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Tri-City Times

50

LAPEER

ST. CLAIR

MACOMB

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

142nd Volume - Issue No. 25

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Yep, its duct tape

Almont senior creates dress from popular product


dress when it comes to using
the former to create the latter.
Tri-City Times Editor
But recent Almont High
ALMONT Its been
School grad Haley Edie did just
called the cure for any problem; that.
the solution for just about
Haley decided to make duct
everything and the go-to tool
tape the center of her art projwhen all else fails.
ect, which she also decided
Were talking duct tape.
would be wearable. Then she
That uber useful, all-encomfigured there was no better
passing sticky substance known place to debut her design than
as the handymans secret
at her Senior Prom.
weapon.
At first glance, the blue and
While the well-known, and silver ankle-length dress looks
oft-made fun of all purpose tape like any other ball gown, but
is useful for patching just about upon closer examination it
anything, its a bit of a stretch
becomes clear Haleys frock is
to think duct tape and prom not your average prom dress.

By Catherine Minolli

Bring
it on!

Back of duct tape dress created by Haley Edie.

Painting the town

Artists create public works for new DDA initiative


By Nicholas Pugliese

Tri-City Times Contributing Writer

Wheelchair athlete
Jason Deloy thrives on
overcoming obstacles
By Tom Wearing

Photo by Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY Jason Deloy has little time to waste feeling sorry for himself.
The 31-year-old wheelchair Olympian
is too busy winning medals and espousing
the abilities of people with disabilities.
Seriously injured in a motorcycle accident in June of 2008, Jason excelled at the
2016 Thunder of the Valley Wheelchair
Olympics competition held June 2-5 at
Saginaw Valley State University.
Representing Lapeer Countys Wheelin
Team 457, Jason improved on his 2015
performance, winning nine medals, including the gold (first place) medal in Table
Tennis and silver (second place) in Power
Lifting, while bench pressing 140 pounds.
In this years track and field events, he
earned bronze (third place) medals in the
400 meter, 200 meter and 100 meter wheelchair races, along with three bronzes in the
Discus, Javelin and Shotput competitions.
Jason might have won more medals
had some events not been rained out,
including the Air Rifle competition in
which he took second-place honors and the
silver medal in 2015.
Jason says he was particularly pleased
with his third-place finish in the 5K Hand-

Duct tape page 6-A

Jason Deloy trains hard on a regular


basisto keep his upper body strength
for competition.
cycle bike race, during which he completed 12 laps around the track, fulfilling a
Athlete page 6-A

IMLAY CITY The


downtown district is about to
get a lot more colorful thanks
to the Downtown
Development Authoritys
new Public Art Initiative.
Two local artists were
chosen from a field of applicants to spend the summer as
resident artists in Imlay
Citys downtown district,
creating unique pieces of art
that will be displayed downtown. The artists, Hunter
Pope and Randy Hughes, say
theyre excited to get started,
and will be working out of
the old sign shop next to the
fire hall from now until July
15.
Imlay City DDA Director
Dana Walker, Imlay City is
just as excited to host the artists, and points out that the
Public Art Initiative is just
one part of a larger plan to
revitalize downtown Imlay.
Our Community
Revitalization Plan, which
was completed last fall,
called for public art installations, Walker says. So it is
very exciting to see the initiative begin.
Walker recalled the successes in recent history with
art in Imlay City and hopes
that this summers Public Art
Initiative carries on that success.

Photo by Nick Pugliese

Haley Edie in duct tape prom


dress she created.

The originally designed


dress is totally made of duct
tape.
In keeping with the theme
of the prom, which was Starry
Night, Haley chose dark blue
duct tape for the base of the
dress, and used silver and glowin-the dark duct tape for
accents.
Those choices became a
standout when the sun went
down and the lights were
dimmed for the dance.
The silver swooshes, as
we called them while designing

Hunter Pope of Imlay City with his first installation


in the DDAs Public Art Initiative project.
Last falls Art in the
Rough was extremely well
received and we are excited
to continue the positive
momentum and excitement.
Walker says.
The current project is
made possible through effort
and participation not just
from the DDA but area sponsors and supporters as well.
The DDA is grateful for
our sponsors, Frontier
Communications, Imlay City
Rotary Club and the Lions
Club, Walker says, and
were grateful for the support

we have received from the


City and our local merchants.
About the artists
Hunter Pope, a 19-yearold Imlay City resident and
2015 Imlay City High School
graduate, says he applied to
the program on the recommendation of friends.
His artistic background
started at an early age, bridging the gap between the visual mediums of painting and
drawing and the more perforArtists page 6-A

Heritage Festival in Almont this weekend

Park and Almont Community


Park.
Among Saturdays high ALMONT Summer is lights are: a Classic Car and
here!
Swap Meet from 10 a.m.-4
As proof, the Almont
p.m.; 5K Run/Walk at the
Downtown Development
high school to benefit
Authority will host its 6th
Almonts Robotics team; a
Annual Almont Heritage
pancake breakfast, pony
Festival this weekend, June rides, rock climbing wall,
24-25.
childrens games and inflata The bulk of the festivals bles, face painting, demonevents and activities will take strations, Yoga in the Park,
place downtown in the park- along with local artists, crafting lot at the southwest corers and vendors.
ner of Van Dyke and W. St.

Great entertainment
Clair St.
This years live entertain Other scheduled activiment will feature The
ties will be held at Burley
Toppermost Beatles on

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Friday night, June 24, and


the Joey Vee Band on
Saturday, June 25, from 8
p.m.-midnight.
For those wishing to wet
their whistles, the Almont
Lions Club will host its traditional beer tent. Food concessions will also be available.
DDABoard Chairman
Terry Roach describes the
Heritage Festival as an
opportunity for Almont families to gather with friends
and neighbors and celebrate
the arrival of summer.
Festival page 6-A

File photo

Live music, kids activities, food, more on tap June 24-25

Youngsters participate in Chalk Around the Fountain chalk drawing contest


during 2014 festival. This years contest begins at 11 a.m. on Sat.

Heart of a lion

In memory...

A fathers tale of his daughters


bravery and perserverance,
...see page 9-A

Family, friends gather for


memorial bench dedication,

...see page 3-A

PAGE 2-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22 2016

Noffert
Dental
2034 S. ALMONT AVE

Goulette pleads guilty to Dryden bank robbery


By Maria Brown

IMLAY CITY

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

We hope everyone had a


wonderful Fathers Day!

LAPEER

Tom
Goulette has admitted to robbing the Oxford Bank Branch
in Dryden in January, entering a guilty plea to one count

of bank robbery in District


Court on June 13.
Prosecutor Tim Turkelson
said
the
former
DrydenSchools superintendents admission will result in
his office dismissing one
count of armed robbery. Each

Be sure to call us today


and get your visit reserved.

(810) 683-5516

Subscribe Today!

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

(810) 724-2615

Fathers should lead by example


and shop at Friendys!

Bob Riehl

General Manager

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FRIENDS & FAMILY

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Commercial Truck
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Brad Curtis
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Picturesmay
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TRI-CITY AREA
Lapeer Countys former representative in the Michigan
House has been bound over to
stand trial on one count each
of perjury and misconduct in
office.
According to media
reports, an Ingham County
judge ruled last week that
there was enough evidence
for Todd Courser to stand
trial. Two other misconduct
charges against the former
Republican lawmaker were
dismissed because they allegedly occurred outside of the
county. Perjury is a 15 year
felony.
In May, Attorney General
BillSchuette formally sought
charges against Courser and
his former colleague Cindy
Gamrat. Misconduct charges
against Gamrat were dismissed.
The pair admitted to having an extra-marital affair and
were accused of using state
resources to cover it up.
Gamrat was expelled from
the House by her fellow legislators and Courser resigned.
Courser claimed that he
was under intense pressure
from an anonymous blackmailer when he sent out a
fake, salacious email alleging
his own encounter with a

male prostitute in late May in


an attempt to cover up the
affair. Michigan Speaker of
the House, Kevin Cotter,
ordered the investigation following a story and audio
recordings published by the
Detroit News in August that
suggested Courser and
Gamrat requested Coursers
then House aide, Ben Graham,
send the fake email.
A
special
Select
Committee of House members was convened to review
the findings of the House
Business Office investigation
that found instances of misconduct and misuse of taxpayer resources by the two
legislators who shared an
office and staff in Lansing.
The select committee recommended the two face
expulsion. Schuette alleges
that Courser perjured himself
when testifying before the
select committee.
Both Gamrat and Courser
sought to regain their seats in
a special November 3 primary election but neither was
successful. A Michigan State
Police investigation showed
that Gamrats husband, Joe
Gamrat, was the anonymous
blackmailer. Lapeer County
Prosecutor Tim Turkelson
declined to press charges in
the case, saying his actions
did not constitute criminal
extortion.

Police and fire briefs . . .


Editors note: The following is a compilation of activity
and reports from area police and fire departments.

Girl hospitalized after dog bite


CAPAC A three-year-old girl was hospitalized after a
serious dog bite incident that occurred June 18 on N. Neeper
Street.
The Capac Police Department reports that charges will be
filed against the owner, a former village resident, who was
visiting someone at the time of the incident.
The dog allegedly bit the girl and also the girls mother
when the mother tried to intervene.
Both the girl and her mother were treated by EMS and
transported to McLaren Lapeer Region Hospital but the
extent of the girls injuries required her to be taken to
Childrens Hospital. She suffered a broken bone among other
injuries. As of press time she was still hospitalized.
Police anticipate leveling vicious animal causing serious
injury charges against the owner.

Senior Project FRESH coupons


TRI-CITY AREA Those 60 years of age or older
who have difficulty getting enough fruits and vegetables
in their diets may qualify for Senior Project FRESH,
which offers free $20 coupons to spend at Michigan farmers markets. Lapeer County residents over 60 earning less
than $1,832 a month qualify. Coupon booklets available
on Tues., July 5 at Silver Maples, Wed., July 6 at
Riverview Towers, Thurs., July 7 at the Imlay City Senior
Center, and Wed., July 13 at the Lapeer County Health
Department. All coupons will be passed out from 10 a.m.1:00 p.m. Participants are asked to bring a picture I.D.
and proof of income. Call 810-667-0341 for more information.

Join Tri-City Times on Facebook


Deb Ruth

Business Manager

1515 Lapeer Rd.

www.jimriehl.com

dished a gun and demanded


money.
The following day,
according to bank employees
in Dryden, a lone male walked
through the Main Street
banks front doors wearing a
black ski mask and verbally
demanded money from bank
tellers. He did not display a
weapon but implied he hand
one, keeping one hand in his
coat pocket. There were no
customers in the bank at the
time and no employees were
hurt in the incident.
Goulette retired from
Dryden Schools in 2013 after
logging more than 20 years in
education and launched a
personal fitness business
with his daughter from their
home.

Courser bound over


on two felony charges

We look forward to seeing you!

SALE PRICE ONLY

count can result in prison


terms of any number of years,
up to life.
The 51-year-old Armada
Township resident will be
sentenced by Judge Nick
Holowka on July 18.
Hes currently serving a
three and a half to 20 year
sentence in the state prison
system after pleading guilty
to one count of armed robbery in St. Clair County.
Goulette appeared via a video
feed for his June 13 hearing
but will be physically present
for sentencing, Turkelson
said.
St. Clair County Sheriff
investigators say Goulette
walked into Tri-County Bank
on North Brockway Road on
January 7 where he bran-

Jim Sadik

Business Manager

Rachel Walls

Business Development
Specialist

TRI-CITY AREA Were


on Facebook! Navigate your way
to the Tri-City Times Facebook
page and become a follower. Well be posting frequent
news updates, photos and event reminders.
You can find us at www.facebook.com/Tricitytimes.
Have any suggestions for what youd like to see? Post
your thoughts while logged on or send us an email at tct@
pageone-inc.com.

PAGE 3-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22 2016

Memorial bench
dedicated in Imlay
IMLAYCITY A large
group of family, friends and
former co-workers gathered
downtown Friday afternoon to
remember Tamarah (Tami)
Buchbinder Gonyea.
A former downtown business owner, Gonyea, 50, died
in a traffic accident on
November 21, 2015.
The occasion of Fridays
gathering was an official
unveiling and dedication of a
memorial bench in honor of
Gonyea.
The bench, which is situated along Third Street and
near her former hair salon,
features a photo and name
plate of Gonyea, along with
words of remembrance.
Among those in attendance on Friday was Gonyeas
longtime friend and former
landlord, Patti Smith, who
helped raise more than $500
for the purchase of the memorial bench.
Smith said the bench is a

Memorial bench offers a


lasting testament to a
much-loved friend.
fitting memory for an individual who brought so much happiness to others during her
lifetime.
She was a wonderful person who was loved by so many
people, said Smith. Now
those people can come down
here and remember her anytime they wish.
Another friend, Jane

Smith, remembered Gonyeas


winning personality and hardy
laugh.
Tami had a great laugh
that no one can ever forget,
said Smith. She was a generous, kind, loyal and true
friend.
We need to remind ourselves to live and love and
laugh as much as we can, she
said, because life is short.
Tamis husband, Gerald
Gerry Gonyea, to whom she
was married on September 23,
1995, wiped back tears before
acknowledging the kindness
and generosity of all those in
attendance.
Iknow how much all of
you meant to Tami, and how
much Tami meant to all of
you, he said. Thanks to Patti
(Smith) and to the many
friends and clients that are
here today. And thank you all
for being such good friends
and neighbors.
Representing the City of
Imlay City were Mayor Walt
Bargen and DDA
Director

A large group of family and friends of Tami Gonyea gathered in downtown


Imlay City Friday (June 10) afternoon to honor her memory and help dedicate
a memorial bench that is currently situated along Third Street.
Dana Walker, each of whom
offered brief words of condolence.
Also present was Randy
Hall of Imlay Citys Heritage
Church who offered a prayer.
Tamarah Tami Lynn
Buchbinder was born Sept. 22,
1965 in Bad Axe to Gerald
and
Patricia
(Vennard)
Buchbinder.
Tami was a graduate of
Imlay City High School, with
the dream of one day becoming a hairdresser.
With that goal in mind,
she went to cosmetology
school, thus beginning a
32-year career as a hair dresser.

National Sojourners present check, plaque


By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

ALMONT Almont
High School graduating
senior Annalise Bourdeau of
Dryden was awarded a
$2,000 prize and plaque from
the National Sojourners
Detroit #1 chapter.
Annalise earned the honors by taking first place in a
national essay contest, writing on the topic which historical American document
in National Archives and
Records Administrations
archives is most important to
you and why?
Annalise chose the
Americans with Disabilities

Act (ADA) of 1990, which is


close to her heart because her
brothersMadison
and
Graysonwere born with
autism.
This Act has already
positively impacted my
brothers lives, Annalise
writes in her essay. They
both currently have jobs,
which they ride buses to or
take a taxi to. They are
trained a little differently
than the normal employees,
but the law sees them as
equal members of society.
Society will always be
judgmental of my brothers,
but in the eyes of the law,
equality shall never be
denied.

Annalise writes about her


brothers wishes to be part of
the mainstream, adding how
the ADA makes it a bit easier
for them to do.
They want to fit in and
be like everyone else, be
treated the same, Annalise
writes. The Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990
makes that a little bit easier
for them. It gives them opportunities and a more meaningful life, as well as the responsibilities and importance they
deserve.
The National Sojourners
was formed in the early
1900s for displaced military

Masons to gather for


support, counsel and
aid.
According to the
website www.nationalsojourners.org,
the
groups efforts are
aimed at Americanism
and Masonic activities.
Patriotic activities
include speeches, flag
ceremonies, presentations and other actions
intended to promote
national security and
true love of country,
with special emphasis
on youth, the website
says.

Attendees peruse through a scrapbook containing


photos of the late Imlay City businesswoman.

Photo Provided

Almont grad earns first place for essay

Photo by Tom Wearing

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Photo by Tom Wearing

Popular hairstylist, Tami Gonyea, is remembered

Annalise Bourdeau receives first place essay contest


check and award from Armand Cote of the National
Sojourners Detroit #1 chapter. Annalise wrote about her
brothers Grayson (left) and Madison (right) Bourdeau.

Summer Food Program


to return to Imlay City
Free meals available to children, disabled
By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

IMLAY CITY The


Imlay City School district is
again sponsoring the Summer
Food Service Program for
Children.

STADIUM SEATING
For Showtimes &
Ticket Information
www.ncgmovies.com
or call

810-667-7469
1650 DeMille
Tuesday $5.00 All Day
For Most Movies

Free meals are available


to children 18-years-old or
under, or persons up to age 26
who are enrolled in an educational program for the mentally or physically disabled
that is recognized by a state or
local public educational agency. Meals are provided without regard to race, color,
national origin, age, sex, or
disability.
Free meals will be served
at Imlay City Middle School,
495 W. First Street, from June
27 through August 8.
Breakfast will be served from
7:45-9 a.m.; lunch will be
served from 11 a.m.-12:30
p.m., and a late meal is also
served from 2-3 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Community
children are invited to participate in the free Summer Food
Service program.
No meals will be served
on Monday, July 4, due to the
holiday.

Kids Night

Thursday, June 30th 6pm to 8pm

Stop by and see


our friend from
Paw Patrol!
Join us for dinner also!

ADMISSION
PRICES

BEFORE 6PM
All Seats Are $6.00

PG

Wednesday, June 22 & Thursday, June 23, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45 & 9:15pm
Friday, June 24 thru Thursday, June 30, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 & 9:30pm

Children 12
& under
$6.00

PG-13

Thursday, June 23, 8:00pm


Friday, June 24 thru Thursday, June 30, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45 & 9:30pm

Join Our Email Club

Senior Citizens
55 and older
$6.00
Students with
Student ID
$7.00

www.RomeoTheatre.com SAVE $$$ GET COUPONS!

ROMEO THEATRE 586-752-3455

MOVIE HOTLINE

66120 Van Dyke In the Village Shopping Center

Kids buffet featuring Hot Dogs,


Hamburgers, Spaghetti and lots more!

AFTER 6PM
Adults $8.00

Imlay City Big Boy


1949 S. Cedar & I-69
810-724-3664

www.bigboy.com for more information

4.99 includes beverage

Adults $12.99 includes Endless Soup, Salad and Fruit Buffet.


Kids night will now be the 2nd and 4th Thursday of Every Month

PAGE 4-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22 2016

Imlay cancels year-round program


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

IMLAY CITY After


two years, Imlay City Schools
has had to end its Balanced
Calendar program due to low
enrollment.
Dr. Stu Cameron, executive director of curriculum
and instruction, made the
official announcement on
June 1 in a letter to parents,
saying that minimum thresholds for class sizes had not
been met at multiple grade
levels.
The
Balanced
Calendar or year-round program had students in grades
Kindergarten through fifth
grades attending school 12
months out of the year with
four to six weeks of class
time followed by a one to
two week break or intercession period in lieu of a three
month summer vacation. The
program was due to begin
July 19.
While I am sure that,
like myself, you find this
announcement disappointing, we are confident that we

can meet the needs of all our


students and families in our
outstanding traditional calendar program, Cameron said
in his letter to parents.
Before the entire program was cancelled, administrators had already decided
to close the fifth grade offering due to very low enrollment which, Cameron said,
created a minor domino
effect in that a number of
parents opted to pull siblings
in lower grades out the
Balanced Calendar program
something he called logical
and understandable.
Having your elementary
aged children on a split
school schedule could be
very difficult to manage,
Cameron said.
The enrollment period
for other grades was extended but the numbers still
werent sufficient. He said
minimum thresholds for this
program were set to achieve
an even number of students
in each classroom at each
grade level so as to prevent
overloading of classrooms in

MANDY J FLORIST
& GIFTS

the traditional calendar.


We valued the Balanced
Calendar program and still
believe in it conceptually as a
viable and effective program,
but when making instructional decisions we have to balance the needs and effects of
individual programs against
the impact they may have on
the students across the entire
school, he said.
Finances were a consideration as well. Additional
staffing costs come from
having a Balanced Calendar
program and with fewer students, Cameron said the district could have incurred a
financial burden that had to
be weighed against the
needs of all of our other
instructional programming at
the school and district level.
He stresses that the move
is only temporarily and that
its likely Imlay City Schools
will reevaluate interest on a
yearly or, at least, periodic
basis.
We know how to run it,
and run it effectively. We
understand all of the logistics

involved. If we can generate


enough interest in the program in the future, I believe
it would definitely be worth
proposing a renewal of the
program to our Board for
consideration, Cameron
said.
With the closing of this
chapter, administrators say
theyre grateful to the parents, students and staff whom
they consider the Balanced
Calendar pioneers.
It was a big commitment for everyone involved,
and I believe an interesting
and valuable experience for
everyone that was involved,
he said.
As a result of this move,
all Imlay City students will
start the 2016-17 school year
on August 29. Last month the
district earned permission
from the state to start before
Labor Day, taking advantage
of a waiver sought by the
Lapeer County ISD, something allowed because of
their affiliation with an institution of higher learning, the
STEMAcademy.

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Low enrollment in Balanced Calendar program forces decision

Retiring Old Glory


Imlay City veterans Butch Earehart and John
Mulder throw tattered American flags on the fire
during flag retirement ceremonies at the Imlay
City VFWPost on Tuesday, June 14. An estimated 150 flags were retired as part of the annual VFW/American Legion Flag Day event.

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FRIDAY, JUNE 24TH

Art on the Lawn

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Almont District Library

Rare/Out of Print Book Sale

11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Almont District Library

Refreshment Tent

5:00 pm - Midnight

Festival Tent

Toppermost Beatle Tribute Band

8:00 pm - Midnight

Festival Tent

SATURDAY, JUNE 25

Michigan Hydro & Gardening Center


Sponsor: Almont Lions Club
Sing along to your favorite oldies!

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Pancake Breakfast

8:00 am - 11:00 am

First Congregational Church

Classic Car Show and Swap Meet

9:00 am - 4:00 pm

First Congregational Church

Prizes in 10 Categories!

5k Run/Fun Walk

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Almont High School

Shock and Awe-Sum Robotics

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Almont High School Track

Vendors

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Downtown Almont

Sponsor: Almont Robotics


Team #4961
Interactive Robotics Fun for
Youth!

Art on the Lawn

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Almont District Library

Rare/Out of Print Book Sale

10:00 am - 2:00 pm

Almont District Library

Almont Historical Museum Open

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

149 S. Main Street

Yoga in the Community Park

11:00 am - Noon

222 Water Street

Chalk Around the Fountain Contest

11:00 am - Noon

Fountain Park

Magic Show

11:00 am - Noon

Festival Tent

Story Time With Miss Donna

Noon - 12:30 pm

Almont District Library

Dance Performance

Noon - 1:00 pm

Festival Tent

Childrens Yoga

12:30 - 1:00 pm

Almont District Libray

Sponsor: Jocelyns School of


Dance
Stretch and story with Ms. Dina!

Magic Show

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Festival Tent

Sponsor: Almont Ash Sifters

Nasquack on the River

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Almont Community Park

Childrens Games

Noon - 4:00 pm

Burley Park

Pony Rides

Noon - 4:00 pm

Burley Park

Sponsor: Almont Project


Graduation 2017
Sponsors: Almont Ash Sifters/
Almont Vineyard Church

Rock Wall/Inflatables

Noon - 4:00 pm

Burley Park

Clown, Balloon Twisting

Noon - 4:00 pm

Festival Tent

Sponsors: Spring Dynamics/


North Branch Rent All
Sponsor: Charlie Browns

Shock and Awe-Sum Robotics

Noon - 4:00 pm

Burley Park

Interactive Robotics Themed Fun!

