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5E instructional model

Unit Plan-Earths Place in Space-Primary Connections


*Note: In the differentiation column, each lesson further has optional activities so that the teacher can cater the lesson
to meet the needs of all students including; students with disability, gifted and talented students and EAL/D students.
The optional activities can provide students with further information relating to a topic by using visual aids, work
sheets and websites.
Time line
e.g.

Objectives
(Aims)

Key Concepts
& Skills

Teaching

To capture
students
interest and
find out what
they think
they know
about the
Earth as part
of a system of
planets
orbiting a star
(the Sun).

discuss a
historical
debate

Students will be
able to:
Lesson 1
ENGAGE
Model
arguments

Students
represent their
current
understandings
as they:
identify
features of
scientific
dialogues and
debates
discuss
different
theories about
the movements
of
the Earth, Sun
and Moon
contribute to
discussions

To elicit
students
questions
about how
humans have
sought to
explore and
understand

& learning
Activities

about
whether the
Earth is flat
identify the
way
scientists
use claims
and evidence
to
test their
theories
create a
3D, moving
model
of the Earth,

Assessment
Activities

Resources

Capabilities

Diagnostic

class
science
journal

English

what do
students
already
know and
understand
about:
how the
Earth is part
of a system
of planets
orbiting a
star (the
Sun).

Differentiatio
n:

Optional:
Provide students
Explore the
with multimedia
rules and
word wall
conventions of resources to help
them understand
TWLH chart debating.
the dialogue, for
example, a map
1 enlarged
showing the
copy of But
locations of the
it looks flat
cities.
(Resource
Optional: This
sheet 1)
unit identifies
1 enlarged
opportunities to
copy of
use interactive
Debating our
digital software
place
in the form of the
(Resource
planetarium
sheet 2)
programs
Stellarium and
3 pieces of
Celestia. They
A4 paper

about Earths
place

Earths place
in

Sun and
Moon

in Space

Space.

start a
glossary of
scientific
terms to do
with Space.

identify the
purpose and
features of a
science journal
and word wall
contribute to
the beginning
of a TWLH chart
work in teams
to create
orreries to
represent their
understanding
of the
movements of
the Earth, Sun
and Moon.

Optional:
cards or
paper strips
for
words for the
word wall
Optional:
multimedia
resources on
Eratosthenes
(see
Preparation)

allow students to
observe the night
sky and
movements of
different objects
in real time or in
fast forward, and
find many other
details.
Optional:
Display the
class science
journal, the
word wall, the
TWLH chart,
But it looks
flat
(Resource
sheet 1),
Debating our
place
(Resource
sheet 2) and
the
planetarium
programs on
an interactive
whiteboard or
a computer
connected to
a projector.

Lesson 2
EXPLORE
Rising and
setting

identify the
paths of space
objects in the
sky as seen on
Earth
predict what
position space
objects will be
in after an hour
and compare
observations to
predictions
work in
collaborative
learning teams
to represent
their
observations as
flow charts
contribute to
discussions
about their
results and how
they relate to
their everyday
lives.

To provide
shared
experiences
of the
observable
movement of
the Sun and
Moon in our
sky.

present
their
observation
from the
home sky
viewing task
use
observations
to describe
how space
objects move
across the
sky
relate the
apparent
movement of
the Sun to
the notion of
a 24 hour
day.

