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TOPIC: Shopping

2 achievement objectives.
In this unit students are
given the opportunity to
practice a range of number
strategies and apply
number knowledge to a
simulated real life context.

Learning Area : Mathematics

Achievement Objective / Conceptual


Understanding:

Year Level:

Number and Algebra

Unit Duration:

The achievement objectives


indicate what I want the
students to learn. Link to
NZ Curriculum: Within a
range of meaningful
contexts, students should
be able to: make up, tell,
and record number stories,
up to 9, about given objects
and sequence pictures

Number Strategies: Use a range of counting,


grouping and equal sharing strategies with whole
numbers and fractions.
Number Strategies: Use a range of counting,
grouping and equal sharing strategies with whole
numbers and fractions.
Equations and expressions: Communicate and
explain counting, grouping and equal-sharing
strategies, using words, numbers and pictures.

7-9 Lessons

Level 1 achievement
objectives because most
students at this school are
at L1 of the curriculum at
this time of the year.

Key Aspects of Learning:

Make up different values of money in a range of ways using


various combinations of coins and notes
Read prices and calculate if they have enough money to buy
products
Use appropriate strategies to give correct change
Record their financial story using pictures, diagrams, numbers
stories, etc.

Money: Use coins and notes for simple transactions give and receive change
Spending: Explore spending choices for a given amount of money and
recognise that peoples spending choices differ.
The Key Concepts are a
combination of prior
knowledge and new
information. Literacy
strategies are needed to
teach the new concepts
and words.

Key Concepts/Vocabulary:

Context based on learning


area p.26 NZ Curriculum:
have a broad range of
practical applications in
everyday life, in other
learning areas, and in
workplaces.

Context for learning:

These 2 key competencies


are selected because they
fit best with the learning
outcomes and activities
regarding Financial
capability progressions.

Key Competencies:

Money, value, dollar, cents, currency, change, coins, notes, transactions,


give, receive, finance, spending, calculate, decisions, consequences,
strategies, price, cashbook, shop, shopping, earn, income, purchase

Students will use New Zealand play money to earn income and purchase goods
from a classroom shop, and will have a turn at taking the role of the shopkeeper.
They will then communicate and explain the choices they made and the
strategies uses.

Thinking:
Identifying and deciding on different
financial options
Evaluating financial decisions and
their consequences
Using language, symbols and texts
Calculating and interpreting financial
information.

My assessment fits the


learning outcomes of
Number Strategies and
Knowledge as well as
Literacy Strategies that are
needed to explain new
concepts and words.

This is an important part of


the unit because NZ
Curriculum states that in
each learning area
students need to learn the
specialist vocabulary
associated with that area.

Values:

Innovation, inquiry, and


curiosity

Thinking creatively, critically and


reflectively to:
Analyse and solve financial problems.

Assessment:
Formative:
Observation and anecdotal notes about how well students use various
strategies to make different monetary amounts. Knowledge hotspots, sharing
and conference reflective questions.
Summative:
Financial Story - How well the children show their understanding of various
strategies to make different monetary amounts when they complete their

The selected value allows


the students to learn to
critically analyse values
and actions based on
them and learn through
the learning experience to
discuss disagreements
that may arise from
differences in values and
negotiate solutions.

Facilitating shared
learning students
engage in shared activities
and conversations with
other people by creating a
learning community. P.34
NZ Curriculum

financial story. JAM and GLoSS Interview.

Learning
Outcome
In my first activity I
am trying to make
connections to
students prior
learning and
experience (p. 34
NZ
Curriculum).And
enhance the
relevance of new
learning by getting
them excited about
the topic.
This activity will
activate learners to
assimilate new
learning, relate it to
what they already
know, adapt it for
their own purposes
and translate
thought into action.
(P.34 NZ
Curriculum)
Students build the
language that they
need to take their
learning further
when the teacher
facilitates share
learning Share
activities and
conversations with
other people,
including family
members and
people in the wider
community (p.34
NZ curriculum).
And reflective
thought and action
is encouraged.
(Effective
Pedagogy)

Students will be able


to share their own
experiences.

