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Effective Course Content

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How to Develop Effective Course Content for Distance


Education Learners

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Instructor: Alaba Agbatogun


Ontario, Canada

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How to Develop Effective Course Content for Distance


Education Learners
About the Course

Who Is It For?

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Course
Requirements

Click each tab to find out more information about the course designed to prepare you for
productive careers in curriculum or course design and development. The course provides you
with hands-on experience that enables you use applied learning theories, instructional design
principles and sound pedagogical approach to solve instructional course design and delivery
problems.

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About the Course

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The How to Develop Effective Course Content for Distance


Education Learners self-paced training course provides you a
hands-on experience on the phases of effective course design.
The course would help you develop the knowledge and skills in
pedagogy, instructional design, and some technology that will
enable you create environment and activities that will improve
students learning experience.

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There is no registration fee, and tuition is not required.


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View Module One Topics

Who is it for?

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This course is designed for:

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Faculty and Instructors


Teaching or graduate assistants
Course or curriculum developers and consultants
Instructional designers, and
Program managers.
The course is divided into six modules.

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Module One
Topics.

Module One: In this module, you will learn about learning goals, objectives and outcomes
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Any Must Have For the Course?

There are no pre-requisites for taking this


course. However, you must have access
to a laptop or desktop or a personal
computer, and Internet with a strong
bandwidth.

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Effective Course Content

Development

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Introduction

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Course development is complex, and facilitating


its learning activities requires specific knowledge,
skills and positive attitude. A well-designed
course should go beyond providing students with
a strong background of knowledge. It should also
focus beyond final exams, but enables students
to apply the strong backgrounds and skills to
solve simple, complex and complicated problems
in real-world contexts.

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Learning outcomes

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Upon completing this module, you will be able to:

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Differentiate between learning goals, instructional


objectives, and learning objectives
Identify and explain three characteristics of
useful learning outcomes
Write measurable and achievable learning
outcomes using appropriate action verbs

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What are course learning goals?

Researchers, and educators suggest that students learn


more if we let them know at the beginning where they will end
up. Learning goals help learners to create a roadmap, draw
the connections between the major places in the course, and
identify purposes for what they are asked to know/do.

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Learning goals are general statements of what you want your


students to learn, or what the program, course or activity
intends to accomplish in general terms. For instance a course
learning goal could be Upon the completion of this course,
students will be familiar with the major theories of active
learning.

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goals

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Basic requirements of learning goals


A learning goal is the course core element, and it
is only after you define it you will be able to
provide the best possible learning environment
for learners. A good learning goal statement
should do or have these five things:
Focus on the end (what the student will be able
to do), not the means (what is taught).
Clarify fuzzy terms
Neither be too broad nor too specific (use
concrete action words when possible)
Be concise, and specific.
Focus on what you expect the student to gain
and be able to do and not the teaching.

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Writing course learning goals

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Writing of effective learning goals requires that you consider the following:
Know your target audience including their experiences, interests, current skill sets, and
knowledge base
Know learners desired learning outcomes from the course. Are students interested in
mastering a specific professional skill? Or would they be taking the course to expand their
knowledge?
Know how you would like to communicate learning objectives to learners concisely,
succinctly, and summarily. This would enable learners to know exactly what they are going
to achieve by completing the course.
An example of a learning goal is At the end of the course, students will learn how to write
laboratory reports.

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Knowledge Check 1
Checkmark the box beside any statement that indicates a well-written learning goal:
Students will articulate ideas verbally and support them with evidence
Learners will demonstrate the engineering design process.
Students will write short analytical exercises in which they evaluate the importance of each
historical figure.
Students will be familiar with the major theories of active learning.
Students will know and learn more about whiplash injuries
Participants will be able to identify various aspects of architectural diversity in their design
projects
Students will increase knowledge about causes, prevention and treatment
related to skin breakdown of inpatients.
Students will be able to read a minimum of two sources about a number of figures that
have made a difference in the course of the school year.

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Goals
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Objectives

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What are instructional

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objectives?

Instructional objectives may also be called


performance objectives, behavioral objectives, or
simply objectives.
A learning objective is a clear and concise statement that
describes an anticipated learning outcomes of an instruction
(in measurable terms) and establish a foundation for
assessment. It does not describe your content, but it could
cover knowledge and skills as well as attitudes. It emphasizes
what you want students to do to demonstrate that he or she
has learned

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Objectives

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Components of instructional objectives

A well-written instructional objective should be:


Specific describe precisely what the learner is
expected to do.
Outcome-based - state what the learner should be
able to doafter the instruction is complete

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Measurable - describe learning outcomes that can


be measured; objectives should be seen or heard

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Able to describe what students should be able to do


after the instruction. It should describe students
behavior.