Child ID

Noon - 4:00 pm

Festival Site

Sponsor: Almont Police Department

Refreshment Tent

Noon - Midnight

Festival Tent

Sponsor: Almont Lions Club

The Joey Vee Band

8:00 - Midnight

Festival Tent

Playing all your New Country


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PAGE 5-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22 2016

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PAGE 6-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Issues for voters to decide this August


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

TRI-CITY AREA In
addition to candidate races,
several millage proposals are
due to appear on the August
primary ballot.
InSt. Clair County, voters
will be tasked with deciding
the fate of four county-wide
leviesthree renewals and
one increase request.

The renewals include the


Parks and Recreation millage
(six years at .4954), roads
millage (four years at .25
mills) and Veterans Affairs
(six years at .10 mills). The
parks millage generates about
$2.7 million per year, roads
net $1.4 million and Veteran
Affairs receives $562,00 in
millage funds.
The Drug Task Force is
looking to up their levy from

.2803 to .5610 mills for a


period of four years, with
estimated revenues pegged at
$3.15 million for the first
year.
The only local St. Clair
County ballot issue in the TriCity area is for a .5 mills local
roads and ditch proposal in
Berlin Township.
Monies from this millage will be used to fund
repairs and maintenance to

deteriorating infrastructure
(culverts and limestone),
additional dust control (additional application(s) of calcium chloride) and ditching in
areas where existing ditches
are inadequate for their purpose,
the ballot language
states.
In Lapeer County, theres
just one county-wide proposal
on the ballot for Tri-City votersa renewal of the .33

mills Lapeer County Medical


Care Facility millage will
appear on the August ballot
too. County officials are
asking for another ten-year
term from 2018 to 2027. Its
estimated to generate more
than $887,536 in the first
year.
In Almont, the township
seeks to renew their five year,
one mill fire levy, which
would raise $218,875.

Additionally, the Almont


District Library is seeking a
1.25 mill, ten-year millage
renewal,
which
would
generate $274,741 in the first
year.
In Goodland Township,
their library millage is up for
renewal. The ballot question
will ask to continue the .9 mill
levy for five years from 2016
to 2020, raising about $52,000
in the first year.

Athlete: No obstacles for Jason Deloy

Photo provided

from page 1-A


dream and honoring a promise he made his late grandmother after his motorcycle
accident.
Last year I didnt have a
bike, so I couldnt compete
in that event, Jason notes.
Now that I have it, I want
to thank all of the people
who donated and helped me
get my hand-cycle.
Jason acquired the bike
last summer, just in time to
represent Wheelin Team 457
in Imlay Citys 2015
Blueberry Festival Parade.
He says the festivals
Blueberry Festival Parade
Committee has invited him
back for the 2016 parade,
which takes place on
Saturday, July 23.
Though he enjoys the
attention success has brought
him, Jason says his participation in the wheelchair olymAlmont High School grad Haley Edie with prom dress she designed and crepics goes far beyond selfated entirely out of duct tape. The dress was a hit at the annual Duck Tape
gratification.
Festival this past weekend.
This was my third time
competing and Im proud of
it, he says. But I want to
encourage others to get
design because of the weight sibly another creation. A seg- involved.
from page 1-A
of the duct tape.
ment on the festival is set to Iwant people to know
the dress, represented the
For the ease of getting in air on the Today Show,
wind and the glow in the
that this chair isnt going to
and out of the dress, Haley
Friday, June 24.
dark dots represented the
keep me down. I can still get
employed another invalu Haley has always been
stars in the dark sky, Haley
out and have fun like everyable, all-around fix-it tool:
creative, say parents Dale
says.
body else.
Velcro.
and Cristy Edie.
I also wanted to incor People with disabilities
Haley says using duct
As evidence, the Edies
porate flowers into my
can still be active and do
design so I added the flower tape was a sticky undertak- say one Halloween she
things other people do, he
found on the top of my dress ing. She recruited her friend decided to dress up as one of insists. Idont want to lay
Lydie Eichsteadt to help her
her favorite book characters around looking at the four
as well as my hair piece to
accomplish her work of art.
and designed a set of wings
give the dress some more
walls. I want to get out and
Not counting the time it took that would collapse and
sparkle.
do things and have fun.
expand eight feet wide.
Haley adds that the stars to shop for all the duct tape,
Haley spent 30 hours creat Last year Haley created a
as well as the center filaing her Starry Night prom
hanging lamp made out of
ments in the flowers were
dress.
plastic spoons which earned
made with glow in the dark
In keeping with the
her honors in the 2015
duct tape. The glittery tape
theme, Haley attended the
Scholastic Art and Writing
reflects off of the surroundDuck Tape Festival in Avon, Competition.
ing silver petals to create a
Ohio this past weekend,
Haley recently graduated from page 1-A
glowing effect.
mance-based medium of
where she garnered a lot of
from Almont High School
I hope everyone has as
attention in her one of a kind and in the fall will be attend- music.
much fun seeing it as I had
ing Michigan Technological I started getting serious
making and wearing it! she gown.
about art in my freshman
She participated in a
University to pursue a
says.
year of high school, Pope
style show, met some fandegree in Mechanical
Haley began the project
says. And when that hapEngineering.
in December 2015, shopping tastically creative people,
and was interviewed by duct Haley had so much fun pened I started with graphite
for the 26 rolls of duct tape
and charcoal, then I started
tape promotional crew and a wearing her dress at the
that it took to make the
oil painting and ever since
dress. After careful consid- United Airlines inflight mag- prom, and she enjoyed the
then Ive been experimenting
azine.
festival so much, Cristy
eration and many modificawith different styles.
Haley hopes to return to
says. It was a neat experitions to the original design
Pope is passionate about
the event next year with pos- ence all the way around.
she went with a two-piece
his art, but hes equally passionate about music, as seen
in his first piece for the
DDAa larger-than-life guitar.
Ive been a musician for
longer than Ive been a professional artist, and I play
guitar, Pope says, and to
add value to the city, I think
music needs to be represented too, and if I can do that
with visual art then Im
going to.
Pope isnt
sure what his next piece will
be, but hes excited to have
the opportunity to explore
different styles of art and
how he can combine his pasVisitors converge on downtown Almont during 2014 Heritage Festival. This
sions with Imlay Citys culyears festival kicks off this Friday, June 24.
ture.
Ive looked forward to
this whole thing, its a great
chance to experiment, Pope
says.
and
a
pair
of
childrens
top
three
artists.
from page 1-A
While Pope hopes to
magic shows sponsored by
For questions or more
Duck race at the park
continue doing art, hes curthe Almont Fire
information, call 586-784 It should be noted that
rently enrolled as a pre-med
Departments Ash Sifters
5137 or email to: nedrab@
the wildly popular
student in college.
group at 11 a.m. and
comcast.net.
NasQuack in the Park
Randy Hughes is
1 p.m.
Vendor apps online
plastic duck race will be
Chalk Drawing contest Artist, crafter and vendor 22-years-old and lives in
returning Saturday from 3-4
Young artists in grades
applications are available at Marlette. She is currently
p.m. at Almont Community
enrolled at Mott Community
6-12 are invited to meet at
the DDA office at the
Park.
Fountain Park for the 2016
Almont Municipal Building, College, with hopes to trans Proceeds from the funChalk Around the
or on line at: www.almontd- fer to the Kendall College of
filled event will go toward
Art & Design in Grand
Fountain chalk drawing
da.com.
Almont High Schools
Rapids in pursuit of a degree
contest, starting at 11 a.m.
For up-to-date informaProject Graduation.
in illustration and photograon Saturday.
tion about the the Almont
Other Saturday activities The patriotic-themed
Heritage Festival, follow the phy. Like Pope, Hughes also
will include:Art on the
has a strong background in
contest is again being coorDDA of Facebook at
Lawn at the Almont District dinated by the Almont
Downtown Almont, call the art.
Library on West St. Clair St.; American Legion Auxiliary.
Ive always drawn and I
DDAoffice at 810-798an open house at the
Cash prizes of $50, $25
8128, or visit the DDA web- never really considered it
Almont Historical Museum;
and $15 will be awarded the site at: www.almontdda.com. more than a hobby but in my

Duct tape: Fabric used for prom dress

Prior to his competitions,


Jason dedicates many hours
to training and preparation,
whether it be rolling through
his neighborhood on a daily
basis or during scheduled
workouts.
His commitment to a
regular physical fitness routine has translated not only
to success in wheelchair
events, but has led to significant financial and moral support from the community.
Jason acknowledges his
fellow Wheelin Team 457
members, Imlay City Eagles,
numerous local business
sponsors and generous individuals for their past and
continuing assistance.
If it werent for the
Wheelin Team, I dont know
where Id be right now, he
says. I strongly encourage
others with disabilities to try
it out and to become active.
I personally feel good
about being able to inspire
others, says Jason, whether
they are disabled or ablebodied people.
There are a lot of things
we can all do to challenge
ourselves and one another,
but you have to get motivated.
Jason is not lacking
when it comes to motivation,
which sometimes requires a
degree of self-promotion.
Im not shy, says
Jason. I dont mind asking
people for help. Right now,
Im trying to raise money to
buy a hand-controlled trike

Jasons best friend, Jon


Maldonado, is always
there to offer support.
from Ray Cs. Iwant to be
able to get back on a motorcycle again. Thats my goal.
Given Jasons history of
accomplishing things that
may seem difficult, even
impossible to others, that
goal could well be realized
in the very near future.

July 16 fundraiser

With Jasons dream of


again climbing aboard a
motorcycle in his purview,
Spartys Bar & Grill at 145
E. Capac Rd. (Old M-21)
will host a fundraiser from 6
p.m. to 2 a.m. to raise money
toward the eventual purchase
of a three-wheel hand-controlled motorcycle.
The event will feature a
50/50 raffle, auction and
music.

File photo

Festival: Family fun in Almont on tap

Photo by Nick Pugliese

Artists: DDA launches new initiative

Marlette resident Randy Hughes with portrait of


train shes creating as her first piece in the DDA
art initiative project.
senior year of high school I
went into graphic designs at
the Sanilac Career Center,
Hughes says, and I found
that I really enjoyed doing
that more than anything
else. Her first project, a
grayscale airbrushing of a
steam engine, ties directly
into the roots of Imlay City.
I decided to do a train
after I read up on the history
of Imlay City, which inspired
me, Hughes says.
Like Pope, Hughes is not
sure what the next project
will be, but she is excited for
the opportunity to explore
different mediums. She
applied to the program near
the deadline and didnt
expect to be accepted.
I figured I might as well
try, because if I dont try,
theres no chance of getting
in, she says.
At the conclusion of the
month-long project the DDA
will host a gathering to celebrate the installation of the
public artwork. The event is

slated for July 14 from 6-8


p.m. Along with a reception,
the event includes a walking
tour of downtown, led by the
artists.
The event will be free
to attend, open to the public,
and will be a great way for
people to meet the artists,
Walker says.
The goal of the Art
Initiative, like many projects
undertaken by the Imlay City
DDA, is to increase traffic
and participation in downtown, which results in more
patronage of downtown businesses and more ways residents can take pride in their
downtown district.
Cultural activities like
art shows or art exhibits are
a great way to attract visitors
while adding another amenity for residents, Walker
says, and the community
seems to support
Placemaking strategies
because of the tremendous
positive effects they have on
a downtown and city.

PAGE 7-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22 2016

DDA Director search


ongoing in Almont

Photo by Tom Wearing

Eleven applicants file resumes


for the part-time director post

Spartys Sport Bar & Grill managers Tom Nikollaj and Maria Gjonaj flank
wheelchair athlete Jason Deloy. Spartys has supported Deloys athletic
endeavors and will host a July 15th fundraiser.

Spartys to host July 16


benefit for Jason Deloy
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY

Wheelchair Olympian Jason


Deloy has been the recipient
of widespread support from
the community since a June
2008 motorcycle accident
landed him in a wheelchair.
For the past two years,
its been the communitys
generosity that has afforded
the wheelchair athlete an
opportunity to participate in
the Thunder in the Valley
Wheelchair Olympics competition at Saginaw Valley
State University.
Having earned seven
medals during last years
competition, Deloy upped
his game, capturing nine
medallions in the 2016
games, held June 2-5 at
SVSU.
Deloy, 31, said he owes a
debt of gratitude to his loyal
friends, supporters and business sponsors, who have
afforded him the opportunity
to compete.
Among those sponsors
are the management and staff
at Spartys Bar & Grill,
located at 145 E. Capac Rd.
(old M-21), who have helped

cover his registration and


entry fees for the recent
Thunder in the Valley games.
Spartys new management team, consisting of
Maria Gjonaj and Tom
Nikollaj, said Deloy regularly reciprocates their generosity with some of his own.
Jason is not only a loyal
customer, said Maria, but
he helps promote the restaurant, and hes always ready
and willing to help out waiting on customers and clearing tables when were busy.
He just shines with positive energy, Maria continued. Jason is motivated like
nobody else I know, and he is
a wonderful example to others.
Nikollaj said Deloys
positive temperament and
can-do attitude tend to rub
off on others in his presence.
The first time I met
Jason, I felt like I had known
him forever, Nikollaj
recalled. This man has a lot
of heart and he deserves
every bit of support he gets.
Spartys
employee
Anthony Hargis said he, too,
admires Deloys rare spirit
and work ethic.

Ive watched this guy


work his butt off around
here, said Hargis. To be
able to do everything he does
is just phenomenal.
In another show of support for the highly successful
wheelchair athlete, Spartys
will host a Saturday, July 16
fundraiser to help raise
money toward an eventual
purchase of a hand-controlled three-wheel motorcycle for Deloy.
The event, to run from 6
p.m. to 2 a.m., will feature an
auction, various raffles and
music.
Deloy also acknowledged the ongoing support of
Wheelin Team 457, Ray Cs
of Lapeer, Imlay City Eagles,
Milestone
Motors
of
Chesterfield Township, along
with
friends:
Donna
Mackenzie of Beaumont
Hospital, Jon Maldonado,
Nick Long and Missy Lane,
who are helping raise funds
toward the purchase of a
hand-operated motorcycle.
Deloy said those unable
to attend the July 16 fundraiser but wishing to make a
donation, may contact Jason
Deloy at 810-542-0158.

IMLAY
CITY

Residents of all ages can set


their imaginations free at the
DDAs Summer Concert
Series on Tues., June 28 as
Arts & Scraps takes center
stage.
The Detroit area nonprofit organization will be in
Lamb Steele Park from 78:30 p.m.
The Arts & Scraps project was founded in 1989 and
uses reclaimed and recycled
industrial materials for children for use in art projects
designed to foster creativity
inspiration, and recycling.
Some 28 tons of material is
used each year by 275,000
children in 3,300 communities.
Its great to have Arts &
Scraps here, says DDA
Promotions
Assistant
Nicholas Pugliese. Itll give
kids in the area a chance to do
something different and creative outdoors.
The event is made possible through a partnership
between the Imlay City DDA
and the Ruth Hughes Library.
Both organizations welcome
opportunities to work together and are pleased to coordinate for such a positive
event. The DDA and the
library have a great relationship, and a lot of events
wouldnt happen if it werent

for our ability to work together for the good of Imlay City,
Pugliese says.
Library staff agrees that
the partnership is mutually
beneficial.
The DDA has been just
incredibly friendly and
incredibly helpful, says
Amanda Summers, Library
youth services coordinator.
Theyre truly lovely.
The DDA and library
have a history of working
side-by-side for the good of
the community, and the Arts
& Scraps event is another
example of planning that
comes to fruition in a positive
way.
Its nice to have a community where everyone cooperates in a fellowship,
Library Technical Services
Coordinator Jessica Bostian
says, and it fosters that small
town feeling that you want in
a small community that
everyone wants, but you dont
always get.
At the June 28 event,
library staff will be teaching
kids all about the art of papercraft and with their Sizzix
diecut machine and will assist
children in creating custom
bookmarks, paper masks, and
more.
The library is also providing the kids with gift boxes
and assembly projects.

Start Your
Search
For the
Perfect
Garden
at

EVERYTHING ON SALE!

Imlay concert series


hosts Arts & Scraps
Interactive, family friendly event
is June 28th at Lamb Steele Park

Tammy
Pepper,
Vice
Chairperson; Steve Schneider,
Secretary; Jenny Vanecek,
Treasurer; and Board members Mike Bohm, Michele
budgets
and
grant
writing.
By Tom Wearing
Breen, Al Dettmer, Christie

Current
Almont
Tri-City Times Staff Writer
DDABoard members include: Kinkade, Johanna Nuculovic
ALMONT

The Terry Roach, Chairperson; and Lynn Zarate.


Downtown
Development
Authority Board continues its
search to find a successor for
longtime DDA Director
Nancy Boxey.
Boxey resigned the post
on June 2 to accept a full-time
position with the Michigan
Dept. of Agriculture and Rural
Development.
DDA Board Chairman
Terry Roach reported that 11
applications had been submitted for the vacant Directors
post by the June 17 deadline.
He said a DDABoard
search committee, consisting of himself, Steve
Schneider, Tammy Pepper
and Johanna Nuculovic, will
meet soon to review the candidates resumes.
We hope to whittle the
list down to two or three finalists by next week, said
Roach. If the committee feels
there are no viable candidates,
we can initiate a second
search.
The vacant part-time
DDADirector position had
been posted on the Michigan
Municipal League and Almont
DDA websites, in addition to
ads in local newspapers.
Though the DDABoard
has the authority to approve
the hiring of a new director,
final approval would be
required by the Almont
Village Council.
Roach said the DDA
Board hopes to hire someone
to fill the Directors position
as soon as possible.
However, that decision
will not likely become official
until the DDA Boards
Wednesday, July 20 meeting.
Boxey served as Almonts
Downtown
Development
Authority Director for nine
years before announcing her
resignation on May 19.
Directors job description
The Almont DDA Director
serves as the part-time (20

hours per week) administrator

of the authority and serves at


the discretion of the Almont
DDA Board. The candidates
salary will be determined
based on his/her education
and experience.
The Director is responsible for planning, organizing,
directing and coordinating all
DDA-sponsored activities and
events within the DDA district.
The Director also serves
as a liaison between the DDA
and local merchants and service organizations and is
responsible for promoting

economic development within


the DDA district, preparing

GET IT WHILE IT LASTS

Arts & Scraps will offer


free artistic fun in Imlay
City on June 28.
Were repurposing older
materials as a second life for
old wallpapers, magazines,
vintage paper, and old, damaged atlases, Bostian says.
People can make their own
stationery and cards, with 3D
objects.
Also participating in the
event is Melvin, also known
as Spunky the Clown.
Spunky will teach kids how
to create balloon animals,
along with entertaining the
crowd.
People of all ages are welcome to participate in the free
Arts and Scraps event. In
the case of inclement weather, the event will be moved
inside at Heritage Church on
M-53 (behind the Silver
Grill). For more information
call 810-724-2135 or visit
www.icdda.com.

Tri-City Times
Published weekly by Delores Z. Heim. Office:
594 N. Almont Ave. P.O. Box 278, Imlay City,
MI 48444. USPS No. 014440. Additional entry
application pending.
Subscriptions: $30 per year Lapeer & St.
Clair Counties; Out of Counties $32 per year,
Senior Citizens $27 per year In-County. Outof-State mailing $40 per year. Outside USA $60
per year. Single Copies 50.
Periodicals paid at Imlay City.
Postmaster please send address changes to
P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.

Fri
Sat. 9; 9am-5pm

Summer Concert Series

DOWNTOWN IMLAY CITY


Join us Tuesday, June 28th
at Lamb Steele Park
(In case of inclement weather, concert will be held at Heritage Church, 543 N. Cedar Street)

Arts and Scraps Mobile &


Ruth Hughes Library Craft

also, stop and see . . .

Spunky the Clown

More information can be found at: www.icdda.com or www.facebook.com/downtownimlaycity

PAGE 8-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Opinion Page

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Letters from our readers...


I would like to comment
on our leaders in Washington
and again, as they say, if we
get more gun control we can
end all these mass murders
that plague our country.
They seem so outraged by
these large amounts of killings but then they support
abortion. Do they or do we
not realize that when we dis-

respect one group of humans,


we disrespect all groups of
humans?
We have been ending the
lives of our unborn since
1973. At 3,000 plus children a
day, Ineed to ask, is this not
genocide? How can we be so
blatantly ignorant? How can
we go into such an uproar
over some killings and be so

silent against another?


Forty-three years later, I
will let you add up the number
of children, the next and next
generation that we have sat by
and allowed to disappear from
this earth.
I find the killing of any
life, born or unborn, unacceptable. We vote for leaders who
are extremely pro-abortion.

On television, one man


spoke of his friend who, during the tragedy in Orlando,
texted him saying help me.
How many unborn babies, if
they could speak, would say
help me?
We just dont get it, do
we?
Deanna Wood
Attica

Why change when we are on top?


Well, it seems to me that
the thinking of some in
Lapeer County is upside
down. I dont get it.

The FBI reports that


Lapeer Countys crime rate
has dropped 30% in the last 7
years.

Our Opinion
LCVA taking action to
support veterans

t a time when everyones giving lip service to taking care of and providing
resources for our countrys veterans,
the office Lapeer County Veterans Affairs is
doing more than talking.
With Director Ed Ronders at the helm, the
LCVA is taking action to see that the needs of
area veterans are met. Ronders has launched a
variety of programs aimed at helping veterans
find employment, find support, connect with
resources and acquire all of the benefits they
have earned through their service to our country.
The LCVA offers LunchNLearn meetings, monthly veterans support group meetings,
free rides for veterans to help meet their medical needs, counseling and entitlement consultations, claims processing, financial emergency
relief and employment and training services.
They recently hosted a bus trip to tour the
Great Lakes National Cemetery, which was
attended by veterans of all ages, including a
World War II vet.
Ronders also personifies the LCVA mission
statement, which is: With promise, our commitment and excellence to patrons of Lapeer
County who served with honor defending our
nations security, freedom, and constitution,
protecting our rights as Americans, and incorporating service ensuring respective federal,
state, and local entitlements due to them and
their families while providing valued quality,
efficiency, and rights and proper responsiveness.
If youre a veteran and havent thought of
connecting with a local resource, the time is
now to make that connection. For the rest of
us, we encourage continued support of the
LCVA, its activities and mission statement, and
say to all, thank you.

And, under Sheriff


Kalanquins guidance, his
department has spent less
than they are budgetedfor
years.
But some are saying
Its time for a change.
Really? When youre on top
and things change, the only

change is down.
When you find something thats really good and
cost effective too, why do
you want to change it? If it
aint broke, please dont fix
it.
Harry D. Akers
Dryden

Thanks to community
for care and support
On behalf of the Ruiz
Taqueria of Imlay city, we
would like to express our
deepest thanks and love to
the Imlay City community
and the amazing members of
it, including Michael and
Matt Romine of The Mulefoot
Gastropub for their support
and help through this difficult
time.
Thank you to everyone
for their donations. Thank
you to the St. Nicholas
Catholic Church in Capac.
Thank you to Imlay City
Schools for their care and
support.
It was amazing to see the

community rally around us


and see how loved my brother was. Words cant express
the gratitude we have for
your care and support. We
love this community and
being a part of it.
Thank you so much to
everyone for your kind words
and sympathy. We will continue to honor Refugio Ruizs
memory by being strong and
moving forward as he would
want. Thank you truly from
the bottom of our hearts and
bless you all.
Sincerely,
Samuel Ruiz and Family
Imlay City

Farmers and Ranchers,


its that time of year again.
The Farm Service Agencys
(FSA)
2016
County
Committee Elections begin
soon. Your FSA county
committees are a vital and
direct link between our farm
community and the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
I encourage all eligible
farmers and ranchers, especially women, minorities
and beginning farmers, to
get involved by making a
nomination and voting in
this years county committee elections. This is a great
podium for your concerns
and opinions to be heard.
Dont miss this opportunity.
Your concerns can reach
the decision makers if you
dont happen to become a
committee member your-

self. FSA county committees operate within official


federal regulations so that
local input is provided on
federal programs such as:
Income safety-net loans
and payments, including
setting county average
yields for commodities;
Conservation
programs;
Incentive, indemnity
and disaster payments for
some commodities;
Emergency programs;
Payment eligibility.
Your knowledge and
experience can only assist
your community by keeping
them thriving and informed.
We need to hear from you.
You wont have to watch
things happen while other

FSA elections start soon

Letters page 12-A

for something. That way


you keep the money in
Imlay City.

