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Year Level:

10

Depth Study:
Rights and Freedoms

Duration (weeks):
6

No. of Periods (50-60 mins):


18

Rationale:
By using the Understanding by Design approach, this unit is able to engage
students in big ideas that are exciting and foster the idea of uncovering
meaning rather than simply recalling people, dates and events throughout
history (Authentic Education, 2014). With the approach of understanding
rather than attaining knowledge, the classroom becomes a community of
enquiry, an idea that is supported by educational theorists such as Vygotsky
and Bruner, where students are able to develop their thoughts by voicing
them with the classroom community (Seixas, 1993). Naturally, some
limitations must be placed on the meanings that students are able to create,
however, students and teachers alike should not interpret history in the
exact same way that historians before them have. By staging the classroom
with constant enquiry, we are able to ensure that this does not happen
(Seixas, 1993). By using a combination of primary and secondary sources,
students are able to develop their historiography skills, as enquiry learning
involves not simply primary source analysis but also the analysis of the
different perspectives presented by different historians and why they may
wish to present their material in a particular way (Husbands and Kitson,
2010). It also helps students to interpret different sources so that they are
able to identify fact from fiction in their day-to-day lives (Yilmaz, 2009).
The approach of understanding is only possible with the constant presence of
teacher scaffolding while students gain their own knowledge and
understanding by developing enough understanding to answer a series of
carefully drafted questions (Husbands and Kitson, 2010). Using question
prompts, as seen in the whiparound activity, encourages students to develop
their own individual accounts, which indicates that they have a coherent way
of processing their thoughts (Molenaar, van Boxtel and Sleegers, 2010). The
jigsaw activities allow students to benefit from the assessment of their peers.
Here students are able to develop an understanding of how their peers are
managing the key line of questioning and they are able to build on their own
skills and techniques (Boon, Fahey, Kriewaldt and Taylor, 2012). The constant
peer interaction paired with a scaffolding teacher creates a classroom
environment where the opinions of all students are valued and encouraged
and where understanding is gained because the student desires it.

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Stage 1 Desired Results


AC or AusVELS Standard: Rights and Freedoms
Students investigate struggles for human rights in depth. This will include
how rights and freedoms have been ignored, demanded or achieved in
Australia and in the broader world context.
Rights and freedoms (1945 the present)
The origins and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
including
Australias involvement in the development of the declaration
(ACDSEH023)
Background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
for rights
and freedoms before 1965, including the 1938 Day of Mourning and the
Stolen Generations (ACDSEH104)
The US civil rights movement and its influence on Australia (ACDSEH105)
The significance of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait
Islander peoples: 1962 right to vote federally; 1967 Referendum;
Reconciliation;
Mabo decision; Bringing Them Home Report (the Stolen Generations), the
Apology
(ACDSEH106)
Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and
Torres
Strait Islander peoples, and the role of ONE individual or group in the
struggle
(ACDSEH134)
The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in
Australia and throughout the world, such as the Declaration on the Rights
of Indigenous Peoples (2007) (ACDSEH143)
Understanding (s) or Big ideas
Students will understand that:
Throughout history, many human
beings have struggled to attain the
rights and freedoms that some are
born with. This unit will explore the

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Essential Question(s):
What provocative questions will
foster inquiry, understanding, and
transfer the learning?
What makes certain facets of
society believe that they are
entitled to rights and freedoms

conflicts that often take place when


one sub-sector of society believes
they are entitled to control and
abuse those they believe are below
them, as well as the struggles that
some people must overcome to
attain human rights, freedoms and
dignities.

that others are not?


Can the damage that is done
throughout the process of the
denial of rights and freedoms
ever be repaired?
Does the denial of rights and
freedoms ensure that social,
educational and financial
outcomes for those denied will
always be less than others?

Student Outcomes:
Students will be able to:
What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit?
At the end of this unit students will understand the struggles that elements
of our society have had to overcome what many take for granted. Students
will have a deeper understanding into the disadvantage that many people
experience today and what historical factors contribute to this
disadvantage
What key skills will students acquire as a result of this unit?
At the end of this unit students will able to confidently analyse a variety of
different sources, including images, video and audio recording as well as
language. Students will be able to cognitively process new information and
interpret it to foster deeper understanding.
What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledge
and skill?
Students will be able to view the global society through informed and
empathetic eyes. Students will also be able to process different types of
information and not take for granted what is before them is truth, but
rather uncover truth through further research and understanding
Stage 2 Assessment Evidence
Formal Assessment task
Through what formal assessment
tasks will student demonstrate the
desired understandings?
Formative 1:
Students will be assessed on the
oral contributions they give during

