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Board of Editors ! Barry Hoffbrand Former Editor Postgraduate Medical Journal London.,UK. Iris Bell Professor of

Board of Editors

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Barry Hoffbrand Former Editor Postgraduate Medical Journal London.,UK.

Iris Bell Professor of Family and Community Medicine (Program in Integrative Medicine) University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona USA

Juliana Brooks Senior Managing Director General Resonance, LLC Havre de Grace, Maryland USA

Effie Chow East West Academy of Healing Arts San Francisco, California USA

Barbara Dossey Director, Holistic Nursing Consultants Co-Director, Nightingale Initiative for Global Health Santa Fe, New Mexico USA

Bart Flick Visiting Professor University of Georgia Athens, Georgia USA

Dr. Krishnaswami C.V Retd. Prof. Clinical Medicine Head. Diabetology Dept, VHS centre Chennai, India.

Viktor Inyushin Doctor of Biology Professor at Al-Farabi Kazakh State University Almaty Kazakhstan

Wayne Jonas President Samueli Institute for Information Biology Alexandria Virginia USA

Brian Josephson Nobel Laureate, Physics Cambridge University, UK

G.B.Jain Formerly, Chief Physician Jassaram Hospital, New Delhi. INDIA.

Mark Mortenson General Resonance, LLC Havre de Grace, Maryland USA

Konstantin Korotkov Professor of Physics St. Petersburg State Technical University St. Petersburg, Russia

Marc Newkirk President, The Lightfield Foundation, Chester, Massachusetts, USA

Marilyn Schlitz Director of Research Institute of Noetic Sciences Petaluma, California USA

Vladimir Voeikov Professor, Vice-Chairman Faculty of Biology Lomonosov Moscow State University Moscow, Russia

Chris Reynolds Wheatgrass Pty. Ltd. PO Box 3294 Caloundra DC. Qld. 4551 Australia

Susan Lark 101, 1st Street, Suite 499 Formerly Adjunct Professor, Stanford University Los Altos, California USA

Andrew Weil Director, Program of Integrative Medicine University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona USA

David Wiebers Emeritus Professor of Neurology Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Gopal K Basisht MD Consultant Rheumatologist. 1300 Edgewater Dr. Orlando, Fl. 32804. U.S.A.

Richard Smith Former Editor of British Medical Journal Editor, Cases Journal, London. UK

William Tiller Professor Emeritus of Materials Science Stanford University Payson,Arizona,USA

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Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016
Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016

P. R. Raghavan

Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes

Metadichol and Type 2 Diabetes: Case Report

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Abstract

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Background: Metadichol is a Nano emulsion of long-chain alcohols called policosanols which are found in many foods like rice, wheat, grapes, sugar cane, apple and many others . It acts on membrane receptors in cells throughout the body to stimulate the immune system and inhibit a variety of disease processes, including those that result in metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity and hypertension.

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Methods: A 38-year-old male of middle eastern origin was diagnosed as diabetic after complaining of tiredness and bouts of hunger. He was not on any medication and chose to be treated with Metadichol @ 10 mg per day.

Findings: Metadichol helped to lower his fasting blood sugar level from 300 mg/dl to normal in 6 weeks. His HbA1C was reduced from 9.8% to 6.2% in 12 weeks. After 32 more months, his diabetic indicators remain normal.

Interpretation: Metadichol is safe and effective in controlling blood sugar and HbA1C levels in humans. Metadichol has been shown to bind to the vitamin D receptor as an inverse agonist. However, it acts more like a protean agonist ligand to increase or decrease activity depending on the system. Since Metadichol has no known negative side effects and consists of natural components of common foods, Metadichol has the potential to serve as a novel treatment for type 2 diabetes.

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Key words: Diabetes. HbA1C, Vitamin D, VDR

Introduction

Globally, it is estimated that 366 million people had diabetes in 2011 . The number of people with type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing in every country and in some low to middle income countries, up to 80% of people have diabetes. India and China are the most affected countries. Diabetes caused 4.6 million deaths in 2011. By the year 2030, it is estimated that 439 million people will have type 2 diabetes.