Wanda
Imlay City
******
Shannon, an excellent
point. There are NO microbrewers in Imlay as far as I
know, and its not just
another bar, its a unique
new business. That is what
grows a town and helps
attract other new businesses. I wish them luck.
Ron Cross
Sun City, AZ
Facebook comments
Great! Hope it happens...love to give it a try!
Tom Melrose
******
Love it!
Colleen Finkbeiner
******
Thats all Imlay City
needs.
Ronald Herbert
******
I love it!!!
Jeffry Mallets
******
Oooooo, will definitely
have to keep in mind and
check out when open!
Jennifer Glenn

Photo provided

Uproar over some yet silent over others

Editor s
note:
Following are a sampling
of recent comments readers
posted on our website at
www.tricitytimes-online.
com and on our Tri-City
Times Facebook page. Log
on today and let us know
what you think!

Story headline: Is
microbrew on tap in
Imlay City by Tom
Wearing:
Do we really need
another drinking business
in our town?
Evelyn Farkas
Imlay Twp.
******
Yeah, why not? Do we
need another lawyer in this
town? Do we need another
hair place in this town? Do
we need another church in
this town? We need more
hangouts and fun places. I
think this is a wonderful
idea.

Shannon
Imlay City
******
I think its a wonderful
idea. We need more businesses in our little town
and more places to go too.
Use these empty buildings

Imlay City graduates enjoy a fun game of Twister


during the 2016 Senior All Night Party.

Grads party all night


The parents of Project
Graduation would like to
thank the community and its
businesses for all the support
they received this year.
Due to the many monetary donations as well as food
donations, once again a successful Senior All Night Party
took place for the class of
2016. Without your contributions this event would not
have been as successful as it
was.
Thank you to following
donors: Muir Brothers
Funeral Home, Nachos Taco
House, Jaliscos, Big Boy,
Taco Bell, Jets Pizza, Hungry
Howies,
Countryside

Banquet Center, Imlay City


Florist, Creations Flower
Shop, Tianas Dollars and
Deals, Silver Grill, Lenny
Millers, Dairy Queen, Rotary
Club, IC Alumni Association,
Churchill Insurance, Output
Entertainment,
Samples
Sweets, Wowie the Clown,
Village Barn Carpets, CDR
Repair,
Four
County
Community
Foundation,
Hungry Dans, Kiwanis Club
of
Almont,
Germayne
Electric, American Tree,
McDonalds,
Luckys
Steakhouse, Little Ceasars,
Tim Hortons and Subway.
Imlay City Project
Graduation 2016

Life lessons delivered to kitchen table


his week is a jumble of
life lessons merge at my
kitchen table, the one my
grandfather Carlo Minolli
purchased for his bride
Caterina in 1925.
Im sitting there Friday
evening, winding down the
week with a glass of wine
and, believe it or not, the
newspaper. Usually I dont
wait this long to take a look
at it with fresh eyes. But for
some reason this week,
Iwaited to re-read my column about my dad. I waited
for a couple of reasons. First,
Imiss him in a way that is
palpable. Like theres a band
around my heart that tightens
every time I think of him. It
squeezes and forces tears out
of my eyes and sometimes
its just too much.
I re-read, however,
because I heard from so
many people about it. Its
funny, that column. I wrote it
several months ago, in the
midst of an illness, but
scrapped it thinking who
cares? I think this a lot, as it
was once told to me...who
cares? about this particular
story or that particular memory?
I decided to go with it for
Fathers Day as Icould think

of no better way to
honor the
way my
dad not
only lived,
but the
way he
died. With
dignity
and grace,
despite the

ravages of
his illness.
Im sipping the chilled
chardonnay from a
1990s-vintage Flintstone
glass. The glasses were a
giveaway from McDonalds
of all places. While I have
never frequented the fast food
restaurant, I came across the
glasses at Nicks Warehouse
down the street from the
office. A vendor sells vintage
glassware there, and back in
the day fast food restaurants
and gas stations actually used
to give away good, usable,
items as part of a promotion.
Ithink the Flintstone thing
was for a movie, Im not
sure.
Anyhow, Im at the bottom of the column and it says
turn to page 11-A, the adjacent page. I scour 11-A and
see all sorts of things, but not

the ending of my column. All


of a sudden one of the compliments Ireceived springs to
the forefront of my brain.
I really loved your column about your dad, Linda
Fisher said when I ran across
her earlier in the day.
I lost my dad last year
and I can relate, she added,
tears forming in her eyes.
I especially liked how it
ended, she said, finally.
How it ended...hmmm.
Was she trying to tell me
something? Since it didnt
end on 11-A, was Linda trying to be polite about the
faux pas that despite our best
efforts occurs from time to
time here where a story suddenly, abruptly ends mid-sentence?
I scour 11-A again. Yes,
Id had a few sips of chardonnay but I was far from
being wasted enough to not
see something that was right
in front of my face. No. it
wasnt the wine. I was not
seeing it because it wasnt
there. Turns out it ended on
page 15-A, a fact I put
together when I note that
other items on 11-A jump to
page 15. Mistakes happen...
...My male duck sort of
jumps/trips/spills/plunges

into the pond. He does this


when I am not paying attention. Ive been working vigorously to keep him from
going into the pond, as once
hes in there he cant get out.
He cant get out because
hes not well. Trouble with
his wing has led to trouble
getting around. Because the
water level on the pond has
dippedand the rim of the
pond has eroded over the
yearsthe elderly bird
doesnt have the strength or
the balance to hoist himself
up and out over the edge.
Ive been keeping him in
the coop, babying him. With
rest and in a safe place, it
seems to have helped. When
I do let him out, hell lumber
down to the end of the ramp
thats at the edge of the elevated coop and sip water
from the big rubber pan that I
put there. Hell also ramble
into the side woods just a bit
to beak around in the cool
rich soil for insects and grit.
But on Saturday, when
Im preoccupied with a phone
call, he makes his way into
the pond and stays there.
In there, he looks healthy
and free. He wants to be with
his female, his partner of four
years, and will do anything to

Photo by Catherine Minolli

Male duck (left) greets his partner in the pond.


keep swimming at her side.
He preceded his wife
by about four years. Hes a
big fella and aside from having one weirdly turned in leg,
hes always been in tip top
shape. His visage in the pond,
swimming silently and swiftly with his partner, gives me
the illusion this is still true.
When I lift him out later, I
know otherwise.
I think in sickness and
in health, and continue to
realize that this is how life
goes, whether I like it or not.
Its part of a sacred vow. I
understand it better with each
passing day.
Mistakes happen. No one
is perfect. All life is sacred,
and fleeting. And all of it, all
if it is temporary.

Prized Flintstone glass.


A McDonalds giveaway
from the 90s.
Another lesson delivered to,
and again duly noted, at my
kitchen table.
Email Catherine at
cminolli@pageone-inc.com.

Page 9-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Editors note: The following guest column was submitted by Ronald J. Kazmierczak,
Post Adjutant and Post Public
Affairs Officer of the VFW
Post 2492 in Imlay City.
n the present and future
days to come in the United
States, Flag Day is celebrated
on June 14. It commemorates
the adoption of the flag of the
United States, which happened on that day in 1777 by
resolution of the Congress.
The Original flag of the
United States was 13 Stars,
seven red stripes, and six
white stripes.
The colors of the pales
(the vertical stripes) are those
used in the flag of the United
States of America. White signifies purity and innocence.
Red signifies hardiness and
valor, and blue signifies the
color of the Chief (the broad
band above the stripes) and
signifies vigilance, perseverance and justice.
Also on this day, the
United States also celebrates
the birth of the Army.
Congress adopted the
American continental army
after reaching a consensus
position in the Committee of
the Whole on June 14, 1775.
On this Flag Day for the
year of 2016, the Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 2492 did
two things at once. At 17:30
(5:30 p.m.) the VFW had an
open house that included hot
dogs, beans, potato chips,
soda, fruit punch, ice tea,

water, and coffee. Then at


18:20 (6:20 p.m.) the VFW
had its United States Flag
Retirement Ceremony. The
open house and flag ceremony were going on at the same
time. Once the flag ceremony
was completed, then the VFW
closed down the open house.
The flag retiring ceremony
was done on the north side of
the VFW Post. It took about
45 minutes to an hour to complete the ceremony.
The VFW and American
Legion showed how the
United States Flag is properly
folded and the proper way a
flag is to be retired and/or
rested and taught the meaning
of what each fold means too.
Listed below are those meaningful folds:
The first fold of our Flag
is a symbol of life.
The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal
life.
The third fold is made in
honor and remembrance of
the veterans departing our
ranks who gave a portion of
their lives for the defense of
our country to attain peace
throughout the world.
The fourth fold represents
our weaker nature; for as
American citizens trusting, it
is to Him we turn in times of
peace as well as in time of
war for His divine guidance.
The fifth fold is a tribute
to our country, for in the
words of Stephen Decatur,
Our Country, in dealing with

other countries may she


always be right; but it is still
our country, right or wrong.
The sixth fold is for
where our hearts lie. It is with
our heart that we pledge allegiance to the Flag of the
United States of America, and
to the Republic for which it
stands, one Nation under
God, indivisible, with liberty
and justice for all.
The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for
it is through the Armed
Forces that we protect our
country and our flag against
all her enemies, whether they
be found within or without
the boundaries of our
Republic.
The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered
into the valley of the shadow
of death, that we might see
the light of day, and to honor
mother, for whom it flies on
Mothers Day.
The ninth fold is a tribute
to womanhood; for it has
been through their faith, their
love, loyalty and devotion
that the character of the men
and women who have made
this country great has been
molded.
The tenth fold is a tribute
to the father, for he, too, has
given his sons and daughters
for the defense of our country
since they were first born.
The eleventh fold, in the
eyes of a Hebrew citizen represents the lower portion of
the seal of King David and

I can safely say, that the


happiest part of my life has
been spent onboard a ship.
--Mrs. Croft from
Persuasion by Jane Austen
ou never know what
characters wait within a
novel. Such is Jane Austens
Persuasion. There, I recently met Mrs. Croft, wife of
Admiral
Croft.
They had
crossed
the Atlantic
four times
together
because
parting
from her
husband

would be
frightful.

Women
may be as comfortable on
board as in the best house in
Englandnothing can
exceed the accommodations
of a man-of-war, Mrs. Croft
insisted.
So, wives were permitted
to travel with their captainhusband during wartime? I
was intrigued by Mrs. Crofts
perception of comfort, a sur-

Honest Living . . .

prising departure from


Austens conventional
Englishwoman.
Neither tall nor fat,
describes the author, (Mrs.
Croft) had a vigour of
formand altogether an
agreeable face; though her
reddened and weather-beaten
complexionmade her seem
to have lived some years longer in the world than her real
eight-and-thirty.
Although I admired Mrs.
Crofts world, larger than
Miss Austen traveled, I
couldnt imagine a marriage
of fifteen years lived in five
various ships with a stinky,
sweaty crew, all the while
longing for mountainous
horizons and solid ground.
Could I endure countless
sunrises without leafing
trees, blooming flowers, and
birdsong?
Furthermore, Ive
encountered enough rough
seas that turned me green to
know I could not embrace
Mrs. Crofts maritime merriment.
Then serendipity rang.
Mom, would you like to go
sailing Tuesday with Kelly
and me? my youngest

Editors note: The following guest column was


submitted by Kevin Felster
Flag Retirement Ceremony at VFW Post 2492 in of Capac.
t was 12:30 a.m., the stadiImlay City on June 14.
um was dark. It had been
King Solomon, and glorifies
almost an hour since the
in their eyes, the God of
tents, which sprang up like
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.
daisies in an open field, had
The twelfth fold, in the
been taken down, loaded up
eyes of a Christian citizen,
and hauled away. A half hour
represents an emblem of eterago the giant flood lights
nity and glorifies, in their
which had made the night
eyes, God the Father, the Son
become day had been
and Holy Spirit.
switched off and now the
When the Flag is comonly illumination came from
pletely folded, the stars are
the full moon overhead. The
uppermost reminding us of
Visitors enjoy Open sounds of the day had given
our Nations motto, In God
House at VFW Post 2492 way to complete, peaceful
We Trust. After the flag is
silence.
in Imlay City.
completely folded and tucked
One man stood silently
in, it takes on the appearance
by the bleachers, peering out
of a cocked hat, ever remind- United States Flag Ceremony into the darkness that envelhonoring someone that has
ing us of the soldiers who
oped the far end of the field.
served under General George served our country, either in
He watched as a faint glow
the Armed Forces or in our
Washington, and the Sailors
of light appeared then disapcivilian services such as the
and Marines who served
peared, like a buoy of hope
Police Force or Fire
under Captain John Paul
leading sailors home, flash,
Jones, who were followed by Department, keep in mind all flash, flash. He watched as
their comrades and shipmates the important reasons behind
the light made its way down
each and every movement.
in the Armed Forces of the
the far side of the field into
United States, preserving for They have paid the ultimate
the turn at the east end of the
sacrifice for all of us by hon- track.
us the rights, privileges, and
oring our Flag and our
freedoms we enjoy today.
A young womans voice
Country.
The next time you see a
pierced the silence, Two
more.
She came into view,
Author at
limping like a soldier
Detroit Yacht
wounded in battle, her dirty
Club with sailblond hair with purple tips
ing partners,
pulled back in a ponytail, the
daughters
cell phone in her hand proRuth
ducing the flash, flash, flash
Underwood
as she walked. In her other
and Kelly
hand was a very long string
Underwood
of beads swinging back and
Rozmus.
forth with each step.

daughter asked.
This was a rare invitation
I couldnt refuse. Kellys
flight back home to her family in California was
Wednesday morning. We
wouldnt lay eyes on her
again until another wedding,
funeral, or holiday called us
back together. Yet, I didnt
want to be a seasick spoilsport.
Dont worry, Mom. We
wont sail if the wind is
high.
Carrie, Ruths sailing
teacher, welcomed us aboard
her boat harbored at the
Detroit Yacht Club. The two
slipped on gloves and lifejackets and into the language

of sailors. Who came to mind


when Ruth tackled the sail
with vigor and raised it with
an altogether agreeable face
at age nine-and-thirty?
Mrs. Croft. I imagined
her tanned face mustve lifted to many sails in her time
at sea, watched in awe as I
did my daughter pull the
sails ropes.
Those ropes! Ive never
witnessed Ruth wholly
engaged in such intense
physical awareness and quick
maneuvers, switching from
port to starboard, unwinding
and winding ropes in coordination with the captains
orders as she tacked the boat.
The sense of danger, the

respect for wind and water


was palpable.
Dont get your feet tangled in the ropes, Mom.
I wanted to reply, And
watch that mast, young lady.
Ive sat beside your sickbed
too often to appreciate another concussion.
Safely docked, Ruth
asked Kelly and me, Did
you have fun?
Sure did.
Dear Reader, I can safely
say Im no Mrs. Croft. The
happiest part of the day I
spent sailing with my daughters was when we disembarked, uninjured.
Email Iris at
irisleeu@sbcglobal.net.

to travel to London, or even


New York or Detroit for the
best in
entertainment.
According
to Pollstar
Magazine,
the industry source
for concert
and tour
Rick Liblong
information, The
Wharton
Center for the Performing
Arts, on the campus of
Michigan State University in
East Lansing, Michigan, is
one of the top twenty entertainment venues in the world.
The Center, opened in 1982,
is named for former MSU
president, Dr. Clifton R.
Wharton, Jr. who guided the
university when I was there.
It was greatly expanded in
2009. There are four theaters,
the Cobb Great Hall Theater
seating 2,420; the Pasant
seating 600; the MSU

All the Liblong day..

Concert Auditorium seating


3,600 and the Fairchild
Theater with 608 seats.
Its executive director
since 2003, my friend, Mike
Brand, who has more than 30
years in the entertainment
management business, has
made sure that Wharton
Center provides top entertainment for the whole family. We present the best touring Broadway shows and
have a huge selection of
diverse performing arts
attractions in every genre,
he says.
According to the
Wharton Center website,
Brand began as Wharton
Centers executive director in
December of 2003, and since
that time, he has helped lead
the Center to national prominence as a premier performing arts center. He has
expanded and diversified
programming and is positioning the region as an entertainment destination, thereby
reaching new audiences of

Home. There are also some


favorites returning such as
Wicked, Mamma Mia, Rent
and Cabaret. Thats just the
Broadway.
We also have a few
homecomings such as Ernie The Play, which returns in
August after a sold-out run in
2015. Mitch Alboms hit play
brings beloved Hall of Fame
broadcaster Ernie Harwell to
life in a love story about
baseball and 20th-century
Americana.
After a decade of
silence, Stomp returnsproviding churning rhythms and
foot-stomping beats.
One of the most influential saxophonists and composers in the pantheon of
modern music, let alone jazz,
Entertain page 12-A

Warrior page 12-A

Photo Provided

few years ago when we


were in London,
England, we visited the
reproduction Globe Theatre.
The original, built in 1599,
was partially owned by
William Shakespeare and
was the venue for many of
his plays.
The Globe was a threestory, open-air amphitheater
approximately 100 feet in
diameter that could house up
to 3,000 spectators. At the
base of the stage was an area
called the pit, where, for a
penny, people would stand
on the earthen floor to watch
the performance. Around the
perimeter were three levels
of stadium-style seats, which
were more expensive than
standing room. A rectangular
stage platform, also known
as an apron stage, thrust out
into the middle of the openair yard. Yes, no roofand
no restroom facilities but it
was well known for its fine
entertainment.
Today, you do not need

Wharton Center, a top entertainment value.


all ages and backgrounds
throughout the state and
upper Midwest.
Mike is excited about the
2016-2017 Season. There
are some firsts, favorites and
homecomings in this new
season. For instance, we will
have eight incredible
Broadway smash hits including a few Wharton
Center firsts: the 2014 Tony
Award for Best Musical, A
Gentlemans Guide To Love
and Murder; the Tony and
Grammy Award winning
Beautiful-The Carol King
Musical; the winner of five
2015 Tony Awards including Best Play, The National
Theatre production of The
Curious Incident Of the Dog
In The Night-Time; and the
Tony Award winner for
Best Musical last year, Fun

Shawna Kristen Felster


with her signature string
of beads after logging
31-plus
miles
at
Saturdays Relay for Life
in Capac.
Walking next to her was
another young woman with
one side of her hair black
and the other side a brilliant
green. Then they disappeared
into the shadows along the
straight away headed to the
far end of the track.
She had entered the stadium the morning before
knowing very well the agony
she was facing. She had
been here before. It had been
a year since she hopped her
way to the car in tears, her
feet blistered, torn and swollen. She had spent two days
barely able to stand. On that
day she had completed 100
laps in 11 hours. Still, she
came to the stadium, knowing how she would leave,
with a new goal of 125 laps.
Thirty-one-and-a-quarter
miles.
She had started at ten
a.m. that morning, walking
around the tent city that had
sprung up in the in-field,
collecting a glass bead and
stringing it on a leather cord
for each lap completed. That
afternoon she entered the
tent.
I feel like Im going to
be sick or pass out, she
says. She sits in the chair,
guzzles water, places cold
rags to the back of the neck,
gobbles some food, and she
was back up and on her way.
A few hours later, I just felt
the blisters on the balls of
my feet pop, I dont even
want to look, and she
didnt. More water, back to
the track.

Wharton Center:
Let us entertain you

Warrior
has the
heart
of a lion

Photo by provided

Persuaded to sail

Photo by R. Kazmierczak

In honor of Old Glory

PAGE 10-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Town Talk
Editors note: Due to space
constraints announcements
will be posted one week in
advance of the event. Notices
must be received in writing
by noon Monday prior to the
publication date.

For Senior Citizens


Gentle yoga, Wednesdays
from 1-2 p.m. at the Imlay
City Senior Center. Practice
led by Dina Miramonti,
RYT.
Dinner and an evening of
card playing with friends,
50/50 raffle and prizes of
high and low for each table
every 3rd Monday at the
Washington Senior Center,
57880
Van
Dyke,
Washington Township, MI
48094, from 4-8 p.m. Call
the center for further
details, 586-752-6543.
Swing Dance Lessons
offered at the Port Huron
Senior Center, 600 Grand
Avenue in Port Huron,
every Tuesday from 7:30-9
p.m. and the 1st and 3rd
Thursday of the month
from 7:30-9 p.m. with
instructors Lyle Malaski &
Kristina Morton. Call 810984-5061 for more information.
Council
on
Aging
Membership is open to individuals 18 and older. The
Capac Senior Center is
open 8:30-4:30 weekdays.
We offer a variety of activities such as fitness and craft
classes, a book review
group, cards and bus trips.
Call Lori at 395-7889 for
more information.
Almont and Dryden area
senior citizens meet the 2nd
Tuesday of the month at 12
p.m. at the Almont Lions
Hall, 222 Water St., for a
potluck and program. Call
798-8210 for more information.
Adults 55 and over are
invited to Berlin Twp.
Senior Center to play cards
from noon-3 p.m. the 2nd
Wednesday of every month.

Bring a sack lunch, beverages provided. Senior


stretch exercise on Tuesdays
10-11 a.m. Potluck luncheons will be served the
4th Tuesday of every month
at noon. Call 810-395-4518
for details.
Ryan Smith, a certified
alcohol and drug counselor
will be available at the
Imlay City Seniors Center
on the 4th Thursday of
every month from 9 a.m.-12
p.m.

Free Meals, Food

Please call LOVE, INC. at


810-245-2414 in advance to
ensure your food voucher
will be received before you
stop in to shop. Any questions, please call Sherrie
Cramton at 810-395-1905.
The Capac Kitchen serves
free meals every Tuesday
from 4:30-6 p.m. at Zion
United Methodist Church.
Free meals for people in
need are offered at the
North Branch Senior Center
on Monday and Thursday
evenings from 5:30-7 p.m.
Call 810-441-0322 for more
information.

St. Pauls Lutheran Church


Food for Families kitchen
is open to the public for
free, hot meals every
Monday and Wednesday
from 4-5:30 p.m.

Orchards Cupboard Food


Pantry is open the 3rd
Saturday of every month 9
a.m.-noon. Food distributed
at 74903 McKay Rd., Bruce
Twp., 586-336-4673. www.
This Heart Loves Food orchardsonline.org
Pantry is open the 1st
Saturday of each month
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at
Gateway Assembly Church, The Capac Historical
2796 S. Van Dyke Rd., Imlay Society is now open to visiCity.
tors daily from 1-3 p.m. and
Dryden Area Food For 1-4 p.m. on Sundays. Call
Families free dinner is 810-395-2859 for more
served on the 2nd Tuesday information.
of each month from 4:306:00 p.m. at St. Cornelius The Imlay City Historical
Church, 3834 Mill Street Museum is now open for the
(north of the light in 2016 season on Saturdays
Dryden). No proof of income from 1 to 4 p.m. Stop by and
is required. Come and enjoy view new exhibits and learn
a home cooked meal with more about Imlay Citys
wonderful history. For more
us.
information call 810-724The Attica United Methodist 1904.
Church will be holding a
free community meal on the
2nd and 4th Tuesday of each
month from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Imlay City Christian School
For more information is now enrolling for Fall.
please call 810-724-0690 or Call
810-724-5695
to
visit www.atticaumc.org.
inquire. We serve students
The Attica Food Bank at from Junior Kindergarten
the Attica United Methodist through the 8th grade with
Church, 27 Elk Lake Rd., is a Christ centered, quality
open from 2-4 p.m. the 2nd education. All inquiries are
and 4th Monday of each welcomed.
month. Proof of residency
Ready, Set, Go! Workshop.
and need required.
This is a FREE workshop
The Capac Community for 3-5 year olds & parents/
Food Pantry, 114 S. Main caregivers! Enjoy fun projStreet, is open each ects that will develop your
Wednesday from 1-3 p.m. childs skills and prepare

Museums

Youth Events

them for school! Children


also enjoy a snack, story
time, and a free book! Call
the Family Literacy Center
today to reserve your seat at
810-664-2737 and for more
information on dates and
times.

com.