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Objective

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Writing an instructional objective

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In order to write an effective instructional objective, following the four parts of ABCDs of
instructional objectives is a great way to include all the necessary information in an objective.
The A stands for Audience, the B represents Behavior, the C stands for Condition and the D
for Degree of Accuracy.

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What does A, B, C, and D stand for?

Now lets take a look at the meaning of A, B, C, and in


instructional objective writing
Audience is always written as students or learners.
Behaviour describes what the learner (audience) will be able
to do after the instruction.
Conditions are the circumstances under which the objectives
must be completed.
Degree specifies the degree of accuracy (related to realworld expectations) the learner have to achieve in order that
his/her performance be judged proficient. This could be a
time limit (in 50 seconds), or a number of correct answers (5
out of 8), or a range of accuracy (70%) or qualitative standard

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Objective

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Differences between course goals and instructional objectives

Learning Goals

Goals are broad,


generalized
statements about
what is to be learned
Learning objectives
are tools you use to
make sure you reach
your goals.

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Learning
Objectives

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Learning objectives are


brief, clear statements
that describe the desired
learning outcomes of
instruction; i.e., the
specific skills, values,
and attitudes students
should exhibit that reflect
the broader goals

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instructional

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From a learning goal to learning objectives

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Lets take a look at examples of a learning


goal and learning objectives:
GOAL: A learning assessment goal could be
To enable students to make reliable and
accurate assessments of learning.
The learning objectives could be:
Learning Objective #1: Given a learning
objective the student will be able to develop an
appropriate multiple-choice question to
measure student achievement of the objective.
Learning Objective #2: Given the
discrimination and difficulty indices of an item
the student will be able to determine if the item
contributes to the reliability of the exam.

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Knowledge Check 2

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It is time for another mastery quiz. You have unlimited time to try the questions.

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1.A well-written learning objective must be specific, smart, outcome-based, and measurable
True / False
2. ABCDs principle of writing instructional objectives implies focusing on Activity, Behavior,
Condition and Degree of Accuracy.
True / False
3. When writing a learning objective, Behaviour describes what the target audience will be
able to do after the instruction.
True / False

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Objectives

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What are learning outcomes?

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Learning outcomes are statements that describe what the learner will be able to
demonstrate in terms of knowledge, skills and values by the end of an instruction.
Learning outcome statements must be specific, measurable, attainable, result-focused
and time-bound.

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Outcomes

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What are the differences between learning objectives and outcomes?

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Learning objectives focus on specific types of performances that students are expected to
demonstrate state (what you hope your students will learn) at the end of instruction. Learning
objectives emphasize teaching intentions and typically indicate the subject content to be
covered. However, learning outcomes are student-centered and describe what it is that the
learner should learn (what your students actually learned).

Student-centred
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Teacher-centred
Alt text: A diagram showing from goal to objectives and to outcomes

For an excellent overview of the distinctions between goals, objectives and outcomes, see
Goal, Outcomes, and Objectives (IACBE) from International Assembly for Collegiate
Business Education, as well as Mission, Goals, Objectives, Outcomes based on material
from California State University

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Writing learning outcomes

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When writing a measurable learning outcome, it is important to:


focus on performance the learner will be able to demonstrate upon completion of a
course
use simple, specific action verbs to what students are expected to demonstrate
state desired performance criteria that express in specific and measurable/observable
terms the performance criteria that are acceptable to a specific course or program.
For further information, read Students Learning Outcomes from University of Oregon

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Outcomes

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Sample learning outcomes

Here are some examples of well=written


learning outcomes:
1) Students will be able to collect and organize
appropriate clinical date (history, physical exam,
laboratory assessments including technological
advancements in diagnostics such as PCR).
2) Students will be able to apply principles of
evidence-based medicine to determine clinical
diagnoses of prostate cancer on senior adults.
3) At the conclusion of module one, students will
successfully understand a work breakdown
structure for an assigned case study

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Do you know what?

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The verb you choose will help you to focus on
what you assess. Avoid such verbs as do, know,
and understand. An example of a poorly
described objective that would be difficult to
measure: Students will know cost management.

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Final Knowledge Check


Learning
Goal

Learning
Objective

Learning
Outcome

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1
2
3
4

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Drag and drop the statements into the appropriate category

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Create a list of learning theories and principles. (Go)


Write marketing matrices that increase organizational growth (Ob)
Understand the main concepts in marketing.(Go)
Use their understanding to solve engineering problems or develop a perspective (Go)
Recognize the criticisms against psychoanalytic approach to psychology (Ou)
Articulate the foundational assumptions about Newtons Law (Ou)
Prepare a work breakdown structure for an assigned case study (Ob)

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Finish

Module One

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Thank you for completing this module, you can now proceed to the next module.

Finish

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