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Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease that can be prevented through lifestyle modification, diet control, and control of overweight and obesity. Education of the populace is still the key to control this emerging epidemic. Novel drugs are being developed but despite new insight into the pathophysiology of the disease, no cure is available in sight. We had previously shown the efficacy of Metadichol in reversing type 1 diabetes . The patient continues to produce insulin 5 years after he stopped using Metadichol. In this case report, we show Metadichol's potential use on patients with Type 2 diabetes.

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Case Report

A 38 years old man complained of tiredness and bouts of

hunger at his annual checkup. A routine blood test revealed that he had high fasting glucose level of 300 mg/dl. The patient decided against using prescription drugs and opted to

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use Metadichol at 5 mg twice a day. His glucose level was measured and monitored regularly throughout the first 12 weeks (Figures 1-8).

There was rapid improvement in his condition and by week 6, his blood glucose levels were under control. By week 12, his HbA1C (Figure 7) had dropped from 9.8% to 6.2%. His tiredness was abated within 2 weeks of starting the regimen. His blood was very thick and dark when he first started using Metadichol but by the end of week 6, his blood color was lighter and the blood flow was normal. He continued to use Metadichol at 5 mg per day and a year later, his glucose and HbA1C remained normal.

Discussion

Metadichol is a Nano emulsion of long-chain lipid alcohols (C-26, C-28 and C-30), which are commonly known as Policosanols. Metabolism studies in fibroblasts suggest that very long chain fatty alcohols, fatty aldehydes, and fatty acids are reversibly interconverted in a fatty alcohol cycle . Since the metabolites of long chain alcohols are

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Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016
Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016
Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes

interconverted, a single dosage even at low doses can theoretically have lasting effects. Metadichol has a particle size of less than 60 nm. We have shown that it binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) as an inverse agonist . It is the only known inverse agonist of VDR known in medical literature.

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General Manager of Micro-Sphere, Switzerland for sample supply and helpful discussions over the past seven years,

and Dr. SC Tang, PhD, CEO of Generation100 LLC for the

collection of data from Metadichol usage on many diseases.

Calcitriol (1,25-Dihydroxy Vitamin D) is the natural ligand for the VDR and acts as an agonist. Protean agonists act as both positive and negative agonists on the same receptor, depending on the degree of constitutive activity that is present. If there is no constitutive activity, the agonist would be a positive agonist. When constitutive activity is present, the Protean agonist would be an inverse agonist . Metadichol can also act both ways, increasing insulin secretion and reducing insulin in hyperinsulinemia . Therefore, it behaves more like a Protean agonist.

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Vitamin D is essential to the skeletal system

  • 10 and recent

evidence suggests that it also plays a major role in regulating

the immune system, perhaps through the involvement in immune responses to diseases .

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The mechanism of action of vitamin D in type 2 diabetes is thought to be mediated not only through regulation of plasma calcium levels, which regulate insulin synthesis and secretion, but also through a direct action on pancreatic beta-cell function. Therefore, owing to its increasing relevance, this review focuses on the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus . Metadichol also shares cross-reactivity with other nuclear receptors . This may explain its activity against a wide range of diseases.

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Conclusion

Metadichol is a product made from agricultural waste and is a renewable resource. It has the potential to serve as an antiviral molecule with a broad spectrum of activity, particularly given that its constituents (long-chain lipid alcohols) are present in foods commonly consumed on a daily basis and that it has demonstrated no toxicity at doses of up to 5000 mg/kg . Metadichol may also serve as a preventive agent for many tropical diseases given that it strengthens innate immunity through VDR binding. This could represent a first key step in preventing diseases. Metadichol is ready for large scale testing in countries that are ravaged by diabetes such as India and China. Once proven on large populations, Metadichol could be used as a preventive nutritional supplement and a cheaper but more effective substitute for prescription drugs that have been largely ineffective and have many adverse side effects that add to higher healthcare costs.

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Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Dr. Michel Muller, PhD,

References:

1.

Raghavan PR. 2014. US patent No 8.722.093

 

2.

Raghavan PR. 2015. US Patent No 9,006,292

 

3.

Hargrove JL, et.al. Nutritional Significance and

Metabolism of Very Long Chain Fatty Alcohols and Acids

from Dietary Waxes; Exp Biol Med (Maywood): 2004

Mar;229(3):215-26

 

4.