TOPS 620 Lapeer weightloss group meets Tuesday


nights at the Hunters Creek
Mobile Home Park Club
House, 725 DeMille Rd. in
Lapeer. Weigh-in from
6-6:30 p.m., meeting from
Play groups available. Free 6:30-7:30 p.m. For more
6 week sessions. At these information, call 810-664FREE 90 minute playgroups 7579.
children will participate in a
storytime, developmentally TOPS 888 (Take Off Pounds
appropriate games and Sensibly) meets Wednesdays
crafts, learn new skills, and at the 25 Pine Ridge Dr. in
enjoy a snack and social Lapeer. Weigh-in at 8:30
time with other children. a.m., 9:30 a.m. meeting.
Parents will have the chance Call Linda at 810-245-3955
to talk to other adults with or Phyllis 810-395-7035 for
same-age children. Register more information.
now for the next session! For those that have experiNumerous locations and enced the death of a loved
dates available. For more one, a support group is
information and to sign up available facilitated by a
call the Family Literacy trained United Hospice
Center at 810-664-2737.
Service (UHS) bereavement
volunteer. Marlette Regional
Hospital, 2770 Main Street
in Marlette, hosts this support group the 1st Friday of
FOR WIDOWED MEN & each month at 10 a.m. in the
WOMEN. Lunch-Cards- Administration Conference
Freindship. Join us every Room. For more informa3rd Tuesday of each month tion, call 800-635-7490 or
from 11:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m. at visit www.marletteregionalCavis Pioneer Restaurant, hospital.org
5600 Lapeer Rd. in Kimball
Twp. 48074 (located approx.
15 Miles S.W. of Port Huron.
No RSVP necessary. For
more information call The Imlay City Christian
Joanne K. at 810-324-2304. School is holding a fundThis activity is sponsored by raiser for TAFFY (Tuition
Widowed Friends, a peer Assistance Fundraising For
support group www.wid- Youth). Come join us for
owedfriends.org.
euchre the 2nd Saturday of
Widowed Friends invites all each month at 7 p.m. at the
widowed to join us for Imlay City Christian School,
breakfast and friendship in 7197 E. Imlay City Rd. in
a safe setting every 2nd and Imlay City. For more infor4th Monday of the month at mation, call 810-724-5695.
9 a.m. at Seros, 925 Gratiot
in Marysville. For more
information about our
group, call Julie at 810-3880868.
Lapeer County Families Almont District Library Against Narcotics group We will be have a Book Sale
meets the second Tuesday of starting June 24 for rare
the month at Faith Christian and out of print books, 213
Fellowship, 69 W. Nepessing W. St. Clair St., Almont.
St. in Lapeer. Call 810-6670119 for more information
or email faithchrist09@aol.

Support Groups

Fundraisers

Craft Shows/Bazaars
Rummage Sales

Other

c
AREA UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCHES

27 Elk Lake Road, Attica, MI

(810) 724-0690

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m


Attica Food Bank: Serving those
in need in Attica Twp, 2-4 pm,
2nd and 4th Monday
Rev. Ron Rouse
www.atticaumc.org
15

Dryden
U.M.C.

Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.


Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Pastor Alan Casillas

15

810-796-3341

15

Sunday School - 9:15 am - All Ages


Sunday Service: 10:30 am
Junior Church and Nursery Available
Bible Studies Every
Monday and Tuesday Evenings
Tuesday Morning

West Berlin
U.M.C.

16

15

15

810-724-1135

586.336.4673

M-T-Thurs-Fri 8 am Wed. 10 am
First Sat. 8 am

Weekend Masses

Sat. 5 pm
Sun. 9 am - English
11 am - Spanish
Reconciliation 1/2 hr. before each Mass &4pm Sat.

Father Paul Ward

15

COME WORSHIP WITH US!

John Barker, Minister

15

Family of
Christ
Lutheran Church Missouri Synod
7191 Imlay City Road
Imlay City
Educational Hour - 9:15 am
Worship Time - 10:30 am

Phone 810-724-2620

16

PASTOR KEN RENARD

6835 Weyer Road Imlay City, MI48444

Sunday 2:30 pm
Tuesday 7:00 pm
Friday Youth 7:00 pm

firstapostolichome.com

15

Sunday Mornings
10:30 am

Wayne Boyd, Pastor

881 Van Dyke - 810-798-8888


Sunday Bible Classes: 9:45 am
Worship Services
10:30 am & 6:00 pm
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 pm
fbc@airadvantage.net
Live Webcasting Sunday all worship services
over Sermonaudio.com/fbcalmont 15
Proclaiming the Sovereign Grace of God

GATEWAY
ASSEMBLY

COME & MAKE A


DIFFERENCE WITH US! 15

2720 Winslow Road


Imlay City, MI 48444

1 Mile South of I-69 Overpass


Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Wednesday Prayer & Praise 7:30 pm

Phone: 810-724-6999

15

(ELCA) 109 E. Kempf Court Capac, MI

(810) 395-7557

Phone: 810-724-8110
Pastor Jeffrey S. Krist

15

ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH

Supervised child care during all services

Adult & Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Children's Church during service.

810-417-0265 cbcimlay.org
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Service 10:45 am
Evening Service 6:00 pm
Wednesday Service 7:00 pm

Light of Christ
Community
Church

Almont
First Baptist Church

2796 S. Van Dyke Road - Imlay City


Morning Worship - 8:55 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night - 6:45 p.m.

74903 McKay Rd., Romeo

Weekday Masses

810-724-3306

15

15

700 Maple Vista, Imlay City

670 N. Van Dyke


Imlay City, MI 48444
Sunday Service
Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am
Morning Worship 11:00am
1st Sunday of the
Month Evening Service 2:30pm
Wednesday Bible Classes (all ages) 7:00pm

810-395-2409

Come Grow With Us!

Sacred Heart
Catholic Church

Imlay City
Church of Christ

905 Holmes Rd. - Allenton, MI


Corner of Almont Road

Imlay City
C.R.C.

810-724-4315

Come as you are - everyone is welcome!

810-724-0687

email: nlcc@newlifechristian.net
www.newlifechristian.net
Pastor Tim Martin
Sunday 10 a.m. Service 15

395 N. Cedar (M-53)


www.imlaycitycrc.org
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Youth Ministry
MOPS Program
Community Mens & Womens
Bible Studies

Church 810-395-2112

Corner of 4th St. & Almont Ave.


(Across from the Library)
www.imlayumc.org
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
Nursery Available
Jr. Church for K-5th grade
Rev. Marcel Allen Lamb

5394 Main Street - Dryden

Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.


Rev. Curtis Clarke

810-724-2702

810-724-1200

14952 Imlay City Rd., Capac

Imlay City
U.M.C.

859 N. Van Dyke Road


Imlay City, Michigan 48444

4411 Newark Road


Attica, MI 48412

Capac
U.M.C.

Attica
U.M.C.

Pastor Patricia Hoppenworth


Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
EVERYONE WELCOME!

(ELCA)

15

Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Sunday 10:00 a.m.


Sunday School
9:00 a.m. September thru May
Staffed Nursery During Worship 15

Christ Evangelical First Congregational Church


Lutheran Church
United Church of Christ
1970 S. Almont Ave., Imlay City
at corner of Newark Rd.

275 Bancroft - Imlay City


(Corner of 5th Street)

810-724-7855

810-724-6207

Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Worship 7:00 p.m.

Pastor

Ralph O. Stuebs
Cell-(567) 674-0438

Come to the WELS

St. Nicholas
Catholic Church
4331 Capac Road
Capac, MI 48014

810-395-7572

www.stnicholascapac.com

15

Sunday School &Morning Adult Group 9:30 a.m.


Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Renee C. Jackson
No matter who you are or where you are
on lifes journey, you are welcome here!15

Holy Redeemer
Lutheran Church
4538 Dryden Rd. Dryden, MI

810-796-3951
www.lutheransonline.com/holyred

8:00 am - BIBLE CLASS


Weekday Masses:
9:30 am - WORSHIP
Wednesday & Friday 8:30 a.m. 11:00 am - SUNDAY SCHOOL & BIBLE CLASS
Weekend Masses:
ALL WELCOME!!!
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Steven Helms
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15
Christian Preschool Available
15

201 E. St. Clair, Almont, MI


810-798-8855
Sr. Pastor: Keith Langley

Sunday Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.


Nursery available and Jr. Church
for ages 3 thru 5th grade
Jr./Sr. High Youth Group ~ Sundays 6-8pm
Kidz 4 Christ ~ Wednesdays 6-7:30pm
Pre-School - 5th grade
15

St. John The


Evangelist
Catholic Church
872 Capac Rd.
Allenton, MI 48002

810-395-7074

www.stjohnsallenton.com

Babycare Class Wed., June


29 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Pregnancy Resource Center
of Lapeer, 1715 Imlay City
Rd. Lapeer. Class is taught
by a registered nurse with
over 25 years experience.
For additional information
call 810-667-0055. Class is
free but donations are suggested.
Ocean Commotion: Diving
into Noahs Flood Vacation Bible School at
Hunters Creek Community
Church, 2471 Metamora
Rd., Lapeer, June 27-30
from 6-8:30 p.m. Students
will catch a glimpse of the
endless blue sea! Theyre off
on an adventure where
theyll dive into learning
about Noah and the worldwide Flood of his day. Free
for students K-6th grade.
Register by calling 810-6646037. Contact person: Emily
Gehman 248-420-7554
Free tutor training for people who would like to help
others in our community
improve English skills.
Volunteer basis. Please call
for orientation before training at 810-664-2737.
Free hearing and vision
screens for children of preschool age are available at
the Lapeer County Health
Department. To schedule an
appointment please call
810-667-0448 or 810-2455549.
Volunteer for the Habitat
for Humanity of Lapeer
County at the office.
Interested parties can call
810-664-7111 and speak to
Carolyn, Cheryl or Pete at
810-660-7823.
Capac Pharmacy is teaming
with Support Million Hearts
by offering in-pharmacy
blood pressure screenings,
136 North Main St. in
Capac, Tuesdays, 9 a.m.- 6
p.m. Everyone is invited to
come and have their blood
pressure read for free.

Club News

St. Pauls
Lutheran Church
200 North Cedar (M-53)
Imlay City, MI

Breastfeeding Class Wed.,


June 22 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Pregnancy Resource Center
of Lapeer, 1715 Imlay City
Rd. Lapeer. Class is taught
by a registered nurse with
over 25 years experience.
For additional information
call 810-667-0055. Class is
free but donations are suggested.

Weekday Masses:
Thursday & Friday 8:30 a.m.
Weekend Masses:
Saturday - 6:00 p.m.
Sunday - 9:00 a.m.
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15

The Imlay City American


Legion Post 135 meets the
2nd and last Wednesdays of
the month at 7:30 p.m. The
post is located at 212 E.
Third Street. Contact them
at 724-1450 or americanlegionpost135@frontier.com.
The Evening Star Quilt
Guild meets the last
Wednesday of each month
at the Davison Senior
Center, 10135 Lapeer Rd. in
Davison. Meetings start at
6:30 p.m. and doors open at
6:00 p.m. For more information, call Lisa, 810-3587294.

Markets
Attention Cottage Food
Vendors - The Market
Lexington is currently looking for Cottage Food
Vendors for the 2016 market season. Contact Kristen
Kaatz, 810-404-7570 for
stall space and pricing.
The Flea Market held each
Sunday at the Lapeer
Center
Building,
425
County Center Rd. in
Lapeer, will be open from 8
a.m.-3 p.m. Up to 50 booths
inside and outside sell a
huge variety of items. This
event is sponsored by the
Lapeer Center Building,
and there is no admission
charge. For info on space
rentals, contact Logan at
810-347-7915. For general
information on the Flea
Market or food service by
Peacock Alley Catering call
810-664-2109 or email lapeercenter@charter.net.

PAGE 11-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Obituaries
~ Edward Eddy Barrett, 58 ~
Edward Eddy Barrett,
age 58, of Imlay City died
Tuesday, June 14, 2016 at
McLaren Lapeer Region in
Lapeer, MI.
Edward Roy Barrett was
born March 20, 1958 in Port
Huron, MI. He is the son of
L.D. Leroy and Rose
(Paquette) Barrett. Eddy
grew up in Imlay City and
attended Imlay City High

School.
He married Wendy Leigh
Makedonsky on July 28,
1979 in Imlay City, MI.
Eddy was employed by
Anderson Peat and Hyponex
as a truck driver for 23 years
and also has been employed
at Lous Trucking and La
Femina Trucking as a truck
driver.
He is survived by his

wife: Wendy Leigh Barrett;


his mother-in-law, Rita
Makedonsky of Imlay City,
MI; one sister: Betty Lou
Bagley of Marlette, MI; and
three brothers: Leroy Barrett
of Lapeer, MI, Clarence
Barrett of Port Huron, MI
and John Barrett of Lapeer,
MI.
Eddy was preceded in
death by his parents L.D.

Leroy and Rose Barrett, two


nieces and two nephews and
his father-in-law Bill
Makedonsky.
A memorial service will
be held at a later date.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay City.
Please be sure to sign our
on-line register book at
muirbrothersfh.com.

~ Edward Chick, 72 ~
Edward Chick, age 72,
of Almont, Michigan, died
suddenly Friday, June 17,
2016 at home. Edward
Jerome Chick was born
September 17, 1943 in
Hamtramck, MI. He is the
son of Joan R. (Kowalski)
and the late Edward
Anthony Chick. Ed grew up
in East Detroit; and spent
much of his youth in the
Attica and Imlay City areas.
He was a 1961 graduate of
Imlay City High School. He
attended Flint Junior
College for two years
majoring in music. He graduated from Detroit Barber
College.
He married Jeanette
Gerlach on January 8, 1966
in Romeo, Michigan.
Ed studied music in college; he played in a band
with Terry Knight and later
with his brother playing
piano and accordion. He
even gave accordion lessons
at one time.
Ed has been a Barber
for 52 years. Ed started barbering in both Grosse Pointe

and Romeo before coming


back to Imlay City to buy
the Barber Shop on East
Third Street in 1969 (19692016). He has been in semiretirement for a few years,
but still could be found at
Chick's Barber Shop three
or four days a week as
recent as two weeks ago. Ed
has raised cattle (especially
Hereford and Red
Limousin) for several years.
He also ran a livestock
transportation business; taking local farmers animals
and his own cattle to the
Marlette Stockyard every
week. Mr. Chick was a
member of: Almont
Planning/Zoning
Commission for many
years; Sacred Heart Catholic
Church of Imlay City parish
council; Our Lady Queen
Of Peace Knights Of
Columbus; Imlay City
Lions Club; and Right to
Life. He was also a member
of the Military Vehicle
Preservation Association
and loved driving and riding
his M38 Jeep. Ed was

instrumental in getting the


Polly Ann Trail through
Imlay City
Ed is survived by his
wife: Jeanette Chick of
Almont, one daughter; Patti
(Jason) Carte of Elgin, IL
and two sons: Edward (Sue
Plachta) Chick of Lapeer
and Tim (Marilyn) Chick of
Attica, MI; his grandson:
Lucas Carte of Elgin, IL;
his mother Joan R. Chick of
Satellite Beach, FL; two sisters: Diane Laudadio of
Indialantic, FL and Joan
Chick of Melbourne, FL;
and one brother: Daniel
Chick of Indialantic, FL.

Ed is preceded by his
father: Edward A. Chick;
and a brother: Gerard A.
Chick.
A Rosary/Scripture
prayer service was held
7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 21,
2016 at Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay
City, 225 N. Main Street,
Imlay City, MI. A Mass of
Christian burial will be held
11:00 a.m. Wednesday, June
22 at Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 700 Maple Vista,
Imlay City, MI. The
Reverend Fr. Matt Kafka
will officiate. Burial will
follow at the Mt. Calvary
Catholic Cemetery, Imlay
City.
The family will be
available for visiting hours
from 10-11 a.m. Wednesday,
June 22 at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church, Imlay
City.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Muir
Brothers Funeral Home of
Imlay City. Please be sure
to sign our on-line register
book at muirbrothersfh.com.

To share one of these obituaries with a friend or a loved-one


VISIT US ONLINE AT:

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Weve Got

Community Calendar

Wednesday, June 22nd

Wednesday, June 29th

Domestic Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to


3:00 p.m. in the Lapeer Court House for
personal protection order clinic. For info
810-246-0632.

Domestic Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to


3:00 p.m. in the Lapeer Court House for
personal protection order clinic. For info
810-246-0632.

Lapeer Area Citizens Against

Lapeer Area Citizens Against

Friday, June 24th

Friday, July 1st

Tuesday, June 28th

Saturday, July 2nd

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.
Imlay City Senior Center Euchre
Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open 4:30
p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.
Imlay City VFW Auxiliary 2492 will
meet 2:00 p.m. at the Post Hall (behind
Tri-City Times)

Tuesday, July 5th

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open 4:30
p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

How to use our Community Calendar


The Tri-City Times Community Calendar is a weekly schedule
of events for churches, clubs, local meetings, and civic
organizations. If you have an item for the Community
Calendar call our office at 810-724-2615. Deadline for all
calendar items is noon Monday prior to publication date.

AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH:

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Compimentary Satellite TV
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Available

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Imlay City, MI 48444

810.724.0254
FAX 810.724.8552
rjorgensen@pageone-inc.com

PAGE 12-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Ed Chick fondly remembered

Barber shop a gathering place in Imlay since 1969


By Tom Wearing

Photo Provided

Scene from Wicked coming to Wharton Center.

A peek inside the Wharton Center on the campus


of Michigan State University.

Wharton:
from page 9-A

Wayne Shorter celebrates his


83rd year in 2016 with a
stop at Wharton Center. The
Wayne Shorter Quartet features Grammy Award winner Danilo Prez on piano,
three-time Grammy Award
winner John Patitucci on
bass and widely respected
Brian Blade on drums, generating a thunderstorm of
electric jazz.
Acclaimed pianist
Yefim Bronfman makes his
Wharton Center premiere,
creating
passionate
poetry with a repertoire that
includes Debussy, Stravinsky
and Schumann. The Alvin
Ailey American Dance
Theater weaves an invigorating tale of the American
experience through dance
including a performance of
their signature masterpiece,
Revelation. World-renowned
violinist Sarah Chang joins
the Prague Philharmonia for
a captivating night of Dvok
and Smetana from the most
requested recording orchestra in Europe. Art of Time
Ensemble, featuring Steven
Page of Barenaked Ladies
and Glen Phillips from Toad
the Wet Sprocket, re-imagines the groundbreaking
Beatles album, Sgt. Peppers
Lonely Hearts Club Band, in
a live performance that
showcases the universality
and high art of this pop-culture phenomenon. The season is rounded out by four
fun family shows taken from

childrens literatureeach
priced to cost less than $60
for a family of fourand
three World View Lectures
from some of the globes
greatest minds.
Wharton Center is, of
course, an educational center
as well. Brand tells us, Its
important to continue and
expand on our educational
programs and collaborations.
Wharton Center was recently
awarded a $100,000 grant
from Disney to bring the
Disney Musicals in Schools
program to Michigan.
Wharton Center is one of
only four arts organizations
in the nation, and the only
one in the State, selected this
year. The program is an outreach initiative developed by
Disney Theatrical Group to
create sustainable theater
programs in under-resourced
elementary schools. This
year, the selected schools are
Lewton and Post Oak
Elementary, both in Lansing
and Doyle Rider and Holmes
STEM in Flint. The afterschool program is free to
these participating schools.
Weve only scratched the
surface. Theres more! Visit
the website at www.whartoncenter.com or call 517353-1982 for a complete
schedule and more information about the Center.
The Wharton Center for
the Performing Arts, indeed,
has something for everyone.
And, unlike the Globe, it has
a roof and lots of restrooms.
Email Rick at
rick.liblong@cox.net.

IMLAYCITY The
downtown district has lost a
familiar face with the passing
of Edward Ed Chick.
Chick, 72, died suddenly
at his home on Friday, June
17.
Born September 17, 1943
in Hamtramck, Chick spent
his early years in East Detroit
and most of his youth in the
Attica and Imlay City areas.
A 1961 graduate of Imlay
City High School, Ed had a
penchant for music and
attended Flint Junior College
where he majored in music.
Chicks musical talents
landed him in a band with
former radio disk jockey and
mid-1960s rock star Terry
Knight, whose roots were in
Flint.
He also played piano and
accordion in a band with his
brother, and for a time gave
accordion lessons.

Making the cut
Aside from his love for
Jeanette, his wife of 50 years;
it was barbering that would
become Chicks passion and
his lifelong profession.
After graduating from
Detroit Barber College, Ed

would cut hair for 52 years;


first in Grosse Pointe and
Romeo before opening up
Chicks Barber Shop on Third
Street in Imlay City in 1969.
Ian Kempf, a downtown
business owner and fellow
Lions Club member, said he
was a frequent visitor at the
barbershop, where the banter
among customers and visitors
tended to be lively and sometimes intense.
Ed was a wonderful guy.
He was a lot of fun and a fixture in our downtown, said
Kempf. Its shocking to hear
of his passing.
Kempf described Chick
as a throwback-style barber,
who provided an environment
where customers would stop
in not just for a haircut, but to
congregate, talk politics and
share stories about the goingson in Imlay City.
Ed had real a gift of gab
and he liked to get everyone
involved in the conversation,
Kempf said. And he always
enjoyed a good laugh. You
could stop in the barbershop
at anytime and laugh for
hours.
He made everyone feel
welcome, he continued.
Though the conversation
could get intense, it was

always
in
good-natured
fun.
Eds
passing is a
real loss to
our community.
Hes
going to be
missed by
Edward
everyone
Ed
Chick
who knew
1943-2016
him.
Another
regular at the downtown barbershop was former Imlay
City Mayor Rod Warner, who
credited Chick with creating
an environment conducive to
conversation that would
sometimes culminate in
debate.
Ed was a real good moderator, Warner said. He was
a businessman so he knew
when it was time to listen.
The barbershop was a
great place to sit around for
awhile, because so many people we knew would stop in,
Warner recalled. It was
always nice and friendly.
There was a lot of talk about
the old times we had back in
school and stuff like that.
Warner noted that he and
his wife, Gladys, sometimes
had dinner at the Chicks
home, and vice-versa.