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Other Evidence (Informal


assessment)
Through what other evidence will
students demonstrate achievement of
the desired results?
Students will continuously participate

a whiparound task and Town Hall


debate
Formative 2:
Students will be assessed on their
submission of the primary source
analysis worksheet
Formative 3:
Students will submit an identity
chart or mind map on a civil rights
activist of their choosing, it is
recommended that they choose the
same person for this activity as for
their summative assessment
Formative 4:
Students will be assessed on their
submission of the primary source
analysis worksheet as well as their
3-2-1 submission
Formative 5:
Students will be assessed on their
answers to four questions
corresponding to unit 7 of the
prescribed text as well as their
submission of the primary source
analysis worksheet

Formative 6:
Students will be assessed on the
oral contributions they give during
the jigsaw activity and as well as
the submission of the primary
source analysis worksheet
(See appendices 2.1-2.6 for details)

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in discussion with their peers and with


their teacher throughout every lesson.
Activities such as the jigsaw
encourage students to be teachers as
well as learners as they engage other
students in information of their
expertise.
Teacher scaffolding will ensure that
students are on the right path in
research activities that will help to
prepare them for their summative
assessments.

Summative 1: Civil Rights Activist


report, 600 words, completed in
Friday class of week 3.
Summative 2: End of unit essay,
8000 words, completed in final
class of the unit in week 6.
(See appendices 1.1 for details)

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Stage 3 Learning Plan


Week Essential
Concepts
Task
Resources
Assessment
question/s
1
How were African Historical
Students will complete a
These activities Oral response to
American people
significance
whiparound activity with
will be
whiparound
deprived of their
the prompt slavery is.
completed in
activity and
human rights and Abuse of
(See appendices 2.1)
the second and
Town Hall
freedoms
third classes in
debate
power by
throughout the
the unit,
Students will complete a
those in
era of slavery?
introductory
authority
Town Hall circle activity
lessons will
where they will divide for a
have already
In what ways do
debate
on
the
abolishment
Conflict
been
the existence of
of slavery. (See appendices
between
completed
the Jim Crow laws
2.1)
diverse
decimate the
cultures
Universal
Declaration of
Human Rights?

Do the Jim Crow


laws foster an
environment in
which racial hate
groups such as
the Ku Klux Klan
can exist?
In what ways are Conflict
Source analysis of image
non-violent forms
between
relating to the end of
of protest
disagreeing
segregation in schools.
successful?
groups
Students will complete

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Primary source
image

Primary source
analysis
worksheet

source analysis worksheet Source analysis


Why were the
Promotion of
worksheet (see
Southern states
peace as a Jigsaw primary source
appendices
able to claim that
form of
activity, students will
2.2)
separate but
protest
analyse four different
equal was a valid
cartoon propaganda
Primary source
policy to enforce Understanding
images (see appendices
cartoon images
on their citizens?
2.2)
the ethical
(see
dimension
appendices
How did
2.2)
segregation
Use primary
effect
source
educational
evidence
outcomes for
African American
children?
Were the non Peaceful or
Students will complete
Recording of
Students will
violent protest
powerful,
source analysis worksheet
Martin Luther
produce a 600
methods of
which will
to accompany Martin
King speech
word report on
Martin Luther
come out on
Luther Kings I Have a
Martin Luther
King or the more
top?
Dream speech
King, Rosa
Source analysis
aggressive Black
Parks or
worksheet (see
Power
Malcolm X
Cause and
Students will create an
appendices
movements
consequence
identity chart or mind map
2.3)
associated with
Students will
of an American civil rights
Malcolm X more Use primary
activist. This activity is
submit an
effective?
designed to aid students in
identity chart
source
research
for
their
first
in preparation
evidence
How did the
summative assessment.
for their first
actions of Rosa
summative
Parks help to
assessment
support the civil

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rights movement
in America?
How did European Continuity and 3-2-1 activity. Throughout
Primary resource Students will
settlement/
change
the lesson students will
relating to
submit A 3-2-1
invasion affect
work on a 3-2-1 document
assimilation in
document at
the Indigenous
(see appendices 2.4)
Australia (see
the end of the
Conflict of
nations that had
appendices
lesson,
different
cared for
2.4)
detailing 4 key
Students will complete a
cultures
Australian land
impacts that
source analysis worksheet
for millions of
European
to
accompany
a
primary
The power
years?
invasion had
source relating to
that one
on Indigenous
assimilation
in
Australia
group can
peoples in
In what ways did
(see appendices 2.4)
hold over
Australia
government
another
policies such as
Primary source
assimilation and Migration for
forced child
analysis
some is
removal have
worksheet
considered
detrimental
invasion by
impacts on
others
Aboriginal and
Torres Strait
Use primary
Islander culture?
source
evidence
Does the legend of Historical
Students will read unit 7 of Prescribed text
the Anzac
perspectives
the prescribed text and
(see
commemorate
use the chunking method
appendices
the contributions Interaction of
to create further meaning.
2.5)
made by
Students are required to
different
Indigenous
answer 4 questions that
cultures in a
people during the
correspond with the unit
campaign for
First and Second
(see appendices 2.5)