Formative
Science
journal
entries
Class
discussions
TWLH
chart
Flow
charts

class
science
journal

Numeracy:

Study time
zones and
word wall
daylight
TWLH chart saving around
the world, and
team skills their
chart
relationship
team roles with the
chart
movement of
the Sun.
Optional:
multimedia
resources on
the
movement of
the Moon
and Sun
Optional:
digital
camera with
tripod and
projector/inte
ractive
whiteboard
role
wristbands or
badges for
Director,
Manager and
Speaker
each team
members
science

Optional:
Take photos
of the Sun,
Moon and
skies at
different
times, for
example,
by setting up
a camera
with a tripod
and taking a
time-lapse
series of
photos, or
bytaking
screen shots
of the
program
Stellarium.
Optional:
Download
Stellarium
(www.stellariu
m.org) onto
your
interactive
whiteboard or
a computer
connected to
a projector.
You can fast
forward the
view of the
sky over a

journal

day to
demonstrate
the apparent
movement of
the Sun and
Moon. This is
best viewed if
you zoom out
so that East
and West are
visible.

each team
members
completed
home
observation
task

Lesson 3
EXPLAIN
Galvanisin
g Galileo

review and
update their
orreries,
identifying
observations
and evidence
that support
their point of
view
read and
discuss a text
about Galileo
identify that
the Earth orbits
the Sun in a
year, the Moon
orbits the Earth
in a month and
the Earth
rotates on its
axis in a day
brainstorm
space objects

To support
students to
represent and
explain their
understanding
of how the
Earth
orbits the Sun
while rotating
on its axis.
To introduce
current
scientific
views about
Earths place
in Space.

work in
teams to
explore
different
models to
explain why
the Sun and
Moon appear
to move
across the
sky
record,
discuss and
interpret
their
findings.

Formative
Science
journal
entries
Class
discussions
TWLH
chart
Orreries

class
science
journal

Indigenous
perspectives

Optional:
Collect
photos or
Invite local
videos
word wall
community
showing the
TWLH chart members
different
and/or
team skills Indigenous
aspects of the
chart
Moon and the
Education
paths of the
team roles Officers to
planets (the
chart
speak with
dance of the
role
students about planets).
wristbands or their local
Optional:
badges for
explanations
Download
Director,
for the origin
Celestia
Manager and and movement
of the Sun and (www.shatter
Speaker
s.net/celestia)
Moon.
each
onto your
Protocols are
students
interactive
available on
science
whiteboard.
the website:
journal
Familiarise
www.science.o
yourself with
team
rg.au/primaryc
its
orreries

present in the
Solar System.

created in
Lesson 1,
Session 2
1 copy of
Perplexing
planets
(Resource
sheet 6) per
student

Lesson 4
ELABORA
TE
Solar
System
scientists

research
information on
objects in the
Solar System
interpret data
to create scaled
models of the
Solar
System
Have
Knowledge

investigate
characteristics
of objects in
the Solar
System, in
particular
their distance
from the Sun
create a
scaled poster
of the Solar
System

investigate
characteristi
cs of
objects in the
Solar
System,
in particular
their size and
distance
from the Sun
create a 3D

Summative
assessment
of the
Science
Inquiry
Skills.

String,
Scissors,
Sticky Tape,
Glue,
Worksheets

onnections/ind functioning so
igenous
that you can
show
students the
solar systems
elsewhere in
the Galaxy
Optional:
Introduce
images and
videos of
other
observations
that the
model
explained, for
example, the
movement of
the planets
(see Teacher
background
information).
Numeracy:

Optional:
Measurement View Bill
of the distance Nyes video
demonstratio
between the
n of the
planets and
distance
the sun
between
planets to
familiarise
yourself with
its
information.

about the
Earths place in
the solar
system and the
distance
between
planets.

visualise the
Solar
Systems
place in
Space.

scaled model
of
the Solar
System
discuss the
pros and

Understand the
every planet
has different
features and
the distance
between the
planets is also
different.

cons of
different
forms of

Be able to
discuss the
earths place in
the solar
system and the
order of the
planets.

place in
Space.