Anything Blueberry contest is underway


Deadline for entry is June 23rd

and address.
For more information,
Three winners will be contact the Chamber offices
The
Anything selected and receive a gift at 724-1361 or the Mulefoot
By Maria Brown
Blueberry Contest invites card to the Mulefoot.
Tri-City Times Assistant Editor
Gastropub at 721-1019.
IMLAY CITY local cooks and bakers to
Blueberries are a versatile showcase their favorite
berry that have a place in blueberry recipe but its not
every meal from breakfast limited to baked goods.
If you ask her why she
to dessert. In anticipation of Tomorrow, June 23, com- from page 9-A
walks shell say for my
the 2016 Blueberry Festival, pleted dishes and recipes

She
had
been
joined
for
Mom, Gramma Poochie,
the Mulefoot Gastropub will can be dropped off at the
some
time
that
morning
by
a
Papa John and for myself. I
once again host a recipe Cedar St. restaurant from
friend
who
came
for
support.
personally think the pain
contest in honor of the little 5-7 p.m.
Since
he
left
she
walked
somehow makes her feel

Written
recipes
must
blue berry, but with a new
alone,
talking
to
that
same
closer to her mom. She had
include
the
entrants
name
twist.
friend on the phone as she
set out this year taking
went. People started to
pledges per lap to raise
notice the girl with the long
money for the ACS but most
string of beads. Is she still
people had just donated, only
going? Some applauded her one had taken her challenge.
as she passed. Some called
She could have easily
her crazy. That evening she
stopped at any time and
took a break to drive to the
called it done. No one would
store and get Band-Aids and know but her. But thats not
insoles for her shoes, then
my daughter.
she was back at it. She
My daughter has a will
hoped some of her friends
and determination born
from school would join her
from a lifetime of disapand show support for the
pointment. When she was
cause, but no one came, still
just seven I became a new
she pressed on.
dad. A dad that could no
Later, just in time for the longer ride her on my shoulLuminaria Celebration, the
ders or swing her around
young man returned bringing like an airplane. I had the
her a sandwich, (thank you
first of four surgeries to
for that), and two other
repair my cervical and lumyoung men arrived to walk
bar spine and literally had
with her. We all walked
to learn how to stand and
silently, the only sound was
walk with my new body. At
our sobbing as we all broke
the same time, my wife who
at some point and began to
was trying to take care of
Longtime Imlay City teacher Mike Powers (cencry.
her mother who was batter) poses for photo at his retirement party with
Closing ceremony, time
tling breast cancer, was
wife Jan and son Torey. Powers, a 5th grade
to pack up, still she walked
diagnosed with kidney canmath teacher at Borland Elementary School,
on. As the stadium emptied
cer, a terminal disease with
retired last week after 35 years in the district.
and one by one her friends
no cure. She was given 18
had to leave, she pressed on. months to live. Thankfully,
When the lights went out she she survived just short of
said nine more, Im finishfour years. She was only 48.
ing.
They say you dont
Her little sisters friend
remember much until you
walked with her until he had are five years old. My
to leave and then her sister
daughters were five and
joined her for the last two
seven when I started my
interest in their own food parties. The parties will be laps. I stood there, silently
medical journey and Mom
production, whether for fun Wednesday, Thursday and by the bleachers, the proudwas diagnosed with cancer.
or for self sufficiency.
Friday and cost $5 in addition est dad on earth and watched Most of their memories of
Each day will have a spe- to fair admission. The parties my girls bring it home. I
Mom were seeing her fight
cific theme, with four one will run from 8 p.m.-midnight tried to cheer like a crowd
with the heart of a lion and
hour classes surrounding the each night. Wednesday will but fell way short.
the fierceness of a warrior,
theme. On Tuesday the Pine be a glow party, Thursday When we got home, very until the very end. They are
River Bee Keepers Club will will be a foam party and early the next day, her little
now thirteen and fifteen.
have classes on everything Friday will be a paint party. sister helped her hop to the
Shawna Kristen Felster,
from establishing a hive to The fair is making a con- door where she fell to her
you are my hero. The heart
creative uses of the extracted certed effort to reach teens. knees and crawled on hands
of a lion, the fierceness of a
honey. Wednesday will focus These types of parties are and knees to her bed. She
warrior and the will and
on backyard animals includ- very popular. The parties will was in tears, her feet swoldetermination of your mothing chickens for both egg and be open to all teens 14-19.
len, bruised and torn, like a
er and I love you with all
meat and rabbits.
Younger children will not prize fighters face after a
my heart.
Thursdays classes will be be left out as bubble parties tough bout. Sunburned and
Dedicated to the memofor the non edible portion of will be available at no addi- sore, it was 87 degrees and
ry of Yvonne Marie Felster
gardening, such as compost- tional cost Wed.-Fri. from sunny all day.
and Ann Marie Stanley.
ing. The series gets back to noon-4 p.m.
food related topics on Friday Attendance will be limitwith meat, preserving and ed for the events and pursafe kitchen practices.
chasing passes early is
TRI-CITY AREA Were on Facebook! Navigate
The series will conclude encouraged to reserve your
your way to the Tri-City Times Facebook page and
on Saturday with a series on spot.
become a follower. Well be posting frequent news
edible gardening including
Sincerely,
updates, photos and event reminders.
herbs. Admission to the tent
Rob Usakowski
You can find us at www.facebook.com/Tricitytimes.
is included with your admisPresident
Have any suggestions for what youd like to see? Post
sion to the fair.
St. Clair County
your thoughts while logged on or send us an email at tct@
In addition the Fair will
4-H Fair
pageone-inc.com.
host 3 nights of teen dance
Goodells County Park

Warrior:

Photo by ?????????

Photo Provided

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Ed and Jeanette were


always a lot of fun to be
with, Warner said. Ed was
always cordial, fun and a
good guy.
Another good friend is
Leonard Greenwald, who
helped Chick with his latest
undertaking; that of raising
and trucking cattle to market.
Ed was a natural, said
Greenwald. He loved to
truck cattle and he took to it
pretty easily.
We were a year apart in
school, he continued. We
were both in FFA and both
had Judge Preisel for our
teacher.
The thing about Ed was
that as a barber, he knew
everybody in town and everybody knew him, said
Greenwald. That was his
calling.
Greenwald said Chick
was quick to make friends,
including those in the local
Amish community who are
currently building a garage
for his son, Tim Chick.
Everybody
is
just
shocked to hear the news,
said Greenwald. Its hard to
talk about. Ill remember Ed
as just being Ed.
For a complete obituary,
turn to page 11-A.

A new chapter...

Letters from our readers...

2016 lineup changes for St. Clair 4-H


The St Clair County 4-H
and Youth Fair is pleased to
announce some very exciting
changes to its 2016 lineup.
The annual livestock exhibition which takes place July
18-23 at Goodells County
Park, will welcome nearly
100,000 visitors.
Hands on learning opportunities will exhibit through-

out the week in the new


Agriculture Education Tent.
Society has had a recent push
to not only know where their
food originated, but also
opportunities to raise their
own organic foods. The education series which will take
place Tuesday-Saturday and
will focus on meeting the
needs of those that have an

Letters continued:
from page 8-A

decision-makers decide things


that affect your business.
Youll be a part of the process
to ensure your concerns are
addressed. Why sit on the side
lines, when you can run the
ball?
The nomination period
began June 15 and runs
through Aug. 1. You can nominate yourself or anyone of
legal voting age who participates or cooperates in an FSA

program.
Visit Nomination forms
and other information can be
found at www.fsa.usda.gov/
elections.
Forms must be postmarked by close of business
Aug. 1.
Kind Regards,
Christine White
State Executive Director
Michigan Farm Service
Agency
USDA

Join Tri-City Times on Facebook

PAGE 13-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Agriscience takes root in Capac

Photo by Maria Brown

CAPAC

Capac
Schools is home to St. Clair
Countys only agriculture science program. While other
districts have abandoned it,
Capac leaders decided it was
a science curriculum and
technical education path
worth investing in.
Currently, high schoolers
have the option of taking botany and an agriscience class
is offered for eighth graders.
In the fall, an animal science
class and ag biology offering
will be added to the roster.
Two years ago the
administration felt it was time
to revitalize the agriscience
program by offering more
classes for all grades,
Science
teacher
Leigh
Osentoski said.
Right now, the eighth
grade class serves as an
excellent feeder for the program and Capac FFAs
Chapter, piquing students
interest in everything from
animal care to crop and soil
sciences.

Our FFA Chapter is getting back on track. Weve


gone from 13 to 36 members
in just a few years, she
added.
The group has also racked
up a considerable amount of
awards too. Both their fall
broiler and winter meat rabbit
projects
earned
them
Michigan
FFA
State
Champion and Runner Up
team awards each in the junior
high division. Osentoski notes
it was the first state meat rabbit contest ever. She gives
kudos to Capacs Julie and
Lindsay Aversa of All Star
Woolies, nationally recognized Jersey breeders, for
their help in preparing for the
contest.
At the Michigan FFA
Convention in March, the
Capac Chapter earned numerous awards including recognition for their Food for
American Day and participation in Tons of Tabs, a pop
can tab collection benefit.
Along with awards, students
gain valuable insight in everything from budgeting and
pedigrees to teamwork and

FFA member Sam Rosati supplied goats for students to pet and see at the Capac FFAs Food for
America Day on May 20.

responsibility, Osentoski said.


Access to the necessary
facilities is also a part of revitalization program, for the
first time in many years, the
high schools greenhouse is in
operating order again. This
spring students used it to cultivate bedding flowers destined for landscaping around
the school grounds, herbs to
be sold and vegetables which
botany students planned to
sample as part of their studies. Osentoski said a new furnace was installed and the
structure was cleaned and
repaired during a work day in
September attended by students and community volunteers.
Osentoski said they owe a
debt of gratitude to the Four
County
Community
Foundation for their continued support over the years.
We want to thank Four
County for helping build the
FFA program. With grant
funds we were able to purchase official manuals, handbooks and posters, she said.
Additionally, grant funds
were given for the FFAs
recent Food For America Day
on the school grounds and
composter balls, used to recycle plant material from the
greenhouse and animal waste
from their broiler and rabbit
projects, were purchased with
the foundations help.
Osentoski is excited for
the future of the program and
what it can offer students
beyond the classroom. A new
articulation
agreement
between Michigan State
University, Michigans agriscience programs and the
Michigan FFA will allow students, who meet all the
requirements, to earn six
MSU credits while still in
high school at no cost to them.
Eighth grade agriscience

Discoveries in Dryden

Event sparks students imaginations, passion to learn


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Alexis Bruman and fellow agriscience classmates


take part in composter ball races. The balls will
break down plant material and rabbit waste.

Baby Bop 5K fundraiser on tap


TRI-CITY AREA Mark your calendars for the
Baby Bop 2016 5K Walk/Run/Bikeathon hosted by the
Pregnancy Resource Center of Lapeer on August 13th.
The event will be held at Rowden Park in Lapeer, and
runs from 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. The cost is $25 per person;
$40 for a family or free with a $40 sponsorship. For more
information call the Pregnancy Resource Center at 810667-0055 and look for more details in future editions of
the Tri-City Times.

Shred Day
IMLAY CITY LOCATION ONLY

Saturday, June 25th 8:30am to 11:30am

Third grader Jaden Insley portrayed Florence


Nightingale and fourth grader Ava DeVlaminck
was Sacagawea in Dryden Elementarys Wax
Museum.
the PTA supplies the books
and topics are determined by
teachers. Students create the
plot and artwork for a uniquely individual story. Genres
ranged from the ABCs to historical fiction.
In the cafeteria, students
and their guest enjoyed an ice
cream sundae bar. This was a
change from the usual
Discovery Day spaghetti din-

ner but, Hudson noted, with


the summer-like weather
weve been having, was
appropriate and appreciated.
In the hallway, the PTA
sold raffle tickets for some
fun gift baskets.

Next year, we plan
to have more participation
with the elementary band
and music groups, Hudson
said.

SkillsUSA scholarships awarded


ATTICA Imlay Citys
Alex Belbeck and Chris
Keller are the each the recipient of a mikeroweWORKS
Foundation scholarship to
attend the SkillsUSA National
Leadership
and
Skills
Conference in Louisville, KY,
June 20-24.
Both are Lapeer County
Ed Tech students in the Public
Safety program and have
qualified to compete on the
national level after earning
gold medals in state competitionAlex for firefighting
and Chris for criminal justice.
Mike Rowe, former host
of the Discovery Channels

students said the class and


FFA experience has opened
up new doors and opportunities for them. Keegan Jaros
said he recently bought two
calves and plans to show them
in an upcoming fair. Leanna
Konarski said she recently
started to breed rabbits and
has launched a business selling them. Logan Swantek
said the class seemed like a
natural fit for him since he
works on a farm and is used
to animals and plants.
Getting the chance to get
out from behind a desk and
work with their hands was a
plus nearly all the students
said when describing the program.
It gives us experiences
outside of the classroom,
said Lilly Rodriguez.

FFA members are already


gearing up for next year.
The officer team for the 201617 school year includes
President Ron Sarka, Vice
President Austin Lowien,
Secretary Dakota Killingbeck,
Treasurer Scout Senyk,
Reporter Erika Kananen and
Sentinel Alexis Zink.

Photo by Maria Brown

DRYDEN It can be
hard to summarize an entire
semester year in one day but
parents, family and friends
get a good idea of what
Dryden Elementary students
have been doing and learning
every year during Discovery
Day. On Wednesday, June 1,
kindergarten through sixth
grades welcomed the public
to get a glimpse at some of
the fun projects theyve done
the classroom in recent
months.
In the gymnasium, science fair projects and artwork
were on display. In the other
corner, third and fourth graders presented a wax museum
with the likes of Florence
Nightingale and Lou Gehrig.
The wax museum was
started as a sixth grade event
and was quite elaborate.
When the sixth grade started
doing the Science Fair, the
event was placed on hold.
This year, the 3-4th grades
decided to try a version of it.
They did a great job, said
teacher Kim Hudson.
In the library, visitors got
to see the work of young
authors as part of the Bare
Books display. Hudson said

Eighth graders Lauren Coltson, Lizzy Parisot, Leanna Konarski, Lilly Rodriguez
and teacher Leigh Osentoski check on plants in the high school greenhouse.

Photo by Maria Brown

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo by Maria Brown

District revitalizes program, students meet with success

Dirty Jobs and current host


of CNNs Somebodys
Got To Do It, created the
foundation in 2008 to, in his
words, give something
back and challenge the prevailing definition of a good
job.
The scholarship provides
support for SkillsUSA state
contest winners who have
insufficient personal resources to travel to and participate
in the 2016 National
SkillsUSA Championships.
This years scholarship award
amounts were determined by
the geographic travel distance
to Louisville, KY. The winners will also have the oppor-

tunity to meet with a member


of the mikeroweWORKS
Foundation staff during the
conference.
The scholarship is awarded based on a student-written
narrative describing the need
for the scholarship and lack
of school or community
resources. A student may be
nominated with a letter of
recommendation written by
his or her SkillsUSA advisor
or the SkillsUSA state association director.
Since 2011, the mikeroweWORKS Foundation
has provided scholarship support to 354 SkillsUSA students.

HELP FIGHT IDENTITY THEFT


bring your bank statements, financial records, credit card
statements, documents containing any personal info!!

The company onsite doing the shredding is Xtreme Shred, all documents are shredded at the location
Bring your shred items in a plastic bag or box
Any questions please feel free to contact our Imlay City office at 810-724-0090
You dont need to remove staples or paper clips

www.tri-countybank.com

Member FDIC

Tri-County Bank


Marlette989-635-0639 Fronney's Family FoodsCapac810-395-8113

PAGE 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

N
W
O
T
!
HOME
E
D
I
R
P
D
N
FUN A

Liz and Tim


Gross were
crowned
Capac Days
King and
Queen during Fridays
ceremony.

Photo by Maria Brown

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

CAPAC
DAYS...

Freddie
Prozida, 9,
of Capac,
bounces his
way toward
fun on bungee
ride during
Capac Days
Festival on
Saturday.

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Veterans Color Guard lead the way, followed by CSB Bank employees during
Capac Days Parade on Saturday.

Photo by Maria Brown

Birds-eye view of happenings on Main Street during Capac Days Festival on Saturday. The scorching heat
kept many visitors in the shade.

Photo provided

Capacs cutest baby 2016 Kristopher Karter


Dalecki and his mom Larisa Dalecki smile for the
crowd in the Capac Days Parade on Saturday.
Kristophers dad, Kris Desmit, is not pictured.

Anthony Martin tests his maneuvering skills during the inaugural lawn mower
races on Friday.

Circus Among Us performer wows the crowd Festival goers lined up take a ride on the events
with his balancing skills. new zipline along Main Street.

Photo by Maria Brown

Donna Wojtysiak parades down Main Street with


Lester the goose during Capac Days Festival.

Photo by Maria Brown

Zach Sterosky tries his best to stay upright on the


mechanical bull rides.

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Photo by Maria Brown

Four County Community Foundation YAC members Shelby Husovsky and McKenna Hopkins
hand out balloons during the festival on Friday.

PAGE 15-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Finding purpose

Photo by Paul Druker

IMLAY
CITY

Exercise is a dreaded word in


most peoples vocabularies
but getting fit doesnt need to
be chore if you take the right
approach. Thats the premise
behind a new program
debuted at the Imlay City
Middle School this spring.
Teacher Greg Prendergast,
with help from fellow staff
and community members,
initiated Imlay Citys own
Iron Man and Iron Maiden
contest. Fifty-eight 8th graders30 boys and 28 girls
took part in the three week
program with an additional
16 6th and 7th graders joining
in for a portion of the contest.
One day per week the contestants gathered in the gym for
practice rounds followed by
the final contest on May 19.
I heard about the positive effects the Iron Man/
Iron Maiden Contest had at
Belleville Schools in years
past and wanted to bring it to
Imlay City to provide another
avenue for individual fitness, Prendergast said.

We consider this type of


competition personal best fitness which stresses the
importance of the individual
growth from week 1 to week
3.
During those practice sessions, teens worked on basic
skills that would prepare
them for the eventual contest
which consisted of six individual testsleg lifts, pushups, sit ups, shuttle run and
sprint. It also proved to be a
great chance to put their
classwork
into
action.
Students in Prendergasts
health class learn about the
F.I.T.T Modelfrequency,
intensity, time and type.
The program required a
bit of tweaking when it came
to the intensity and time of
these tests during practice
sessions but Prendergast said
the necessary changes were
made with input from Imlay
City Schools Athletic Director
Don Gauthier and former
Imlay City High School
counselor Paul Druker, who
was familiar with the program during his time at the
Belleville district.

Alumni Matt Van Dyk and Ben Rodak served as


guest judges during the contest.

We like to focus on training


as opposed to working out
without a purpose. Training is
when you follow a systematic, progressive plan with
measurable goals. Training is
purposeful and consistent.
Working out is when you
push to exhaustion with no
real direction or specificity.
You get sweaty and tired but
dont accomplish anything.
We thought this contest provided consistent growth and
helped with goal setting for
achievement. Each individual
was able to learn about themselves in different areas of
strength, agility and speed
and work hard to improve
each week, he said.
Many competitors took
the opportunity to practice at
home too.
When May 19 came and
the final contest concluded,
many awards were handed
out.
In the Iron Maiden contest Victorya Truemner was
the leg lift winner, Mackenzie
Allen came out on top for
push-ups, Katlyn Judd had
the best sit up performance
and it was a tie in the pull up
contest between Jillian
LeFevere and Katlyn Judd.
Angelica
Vaughn
was
declared the shuttle winner
Layla Delecke was the fastest
sprinter.
We also picked two
judges choice awards for outstanding effort. Those awards
were given to Kierra
Bickmann and Izzy Aune,
Prendergast noted.
On the Iron Man side, the
leg lift contest was won by
Alec Adamczyk, Austin
DeRocher took first in pushups, pull-ups and sit-ups was
won by Austin DeRocher and
Riley Bertram won both the
shuttle and the sprint events.
Additionally,
Maleke
Thompson, Kennedy Kramek

Imlay City Middle Schools Iron Maiden Katlyn Judd, center, poses with other
contest group winners.

Photo by Paul Druker

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo by Paul Druker

Imlay students participate in Iron Man/Maiden training

Iron Man winner Austin DeRocher, center, and his fellow contest winners celebrate a successful, first year program.
and John Ciurla were awarded for outstanding effort in
multiple events.
The overall Iron Maiden
was Katlyn Judd with 34 total
points and the Overall Iron
Man was Austin DeRocher
with 37 total points.
I feel we were able to
teach the students that it is
important to challenge yourself and test your personal
limitations. We wanted to
open up their eyes to show
that anyone can be successful
if you dedicate yourself and
work hard, Prendergast said.
Organizers deemed it a success and plan to make it an
annual event.
This event would not
have been possible without
the support of our teachers,

administration and support


staff, Prendergast said.
He credits teachers
Shayne Hellebuyck and
Christine Hibbler for helping
sign up students for the contest; teachers Tim Shultz,
Jean Bannister, Julianne
Kent, Amy Sung, Dan Cook,
Mike LaMarra, Kim Perrault,
Lisa Grout and Barb Gates
who served as guest judges
and administrators Pat Brown
and Vince LaCavera for their
support. High School counselor Laura Druker and Jim
Owen, alumnus Jackie
Alcazar and three high school
seniors lent a hand during the
finals.
In addition, we were
happy to have many other
community members includ-

ing new Imlay City Chief of


Police Scott Pike and officer
Joe DeLuca during our event
as well. Former IC athletes
Matt Van Dyk and Ben Rodak
made appearances as guest
judges as well, he said.
Support from community
members was also appreciated. Diane Strohm of
INKSPOT Custom T-Shirts
helped them create event
t-shirts and Rick and Lynn
Bogart donated $100 to help
support the contest after
learning about it from Paul
Druker.
Again, this was our first
year attempting this contest
and we were fortunate to have
the support of many in our
community, Prendergast
said.

PAGE 16-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEERCOUNTY
Graduation Day can be particularly satisfying for those
who collect their diplomas
having already attained adult
status.
Last Wednesday (June
8), sixteen adults earned
their high school diplomas
through the Lapeer County
Intermediate
School
Districts (ISD) Adult
Education program.
Annette Schlaud, longtime manager of the ISDs
adult education program,
describes such graduation
ceremonies as uniquely
moving and inspiring.
Schlaud attributes the
programs continued success
to distance learning, which
allows
students
from
throughout the area to study
from home and meet the
requirements of graduation.

Top
grad
McCullough.

Chieko

This years graduates


included: Kassidi Bausick,
Nicole Cain, Matthew
Dixon, Erinn Elequin, Riley
Halbert, Keisha Hartwick,
Payton Jewell, Chieko
McCullough, Cody Nycamp,
Taylor OConnor, Daniel
Romstad, Andrea Taylor,
Felicia Van Daele, John
VanDerWater, Ken Weathers,

Michael Wirgau and Ashley


Young.
Schlaud said the evening
began with several 2016
inductions into the National
Adult Education Honor
Society.
The inductees were:
Kassidi Bausick, Chieko
McCullough,
Monroe
Murphy, Taylor OConnor,
Ken Weathers and Michael
Wirgau.
Schlaud noted that students must qualify for the
Honor Society by demonstrating dependable attendance, a cooperative attitude
and a good work ethic.
Guest speakers at the
commencement exercise
were: 82nd District House
Rep. Gary Howell, and
Maria Hoebeke, a 2006
Lapeer ISD Adult Education
graduate who is now an
attorney in Lapeer County.
Among the evenings
highlights was the presenta-

Lapeer County ISD Adult Education graduates celebrate commencement


exercises on June 8.
tion of this years Top Grad
award to Chieko McCullough
of Almont, who is currently
enrolled
at
Macomb
Community College.
Schlaud acknowledged
other graduates whose
accomplishments are worthy
of mention.
Graduate
Keisha
Hartwick distinguished herself by completing certification as a phlebotomist and
EKG Technician, while
earning her diploma, said
Schlaud.
Keisha
has

Photo by Maria Brown

The 2016 Relay For Life of


Capac was held Saturday at
the high school track where
more than $25,000 was
raised for the American
Cancer Society. At right,
cancer survivors are honored during a special lap.
Below, Team Mema poses
for a photo in their 1950s
era sock hop campsite.

