
oil paint on canvas, 1844-
by Frank Auerbach
pencil and graphite, 1994-2001
30 ⅛ in. x 22 ¾ in (764 mm x 577 mm)
1845
45cm x 55cm
Rio Rancho I
Medusa
technique of twisting two or more wires
together add strength. However, it must be
noted that none of the pieces share the same
media nor application of that media.
by Alexander Calder
Wire
31.115 cm x 43.815 cm x
24.13 cm
by Timothy
Meyerring
Oil, mixed media,
gold & silver leaf on
stretched canvas
76.2 cm x 76.2 cm

Comparing and Contrasting Application of Medium

Self-Portrait by Alexis Pacala ink on paper, October 2014 35 cm x 12.5 cm In connection
Self-Portrait
by Alexis Pacala
ink on paper, October 2014
35 cm x 12.5 cm
In connection to my own art, I used Auerbach’s
self-portrait as an inspiration for my dry point
print. Using the same subject matter, myself, and
the same technical applications such as line,
form, and contrast, I believe that I was able to
convey my theme of chaos through my piece.
In seeing the technique used to create the
printing plate for the dry point print, the harsh gouges carved into the plastic reminded me a lot of the German Expressionism art movement.
Although not considered an artist of the German Expressionist movement, but rather of the Modern Art period, Auerbach was certainly
influenced by some of the technical applications of distorted colours, space, and scale from the aforementioned movement.
In the same way that Auerbach’s self-portrait presents a darker theme, I believe that the theme of chaos presented in my piece is also
somewhat of a darker theme. The sporadic and criss-crossed lines in my print are what I believe give that theme away. In relation to myself,
the chaos expresses a few of the emotions I feel when I am especially stressed. For example, not being able to focus on one thing at once.
Chaos doesn’t have to symbolize a description of an external or physical situation, but can just as easily be an emotion or something felt and
thought.
Self-Portrait by Alexis Pacala ink on paper, October 2014 35 cm x 12.5 cm In connection

Connection To Own Art: Frank Auerbach

Connection To Own Art: Gustave Courbet

Connection To Own Art: Gustave Courbet The Desperate Woman by Alexis Pacala acrylic on canvas, December

The Desperate Woman

by Alexis Pacala acrylic on canvas, December 2014 91.5 cm x 91.5 cm

Connection To Own Art: Gustave Courbet The Desperate Woman by Alexis Pacala acrylic on canvas, December

In connection to my own art, I used Gustave Courbet’s self portrait, The Desperate Man, as an inspiration for my own self-portrait. Like Courbet, I tried to focus on the technical applications of emphasis, contrast, and space. Through these, I believe that I was able to convey the appropriate emotion of desperation.

The justification of certain features affects many aspects of a composition. For example, the placement of lighting effects shadows and highlights, both of which determine the level of contrast that is needed between lighter sections and darker sections. In my self portrait, much like Courbet’s, with the face placed directly in the center of the canvas with a symmetrical sense of balance, places emphasis on defining features. Rather than the eyes, my defining features in my piece is probably my cheeks and chin. The shadows are more prominent on my chin and compared to Courbet’s level of rosy cheeks, my cheeks are certainly more rounded and more red.

As for the emotion, expression is everything. In keeping with the original pose of pulling the hair and stretching the neck, I believe that the same desperation is shown in my piece as it is in The Desperate Man. The colours and technique are not what give this painting its emotional quality, but rather the subject matter and placement of the subject, both of which happen to be the artists.

In connection to my own art, my main point of inspiration came from Alexander Calder’s technique
In connection to my own art, my main point of inspiration came from
Alexander Calder’s technique of bending wire and wrapping it back in a
“corkscrew” fashion. Not only does this technique place emphasis on the
joints where the cut, individual steel wires meet, but also provides a strong
and stable point of anchoring that helps the piece to retain its form.
Calder’s wire sculptures appear almost as suspended drawings, most likely due to
the cleanliness and sharpness of the lines. However, this is where my take on the
technique differed, because instead of a drawing, I wanted to present more of a
skeletal appearance. The skeletal appearance in this piece draws attention to the
idea of an object in its very basic form.
In connection to my own art, my main point of inspiration came from Alexander Calder’s technique

Bracken Crown

by Alexis Pacala Mixed Media 31.115 cm x 43.815 cm x 24.13 cm

In connection to my own art, my main point of inspiration came from Alexander Calder’s technique

Connection to Own Art: Alexander Calder

Connection to Own Art: Timothy Meyerring

Similarly in the way that Timothy Meyerring focuses on texture and large scale “statement pieces”, a
Similarly in the way that Timothy Meyerring focuses on texture and large scale
“statement pieces”, a few of my own artworks attempted to encompass that same
idea.
The Man Who Would
Be King
by Alexis Pacala
Acrylic on Canvas
60.96 cm x 121.92 cm

In the painting, The Man Who Would Be King, depicting a visual representation of the angels that Ezekiel described in Revelation 4: 6-7, the focus on texture comes from the fiery hellscape created as the background of the piece, and each of the feathers on the figure’s wings. This places emphasis on these two symbols, specifically in terms of contrast. This idea is similar to Meyerring’s contrast between the layering of both colour and texture in his pieces to create what appears as outwardly expanding forms from one centralized point. The painting is also the largest painting out of my body of work due to the large

“statement”, which in this case is the central theme of a high ranking holy figure from the Bible. It would seem appropriate to create a piece large enough to embody the scale of the theme. In the wire armature sculpture,

Bracken Crown, the inspiration came from the same example of Meyerring’s naturalized textures. In this case,
Bracken Crown, the inspiration came from the same example of Meyerring’s naturalized textures. In this case,
the faux wooden placard that serves as the
base for the form uses the same rough
application of medium as well as the
utilization of colour in neutral, woodsy
browns.
Bracken Crown
by Alexis Pacala
Mixed Media
31.115 cm x 43.815 cm x
24.13 cm