Skills
(practical and
thinking)

Suggested Activities

Resources

Getting Started: Read a story about going shopping.


Children will share their experiences of shopping. Prompts: Talk
about different types of shops they have been to or seen. What kinds
of things do they sell?

A book/story about going


shopping

Sharing: Experiences
of shopping
Communication
Reading

Themes are decided for the tour walk and talk tour for the students:
The shopping process from looking to buying. What are the steps?
What goods on sale are needs and what goods are wants?
We generate ideas to create each step of the shopping process using
pictures and simple captions. Students work in cooperative groups to
assemble these steps in the correct order.

Pictures and name


labels

Grouping and order


sequence

A shopkeeper visit the class and talk about how they work and how
they communicate with customers. The shopkeeper and I will roleplay appropriate and inappropriate buyer/seller interaction.

Poster, paper,
shopkeeper/ video about
scenarios

Observe
Reflection
Share
Maori Language
Values
Manners
Effective
communication

Random items for the


shop, cardboard,
recycled paper, currency
notes and coins,
whiteboard, markers

Fine motor skills


Creativity
Innovation
Collaboration
Reading prices and
currency

Explain that we are going to set up a shop in the classroom. In this


shop they will buy things to practice their number skills. But first they
have to earn some money by coming up with some very good ideas
for their shop.

Student will be able to


generate ideas about
the shopping
process.
Students will be able
to assemble the
shopping process
steps in the correct
order.

Students will be able


to observe and reflect
on role-play.

The shopkeeper could ask, for example:


Maori vocabulary
English translation
Kia hia ng poro mhau?
How many apples for you?
A customer could reply:
Maori vocabulary
English translation
Kia toru ng poro.
Three apples.
Or they might be able to say:
Maori vocabulary
English translation
Kia rima ng poro mku.
Five apples for me.
Similarly, a customer could ask the shopkeeper about the price of
something, as in the reomation Te hoko kai (Buying/selling food). A
customer might ask, for example:
Maori vocabulary
English translation
He aha te utu m te poro?
What does the apple cost?
The shopkeeper could reply:
Maori vocabulary
English translation
E rua tra.
Two dollars.
or
Maori vocabulary
English translation
Kotahi tra, rima tekau hneti.
A dollar and fifty cents.
Students share their ideas about what they observed as being
effective practice by both the shopkeeper and the customer. I record
these as success criteria in poster form.

I will deliberately
build on what the
students know and
have experienced
to maximise the

Students will be able


to make up different
values of money in a
range of ways using
various combinations
of coins and notes.

Success Criteria:
How to ask - Manners/ polite demeanour?
Information about goods - Clear communication?
Price and change - Honesty?
Patience?
Helpful?
Knowledgeable?
I pose the problem: What do we need in our shop? Something to
buy! Students work in teams to produce some notebooks and other
items using recycled paper, cardboard, etc. for the shop.
I thank the students for their good work and pay them a set amount of
money ($5, $10 or $20 depending on the students number

knowledge and strategy levels using knowledge hotspots) using


various combination of coins and/ or notes. This money can be used
to spend in the shop.

use of learning time


(p. 34 NZ
Curriculum).

Counting

Students will talk about the different strategies they could use to count
their money and decide on a best way for them. They count their
money. Focus question: Even though students have different
combination of coins and/or notes, do we all have the same amount?
I will record pictorially the different ways $5 can be made up. Eg
$1$1$1$1$1- 5 coins= $5
$2$2$1 3 coins = $5
What are all the possibilities?
Extension: $10 and/or $20 if appropriate.
There are many
opportunities for
Facilitating shared
learning (p. 34 NZ
Curriculum) in this unit.

Students will be able


to read prices and
calculate if they have
enough money to buy
products.