TRI-CITY AREA A
Motor City Casino Bus Trip
fundraiser to help young
baseball star Adam Van
Buren make a trip to Japan to
play in a tournament there is
slated for Sun., July 17. The
cost is $40 per person and
includes round trip motor
coach transportation, five
hours of gambling at Motor
City Casino and $25 in gaming from the casino. The trip
leaves Tractor Supply in
Imlay City at 12:15 p.m. and
returns to Imlay City at 7:15
p.m. Payment is due upon
sign-up. Registration deadline is July 1. To reserve a
spot or for more information
call 810-343-8097 or 810614-5623 or send an email to
sassywhiskers1@gmail.com
or loravanburen@yahoo.
com.

Reconstruction
Nominating petitions available for school board on N. Almont
CAPAC Nominating petitions and affidavits for may sign up to three six-year to begin June 27
petitions for board candidates any person wishing to run for term petitions and one peti-

Sponsors valued, appreciated


TRI-CITY AREA Our Fathers Day Photo Contest
drew entries from around the area, and made the weekend
brighter for our winners: Alicia Smith of Capac, Mindy
Rogers of Attica, Melissa Garner of Almont, Gynnae
Bourdeau of Dryden and Kim Morris of Almont. Their
submissions appeared in the June 15 issue of the Tri-City
Times.
We are grateful to our sponsors Great Clips in Imlay
City, Arcadia Hills Golf Course, Woods-N-Water
News and Castle Creek Golf Club. Their generous gifts
were most appreciated by our winners, and their support
is valued by us. Thank you to our sponsors for their prized
contributions and thank you to those who entered the
photo contest.

tion to fill the remainder of


the appointed term ending
December 31, 2020.
Separate petitions must
be used for each township
within the school district. A
$100 non-refundable fee may
be filed in lieu of a petition. It
will also be necessary for
candidates to file two copies
of an Affidavit of Identity
at the time of filing nominating petitions. If a person other
than the candidate files the
petitions, it is still necessary
that the Affidavit of Identity
be executed by the candidate.

IMLAY
CITY

Reconstruction of N. Almont
Avenue from 4th Street to
Capac Road (Old M-21) will
begin on Monday, June 27 as
part if the citys street
improvement project. Please
note there will be limited
access during construction in
this area and motorists are
advised to use other local
streets. City Manager Tom
Youatt says construction is
anticipated to be completed
by Labor Day weekend.

Photo by Dana Walker

the office of board trustee.


The deadline for a candidate to withdraw his or her
name is 4 p.m. on July 29,
2016.
The board members will
be elected on November 8,
2016.
To qualify as a candidate,
you must be (1) a registered
school elector, (2) a citizen of
the United States, (3) at least
18 years of age, (4) a resident
of the State of Michigan for
30 days, and (5) a resident of
the school district on or before
the 30th day prior to the date
of the election.
Property ownership is not
a requirement for candidacy.
Candidates should acquire a
minimum of six valid signatures on their nominating
petition(s). It is recommended
that candidates obtain the
maximum of 20 signatures
for a safe margin. Signatures
must be of persons who are
registered electors of the
school district in which they
are circulating the petitions. A
person signing the petitions

all of these graduates and


proud to have been a part of
their achievement, said
Schlaud.
The
Lapeer
Adult
Education program is operated through the Lapeer
County Intermediate School
District.
Classes are held at the
Lapeer Education and
Technology Center in Attica
Township.
For questions or more
information, call 810-6676454.

Casino fundraiser
for Adam
Van Buren

Relay for Life in Capac

can be obtained from your


local township clerk, county
clerk, or picked up at Capac
Community Schools, Central
Office, 403 North Glassford
Street, Capac, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
Completed petitions and
affidavits of identity must be
turned in to the St. Clair
County Clerks Office.
Capac School Board has
four board terms that will
appear on the November 8,
2016 ballot. Three board
terms which expire December
31, 2016 (Walter Lentz,
William Ellis, and Monica
Standel) are six-year terms
from January 1, 2017 through
December 31, 2022. One term
to fill the appointed vacancy
term which expires December
31, 2020, currently held by
Dwayne Loper, will be on the
ballot; this elected board
member will take office after
the election is certified and
the newly elected board member is sworn in.
July 26, 2016 by 4 p.m. is
the last day to file nominating

worked hard to achieve this


goal and will certainly
achieve anything she puts
her mind to. She was also
the youngest member of her
graduating class.
Additionally, two of this
years graduates were recipients of scholarships from
Baker College.
Kassidi Bausick plans to
pursue a degree in Health
Sciences, while Michael
Wirgau will be studying
Civil Engineering.
We are very proud of

Efforts acknowledged
Rotary International District 6330 Assistant
District Governor Dr. James Sillers presents
2015-2016 District Literary Award to Imlay City
Rotary President Walt Bargen. The Imlay City
Rotary Club was acknowledged for their efforts
to support literacy, including reading to youngsters at Weston Elementary during March is
Reading Month, donating books to Weston
Elementary, awarding two $2,000 scholarships
to Imlay City High School seniors, and participating in the Camel Races fundraiser for the
Family Literacy Center.

Photo by Kendra Bickman

By Tom Wearing

Photo provided

Adult Education grads


collect their diplomas

Imlay City Schools Band Director Scott Pries and


middle school student Ruby Hellebuyck with
MSBOA Scholar Instrumentalist Award presented
to Ruby for her achievements.

MSBOA award for


Ruby Hellebuyck
By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City Middle School student
Ruby Hellebuyck was
recently recognized for her
musical and academic talents.
Ruby was the recipient
of the Michigan School Band
and Orchestra Association
(MSBOA)
Scholar
Instrumentalist Award.

The award is reserved


for young musicians who are
high achievers as musicians
and students.
Ruby, who carries a 3.81
grade point average, was
chosen for the honor because
she continually and challenges herself in the band
and the classroom.
Ruby has participated in
the Solo & Ensemble
Festival and the MSBOA
District 3 Honors Band.

Summer reading on
tap at Goodland library
By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

GOODLAND TWP.
If youre looking for some
summer reading fun for the
children, look no further than
the Goodland Township
Library.
The Summer Reading
Program kicks off on
Monday, June 27 at 3 p.m. at
the library with a visit from
Jenifer Strauss.
The author will present
her program Going Beyond
the Tortoise and the Hare.
The free program is geared
toward young children, but
all are welcome to attend.
Library director Catherine
Yezak says Strauss is a former middle school teacher
who used story telling as a
way to connect with students.

She
uses
puppets to
help convey
meaning.
This
will be a
wonderful
way
to
spend
an
h o u r ,
Jenifer
Strauss
Yezak says.
The children will be active and moving around.
The program is free; but
registration is required due to
limited space. To register or
for more information contact
Yezak at 810-721-2110 or
register online at goodlandtwplibrary.org.
The library is located at
2370 N. Van Dyke, north of
Imlay City.

SEND US YOUR
ANNOUNCEMENTS!
Tri-City Times

P.O. Box 278 Imlay City, MI 48444 or


Fax to 810-724-8552 or email to tct@pageone-inc.com
or www.tricitytimes-online.com

PAGE 17-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

New administrator on
staff in St. Clair County
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

ST. CLAIR COUNTY


Karry Hepting is the countys new administrator/controller, moving from her most
recent position as finance
director/deputy controller for
St. Clair County. Hepting
succeeds Bill Kauffman who
retired from the top post June
1.
Hepting, a lifelong resident, started her career with
the county in 1999 as a payroll staff accountant before
being promoted to accounting
manager. She held that post
for 12 years, becoming
finance director in late 2011.
I am proud of the contribution I have been able to
make to help the County
remain fiscally strong while
still providing quality services to residents during difficult
economic times. I chose to
apply for the AdministratorController position because it

would allow
me to make
an even greater impact on
the organization and community, she
said.
S h e s
Karry
only
three
Hepting
weeks into
her new job,
so getting acquainted with
tasks and projects is her main
objective at the moment but
Hepting said shes looking
forward to reach out and build
relationships with community
groups.
One thing everyone has
learned since 2008 is that collaboration is the key to everyones success. When governments and community groups
share resources, everyone is
able to make a greater
impact, she said.
Forging ahead with priorities identified by the county
commission will require her

time and attention too.


Community and economic development along
with regional marketing are a
top priority for the board right
now so I will be involved in
many of those initiatives,
Hepting said.
County commissioners
approved Heptings contract
at their May 19 meeting. She
was one of three internal candidates to apply for the job.
The rest of the field included
Dave Struck, Metro Planning
Commission executive director and Michael McMillan,
probate and family courts
administrator.
Hepting is a graduate of
St. Clair High School and
Michigan State University.
After earning her bachelors
degree from MSU, she earned
her certified public accountant license. She currently
resides in Port Huron
Township with her husband
and two children.

instrumental, they say, in


implementing a plan that gave
every student access to computers.
Principal David Kochan
praised Nestle for the relationships he builds with his
students.
Mr. Nestle is a dedicated
teacher who spends extra
time getting to know the students and their learning
styles, Kochan said.
Outside of the classroom,
Nestle also coaches varsity
football, middle school wrestling and is an assistant coach

with the varsity boys track


program.
Whether during the
school day or on the field,
Nestle has demonstrated
unwavering commitment to
excellence, innovation and
improving the lives of his
students, noted RESA
Director
of
Education
Services Brenda Tenniswood.
In addition to his certificate of recognition, Nestle
received a $300 gift from the
local
MEEMIC
agent,
Insurance Specialists Agency
in Marysville.

Dad Fest in Imlay


is all about Dads!
Heritage Church in Imlay City hosted
Dad Fest on Fathers Day, June 19,
outside of their church on Cedar
Street (M-53). Part of the fun included a dunk tank, where Lilah Dietrich,
7, of Mussey Twp. attempted to hit
the target to plunge Austin Blount
into the tank (top). The classic car
show drew dozens of interesting
entries, including the vintage police
car that Imlay City
residents Devin
Strachan, Caitlyn
Miller and their
15-month-old son
Ryder Strachan
were drawn to
(middle). Hungry
guests
also
enjoyed free hot
dogs and refreshments, courtesy
of the church
(below).

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

CAPAC Capac Middle


School teacher Bill Nestle has
been recognized as the June
2016 St. Clair County
Distinguished Teacher.
The award, sponsored by
St. Clair County RESA, was
presented to the English language arts instructor in his
classroom on June 14.
Local and county leaders
sought to honor Nestle for his
work to bring new technology
to the classroom. He was

Photos by Catherine Minolli

Distinguished Teacher Award for Nestle

Toddler
contest
entries
sought
By Maria Brown

Photo provided

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo provided

Capac Schools Superintendent Steve Bigelow, Capac Middle School Principal


David Kochan, Bill Nestle and RESAs Kevin Miller take part in last weeks
presentation at the Middle School.

Big fun at Big Boy


Imlay City Big Boy Assistant Manager John Watkins (back, 2nd from left)
and the Big Boy Crew welcomed Elsa from the hit movie Frozen at the
inaugural Kids Night at Big Boy last Thursday. The popular eatery will
host Kids Night the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month from 6-8 p.m.
The Kids Night planned for June 30 from 6-8 p.m. will feature Paw
Patrol. All are welcome to come out and enjoy the fun.

IMLAY CITY Entries


are now being taken for the
Blueberry Festival Baby and
Toddler Contest. This is year
number two for StudioE
Photography to host and
sponsor this popular event.
Owner Erin Wetzel is
scheduling photo sessions for
entrants on July 5-7. Sessions
for kids up to four years-old
are free of charge. Portraits
will be on display at City Hall
in advance of the July 22-23
festival where votes, in the
form of monetary donations,
can be cast. The baby and
toddler that garners the most
votes will earn gift packages
from StudioE. The first prize
in each category will be a gift
package including a $100 gift
certificate
to
StudioE
Photography and those coming in second will get a $50
gift certificate to StudioE
Photography.
For more information or
to make an appointment, send
an email to erin@visitstudioe.com.

COOKS
APPLY ONLINE . . .

by going to bigboy.com
When applying, select the
IMLAY CITY LOCATION.

PAGE 18-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

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Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Sports

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Huss returns as SC4 coach

Former Capac girls hoop coach aims to repeat success


CAPAC Following a
14-year absence, Capac High
Schools Chris Huss is back
involved with the St. Clair
County Community College
womens basketball program
once again.
This past Friday Huss was
announced as the Port Huronbased schools newest coach.
He last held that sideline
assignment in 2002.
It is great to be back with
SC4 again, Huss, who had
coached the Capac varsity
girls squad the past six seasons before stepping down,

commented.
I am looking
forward to the
opportunity to
go
back
there,
he
noted.
Huss certainly is no
Huss
stranger to
s u c c e s s
coaching at the collegiate
level.
During his stay at SC4
from 1994 to 2002, Huss
directed the program to the
National Junior College
Athletic Association Division
2 title game in 1994. It was
there the Skippers dropped a

triple overtime verdict.


He also guided SC4 to four
Michigan Community College
Athletic Association Eastern
Conference top finishes and
one state championship.
SC4 has not returned to the
NJCAA Division 2 championship game since that time, but
the program has proven a consistent winner year in and out.
One need only look at their
recent track record for proof of
that statement. They have
reached the NJCAA National
Tournament four of the past
five seasons, despite having
several coaches during that
span.
Huss takes over the job

from Akilah Edmondson,


who guided SC4 to the
national tournament in her
only year with the program.
Huss says he is looking
forward to coaching at the
collegiate level again.
With the success the
program has had over the
past few years it should help
us with recruiting, Huss
said. We are also moving
into a new arena, he noted.
I think SC4 is a nationally respected program. My
goal is to get the best players
we can to come here and
hopefully uphold that tradition, he noted.
Photo by Kevin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Combs selected as All-Star MVP

Ashton scores 20 points in Bluewater Senior All-Star game

TRI-CITY AREA
Imlay Citys Ashton Combs
hit a triple en route to a gamehigh 20 points and MVP
plaudits, leading the Blue

Ashton Combs with her


MVP plaque.

squad to a 72-36 victory over


the Gold team in the Blue
Water Area Senior All-Star
Girls Basketball Game last
Friday night.
St.
Clair
County
Community College, in Port
Huron, is where the action
unfolded.
In Fridays confrontation,
the Blue squad bolted out to a
13-0 advantage with 3:30
gone.
The Gold team then countered with an 8-4 run over the
next 6:30 of action, closing
the gap to 17-8 midway
through the initial half.
However, the momentum
would soon shift back to the
Blue squads side. Aided by a
23-10 run encompassing a
10-minute stretch, the team
went up 40-18 at the halftime
break.
The Blue team followed
it up with a 32-18 advantage
the rest of the way, putting
the finishing touches on a
72-36 win.
Madison Sokacz (Yale),
Desiree Lerma (Cros-Lex),
Daleigh Bisset (Peck), Kelsey
Gustafson (Armada), Morgan

Klein (Marlette), Kiana


Votava (Port Huron Northern)
and Haley Cross (Marlette)
also appeared on the roster of
the Blue team. They were
coached by Mike Banyas
(Imlay City).
Capacs Megan Jamison
and Meredith Moore plus
Almonts Abbey Johnson
joined forces for the Gold
squad that evening. They finished with four points apiece.

Taylor Pitts (Brown City),


Grace Kozfkay (Harbor
Beach), Sarah Longuski (St.
Clair),
Devan
Valko
(Marysville), Brooke Mahn
(St. Clair), Shannon Curley
(Marysville) and Olivia
Liebler (Brown City) also
were listed on the Gold
teams roster. They were
coached by Ryan Rathje
(Marysville) and Tom Valko
(Marysville).

Burgess nets MVP


honor for All-Stars

Capac standout pours in 22,


Blue team wins 88-80 shootout
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
Capacs Noah Burgess
amassed 22 points to help the
Blue team outscore the Gold
squad, 88-80, in the Blue
Water Area Senior All-Star
Boys Basketball Game last
Friday night.
St. County Community
College, in Port Huron, is
where the battle was contested.
For his effort, Burgess
was chosen the games MVP.
The opening 20 minutes
of action would see the Blue
team generate 43 points and
All-Stars Meredith Moore, Megan Jamison, Abbey
Gold squad manage the same.
Johnson and Ashton Combs pose for a photo.
When play resumed, the
Blue put together a 29-19 run
encompassing a 10-minute
span. That staked them to a Noah Burgess poses
72-62 advantage with 10 min- with his MVP plaque.
H a l l utes remaining.
By Kevin Kissane
(Marysville), The Gold squad then presented them with a 10-8
Tri-City Times Sports Editor
K e l s e y closed the gap to 78-72 with run over the next five-min TRI-CITY AREA
G u s t a f s o n 5:22 to play, putting the out- utes plus. That enabled them
to celebrate an 88-80 win
Almonts Olivia Dean and
( A r m a d a ) come up for grabs.
Abbey Johnson along with
and Brittany However, the Blue team when the final second ticked
Capacs Kathryn Oliver and
Goodwin
Burgess page 2-B
Cassidy Loridon helped the
(Port Huron responded to the challenge
Blue team down the White at
High) also
Dean
a Blue Water Area All-Star
appeared on
Volleyball
match
last
the roster of
Thursday evening.
the Blue team. They were
St.
Clair
County coached by Mandy DeHondt
Community College, in Port (Almont).
Huron, is where the action Calista
Chaltron
unfolded.
(Cardinal Mooney), Hannah
The Blue team fell 22-25 Coverdill (Marine City),
in the first set, before bounc- Hannah Gates (Marysville),
ing back for a 25-11, 25-16 Bailee Gunderson (Marine
victory.
City), Taelor Frank (Marine
For her performance, City), Sydnee Frank (Marine
Dean (who will play at City), Ruthie Polio (Marine
Saginaw
Valley
State City) and Michelle Rovito
University next season) (Cardinal Mooney) comearned MVP accolades.
prised the White teams
Payton
Husson squad. Dennis Caulfield All-Star participants Hunter Galbraith, Seth Reiff,
(Marysville),
Mikayla (Cardinal Mooney) was their Noah Burgess and Mike Nadrowski pose for a
photo.
Morgan (Marysville), Alicia coach.
Photo by Kevin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Noah Burgess, of Capac, drains a shot in the Blue


Water Senior All-Star Boys Basketball Game.

All-Star volleyball players Cassidy Loridon,


Kathryn Oliver, Abbey Johnson and Olivia Dean
take time out for a photo at Thursdays match.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City players combine for a win

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Page 2-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Area players tee it


up at Holly Meadows
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Jesse Kautz, of Almont,


paced the list of Tri-City Area
finishers that day. Kautz took
the Girls 10-11 age group
with a 63 over nine holes.
Almonts Brandi Kautz
garnered a first as well. She
won the Girls 12-13 age division, thanks to a nine-hole
effort of 58.

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Photo by Kevin Kissane

TRI-CITY AREA
Seven players hailing from
the Tri-City Area teed it up at
a Blue Water Junior Golf
Association event on Monday.
Holly Meadows Golf
Course, in Capac, served as
the tournament venue.

Albrecht captures
B Division title

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Almonts Jack DeMara watches his shot land on


the green during Mondays tournament.

Almonts Tyler Kautz follows through on a shot


during Mondays tournament in Capac.

Their sister, Tyler, wound up


third among Girls 14 and
Over A Division entrants. She
posted a 101 over 18 holes.
Thomas Manko led three
Almont participants in the
Boys 14-15 age group.
Manko shot a 59, paving the
way to a third.
Paul
Biolchini
and
Michael Rinke competed in

TRI-CITY AREA
Almonts Lindsey Albrecht
shot a 99 over 18 holes to win
the Girls 14 and Over B
Division at a Blue Water
Junior Golf Association stop
last Friday.
The Elks Golf Course, in
Port Huron, is where the
action unfolded.
Almonts Ashley Gibbs
also competed in same division. She carded a 129, paving the way to a sixth.
In the Girls 14 and Over
A Flight, Capacs Emma Kerr
posted a 106 en route to a
fifth.

that age division as well.


Biolchini managed a 69 for
fourth and Rinke supplied a
72 for fifth.
Jack DeMara, of Almont,
also tested his skills that day.
Participating in the Boys 16
and Over Division, DeMara
By Kevin Kissane
generated an 18-hole perforTri-City Times Sports Editor
mance of 96 on the way to a
DRYDEN The foltwo-way tie for fifth.
lowing athletes earned spots
on the All-North Central
Thumb League softball squad
which was announced recently:
Sekloch, Richmond.
First team - Lauren
Coach of the Year - Erica Franzel, pitcher, Mayville;
DiMatteo, Almont.
Nicole Alexander, pitcher,
North
Huron;
Natasha
Kandell, catcher, CarsonvillePort Sanilac; Allyson Majeski,
catcher, North Huron; Katelyn
Vogel, first base, Deckerville;
Natalie Gorde, third base,
Notre Dame Prep; Ruth Polio, Mayville; Miranda Zaremba,
Marine
City;
Alexa infield, Mayville; Lindsey
Landschoot, St. Clair; and Grifka, infield, Deckerville;
Madeleine Fazio, Notre Dame Brianna Fischer, infield,
North Huron; Hunter Wilson,
Prep.
Shortstop - Carley outfield, Mayville; Madisyn
Barjaktarovich Richmond; Guza, outfield, Deckerville;
and Reese Ruhlman, North Ellie Preston, outfield, North
Huron; and Claudya DeLand,
Branch.
First base - Gabrielle utility, Dryden.
Maday, Country Day; and Second team - Abbey
Schell, pitcher, Peck; Kara
Libby Black, Marine City.
Second base - Cameron Giraud, pitcher, Deckerville;
Smith,
catcher,
Katkic, Imlay City; and Sarah Jessie
Mayville; Cheyenne Johnson,
Longuski, St. Clair.
Third base - Kaleigh first base, Peck; Abby Bullis,
Creech, Almont; and Madison third base, Peck; Sarah
McClune, Notre Dame Prep. Savage, infield, Kingston;
Shafor,
infield,
Catcher - Heidi Likins, Rylee
Mayville;
Mia
Sliman,
St. Clair; and Jessica Gierman,
infield, Dryden; Cindy
Country Day.
infield,
Pitcher - Erin Shuboy, Alexander,
Richmond;
Jaqueline
Spizizen, Country Day;
Micaela Gleason, Notre
Dame Prep; and Veronica
Watson, Almont.
Utility - Ally Swantek,
Richmond;
and
Haley
Medrano, Imlay City.
DP - Olivia Young, St.
Clair; and Libby Vermeulen,
Country Day.
At Large - Aryanna
Daddabo, Marian.

Dryden lands two


picks on NCTL team

All-BWAC soccer team is announced


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
The following players were
named to the All-Blue Water
Area Conference girls soccer
lineup which was announced
last week:
First team - Kirsten
Schapman, Almont; Cassie
Latcha, Almont; Mikayla
McCarthy, Almont; Jennifer
Curtis, Almont; Kendal
Davis, Armada; Kirstyn
Madill, Armada; Peyton
Schmid, Armada; Andrea
Sekloch, Richmond; Grace
Aikens, Richmond; Lauren
McCullough,
Richmond;
Morgan Allen, Algonac;

Alyssa Schreck, Algonac;


Paige Kinnee, Cros-Lex;
Genevieve Milletics, CrosLex; Megan Jamison, Capac;
Sierra Cox, Capac; Rachel
Kulin, Imlay City; and
Amanda Randazzo, Yale.
Honorable mention Alayna Panduren, Almont;
Jen Weiland, Almont; Emma
Coenen, Armada; Sylvia
King, Armada; Hannah
Dullea, Richmond; Adrianna
Kunce; Madisyn Wilson,
Algonac;
Hope
Davis,
Algonac; Paige Kasper, CrosLex; Lauren Barbarich, CrosLex; Kelsey Payne, Capac;
Kristen Payne, Capac; Areli
Cardenas, Imlay City; Starr
Howland, Imlay City; Riley

Druia, Yale; and Abby Cowhy,


Yale.
League MVP - Andrea

Five named to AllRegion softball team


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA - The


following players were chosen to the Division 2 AllRegion 16 softball lineup
which was announced recently:
Outfield - Sydney Jascoe,
Marian; Stacy Houghton,
Almont; Elizabeth Swartz,

Megan
Randolph, of
Fort Gratiot
took division
honors on the
strength of an
85.
Almonts
Jack DeMara
was the lone Albrecht
Tri-City Area
boys competitor on hand.
Participating in the 16
and Over Division, DeMara
pulled up ninth with a 104
over 18 holes.
Macombs
Nick
Rutkowski was the division
pacesetter. Rutkowski managed an 83.