Kenakin T. Functional Selectivity through Protean and

Biased Agonism: Who Steers the Ship? Mol Pharmacol:

2007; 72:1393-1402

 

5.

Zimmet P, Alberti KG, Shaw J. Global and societal

implications

of

the

diabetes

epidemic.

Nature:2001

Dec;414(6865):782-787

 

6.

Raghavan PR. A case report of Type 1 Diabetes. Journal of

the Science of Healing Outcomes: 2010; Vol 2(8/9):24

 

7.

Rizzo

WB.

Inherited

disorders

of

fatty

alcohol

metabolism. Mol Genet Metab: 1998; 65:63–73

8.

Rizzo WB, Craft DA, Dammann AL, Phillips MW. Fatty

alcohol metabolism in cultured human fibroblasts: evidence for a fatty alcohol cycle. J Biol Chem: 1987;

262:17412–17419

 

9.

Neubig RR. Missing Links: Mechanisms of Protean

Agonism, Mol Pharmaco: 2007; l71:200–1202

  • 10. Christakos S, Hewison M, Gardner DG, et al. Vitamin D:

Beyond bone. Ann N Y Acad Sci: 2013; 1287:45-58

  • 11. Bikle DD. Vitamin D and immune function:

Understanding common pathways. Curr Osteoporos Rep:

2009; 7:58-63

  • 12. Palomer X, González-Clemente JM, Blanco-Vaca F,

Mauricio D. Role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of type 2

diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Obes Metab: 2008

Mar;10(3):185-97

  • 13. Raghavan PR. unpublished work

  • 14. Alemán CL, Más R, Hernández, et al. A 12-month study

of policosanol oral toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. Toxicol

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Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes

Lett; 1994; 70:77-87; Alemán, C.L, Más Ferreiro, et al. Carcinogenicity of policosanol in Sprague Dawley rats: A 24-month study. Teratog Carcinog Mutagen 1994; 14:239

15. Aleman C.L, Puig MN, ElN, E.C., et al., Carcinogenicity of policosanol in mice. An 18-month study. Food Chem Toxicol: 1995: 33, 573-8

Type 2 Diabetes interconverted, a single dosage even at low doses can theoretically have lasting effects.

Figure 1: Daily Fasting Glucose level before breakfast

Type 2 Diabetes interconverted, a single dosage even at low doses can theoretically have lasting effects.

Figure 2: Glucose level 2 hours after breakfast

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Type 2 Diabetes interconverted, a single dosage even at low doses can theoretically have lasting effects.
Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes Figure 3: Glucose level before lunch Figure 4: Glucose level 2 hours after

Figure 3: Glucose level before lunch

Type 2 Diabetes Figure 3: Glucose level before lunch Figure 4: Glucose level 2 hours after

Figure 4: Glucose level 2 hours after lunch

Type 2 Diabetes Figure 3: Glucose level before lunch Figure 4: Glucose level 2 hours after
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Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016

Figure 5: Glucose level before dinner

Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes Figure 3: Glucose level before lunch Figure 4: Glucose level 2 hours after

Figure 6: Glucose level 2 hours after dinner

Type 2 Diabetes Figure 3: Glucose level before lunch Figure 4: Glucose level 2 hours after

Figure 7: HbA1C levels at baseline and at day 84

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Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016
Vol. 8 No.32 July 2016
Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes Note: Glucose units are mg/dl Figure 8: Glucose level comparison at baseline, average

Note: Glucose units are mg/dl

Figure 8: Glucose level comparison at baseline, average first 41 days and average days 42-84

Dr. P. R. Raghavan

Nanorx Inc. P.O. Box 131 Chappaqua, NY 10514 USA Email: raghavan@nanorxinc.com

Cover: Metadichol: Metadichol is found safe and effective in controlling blood sugar and HbA1C levels in human beings. It binds to vitamin D receptor2 as an inverse agonist. It acts more like a protean agonist ligand 4 to increase or decrease activity depending on the system. Since Metadichol has no negative side effects and consists of natural components of common foods, it has the potential to serve as a novel treatment for type 2 diabetes.

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