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Answers to four
questions
relating to unit
7 of the
prescribed text
(see
appendices
2.5)

World Wars?

equality and
peace
Students will complete a
In what ways did
whiparound activity where
Patterns that
the 1967
they will verbally disclose
referendum
are visible
why the would vote yes or
change the rights
between
no in the 1967 referendum
and freedoms
different
(see appendices 2.5)
granted to
cultures who
Aboriginal and
are have
Torres Strait
similar
Islander people in
experiences
Australia?

What similarities
can be drawn
between the
freedom rides in
the USA and the
freedom rides for
Indigenous
people in
Australia?
How did the Mabo Understanding Students will complete a
Primary sources Oral responses
case help
the ethical
jigsaw activity in which 4
relating to
from jigsaw
Australian
dimensions
primary source images will
Indigenous
activity
Indigenous
be analysed (see
land rights in
people to reclaim Use primary
appendices 2.6)
Australia (see Primary source
their ancestral
appendices
source
analysis
lands?
2.6)
Students will complete a
evidence
worksheet
source analysis worksheet
How has Sorry
Primary source End of unit
to accompany a primary
How culture
Day helped
source
relating
to
relating to
can change
essay (see

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Australia to move
over time
towards a state
of reconciliation? The obligation
that those in
What else needs to
power have
be done to close
to right
the gap between
historical
Indigenous
wrongs
Australians and
the nonindigenous
population in
Australia?

reconciliation in Australia
(see appendices 2.6)

reconciliation
in Australia
(see
appendices
2.6)

References:
Authentic Education (2014). Four Beliefs. Retrieved from
http://www.authenticeducation.org/whoweare/fourbeliefs.lasso
Boon, D., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J. & Taylor, T. (2012). Place and Time: Explorations in Teaching
Geography and History. NSW: Pearson Australia.
Husbands, C. & Kitson, A. (2010). Teaching History 11-18. Berkshire:
McGraw- Hill Education.

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appendices
1.1)

Molenaar, I., Sleegers, P. & van Boxtel, C. (2010). The Effects of Scaffolding Metacognitive Activities in
Small Groups. Computers in Human Behaviour, volume 26(6), 1727-1738. Retrieved from
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563210001949
Seixas, P. The Community of Inquiry as a Basis for Knowledge and Learning: The Case of
History. American Educational Research Journal 1993 volume 30 (2), 305-324. Retrieved from
http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/stable/1163237?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
Yilmaz, K. (2009). A Vision of History Teaching and Learning: Thoughts on History Education in
Secondary Schools. High School Journal, volume 92 (2), 37-46. Retrieved from https://web-b-ebscohostcom.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=fc78770b-eb6c-408c-aa55e4fb5996df63%40sessionmgr115&vid=1&hid=125
Appendices 1.1:
Summative Assessment one:
Students are required to submit a 600-word report on a civil rights activist; they may choose between
Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks and Malcolm X. The report should detail the experiences of the activist as a
child, what led them to civil rights activism and the achievements that they contributed to attaining civil
rights for African Americans. Students are able to prepare for this assessment outside of class and may
bring a 100-word essay plan into class. The assessment will be completed in a 60-minute period.
Summative Assessment two:
Students are required to submit a 800-word essay answering the question below. Students are able to
prepare for this assessment outside of class and may bring a 150-word essay plan into class. This
assessment will be completed in 90 minutes during a double period.
In what ways have the Indigenous civil rights movement and the 1967 Referendum improved living

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standards for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Australia and what remains to be done to close the
gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians?
Appendices 2.1:
After a lesson on slavery and its impacts on different areas and groups across the United States students
will participate in a whiparound activity in which they will be provided with the prompt, slavery is
students will then verbally state their answer to the class. Their answer should reflect the information that
has been shared throughout the lessons given on slavery.
For the town hall circle activity students will be divided into four separate groups, one group will represent
Northern states politicians who are in favour of the abolishment of slavery, one will represent Southern
states politicians who are not in favour of the abolishment of slavery, another will represent slave owners
who are not in favour of the abolishment of slavery, and the fourth group will represent African American
slaves, who are in favour of the abolishment of slavery. Each group will be required to devise a contention
for the party they represent, as well as four key points they believe support their argument.
Appendices 2.2:
Students will examine and research the below image and answer the corresponding questions on the
source analysis

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Image sourced from http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00649675/

1: What type of source is this?