Carsonville-Port Sanilac;
Maddie Cofer, outfield,
Kingston; Rebecca Willett,
outfield, Carsonville-Port
Sanilac; Kayla Chaplinski,
outfield, North Huron; and
Lauryn Cumper, utility,
Kingston.
Honorable mention Emily Sawyer, CarsonvillePort
Sanilac;
Cassidy
McClelland, Caseville; Carly
Simmons, Caseville; Katelyn
Schutz, Deckerville; Julia
Flanagan,
Deckerville;
Cassandra
Wagester,
Deckerville;
Camryn
MacGuire, Kingston; Sarah
Savage, Kingston; Cira
Skinner, Kingston; Alli
Bundschuch,
Kingston;
Ahstian Davis, Kingston;
Chelsey
Clapsaddle,
Kingston;
Larissa
Drozdowski, Mayville; Emily
Kosinski, North Huron; Paige
Woodke, North Huron;
Larissa
Drozdowski,
Mayville; Taylor VanConant,
Peck; Lexi Ureel, Peck; and
Anna Dhooghe, Peck.

e
b
i
r
c
s
b
u
S
Today!

724-2615

Athlete of the Week

Burgess:
from page 1-B
off the clock.
Andrew Storm (Marlette),
Matt Skoryanc (Richmond),
Joe Hagner (Brown City),
Cody Kegley (Yale), Jeff
Mullaly (Cardinal Mooney),
Daniel Bobick (Cardinal
Mooney), Michael Proia
(Cardinal Mooney), Eric
Burgess (Brown City), Jason
Gaffke (Harbor Beach) and
Cody Sieman (Harbor Beach)
joined Burgess on the roster
of the Blue team. They were
coached by Josh Presnell
(Richmond).
Hunter Galbraith led a
trio of Imlay City players
who suited up for the Gold
squad. He finished with 15
points, draining a triple as
well. Mike Nadrowski followed with 12 points and
Seth Reiff hit for three.
Danny Hale (Sandusky),
Kodi Badger (Port Huron
Northern), Austin Paterson
(Marysville), Brandon Potter
(Sandusky), Jermaine Drake
(Port Huron High), Brendan
Vermander (Anchor Bay),
Geryd Welsh (Port Huron
Northern) and Fred Lawson
(Armada) also appeared on
the Gold squads roster. They
were coached by Don
Gauthier (Imlay City).

Capac senior Noah


Burgess was named MVP
of the Blue Water Senior
All-Star Basketball Game
last week.
For his effort, Burgess
nets our Boys Athlete of
the Week honor.

Imlay City junior


softball standout Kenady
Kaufman collected 36
RBI and batted at a .421
clip this past season.
For her effort,
Kaufman earns our
Girls Athlete of the
Week honor.

Be sure to pick up your t-shirt at the Tri-City Times office.


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Page 3-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Thompson, Maday set the pace at race


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

3) Adam Snider, 22:16.91;


4) Hank Barker, 22:43.9; 5)
Logan Swantek, 23:39.3; 6)
Chris Glanert, 24:55.78; 7)
Andrew Kruger, 30:19.97; 8)
Mike Dey, 31:03.23; 9) Jerry
Phillips, 31:34.6; 10) Tony
Najor, 31:55.21; 11) Bud
Brecht, 31:56.29; 12) Michael
Dineen,
31:57.24;
13)
Michael Maday, 39:11.75;
and 14) Thomas Manney,

44:18.29.
Women
3) Mary Adamczyk,
31:28.03; 4) Andrea Brecht,
31:59.58; 5) Milissa Phillips,
36:20.87; 6) Noelle Mosler,
38:23.07; 7) Emily Forsberg,
40:41.76; 8) Liliana Williams,
40:45.21; 9) Lori Barker,
42:33.78; 10) Gina Grzyb,
46:00.03; and 11) Michelle
Zink, 46:00,93.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

TRI-CITY AREA
Capacs Kevin Thompson and
Carlene Maday earned the
distinction of overall male
and female pacesetter last
Saturday at the Running Hot
Road Race in Capac.
The event covered 3.3
miles.
Thompsons winning time
was 20:43.01.

Ryan Najor, of Capac,


took second that day. He
stopped the watch at 21:17.42.
Maday, meanwhile, needed 29:15.58; to obtain her
first-place finish.
Angela Theobald, of
Imlay City, pulled up second.
She registered a 30:46.96
clocking en route.
Here is a rundown of how
the other competitors fared
that day:

Men

Kevin Thompson heads to the finish-line en route


to a first at the Running Hot Road Race Saturday.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Carlene Maday was the top female finisher at the


Running Hot Road Race in Capac.

By Kevin Kissane

TRi-CITY AREA
Almonts Adam Finn, Nick
Terry and Matt Schuster
helped the White team register a 12-9 triumph against the
Blue squad in the Blue Water
Area Senior All-Star Baseball
Game Sunday evening.
Sanborn Park, in Port

20% Of f

Capacs Tony Najor (L) and Bud Brecht (R) carry


the American flag with them in Saturdays race.

Almont trio on the winning


Blue Water All-Star squad
Tri-City Times Sports Editor

SALE

LaRowe (Port Huron High),


Dallas Mitchell (Port Huron
High), Dillon Mitchell
(Memphis), Austin Paterson
(Marysville), Isaac Raab
(Port Huron Northern),
Mason Ruhlman (Algonac),
Tyler Vercammen (Algonac),
Jacob Walsh (Memphis) and
Jacob Woodard (Marysville)
joined the Almont trio on the
the winning team. They were

Marritt (Peck), Noah Moore


(Anchor Bay), Brandon Potter
(Sandusky), Derrick Scott
(Sandusky), Matt Skoryanc
(Richmond), Ryan Toth
(Yale), Hunter Welsh (Peck)
and Ryan Woods (Brown
City) comprised the Blue
squads roster. They were
coached by St. Clairs Bill
McElreath and Denny White.

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Page 4-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

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Page 5-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Legal Announcements

MORE LEGALS 6 & 7-B

ALMONT
TOWNSHIP

ALMONT TOWNSHIP
BOARD REGULAR
MEETING SYNOPSIS
JUNE 13, 2016


Meeting called to order by
Supervisor at 7:00 p.m. at 819 N. Main
St., Almont, MI. Members present were
Supervisor Bowman, Clerk Hoffner,
Treasurer Kudsin, and Trustees Moore,
Stroup, and Streeter. Absent was Trustee
Groesbeck. The following actions were
taken: 1)approved budget amendments
as presented, 2)approved consent agenda as presented, 3)set special millage
rate for police protection, 4)adopted
township budget for 2016-2017, 5)
approved purchase of camera system for
township hall, 6)hired new fire fighter.
Meeting adjourned at 7:27 p.m. A com-

plete copy of minutes may be viewed on


the township web site at almonttownship.org.
Paul Bowman-Supervisor
Carol Hoffner-Clerk
25-1

ATTICA
TOWNSHIP

ATTICA TOWNSHIP
BOARD MINUTES OF
JUNE 9, 2016


The meeting was called to order at
7:00 p.m. by Supervisor Ochadleus.
Present were: Clerk Herpolsheimer,
Treasurer Mason and Trustees Madeline
and Lacey. Absent: None

Public Hearing for Truth in
Taxation Fiscal Year 2016-2017 Moved and seconded to approve the
Truth in Taxation as presented. Roll call

OFFICIAL NOTICE
CLOSE
OF REGISTRATION
FOR THE
PRIMARY ELECTION
TUESDAY, AUGUST 2, 2016
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

To the Qualified Electors of Lapeer County, Michigan


Notice is hereby given that Tuesday, July 5, 2016, is the last day to register
to vote or change your address for the above stated election. The following
Clerks will be in their respective offices during the business hours listed below for
the purpose of accepting applications for registration in said Township or City. Persons may also register at any Secretary of State Branch Office or the County Clerks
Office.

vote taken, all ayes, motion carried.



The minutes of May 12, 2016 were
approved as presented.

The treasurer report showed a new
balance of: General Fund $646,886.55,
and CDARS savings $202,074.47; Fire
Millage $86,559.65, CDARS savings
$50,518.60; Fire Escrow $80,791.45,
CDARS savings $50,518.60. Public
Safety $108,164.72, CDARS savings
$50,518.60

Police Report - 193 calls in May
with 108 handled by Township deputies.
Public Time - Tracy Aldrich, director of
the Ruth Hughes Memorial Library,
gave her report.

Steve Micic voiced his concerns
about the intersection of Lake George
Rd. and Hunters Creek Rd. Discussion
followed.

Old Business - Supervisor
Ochadleus reported that the plans for the

museum addition have been received


from the architect. Bids will be opened
at the July meeting.

The remodeling of the restrooms in
the township hall are moving forward.
The township is acting as the general
contractor for the project.

New Business - Tim Turkelson
introduced himself and gave his resume
as he is a candidate for Lapeer County
Prosecutor.

Moved and seconded to approve
the proposed budget for the fiscal year
July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017 as presented. Also to approve the wage recommendations as presented by Supervisor
Ochadleus. Roll call vote taken, all ayes,
motion carried.

Moved and seconded to approve
Mr. Marquardts Special Land Use
request to expand A2Z Storage as recommended by the Planning Commission,

The proposed millage is a RENEWAL of a previously-authorized millage and does


not constitute new additional millage.

BRANDON SCHOOL DISTRICT


MILLAGE PROPOSAL, BUILDING AND SITE
SINKING FUND TAX LEVY
Shall the limitation on the amount of taxes which may be assessed against all property in Brandon School District in the Counties of Oakland and Lapeer, Michigan,
be increased by and the board of education be authorized to levy not to exceed 2
mills ($2.00 on each $1,000 of taxable valuation) for a period of 2 years, 2017 and
2018, to create a sinking fund for the construction or repair of school buildings
and all other purposes authorized by law; the estimate of the revenue the school
district will collect if the millage is approved and levied in 2017 is approximately
$1,100,000?

ELBA TOWNSHIP
RENEWAL OF MILLAGE FOR FIRE PROTECTION
Shall the constitutional limitation upon the total amount of taxes which may be
levied on all taxable real and personal property in the Township of Elba, Lapeer
County, Michigan be increased by 1.4692 mills for each one ($1.00) dollar
($1.4692 for each $1,000.00) of the taxable value of such property, as finally
equalized, pursuant to 33 PA 1951, as amended, for a period of four (4) years
(2016 through 2019 inclusive) for the purpose of providing for the operation, staffing and training of the Elba Township Fire Department?
The estimated revenue to be collected in the first year that the millage is authorized
and levied is $278,952.67.
The proposed millage is a renewal of a previously authorized millage and does not
constitute new additional millage.

GENESEE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT


OPERATING MILLAGE PROPOSAL
Shall the limitation on the amount of taxes which may be assessed against all
taxable property in Genesee Intermediate School District be increased by .25 mills
($.25 on each $1,000 of taxable value) for twenty (20) years, calendar years 2016
to 2035, inclusive, for the purpose of providing funds for lifelong education, adult
education, community education, training, and enrichment, and for other operating
purposes, in Genesee Intermediate School district? It is estimated that the revenue
the school district will collect if the millage is approved and levied in 2016 will be
approximately $2.3 million. Revenues will be disbursed to Genesee Intermediate
School District.

GOODLAND TOWNSHIP
LIBRARY RENEWAL MILLAGE PROPOSAL
Shall Goodland Township be authorized to levy a renewal of the previously
voted increase in tax limitation, which last resulted in a levy of .90 mill ($.90 on
each $1,000 of taxable value), in an amount not to exceed .90 mill ($.90 on each
$1,000 of taxable value) against all taxable property within Goodland Township
for a period of five (5) years, 2016 to 2020, inclusive, for the purpose of operating, maintaining and equipping the Goodland Township Library and for all other
library purposes authorized by law? The estimate of the revenue the Township will
collect if the millage is approved and levied by the Township in the 2016 calendar
year is approximately $52,348.59

GOODRICH AREA SCHOOLS


OPERATING MILLAGE RENEWAL PROPOSAL
For regular office hours for days PRIOR to the last day of registration, please
contact your local clerk at the telephone number listed above.
The purpose of said Primary is for voting for candidates of the Republican and
Democratic parties seeking the nomination to the following partisan offices:
Representative in Congress 10th District
Representative in State Legislature 82nd District
Prosecuting Attorney
Sheriff
County Clerk
County Treasurer
Register of Deeds
County Road Commissioner regular term
County Road Commissioner partial term
Drain Commissioner
Surveyor
County Commissioner District 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7
Township Supervisor, Clerk, Treasurer and Trustees for
Almont Township, Arcadia Township, Attica Township, Burlington Township,
Burnside Township, Deerfield Township, Dryden Township, Elba Township,
Goodland Township, Hadley Township, Imlay Township, Lapeer Township,
Marathon Township, Mayfield Township, Metamora Township, North Branch
Township, Oregon Township and Rich Township
and such other partisan offices that are required by law to be nominated at the primary.
Please be further notified that delegates to the Republican Party and Democratic
Party county conventions will be elected at the August 2, 2016 Primary Election.
Also to elect the following Nonpartisan Offices:
(The offices of Judge of the 4th District Court of Appeals (Incumbent Positions),
Judge of the 40th Circuit Court, Dryden Township Library Board Members and the
North Branch Township Library Board Members will not appear on the primary ballot due to the number of candidates whom filed for the available positions.)
In addition to the nomination or election of candidates for various offices, the following propositions will be voted on:

ALMONT DISTRICT LIBRARY


LIBRARY MILLAGE RENEWAL PROPOSAL
Shall the previous voted increase in the tax limitation imposed under Article IX,
Section 6 of the Michigan Constitution on general ad valorem property taxes within the Township of Almont of 1.25 mills ($1.25 per $1,000.00 of taxable value)
reduced to 1.2436 mills ($1.2436 per $1,000.00 of taxable value) by the required
millage rollbacks, be renewed and increased up to the original voted 1.25 mills
($1.25 per $1,000.00 of taxable value) and levied for ten years, 2017 through 2026
inclusive, for the purpose of funding the operations of the Almont District Library
so as to support the current level of library services; and shall the District levy such
millage for said purpose, thereby raising in the first year an estimated $274,741?

ALMONT TOWNSHIP
RENEWAL OF FIRE DEPARTMENT MILLAGE
Shall the constitutional limitation upon the total amount of taxes which may be
levied on all taxable real and personal property in the Township of Almont, Lapeer
County, Michigan be increased by one (1) mill for each one ($1.00) dollar ($1.00
for each $1,000.00) of the taxable value of such property, as finally equalized, pursuant to 33 PA 1951, as amended, for a period of five (5) years (2016 through 2020
inclusive) for the purpose of providing funds for the operation and maintenance of
the Township Fire Department, purchase of fire extinguishing apparatus and equipment and housing for the same?
The estimated revenue to be collected in the first year that the millage is authorized
and levied is $218,875.00

Goodrich Area Schools existing authority to levy operating millage expired


with the 2015 levy. This proposal will correct a technical error in the operat
ing millage renewal proposition approved by the voters on March 8, 2016
and will allow the school district to continue to levy that millage in 2016
only in an amount not to exceed 18 mills on all property in the School District
(except principal residence and other property exempted by law). The
millage is required for the school district to receive its full foundation
allowance per pupil.

Shall the millage rate limitation on the amount of taxes which may be assessed
against all property, except principal residence and other property exempted by
law, in Goodrich Area Schools, Genesee, Oakland and Lapeer Counties, Michigan, be increased by 18 mills ($18.00 on each $1,000 of taxable valuation) (as a
renewal of previously approved millage authorization which expired with the 2015
levy) for 2016 only to allow for the continued levy of millage to provide funds for
operating purposes; the estimate of the revenue the school district will collect if the
millage is approved and levied in 2016 is approximately $1,107,788?
(This is a renewal of the operating millage that expired with the 2015 tax levy and
does not constitute new additional millage.)

KINGSTON COMMUNITY SCHOOL


BONDING PROPOSAL
Shall Kingston Community School, Tuscola and Lapeer Counties, Michigan, borrow the sum of not to exceed Five Million Four Hundred Fifteen Thousand Dollars
($5,415,000) and issue its general obligation unlimited tax bonds therefor, for the
purpose of:






partially remodeling, equipping and re-equipping, and furnishing and refur


nishing school buildings; acquiring, installing, and equipping school
buildings for instructional technology; erecting, furnishing and equipping
an outdoor concession/restroom facility; demolishing school buildings and
facilities, or portions of school buildings and facilities, including the north
wing of Kingston Elementary School; and remodeling, developing, equipping
and improving playgrounds, athletic structures, athletic facilities and sites?
The following is for informational purposes only:

The estimated millage that will be levied for the proposed bonds in 2016 is 2.64
mills ($2.64 on each $1,000 of taxable valuation). The maximum number of years
the bonds may be outstanding, exclusive of any refunding, is sixteen (16) years.
The estimated simple average annual millage anticipated to be required to retire
this bond debt is 4.99 mills ($4.99 on each $1,000 of taxable valuation).
(Pursuant to State law, expenditure of bond proceeds must be audited, and the
proceeds cannot be used for repair or maintenance costs, teacher, administrator or
employee salaries, or other operating expenses.)

LAPEER COUNTY MEDICAL CARE FACILITY


SUNCREST
MILLAGE TO EQUIP, MAINTAIN AND OPERATE

Shall the limitation on general ad valorem taxes within Lapeer County, Michigan
as provided in Article IX, Section 6, of the Michigan Constitution be increased by
.33 mills (33 cents per $1,000.00 on Taxable Value), and shall the Lapeer County
Board of Commissioners be authorized to levy a millage of .33 mills (33 cents per
$1,000.00 on Taxable Value) of the Taxable Value of all Property for a period of
10 years from 2018 through 2027 inclusive to provide funds for general operation,
equipment and maintenance of the Lapeer County Medical Care Facility? (THIS
BEING A RENEWAL OF THE SAME .33 MILLS THAT WILL EXPIRE WITH
THE 2017 TAX LEVY).
This levy would raise an estimated $887,536.00 in the first year. To the extent
required by law, a small portion of the total revenues from the tax levy (estimated
to be less than 1% in the first year of the levy) will be captured only from within

subject to engineering approval of the


storm water retention plan. Also to
amend Section 2.2 definitions, section
3.1.1 Agriculture District and adding
section 4.60 Small Wine Maker (microwinery) Micro-brewery and Micro
Spirits Distiller and similar uses of the
Attica Township Zoning Ordinance.
Also to amend section 6.4 Performance
Bond of the Attica Township Zoning
Ordinance. Votes were taken, all ayes,
motion carried.

Moved and seconded to transfer
$33,100.00 from the contingency fund
to the Planning Commission account,
Park account, Insurance account,
Pension account. Roll call vote taken, all
ayes, motion carried.

Moved and seconded to accept the
quote from Rosy Brothers to purchase a
new Kubota tractor and mower deck for
$16,387.00 plus trade ins and to autho-

rize Supervisor Ochadleus to sign the


contract. Roll call vote taken, all ayes,
motion carried.

The Lapeer County EMS assessment will be raised to $6.00 per capita.

Fire - 7 runs since last month one
of which was the Imlay City fire at the
Taco House. 4 Attica firefighters assisted in removing a victim from the building and starting CPR. They will receive
a letter of merit for their performance.

Park - Manager Madeline reported
that lumber has been ordered to replace
some on the bleachers and benches at
the ball diamonds. The township is looking for someone to work at the park on
an as needed basis for $10.00 per hour.

Planning Commission - Planning
Administrator Lemons reported that the
mean height of the accessory buildings

LEGALS Page 7-B

the district of and disbursed to the following Downtown Development Authority:


Village of Clifford.

METAMORA TOWNSHIP
POLICE PROTECTION MILLAGE RENEWAL
METAMORA TOWNSHIP BALLOT PROPOSAL
Shall the previously authorized millage increase in the tax limitation imposed under Article IX, Section 6 of the Michigan Constitution on general ad valorem taxes
within Metamora Township, Lapeer County, be renewed as presently reduced by
the required millage rollbacks at the rate of 2.1793 mills ($2.17 per $1,000 of taxable value) for the period of 2016-2025 inclusive, for a continuation of the current
level of police protection by the Metamora Township Police Department; and shall
the Township levy such renewal in millage for said purpose, thereby raising in the
first year an estimated $468,600.

MOTT COMMUNITY COLLEGE


MILLAGE RENEWAL PROPOSITION
Shall the previous voted increase in the limitation on the amount of taxes that
may be levied by Charles Stewart Mott Community College, Genesee County,
Michigan, against all property in the community college district be renewed for
a total of .6410 mill (which is equal to $.6410 per $1,000 of taxable value of real
and tangible personal property), for a period of 10 years, 2018 to 2027, inclusive,
to provide funds for community college purposes? If the .6410 mill increase is
approved it is estimated that the college will collect approximately $5.7 million of
revenue in the first calendar year it is levied. The proposed millage is a renewal of
a previously authorized millage.

OXFORD COMMUNITY SCHOOLS


OPERATING MILLAGE PROPOSAL



This proposal will allow the school district to levy the statutory rate of not
to exceed 18 mills on all property, except principal residence and other
property exempted by law, required for the school district to receive its
revenue per pupil foundation allowance.

Shall the limitation on the amount of taxes which may be assessed against all
property, except principal residence and other property exempted by law, in Oxford
Community Schools, Oakland and Lapeer Counties, Michigan, be increased by
18.4442 mills ($18.4442 on each $1,000 of taxable valuation) for a period of 10
years, 2017 to 2026, inclusive, to provide funds for operating purposes (17.9442
mills of the above is a renewal of millage that will expire with the 2016 tax levy,
.0558 mill is a restoration of millage lost as a result of the reduction required by
the Michigan Constitution of 1963, and .4442 mill is to restore millage lost as a
result of potential future reductions that may be required by the Michigan Constitution of 1963, to be levied only to the extent necessary to restore such future reductions); the estimate of the revenue the school district will collect if the millage
is approved and 18 mills are levied in 2017 is approximately $5,345,514?

RICH TOWNSHIP
PROPOSAL FOR RENEWAL OF
EXPIRED MOSQUITO CONTROL MILLAGE
FOR RICH TOWNSHIP
Shall the expiring previous voted increase in the tax limitation imposed under
Article IX, Section 6, of the Michigan Constitution of two (2) mills ($2.00 per
$1,000.00 of taxable value) on general ad valorem property within Rich Township
be renewed at the previously voted 2.000 mills ($2.00 per $1,000 of taxable value)
for a period of four (4) years, 2017 through 2020 inclusive, for the purpose of
reducing and controlling the mosquito population within the Township; and shall
the Township levy such millage for said purpose, thereby raising in the first year an
estimated $91,442?

