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The New

Immigrants
1890-1919

Why They Came

PUSH FACTORS drive people out of their


country
PULL FACTORS pull people into a country

Why They Came


Push Factors
Lack of
Economic
Opportunity

Why They Came


Push Factors
Lack of
Economic
Opportunity

Political
Unrest in
Europe

Why They Came


Push Factors
Lack of
Economic
Opportunity

Political
Unrest in
Europe

Fleeing
Religious
Persecution

Why They Came


Push Factors
Lack of
Economic
Opportunity

Political
Unrest in
Europe

Fleeing
Religious
Persecution

Pull Factors
Many Industries Advertised
in Europe and Asia,
Promising New Jobs

Why They Came


Push Factors
Lack of
Economic
Opportunity

Political
Unrest in
Europe

Fleeing
Religious
Persecution

Pull Factors
Many Industries Advertised
in Europe and Asia,
Promising New Jobs

The Homestead Act


Created the Possibility
of Owning Farm Land

Why They Came


Push Factors
Lack of
Economic
Opportunity

Political
Unrest in
Europe

Fleeing
Religious
Persecution

Pull Factors
Many Industries Advertised
in Europe and Asia,
Promising New Jobs

The Homestead Act


Created the Possibility
of Owning Farm Land

Relatives, Who Had


Migrated Earlier,
Encouraged Them to Come

Where did they come from?


While most earlier immigrants had

come from northern and western


Europe, the New Immigrants came
from southern and eastern European
countries or from Asia or Latin
America.

Where did they come from?


They were leaving countries with

severe political problems or low


standards of living.
Many of these immigrants were
uneducated and culturally very
different than other Americans at that
time period.

European Immigration
(in millions)

Ellis Island

Impact of Immigration

Many immigrants became disillusioned

because of unfulfilled promises.


Those who settled in the growing cities
faced serious urban problems.
Ethnic neighborhoods (like
Chinatown and Little Italy)
developed in most urban areas,
allowing these cultures to flourish.
It was believed that these immigrants
needed to be Americanized.

Nativism
Most immigrants during

this time period faced


nativism (prejudice) and
xenophobia (an irrational
fear of immigrants).
Blatant discrimination
was very common
against the Irish, Poles,
Italians, Slavs, Asians,
Hispanics, Catholics and
Jews.

Pressure Mounts to Limit


Immigration

Due to nativism and xenophobia,

many citizens wanted legislation


to halt or reduce the flow of
immigrants to the U.S.
The Chinese Exclusion Act of
1882 banned any further
immigration from China.
Immigration from Japan was
reduced by the Gentlemans
Agreement of 1908.
Immigration quotas would be
set in the 1920s.
(1899)

I spose you can come in. Theres no law to keep you out.