representatio
n
visualise
the Solar
Systems

Optional:
Download
Celestia
(www.shatter
s.net/celestia)
onto your
interactive
whiteboard.
Familiarise
yourself with
its
functioning so
that you can
show
students the
place of the
Solar System
in the Galaxy.
Enlarge a
copy of
Scaled
planets
(Resource
sheet 9).
Optional:
Display the
enlarged
copy of
Scaled
planets
(Resource
sheet 9) on
an interactive
whiteboard or
a computer

connected to
a projector

Lesson 5
EVALUATE
Sunning it
up

identify that
the Earth is part
of a Solar
System
orbiting the Sun
while it rotates
on its axis
support
claims about
how to explain
everyday
observations
with evidence
in a dramatic
dialogue

To provide
opportunities
for students
to represent
what they
know about
the Earth as
part of a
system of
planets
orbiting a star
(the Sun) and
to reflect on
their learning
during the
unit

create a
dramatic
dialogue
between two
imaginary

Summative
of Science
Understandi
ng

characters
about Earths

Science
journal
entries

place in
Space

Class
discussions

reflect on
their learning

TWLH
chart

during the
unit.

Multimedia
texts

class
science
journal

Explore
writing scripts
word wall
for dramas
TWLH chart and/or plays.

Optional:
Invite an
audience, for
example,
another class,
parents or a
scientist,
to view the
dialogues and
discuss what
students
have learned
throughout
the unit.
Optional:
Allowing
student to
showcase
their work in
numerous
way.

contribute to
discussions and
express their
opinions about
their learning
journey.

Year level: 5 Lesson number:_4__Lesson Topic: Solar System Scientists

English

Time:

Essential Learning: To support students to investigate characteristics of objects in the Solar System and create an accurate model of the Solar System
Learning outcome strand: The Earth is part of a system of planets orbiting around a star (the sun) (ACSSU078)

By the end of the lesson, students will (KUDs):

At the beginning of the lesson

Have Knowledge about:

To gain students prior knowledge on the solar system and engage them, get
students to cut out the planets with their names below them and order them
from the sun to pluto.

The Earths place in the solar system and the distance between planets.
The quality of data and how to interpret it

Be able to (Do):

The introduction to the lesson will be followed up by exploring the NASA


solar system exploration website. Find out what students know about the
planets and check on their knowledge of the topic by choosing the planets
and looking at the information on the NASA website to check and develop
their knowledge.

Research information on objects in the Solar System

During the lesson

Compare findings and discuss discrepancies in collected data

Using string and rulers to measure how far each planet is in relation to the
sun, students will be provided with the worksheet, a piece of poster paper,
string, scissors and sticky tape in order to do this activity. The worksheet
provides the length of string needed for each planet. The students measure the
string, cut it and then stick it on the poster.

Understand:
The every planet has different features and the distance between the planets is
also different

Interpret data to create scaled models of the Solar System


Discuss how different models serve different purposes in science.
Prior Knowledge:
Earth rotates on an axis and that its surface changes over time as a result of
natural processes and human activity

Sun 0 0
Mercury - 58,000,000km - 1.25cm
Venus - 108,000,000km - 2.33cm

Resources:

Earth - 150,000,000km - 3.23cm

String, Scissors, Sticky Tape, Glue, Worksheets, Black Poster Paper

Mars - 228,000,000km - 4.91cm


Jupiter - 778,000,000km - 16.77cm
Saturn - 1,427,000,000km - 30.75cm
Uranus - 2,870,000,000km - 61.85cm
Neptune - 4,497,000,000km - 96.92cm

Differentiation:

At the end of the lesson

For those who are struggling to understand provide them with worksheet and
allow them to watch videos to develop understanding.

Discuss the model as a class. Ask questions such as:

Safety:

Was everything we know about the Solar System accurately represented in


the model?

Children need to handle Scissors safely

What did you find challenging about making a model to scale?


What have you found out?

What are the strengths of this model compared to the previous one (for
example, it is closer to reality)?
What are the weaknesses of this model (for example, some planets are
harder to see as they are so small compared to the Sun)?
Assessment:
Summative assessment of the Science Inquiry Skills. Assess the groups abilities to order the planets in order and listen to
discussions about the distances the planets are from the sun.