RICH TOWNSHIP
PROPOSAL FOR RENEWAL OF
EXPIRED ROAD MILLAGE
FOR RICH TOWNSHIP
Shall the expiring previous voted increase in the tax limitation imposed under
Article IX, Section 6, of the Michigan Constitution of one (1) mill ($1.00 per
$1,000.00 of taxable value) on general ad valorem property within Rich Township be renewed at the previously voted 1.000 mill ($1.00 per $1,000 of taxable
value) for a period of four (4) years, 2017 through 2020 inclusive, for road and
bridge construction and maintenance purposes within the Township; and shall the
Township levy such millage for said purpose, thereby raising in the first year an
estimated $45,721?

VILLAGE OF OTTER LAKE


PROPOSITION FOR THE ADOPTION OF
AN ORDINANCE FOR THE
APPOINTMENT OF THE CLERK IN THE
VILLAGE OF OTTER LAKE
Shall the Village adopt an ordinance which provides that the Village President shall
nominate for appointment, with approval by the Village Council, the clerk for four
(4) year terms?

VILLAGE OF OTTER LAKE


PROPOSITION FOR THE ADOPTION OF
AN ORDINANCE FOR THE
APPOINTMENT OF THE TREASURER
IN THE VILLAGE OF OTTER LAKE
Shall the village adopt an ordinance which provides that the Village President shall
nominate for appointment, with approval by the Village Council, the treasurer for
four (4) year terms?
ALL PRECINCTS ARE HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE.
If you are disabled and require reasonable accommodations for this election,
contact your township or city clerk as listed above 48 hours before the election, in writing or by telephone. Instructions are also available in audio and
Braille upon request.
REMINDER:
The last day for receiving registrations for the August 2, 2016 Primary will be Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Persons registering after that date will not be eligible to vote at
said election. Qualified persons may register at any Secretary of State Branch office, at their county, city or township clerks office, or by mail (must be postmarked
on or before July 5, 2016).
Questions regarding the August 2, 2016 Primary may be directed to your city or
township clerks office or to the Lapeer County Clerks Office at 810-245-4863.
THERESA M. SPENCER
LAPEER COUNTY CLERK

25-1

Page 6-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Legal Announcements

Business
Directory

2015 Water Quality Report for Village of Almont

Water Quality Data


The table below lists some drinking water contaminants that we detected in out West St. Clair Street well in the past. Attached is the water quality data from the Lake Huron
Water Treatment Plant. The Great Lakes Water Authority Department provided this information. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate
that the water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 December 31, 2015. The State allows us to monitor
for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year. All of the data is
representative of the water quality, but some are more than one year old.
Terms and abbreviations used below:
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for
a margin of safety.
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the
best available treatment technology.
N/A: Not applicable ND: not detectable at testing limit ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter ppm: parts per million or milligrams per liter pCi/l: picocuries
per liter (a measure of radiation).
Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
Stand-by Well #3 (St. Clair Street)

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This report covers the drinking water quality for the Village of Almont, for the calendar year 2015. This information is a snapshot of the quality of the water that we provided to you in 2015. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state
standards.
Your source water comes from the Lake Huron Water Treatment Plant located five miles north of the City of Port Huron. The water arrives at the plant via a deep tunnel
with the intake offshore under 45 feet of water. The water is pumped from the water treatment plant to the Village of Almont. Your source water comes from the lower Lake
Huron watershed; the watershed includes numerous short, seasonal streams that drain to Lake Huron. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality in partnership with
U.S. Geological Survey, The Great Lakes Water Authority, and the Michigan Public Health Institute performed a source water assessment in 2004 to determine the susceptibility of potential contaminant. The susceptibility rating is on a seven-tiered scale from very low to very high based primarily on geologic sensitivity, water chemistry, and contaminant sources. The Lake Huron water treatment plant has historically provided satisfactory treatment of this source water to meet drinking water standards. If you would
like to know more about this report please contact your local water department at (810)798-8528. The Village of Almont also has a groundwater well located at 121 West St.
Clair Street. We use this well only in emergencies, for example, if the Lake Huron plant or the pipeline is out of service. The State will be performing an assessment of our
source water. We will inform you on how to get a copy of the assessment report when it becomes available.
Contaminants and their presence in water: Drinking Water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.
The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by
calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
Vulnerability of sub-populations: Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons
such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune systems disorders, some
elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on
appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
Sources of drinking water: The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. Our water
comes from wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and
can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil
and gas production, mining or farming.
Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture and residential uses.
Radioactive contaminants, which are naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come
from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food
and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which provide the same protection for public health.

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*Unregulated contaminant monitoring helps EPA to determine where certain contaminants occur and whether it needs to regulate those contaminants.
Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome.
Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask for advice from your health
care provider.
Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show
slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. It is possible that lead
levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your homes plumbing. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels
in your homes water, you may wish to have your water tested and flush your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water. Additional information is available from
the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800-426-4791.
Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience
gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilsons
Disease should consult their personal doctor.
Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill, and if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.
Is our water system meeting other rules that govern our operations? The State and EPA require us to test our water on a regular basis to ensure its safety.
We met all the monitoring and reporting requirements for 2015.
We are committed to providing you safe, reliable, and healthy water. We are pleased to provide you with this information to keep you fully informed about your water. We
will be updating this report annually, and will also keep you informed of any problems that may occur throughout the year, as they happen.
We invite public participation in decisions that affect drinking water quality. You are invited to attend the Village Council meetings held the first and third Tuesday of each
month at 7:30 p.m. at the Almont Municipal Building. For more information about your water, or the contents of this report, contact Bryan Treat at (810) 798-8655. For more
information about safe drinking water, visit the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at www.epa.gov/safewater/.

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ESTIMATES www.walters-enterprises.com

8-17-16

Family Owned Since 1973 Licensed & Insured

Tree
Service LLC

Dan Weingartz

810-724-0019
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured

Clock Repair

11-30-16

Roberts Tree Trimming


Call for a Quote
810-724-8027
Local & Very Affordable
25 Years Experience

Clean Your Clock

Need someones clock cleaned?


Im your man.
Cleaning and repair.
Insured/Guaranteed.
Imlay City.
810-358-7740

Dans

12-7-16

8-24-16

Tractor Repair

Excavating

GARYS
TRACTOR REPAIR
Farm/Lawn/Snowblower
Pick-up & Delivery
25 years Exp.
586-457-4649
8-3-16

Dryden Excavating
F o r A l l Yo u r

EXCAVATING & TRUCKING NEEDS


Call Loren Starr
810-796-3917 or 810-602-5625

9-14-16

Licensed Insured

TODD'S GLASS
MIRRORS & MORE

8-3-16

Glass

Outdoor
Equipment

Frame & Frameless Shower Enclosures


Custom Mirrors Replacement Windows

AKS
NOV

SUPPLY
&
EQUIPMEN
T

719 Van Dyke - Imlay City 810-724-2480


TODDSGLASS.COM

Home Repair
AFFORDABLE
HOME REPAIR

CARPENTRY & REMODELING


SIDING ROOFING WINDOWS
KITCHEN & BATH HANDYMAN SERVICE

Capac, MI 30 Years Experience

586-651-5597

7-16-16

Heating &
Cooling
8-17-16

Commercial & Residential

HEATING & COOLING SPECIALISTS


Service & Install, Financing Licensed & Insured

25-1

Yale Location 810-387-4452

Located Between Imlay City


and Almont on M-53
Parts &e
Servic

3620 Van Dyke Almont, MI

810-798-8533 FinE-Zancing
Fax 810-798-3738

Page 7-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22, 2016

Classif ieds

Tri-City Times Classifieds also


Online! Buy, Sell or Trade at
www.tricitytimes-online.com
810-724-2615

For Sale

Garage Sale

Real Estate

1989 LINCOLN TOWN CAR,


showroom condition, stored winters, a beautiful car! $4,200.00
or best offer. Call 810-660-7469.
A-1-CAT
...................................................

HOOSIERS TIRE END TABLES


$50. Kenmore slide window air
conditioner 12,000 btu $200.
586-634-4678
FS-24-3
...................................................

VACANT LAND 10 acres in


Capac. $30K - price reduced.
Nice building site. Proceeds will
help elderly lady stay in home.
Call 586-243-7105. RE-23-4
...................................................

For Sale

Garage Sale

FRIDAY, JUNE 24 AND


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. at 610 S. Almont Ave.,
Imlay City. Household, window
blinds, light fixtures, Carhart
coats and bibs, womans clothes,
pond fountain, wood splitter,
church pew. GS-25-1
...................................................

WEED EATER WEED TRIMMER, good condition ready to


work $30.
810-417-2249.
FS-25-6
...................................................

582 E. BORLAND RD., IMLAY


CITY Thursday, June 23rd and
Friday, June 24th 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. GS-25-1
...................................................

For Rent

PART-TIME
SHOP/YARD
MANAGER - Mature individual.
On-call schedule, mostly afternoons & evenings. Forklift experience. Apply @ 3821 Van Dyke,
Almont. EOE HW-25-2
...................................................
ARE YOU A HOME HEALTH
AIDE, CNA, LPN, or RN that is
reliable, caring, and hard-working? If so, Mercy Plus Home
Healthcare Services has the
perfect job opportunity for you!
Please send in your resume
through email OR fax it to
(810)519-4924 Questions? 810487-5571 HW-25-1
...................................................
STYLES BY CONNIE wants
hairdresser and manicurist. 810724-4412. HW-22-4
...................................................
AFC HOME IN MARLETTE IS
HIRING PART-TIME FOR
2ND/3RD SHIFT. Must be at
least 18 years old, have reliable
transportation, available weekends and holidays, and be able
to pass a criminal background
check and drug screening. If
interested, please contact
Jennifer at (989) 635-3151
Monday-Friday
8am-4pm
HW-24-3
...................................................
ROOFERS AND LABORERS
NEEDED. Work 5 days (7
optional) experienced only. Call
586-651-1010. HW-24-3
...................................................

MOTOR CITY CASINO


BUS TRIP FUNDRAISER

FR-1-26

~Newly Remodeled~
Full & Half-day Rental
810-338-0163/810-724-6102

Sunday, July 17th, 2016

Proceeds to Benefit: Japan Baseball Trip - Adam Van Buren

Apartment For Rent

$40 per person


00

Round trip motor coach transportation to Detroit, MI


5 hours of gaming at Motor City Casino
Each person to get back $25.00 in gaming from casino

Itinerary:

12:15pm Depart from Tractor Supply, Imlay City


12:40pm Depart from Dunhams, Sterling Heights
1:30pm to 6:30pm Motor City Casino, Detroit
6:55pm Return to Sterling Heights, MI
7:15pm Return to Imlay City, MI

Full Payment Due Upon Sign-Up Registration Deadline: 07-01-16

Limit 56 seats each bus (112 total)



Casino requires a completed manifest for incentive

Must be at least 21 years of age with a valid ID
(Must Bring with you to get incentive)

Limit (1) casino incentive package per person

Must arrive on the bus to get the casino incentive

Casino incentives subject to change without notice

For reservations, please contact Shannon Quintal


Phone: 810.343.8097 | Email: sassywhiskers1@gmail.com
Or Lora Van Buren
Phone: 810.614.5623 | Email: loravanburen@yahoo.com

CAPAC VILLAGE: 2 bedroom


upstairs apt. for 1 or 2 adults,
50+, spacious, lots of storage,
appliances and all utilities,
except AC included, carport, no
pets, security deposit required;
call 810-395-2226 and leave
message. APR-20-17
...................................................

COME HOME TO
HICKORY SQUARE
APARTMENTS
IMLAY CITY

1, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS!

1 Bedroom...........Starting at $560
2 Bedrooms.........Starting at $610
3 Bedrooms.........Starting at $815

Call Us Today!

810-724-0266

Professional
Directory

www.mi-apartments.com

Lapeer County Vision Center

HOME SALES, DIVISION,


JUST LAND SALES. We are
here to Help! Almont. Brown
City. Capac. Imlay City. Yale.
586-206-0118 RE-24-8
...................................................

724-EYES

Doctors of Optometry

Craig J. Watson, O.D Jeffrey D. Johnston, O.D.

518 S. Cedar Street, Imlay City


Fax: 724-6644

CAPAC

PHARMACY

BEER WINE LIQUOR LOTTO

Store Hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:00 am to 9:00 pm;


and Sunday 12:00 noon to 5:00 pm
Pharmacy Hours: Monday thru Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm;
Saturday 9:00 am - 2 pm; Closed Sunday
M O V I E R E N TA L S

136 N. MAIN ST.


Check out

the great
finds in the
Classifieds.

810-395-2336

*Some conditions apply. E.H.O.

FR-12-13

Trip Includes

Real Estate

Help Wanted

Nail Tech
Wanted

Evies Hair Studio


418 E. Third St. Imlay City

Apply within or call

724-6564

HW-22-4

Albar Industries, Inc., a Lapeer area leader


in the automotive painting industry is
currently accepting applications for the
following positions:
General Production - Requirements include the ability to keep
up with line speeds, capable of performing repetitive motions,
lifting, and operating orbital sanders and buffers while
maintaining production rates.
Applicants must be able to practice proper safety procedures.
Applicants must be available to work any shift.
We offer competitive wages and medical, dental, and vision benefits.
Interested candidates may apply in person at
Albar Industries Inc.,
780 Whitney Dr., Lapeer, MI 48446,
by fax (810) 667-2197,
online at www.albar.com or by email to hr@albar.com.
For e-mail submissions, please indicate job title
(General Production) in the subject line.
No phone calls please.

HW-25-3

Now Hiring
All Shifts
Open Interviews
Mondays 2 - 4pm

Tri-City
Times
810-724-2615

594 N. Almont Ave.


P.O. Box 278
Imlay City, MI 48444
tct@pageone-inc.com

(except July 4th)

Apply within or
Call Chris Glombowski
3200 Capac Rd Capac

810.395.9399

Announcements

MORE LEGALS 5 & 6-B

continued from 6-B

Autos

VFW HALL
IMLAY CITY

Legal

HW-25-1

is in the process of being changed from


17 feet to 17 feeT, 6 inches; they are still
evaluating the Master Plan: there are 3
automotive repair shops operating without a Special Land Use; and Starr
Aggregates is working on non-compliance issues as indicated in the letter
from Rowe Professional Service.

Attorney - Charles Boike stated
that a court date of June 20th has been
set for Mr. Ogle of the rabbit farm.

Ambulance - none
Commissioner - Commissioner
Jarvis distributed a chart showing property taxes collectable vs. collected and
property taxes collected after capture.

Board - none

Public - none

Review and pay the bills - Moved
and seconded to pay the bills: General
Fund - $43,796.34, and Fire Fund $10,204.48, Public Safety - $12,108.28
Total for bills $66,109.10. Roll call vote
taken, all ayes, motion carried.

Meeting adjourned at 8:06 p.m.

A complete copy of the minutes is
available at the Attica Township Hall.
Nancy Herpolsheimer
Attica Township Clerk
25-1

BERLIN
TOWNSHIP

BOARD MEETING
SYNOPSIS
JUNE 13, 2016


Meeting called to order at 7:30pm
by Supervisor Winn. Pledge of
Allegiance recited. Members present:
Parks, Klos, Winn & Wittstock
(Christian absent). May minutes
approved. Treasurer's report approved.
Fire report given by Assistant Chief,
Bonner: responded to 12 runs last month
(one billable). Planning Commission
report: 3 issues tabled due to lack of
information on all. Senior report: 48
attended potluck, 6 attended cards and
craft and exercise is every Tuesday at
10am. Discussed: waste water update,
insurance coverage and fireworks on
6/24. Board member questions and comments: thanked Peggy Wolfe for taking
care of cemetery flags, ballots in soon
for August Primary Election and Bureau
of Elections handicapped requirements.
Audience questions and comments:
neighbor issues on Tubspring Road,
cemetery headstone issue, traffic safety
on Capac Road, VFW hall in Berville to
be sold and a property issue on Fox
Ridge Lane. Motion to pay the bills
made and accepted. Motion to adjourn
8:40pm. A complete copy of the minutes
is available at the township hall during
business hours.
Karen A. Klos, Clerk
25-1

STATE OF MICHIGAN
PROBATE COURT
COUNTY OF ST. CLAIR


Estate of Franklin William Standel,
Deceased. Date of birth: 3-7-1936. File
No.: 2016-0283-DE

To all creditors:

Notice to creditors: The decedent,
Franklin William Standel died May 16,
2016.

Creditors of the decedent are notified that all claims against the estate will
be forever barred unless presented to
Robert Anglebrandt, personal representative, or to both the probate court at 201
McMorran Blvd, Port Huron and personal representative within 4 months
after the date of publication of this
notice.
John L. Lengemann
P16553
202 E. 3rd Street
Imlay City, Michigan 48444
810-724-2565
5-26-16
Robert Anglebrandt
16205 Burt Road
Allenton, Michigan 48002
25-1

STATE OF
MICHIGAN
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR THE
COUNTY OF
LAPEER


File # 16-049859-CH(H)

Smither Family Trust, Plaintiff vs
David Morton Battice, his unknown
heirs, assigns and successors in interest,
Defendants.
John L. Lengemann P 16553
Morrice, Lengemann & Miller P.C

Attorneys for Plaintiff


202 East Third Street
Imlay City, MI 48444
810-724-2565
ORDER TO ANSWER

At a session of Court held in the
Courthouse for the 40th Judicial Circuit.

PRESENT: THE HONORABLE
NICK O. HOLOWKA, CIRCUIT
JUDGE
IT IS ORDERED that the
Defendants, David Morton Battice, his
unknown heirs, assigns, and successors
in interest shall answer, or take such
other action as may be permitted by law,
the Plaintiffs Complaint to Quiet Title
to the following described lands:

Land situated in the Township of
Attica, County of Lapeer, State of
Michigan, described as follows:

Parcel C: A parcel of land located
in and being a part of the Southwest 1/4
of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest
1/4, Section 29, Town 7 North, Range 11
East, Attica Township, Lapeer County,
Michigan, being more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at
the South 1/4 corner of said Section 29;
thence North 89 degrees 44 minutes 00
seconds West 655.00 feet along the
South line of said Section 29, being the
centerline of Hunters Creek Road, to
the point of beginning; thence continuing North 89 degrees 44 minutes 00
seconds West 165.00 feet along the said
south line of Section 29 and centerline
of Hunters Creek Road; thence North
00 degrees 13 minutes 23 seconds West
663.01 feet; thence South 89 degrees 33
minutes 09 seconds East 165.01 feet;
thence South 00 degrees 13 minutes 23
seconds East 662.49 feet to the point of
beginning.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED the
answer or other action shall be filed with
the Circuit Court for the County of
Lapeer at 266 Clay Street, Lapeer, MI
48446 no later than 28 days from the
date of the last publication of this Order
to Answer.

The complaint that has been filed
with this Court seeks to quiet title in the
Plaintiff as a result of the Plaintiffs successor in title having acquired title by
means of a conveyance from the Lapeer
County Treasurer resulting from a forfeiture of the interest of David Morton
Battice for delinquent taxes, penalties,
interest and fees.

Failure to answer the complaint or
take such other action as permitted by
law will result in judgement in favor of
the Plaintiff by default.
Nick O. Holowka
Circuit Court Judge
Order signed: 5/26/16
23-4

VILLAGE OF
DRYDEN

REGULAR MEETING
June 7, 2016
SYNOPSIS


President, Betcher called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. Council
Members Present: Betcher, Jones, Nash,
Roszczewski, and Franz.

The Council Approved the Minutes
from the Regular Meeting on May 3,
2016; approved the June 7, 2016 agenda
with deletion of item B. and an addition
under New Business, Item A.Variance
Request 5531 Liberty Street and move
all other items down; approved the Bills
to Pay in the amount of $25,419.44 and
the disbursements in the amount of
$54,789.18; approved the road repair at
the corner of Main and Mill in the sum
of $1,800.00 from Priehs Paving;
approved the purchase of a new pump
the sum of $606.00; to approved the
Variance Request 5531 Liberty Street,
Parcel Id No. 044-404-007-00 contingent on the approval of all Utility easements; approved the sum of $8,475.00
to be paid to Michigan Rural Water with
reimbursement of 50% back to the
Village after August Well Head protection Meeting in the sum of $4,237.50;
approved the 2016 Millage Rates of
General Operating at 9.811 mills and the
Street at 2.0 Mills; Set the Public
Hearing for July 5, 2016 at 7:15 p.m. for
the Sign Ordinance; approved the firm
Kohl, Harris, Nolan & McCarthy, P.C. to
be the acting attorney for the Village of
Dryden effective June 8, 2016. The
meeting was adjourned at 7:56 p.m.

Complete copies of the minutes are
available in the clerk's office during
regular business hours or at www.villageofdryden.com
Holly A. Shroyer
Village Clerk /Deputy Treasurer
25-1

CALL
810-724-2615
to publish
your legal
announcement
or email:
tct@pageone-inc.com

PAGE 8-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 22 2016

FORD MOTOR
A/Z PLAN
EXPANSION

NOW INCLUDING
AUNTS UNCLES
NIECES NEPHEWS
UNTIL 6/30/16

SUMMER SIZZLER S ALE !


2016 FORD F-150 4X4 SUPERCAB
2016 FORD EXPLORER XLT, 4WD DEMO

0% APR
AVAILABLE

WAS $46,545.00

- $800.00 Special Discount


- $4,044.00 Demo Discount
- $950.00 Retail Cash
- $1,000.00 Conquest Cash
- $1,000.00 Smart Bonus Cash

NOW $38,75100*
SAVINGS OF

* All rebates assigned to dealer. Must qualify and finance with Ford Motor Credit.
Must have a 1995 or newer competitive make in house hold for $1,000.00 conquest
cash. Residency restrictions apply. Must be delivered by 6/30/2016

7,794

00

2016 FORD FOCUS SE AUTOMATIC

00**

00/MO

2016 FORD ESCAPE SE, FWD

00**

2016 FORD EDGE SEL, FWD

24 MONTH LEASE

24 MONTH LEASE

139
WITH 1,099 DUE AT SIGNING

00/MO
209
WITH 1,879 DUE AT SIGNING

00/MO

00**

129
WITH 1,399 DUE AT SIGNING

00/MO

00/MO

24 MONTH LEASE

109
WITH 1,409 DUE AT SIGNING
$

189
WITH 2,409 DUE AT SIGNING
$

2016 FORD FUSION SE, FWD


w/TECH PACKAGE

24 MONTH LEASE

24 MONTH LEASE

00**

00**

** 10,500 miles per year, must qualify for A/Z plan pricing. Residency restrictions apply. Must take delivery by 6/30/16. Must be a current F-150 lease. Must be coming out of a RCL Lease to qualify. A/Z Plan customers with a competitive vehicle.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONES BUDGET


2014 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LT

$37,500

2014 FORD F-150 LARIAT

$36,995

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

2012 FORD EXPLORER XLT

2014 DODGE CHARGER R/T 2015 FORD TRANSIT CARGO 2015 FORD F-350 SUPER DUTY XLT 2014 FORD ESCAPE TITANIUM

FORD EXPLORER LIMITED

2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT

$16,900

12,500
MILES

Loaded,
8,000 miles

Low Miles,
Leather

$22,900

M-53 (1 Mile North of I-69)


800-764-6505

www.imlaycityford.com
Like Us On
*Pictures may not represent actual vehicle, must qualify for actual A-Plan, must qualify
for all rebates used. Subject to change without notice.

2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING

$20,500

$21,900

DVD, NAV,
Loaded

2012 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT

$26,900

$32,500

Low
Miles

$22,983

$21,500

$19,995

$36,500

SHOWROOM HOURS

MON., THURS. 9 - 8
TUES., WED., FRI. 9 - 6 SAT. 9 - 3

SERVICE HOURS

MON., THURS. 7:30 - 8:00


TUES., WED., FRI. 7:30 - 6 SAT. 8 - 3

Bewerten