2: What is unique about this source?

3: Approximate date of source:

4: Who are the subjects of the source:

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5: Information about the subject/s: who was he/she? What does this image tell us about some of the
experiences he/she may have had? What does this image tell us about his/her beliefs?

6: List 5 important points you can detract from the source:

7: What does this source tell you about life in the United States for African Americans at the time?

8: If you could ask the subjects of the source one question, what would it be?

Students will participate in a jigsaw activity using the cartoons below. In four groups, students will research
the scenarios presented in the cartoons. Focus questions will include, which groups are depicted in the
cartoon? What is the main contention of the cartoon? Who is the cartoon directed at? Students will then
present their findings to the rest of the class.

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Sourced from http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/mauldin/mauldin-cartoonist.html

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Sourced from http://pixgood.com/civil-rights-movement-political-cartoons.html

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Sourced from http://hti.osu.edu/opper/lesson-plans/the-civil-rights-movement

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Sourced from http://hti.osu.edu/opper/lesson-plans/the-civil-rights-movement

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Appendices 2.3:
Students will watch the below YouTube video and answer the questions on the source analysis worksheet.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vDWWy4CMhE
1: What type of source is this?

2: What is unique about this source?

3: Approximate date of source:

4: Creator of source:

5: Information about the creator: who was he/she? What role did they play in attaining rights and freedoms
for African Americans?

5: Whom is this source directed at?

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6: List 5 important points you can detract from the source:

7: What does this source tell you about life in the United States for African Americans at the time?

8: If you could ask the creator of the source one question, what would it be?

Appendices 2.4:
Students will work on a 3-2-1 document throughout the lesson. They must detail three new pieces of
information about indigenous Australians they have learned, two pre-conceptions about the colonial
settlement in Australia which have now been proven untrue, and one question that they still have
regarding the settlement/invasion of Australia.

Students will examine and research the below image and answer the corresponding questions on the
source analysis worksheet.

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Image sourced from http://www.kooriweb.org/foley/essays/neville2.jpg


1: What type of source is this?

2: What is unique about this source?

3: Approximate date of source:

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4: Who are the subjects of the source:

5: Information about the subject/s: who was he/she? What does this image tell us about some of the
experiences he/she may have had? What does this image tell us about the life that the subject may have
led?

6: List 5 important points you can detract from the source:

7: What does this source tell you about life in Australia for Indigenous people at the time of the
assimilation policy?

8: If you could ask the subjects of the source one question, what would it be?

Appendices 2.5:

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Students are required to read unit 7 of the prescribed text using the chunking method to demonstrate
deeper understanding. Students will circle and look up words that are unfamiliar, underline or highlight
key events or people, read aloud and bounce ideas off their peers. Students are required to submit their
answers to the following four questions at the end of the lesson:
1: What rights were restricted of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at the time of the instatement
of a federal constitution in 1901?
2: What does the denial of these rights mean for Australia as a signatory of the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights (1948)?
3: Name 3 key groups or figures involved in the Yes campaign for the 1967 referendum and outline their
roles and contributions.
4: What rights were granted to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as a result of the 1967
referendum? What rights remained denied?
Prescribed text chapter available here: http://www.pearson.com.au/media/345031/pearson-history-10sbch3.pdf
Students will complete a whiparound activity with the prompt I would vote yes/no because students
must use examples from the prescribed text to support their choice.

Appendices 2.6:
Students will participate in a jigsaw activity using the images below. In four groups, students will research
the scenarios presented in the images. Focus questions will include, which groups are depicted in the

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images? What is the main contention of the image? Who is the image directed at? Students will then
present their findings to the rest of the class.

Sourced from http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/land/images/land-rights-compromise.jpg

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Sourced from http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/history/images/referendum-flyer-1958.gif

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Sourced from

http://indigenousrights.net.au/__data/assets/image/0010/384139/i922_m.jpg

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Sourced from http://indigenousrights.net.au/__data/assets/image/0011/395390/i799_m.jpg


Students will watch the below YouTube clip and complete the corresponding questions on the source
analysis worksheet.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDvome0bCXs
1: What type of source is this?

2: What is unique about this source?

3: Date of source:

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4: Does the source accurately detail the experiences of Indigenous Australians since European
settlement/invasion?

5: Whom is this source directed at?

6: List 5 important points you can detract from the source:

7: Is there anything that you believe is missing from the source relating to the struggles experienced by
Indigenous people in Australia?

8: What changes do you believe need to be made in Australia so that the gap between Indigenous
Australians and non-Indigenous Australians can be closed?

Brooke Adams