The students brainstorm and then make/ source some other products
for the shop, eg. Vouchers for 10 minutes with the puzzles, vouchers
for computer time, small stickers, recycled McDonalds toys, pencils,
note pads, etc. I price the items in the shop. The prices will reflect
students number knowledge and strategy levels. (If the students are
still working within 5 then the prices need to be less than $5,etc)
Extension: Items for sale up to $20

Reading
Calculations
Number skills
Number knowledge
Brainstorm

Once the shop is set up, guide the students through the shop,
discussing all the products available and reading the prices of the
each set of items.
.

Use appropriate
strategies to give
correct change.

Throughout the unit I


will foster positive
relationships within
environments that are
caring, inclusive, nondiscriminatory and
cohesive. (p.34 NZ
Curriculum) By
repeating the cycle
sufficient opportunities
to learn are provided.
(p.34 NZ Curriculum)

Students will be able


to make up different
values of money in a
range of ways using
various combinations
of coins and notes.
Students will be able
to read prices and
calculate if they have
enough money to buy
products.

Practice the skills of giving change. I will then explain that they will
have an opportunity to buy some items to keep when the shop opens
an each will have a turn at being the shopkeeper. We will revise the
success criteria listed about the different roles of customer and
shopkeeper.
I will design a roster so every child has a turn at each of the roles, or
we will run the activity on two days.
Roles to the students will be allocated. Students to discuss the
choices they have; to spend all, some, or none of their money and
predict the consequences of each choice.

Counting Strategies
Addition
Subsitising
Addition strategies
Reading currency
Responsibilities
Respect
Communication
Language
Number skills

Open the shop for business and repeat this cycle a number of times
so that students make links between earning and spending.

Students will be able


to use appropriate
strategies to give
correct change.

Sharing and Evaluating:

Students use the success criteria (previously listed) to evaluate the effectiveness of their communication in their shopping
experience.
Students draw a picture or take a photo of themselves with their purchases. Using the pictures/photos we make a class book
showing how much each student has spent.
We will use a simple cashbook template to draw the financial story of 2/3 students as a model.
The students will record their own transactions as a number story. Discuss individual choices The students will be able to record
their financial story using pictures, diagrams, number stories.
I will encourage parents to take their children with them on a shopping experience and have the children identify prices, select the
cash needed for the item/item and use appropriate customer manners.

Reflective questions
Exploring new knowledge and skills
How did our number skills help us when we were buying goods from the shop?
How did our number skills help us when we were the shopkeeper giving change?
Which counting strategies did you use to solve money problems?
What choices did you have to make and how did you decide?
Would you make any different choices if we did this activity again? Why?
How did you feel when people communicated with you in a positive way?
Will you make any changes to the way you communicate with others in our classroom now?
Summative Assessment:
Financial Story Success Criteria:
The students will be able to record their financial story using pictures, diagrams and number stories to show their understanding of
how to use various strategies to make different monetary amounts.

Success Criteria
I can forward count from 1-100
I can read prices on items
I can identify and name coins and notes
I can make up $5 in different ways (1,1,1,1,1/1,1,1,2)
I can make up $10 in different ways (5,5/2,2,2,2,2/2,2,1,5/1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1, etc)
I can make up $20 in different ways (10,10/5,5,5,5, etc)
I can use different strategies to count my money
I can use different strategies to work out how much I can spend
I can use different strategies to work out how much change I have to give/receive
I can select the correct strategy/strategies that works best for me
I can use various strategies to make different monetary amounts
I can draw the different strategies I used
I can create a diagram for my financial story
I can use pictures to write my financial story

Counting Strategies:
Tally marks, Number sentences, Count on fingers, use a 10 frame, mental math, use a number line, and draw a picture.

Link to the NZ Curriculum:


Within a range of meaningful contexts, students should be able to:

make up, tell, and record number stories, up to 9, about given objects and sequence pictures